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Magazine of the Waterloo Science and Business Program

2013 Graduate and Alumni Edition Issue 15

Producing Leaders for the New Economy uwaterloo.ca/science-and-business


SCIENCE AND BUSINESS - “attracting the highest quality student entrants and delivering oustanding, highly soughtafter graduates to the private/public sector workforce!”

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

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Skills Development: A Better Preparation for Work and for Life By: OWEN WARD, Former Science and Business Director

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Resumés with an Edge: A SciBus student’s Weapon to taking over the World By: MATTHEW BOTELHO, 3A Science and Business Student

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The Perception of a Degree By: EMILY IRVINE, Science and Business Alumna

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Science and Business - Aligning with Reality By: GOWTHAM SATKUNARAJAH, Science and Business Alumnus

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The Only Play that Matters is the Next One By: KEANAN LARGO-AFONSO, 4A Science and Business Student

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The Positive Impact of a Diverse Degree By: NAVEENA SWAMINATHAN, 4A Science and Business Student

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Practical Application of a Science and Business Degree By: TATJANA MILOJEVIC, 3B Science and Business Student

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“Get tough. Be tough. Stay tough.” By: DREW BROTHERSTON, Science and Business Alumnus

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Life after First Year of Science and Business By: TOYIN OLAWALE, 2A Science and Business Student

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Mission, Vision, Values By: MARK KRYSHTALSKYJ, 3A Science and Business Student

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FUSION 2012: IGNITE YOUR PASSION

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SCIENCE AND BUSINESS MILESTONES 2012

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Kashif Memon Science and Business Program Advisor and Coordinator Dear Readers, It is a pleasure to welcome you to the 2013 Graduate and Alumni Edition of Scibus.ca. Every year our three programs gain strength mainly due to the achievements of our amazing students, faculty and staff. In the midst of our 7th year of success we have a number of things to be proud of, both at the international and national level. For example, the 2012 Excellence in Science Teaching Award, the 2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Student Scholarship Award, and the 2012 Suncor Emerging Leaders Award have been awarded to our faculty and students. These and many others await you as you open the pages of this amazing publication which showcases the accomplishments and wonderful stories of Science and Business, Biotechnology/Economics, Biotechnology/Chartered Accountancy.

Contact Kashif: Phone: 519.888.4567 (x35114) Email: kmemon@uwaterloo.ca Office: ESC 254E

These stories will become a guide for you as you prepare for work and life and as you take on the world as a Science and Business student. It will help you in putting your university experience in context and assist you in setting a realistic goal in your life. Our students will tell you why they chose Science and Business and the impact of a diverse degree in the workforce. We will also tell you what to expect as you transition through the first year of university and how your life will change for the better! So read on and come back to tell us what you think of our three programs and our students! I am grateful to our student community for their excellent contributions to the magazine. I am also thankful to the entire editorial team for their hard work in writing and producing this publication. I am particularly thankful to the Project Lead, Pragna for leading this effort. Happy Reading!

- Kashif Memon

Pragna Chandrasekhar Science and Business Project Manager Each time I’m posed with the question - “What does a typical Science and Business graduate do after university?”, I proudly state various aspects of the two starkly different worlds that our students have become a part of. Science and Business students have carved a unique niche for themselves in all realms of the two fields, and have successfully bridged the gap between the sciences and business, by understanding the application of science commercially.

As a Science and Business graduate, I have come to understand that learning is a constant process. Don’t be afraid to fail, or make mistakes - always remember to learn from them, and improve yourself. Here’s wishing the graduating class of 2013, and all our other Science and Business students, the very best in their endeavours! - Pragna Chandrasekhar

Contact Pragna: Phone: 519.888.4567 (x36684) Email: p2chandr@uwaterloo.ca Office: ESC 254E

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2013 GRADUATE & ALUMNI EDITION

The 2013 Graduate and Alumni Edition of our Scibus.ca magazine, the 15th issue published since it’s inception, portrays the diverse experiences that our past, as well as current, students have gained. One will notice a trend in this vast diversity among our students - we all take pride in our degree and our hunger for learning never dies!

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Owen Ward, BSc., PhD Skills Development: A Better Preparation for Work and for Life. Dr. Owen Ward is a former Director of the Science and Business Program from 2005-2009. He is currently a Professor of Biology at the University of Waterloo, and the Chairman and Technical Director of Lystek International. In the picture, to the left, is one of two organic plants in Ontario, which uses Dr. Ward’s technology, developed at his laboratory at the University of Waterloo, and is commercialized by his company, Lystek International. A real humdinger of coupling Science with Business!

In 2013, I will retire from University of Waterloo to pursue a less structured schedule, while continuing current business R&D activities as well as expanding my horizons into one or two new exciting entrepreneurial ventures in the Microbial Biotechnology area. By the time this article is published I expect to be ‘listening’ to my outstanding students as we proceed through my Winter 2013 Biology 474 Bioprocessing Class for the last time. Note the use of the term ‘listening’ rather than ‘lecturing’ because that’s precisely what goes on in Bio 474, where each of 60 students becomes adept at developing communication skills through presentation of 5 individual seminars and preparing a research paper. ἀi s course is primarily about skills development and attempts to build personal confidence in some of our senior undergraduate students. And the emphasis on listening to students rather that lecturing also facilitates a much greater level of student-professor engagement and creates an environment conducive to highly productive motivational and mentoring activities. ἀ e objectives of these activities are to contribute elements to student personal and professional development, which better prepare them for work and for life. Somewhat akin to what Science and Business students do, throughout my career I have always straddled two domains, the academic and industry workplaces, which tend to have very different cultures, even though I believe they should not. And retrospectively, I have found myself taking contrasting approaches to interviewing candidates for graduate studies and for company positions. When recruiting students for graduate school, greater emphasis was placed on grades and relevance of particular subjects because of the strong academic component in graduate courses to be taken, literature to be reviewed and thesis writing and because higher grades better positioned graduate students to win scholarships to help fund their graduate studies. However, I want to emphasise a word of caution about this narrow approach. Since the vast majority of graduates from postgraduate degree programs will ultimately have to seek employment in the business, industry and other private sectors, these postgraduates must develop the attributes, elaborated upon below, that employers in these sectors value.

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When recruiting for industry I found my approach to be entirely different. Industry employers generally have little interest in grades. Indeed they may also have limited interest in the specific combination of subjects a particular graduate has taken, other than having a sense that a particular programme, in a particular Department, in a particular University, has a good reputation and that the graduates will be presumed to be academically well trained in a particular discipline. So with my private sector hat on, as I interviewed candidates for industry business positions, I was much more interested in the non-academic dimensions of the prospective employee. To what extent will this candidate add value and bring identifiable technical and interpersonal strengths to my company? How will this person impact on our clients, respond to their manager, work in the variety of personalities in our team, including ‘not-easy-work-with X’? Is the candidate well organized? Is there evidence of leadership skills? How good are the candidate’s verbal and written communication skills. Is there an ability to focus on the task at hand and to be concise and to the point? Is there strong evidence of good creative and problem-solving skills? And what about the candidate’s personal demeanor? Does the candidate have a reasonably well thought-out plan for their future? Is there a sense that our employment opportunity is a good fit with the candidate’s own career outlook and plan? Does the candidate exhibit an appropriate level and balance of personal confidence, personal respect and pride in some prior accomplishments? In my experience candidates who exhibit positive qualities in these areas on a personal basis tend to extend that personal pride in accomplishment to their jobs and tend to be highly committed and beneficial employees.

But even where it is accepted that the current culture or practice of third level education does not achieve this and needs to be changed, it is unlikely that it will dramatically change overnight. ἀ us, students need, to a large extent, to take control over their own development. Put simply, in order to be successful in competing for employment opportunities and to achieve one’s true potential, it is vital that every student dedicates sufficient time and resources to focusing on development of the requisite skills for work and for life. ἀi s includes identifying personal strengths and aptitudes, setting goals, developing a variety of skills and engaging in career planning and execution related to one’s strengths. SCIBUS.CA Issue 15

2013 GRADUATE & ALUMNI EDITION

Professors generally focus predominantly on academic matters, and this, together with the constant pressure of academic performance evaluation and the desire to achieve high grade point averages, may give students the incorrect impression that academic performance should be a student’s singular focus. But there is increasing criticism regarding this academic approach. ‘For a person, organization, economy, or society to be innovative requires wide ranging skills, including “soft skills”, making it a priority to ask how effectively education systems foster them’ (Education Today 2010: the OECD Perspective, p 80). A critical editorial of the Toronto Globe and Mail Oct 11, 2011 calls on Universities to “spell out what an undergraduate education is good for”. John Milloy, Ontario Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities, May 30, 2011 appeared to answer this question by stating a rightful expectation was that students should “receive a high quality education that leads to meaningful employment”.

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Matthew Botelho Resumés with an Edge: A SciBus student’s Weapon to taking over the World Candidate for BSc. Honours Co-op, Science and Business (Biotechnology) PAST EXPERIENCES: Committees Branch, Legislative Assembly of Ontario Strategic Research Analyst for Ontario Liberal Party, Legislative Assembly of Ontario FUTURE ENDEAVOURS: Go to Law school, specialize in patent law and make use of my science edge as a lawyer in the medical or pharmaceutical industry (hopefully!)

It’s been a week since you’ve thrown your mortarboard in the air and you suddenly find yourself anxiously sitting outside the door of who could be your next employer. You eye down your competition sitting around you as you begin to wonder what credentials they have. What makes me more qualified than them? You come to the realization that although your Bachelor of Science degree demonstrates some level of knowledge, the sharply dressed grads around you probably possess one as well. Suddenly, all perspiration ceases as you realize you’re a Science & Business graduate – well-rounded, experienced, and multi-dimensional. Let’s face it: everyone else from every other school is going to have that same undergraduate degree at the end of the day. ἀ ankfully, I have found that being a Science & Business student at UW has given me the opportunity to add value to my degree that goes beyond a transcript and three letters beside my name on a resumé. I think it’s a no-brainer that employers will prefer to hire someone with a degree accompanied with actual job experience than someone with just a degree alone. ἀ e same goes for admissions officers at any graduate program. Personally, I plan to do my JD/ MBA after I graduate and have used my co-op placements, working as a strategic research analyst for Ontario Parliament, to experientially learn about the legal system. ἀr ough interacting with current and former MPPs, cabinet ministers, and other colleagues; I have expanded my network and learned a lot more about opportunities in the legal sector. I specifically plan to become a patent lawyer or start up my own business in the medical sales industry, which is why I take value in the science and business components of my degree. I

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feel that the marriage between the two fields is becoming increasingly important in today’s innovative and technologically progressive society which creates a demand for multi-dimensional thinkers. Another way the Science & Business program has allowed me to add value to my degree is by participating in a wide variety of extracurriculars. All students are able to take part in organizing and executing the program’s Fusion conference, become a SciBus Ambassador, or become a Science & Business Students’ Association (SBSA) executive. I was fortunate enough to be the Vice-President of SBSA for a year and enhanced my event planning, logistic coordination, marketing, and outreach skills. Currently, I sit as student-at-large on the UW Federation of Students Education Advisory Committee and Internal Administration Committee where I have been able to expand my knowledge on policy development, student advocacy, and outreach. Many SciBus students, like myself, volunteer as a leader in Orientation Week which develops team-building and leadership skills. ἀ ough all these are volunteerbased, they add an incredible amount of value to one’s degree as they exemplify one’s effort to develop themselves as a person in ways that cannot be taught in a classroom. From experience, I can also assure you that 90% of your interviews will probably be about your extracurriculars and past job experience (ie. nothing or little to do with what you memorized out of a textbook). I believe that academia is sometimes the filter to get you into an interview, but as soon as you plant yourself on the hot seat all that matters is the experience you have been able to add to your degree through work experiences and extracurriculars.


Emily Irvine The Perspection of a Degree Candidate for MSc Neuroscience, McGill University BSc. Honours Co-op, Science and Business (Biotechnology) PAST EXPERIENCES:

Fourth Year Thesis Student, Dr. J. David Spafford, University of Waterloo, Waterloo ON Research Assistant, Electrophysiology, Xenon Pharmaceuticals, Burnaby BC Laboratory Technician, Dynamic Microbial Species in Recreational Water, Laboratory for Foodbourne Zoonoses Microbiology, Public Health Agency of Canada, Saint Hyacinthe QC Laboratory Assistant, CIPARS and C-EnterNet, Laboratory for Foodbourne Zoonoses Microbiology, Public Health Agency of Canada, Guelph ON Assistant Regulatory Officer, Labelling, Pest Management Regulatory Affairs, Health Canada, Ottawa ON

At the end of high school and into my first

few co-op experiences I often came across confusion when I told others that I was in a joint Science and Business program, with a specialization in Biotechnology. First of all, I think most people had trouble understanding that this wasn’t a double degree. Once that was cleared up, they thought about its content and it just didn’t make sense to most people. “So you're studying the science of business? ἀ e business of science?” they would ask. Not quite.

When thinking about career directions, a few of us Scibus students knew we would pursue a career in science. We were excited for our six-hour molecular techniques lab every week and really took ownership of our fourth year honours thesis proj-

ἀr oughout my post-secondary education, the perception of Science and Business to the community made significant improvements. People are no longer confused; instead they almost seem jealous when I tell them about the opportunities that Science and Business has provided me. I know that I have a strong foundation from my undergrad in the Science and Business program at the University of Waterloo. It has given me the tools and confidence that I need to succeed in grad school at McGill University. I now work on cholinergic neurons, specifically looking at how a protein known as the high-affinity choline transporter is regulated at the transcriptional level. Despite having chosen to pursue a science career, I regularly use my business training. ἀi s includes efficient resource allocation, implementing SMART goals, and evaluating decisions with a SWOT analysis, inspired by the business component of my Science and Business degree.

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After a few years of Scibus graduates proving themselves in science and business positions alike, I sensed a shift in the perception of my degree. In about the middle of my five-year degree, joint programs like Science and Business became more well-known, more accepted. I was at a work retreat on my 3A co-op term and met someone in upper management in the government division where I worked. When I told him about my degree he smiled with a look of disbelief. He said that he wished that opportunity had been available to him when he was going through school. To me, that felt like the turning point when my degree suddenly became less confusing to the community and more respected. From then on I had interesting discussions with prominent people in their fields about the usefulness of the combination of science and business.

ects. Personally, I started to seriously consider grad school while on my second co-op term when we were encouraged to attend a graduate seminar. Once I had decided to pursue science, I discussed my decision with supervisors and other people that have acted as mentors to me. It was with their help and guidance that I knew what to look for when I was making my decisions for grad school. ἀ e school, program, lab, and supervisor all play important roles in a grad school experience. During my final year at the University of Waterloo I felt completely supported by my personal network as I had many interviews and site visits with scientists across the country.

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Gowtham Satkunarajah Science and Business: Aligning with Reality D.A.R.E Associate (Rotational program), Walmart BSc. Honours Co-op, Science and Business PAST EXPERIENCES: Banking Specialist, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce Product Submission Coordinator, Health Canada Business Development Specialist, One Voice One Team Data Analyst, Research in Motion

We live in a society where there is an em-

phasis on finding a ‘career’ that aligns with what you love or are very passionate about. So we go through high school/university and contemplate what we would ‘love’ to do as a career. In my opinion, that mentality is potentially the biggest trap anyone can fall into. Reality is that most of us are passionate about a lot of things but when you translate that into a business possibility it doesn’t make sense. For example, I am passionate about reading books and what if I pursed that as a career? What type of career growth is there? Would I make enough money? Can I sustain that profession and take care of a potential family? What kind of skill set am I developing? I am not saying that all of us can’t pursue a viable passion that makes sense as a career. However in reality most of our passions aren’t really career-oriented or it just doesn’t make sense for us to purse. Sometimes people restrict themselves from possible career opportunities because they don’t know if they would ‘love it’. Enter Science and Business. I was fortunate to be in 4 different fields for my coop terms within the program. I was a banking specialist at CIBC, a product submission coordinator at Health Canada, business development specialist at a charitable organization and a data analyst at Research in Motion. What I learned is you could potentially be good at anything and like your job if you had a great skill set. You must be thinking where am I going to get a good skill set? Answer: Science and Business. ἀ e program is designed to put students in positions where they must use certain skills to succeed.

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Within several of the science courses, students need to be analytical, problem solvers, detail oriented, curious and hard working. On the other hand, business courses you take within the program give you an entirely different skill set such as communication, team work, leadership, risk taking, presenting, and building relationships. Here comes the best part, you get to apply that in your coop terms. You are not only using it within your post secondary education but you are actually honing these skills within your work terms!! So once you are actually done the program, you have a tangible skill set that can be applied to almost every job out there. Once you start working you will have the ability to move through various positions in a company and you’ll find a niche that you do well in. It is essential that you keep building a great skill set because that will eventually lead into a career you will enjoy! Currently, I am in a graduate rotational program with 9 other students at Walmart Canada, where I get the opportunity to work in key areas of the business: Store operations, Merchandising, Marketing, Finance, Supply chain, Logistics and Modular planning. I have realized going through some of these rotations that I wouldn’t be where I am today if not for the skill set that I developed through the science and business program. To be honest with you, I never imagined I would be in retail, but I am thoroughly enjoying it – Science and Business made that happen!


Keanan Largo-Afonso The Only Play that Matters is the Next One Candidate for BSc. Honours Co-op, Science and Business PAST EXPERIENCES: Pharmaceutical Sales and Marketing Associate, Converge Advertising Project Coordinator, Project Management Office, Ericsson Telecommunications Laboratory Technician, CANMET Laboratories, Natural Resources Canada

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rustrated. 10 interviews later and I still haven’t landed a single coop job. What’s going on? Finally, aἀer a journey of hard work and persistence, I hit the jackpot. Ottawa, here I come... I came into university knowing exactly what I wanted to do...or at least I thought I did. I came from a prestigious high school in Mississauga and graduated out of the Advanced Placement program. I played a number of sports competitively and was thoroughly involved in a handful of extracurricular activities within my community. I thought that I had it all figured out... I started university pursuing an undergrad in Honours Co-op Biochemistry. I had a passion for chemistry and a vision that the medical field was meant for me. I figured it was just a matter of time before I saw myself a part of UW’s School of Pharmacy. Achieving my first coop position was difficult and frustrating. But after many failures I finally found success. I moved to Ottawa to start a term working at Natural Resources Canada where I was exposed to a number of bright and recognized scholars. I had the opportunity to learn about their experiences, passions, and re-evaluate my very own. I realized that I enjoyed my program, but I faced a problem. I had a hunger for interaction, classroom presentations, communication, and most importantly creativity.

I can describe myself as your typical “Left-Brain” thinker - highly analytical and directive. I searched for logic, focused on words and numbers. I wanted to explore the right side of my brain, further enhancing and focusing on intuition, creativity, looking at the big picture. ἀ e answer was right in front of me. ἀ e Science and Business program provided a unique, one of a kind curriculum catered to a niche field of students who wish to capitalize on the best of both worlds. After entering the program midway of second year in university, I realized and learned things during my university career that would take years to learn in the ‘real world’ – how to work in teams, how to think outside the box, how to integrate a business mindset with a science and technology background. I think that what is most important is the balance between the left and right brain thinking. Even to this day the things I’ve learned in this program have taught me how to be proactive in professional, academic, and personal initiatives.

Moving on to my second work term, I found myself at Ericsson Telecommunications, working in Project Management. I valued to opportunity to work in a corporate environment, where I put into practice the professional tools I learnt as a student within this program. Finally, I spent my final work term at a small pharmaceutical marketing firm, Converge Advertising. It was essentially a dream come true, to work in an environment where I achieved the best of both worlds. Every day was action packed and different from the next. From presentation to client/doctor meetings and business trips to San Diego, I was finally working in a field that I felt passion for. I was fortunate enough to work under the CEO and President, who turned out to be, and is, a great mentor and coach of mine. One of my most prestigious accomplishments during undergrad has been admission to VeloCity, University of Waterloo's Entrepreneurial Incubator. ἀi s elite residence works to apply innovation and creativity to the ideas, development of projects, and funding from venture capitalists. Most recently, I have been given the privilege of working under our program director as a Teaching Assistant. It has served as both an opportunity and challenge, developing vital skills by serving as a coach and mentor to a number of students. I must say, my experiences with the Cooperative Science and Business program have proven invaluable to me. Learning to look for the silver lining in any business and team activity has assisted me in developing traits that are valuable for success and distinctiveness within any organization I pursue. ἀ e innovative curriculum and real-world experience that this program has to offer ensures that along with my passion to succeed and make a difference, I will also be armed with the technology-management skills to prosper in today's marketplace.

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“The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new lands, but in seeking with new eyes.” – Marcel Proust

Most importantly, Science and Business is a community, a cohesive family of students working towards a common goal. ἀ e Ambassador program within SciBus helps bring all the students together. Everything from brainstorming sessions, to networking events, to end of term socials… the program and its advantages helps to connect individuals to one another, forming a closely knit community.

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Navena Swaminathan The Positive Impact of a Diverse Degree Candidate for BSc. Honours Co-op, Science and Business, HR Minor PAST EXPERIENCES: Sales Process Specialist, Petro Canada Lubricants Inc. Marketing Service Intern - Petro Canada Lubricants Inc., Suncor Energy Inc. Research Assistant - University of Toronto Stroke Program, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Business Intelligence Analyst, OntarioMD R&D Food Technologist - Canada Bread Frozen Bakery Ltd, Maple Leaf Foods Inc.

Two full-years of multi-industry

work experience. A versatile education in both Science and Business disciplines. Passionate, while results-focused, my personal brand developed over my undergraduate career. I truly believe that the Science and Business program at UW has equipped me with a positive mindset, versatile skills, and valuable academic and life experiences which have allowed me to secure full time employment early on in the game. Why did I choose Scibus? My journey commenced in high school when I was uncertain about my future career goals. I was the so-called typical science nerd but did not see myself pursuing a profession in pure sciences. However, I knew that I wanted to gain a broad-based degree with a science focus that would prove me with unique opportunities in various fields as I progressed through my undergraduate program. By choosing the Science and Business Co-op program, I was able to postpone the bigger decision on a specific career choice. My ongoing intent in the co-op program was to take advantage of the interdisciplinary features of the Scibus program available to me. I strived to be as diverse as 10

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possible in landing placements in both fields, even when the odds were stacked against me having to compete with those who had fullyfocused majors in Science or Business. I was always keen on applying both my disciplines to differentiate myself and add value to any organization. From roles in marketing and sales, to research and front-line healthcare, to technical reporting, to R&D and operations, it is evident that I stayed true to my original personal goals instead of conveniently specializing in a particular area of interest. By testing out the waters in diverse 4-month stints in varying industries, my goal was to set myself up to be in the best position to narrow down where my true interests lay. Scibus has imparted me with analytical, collaborative team work, leadership, problem-solving and communication skills within all levels of an organization. In my 5th year, I can truly attest to the fact that the Scibus program gave me that right blend of the sciences and businesses that has enabled me to reflect on my science knowledge in the practical business environment. I was successful in finding my ideal full time job in Suncor Energy`s New Graduate Rotational Program, all thanks to this one-of-a-kind program with endless opportunities.


Tatjana Milojevic Practical Application of a Science and Business Degree BSc. Honours Co-op, Science and Business (Earth Sciences) PAST EXPERIENCES:

Environmental Technician, WESA Inc., Kitchener ON Land and Water Researcher, Aboriginal Affairs and Nothern Development Canada, Gatineau, QC Environmental Science Technician, Baffinland Iron Mines Corporation, Nunavut FUTURE ENDEAVOURS: Complete graduate studies, conduct international research and work in consulting.

2008 - the year when newspapers were

headlined with news about the Great Recession, when a newly elected U.S. President made history, and when I was considering the all-important decision about which university to apply to. With globalization, I knew it was becoming increasingly difficult to develop a competitive advantage as an expert in only one field of study. So, I searched out the university scene for a program offering a broad, but strong fundamental education that can be specialized. Enter the Science and Business program with a hydrogeology specialization at the University of Waterloo - I applied to this program because it offered a way of successfully integrating science into the current economic system. I chose to specialize in hydrogeology because water is my passion, the University of Waterloo is home to one of the top ranked hydrogeology programs in North America, and the need for hydrogeologists is increasing globally.

Business and communication are best learned through practical application. ἀi s is the value added through ScBus workshops and related extracurricular involvement - it is the soft skills gained from the interdisciplinary studies that come across in professional setting and set you apart from the competition. A benefit to studying science and business is that you can emphasize one area as needed to suit the career path you wish to pursue. In the future, I would like to complete graduate studies in hydrogeology. With an undergraduate degree in Science and Business, Hydrogeology and significant practical experience, I feel I will be prepared to accomplish my goals and make a positive difference in the world.

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What happens in the world is largely affected by economic situations. Capitalism has a strong influence in society, so understanding how this system works is vital to success in this day and age. ἀ e Science and Business program prepares students for today’s business world. I see this from the high calibre of my peers. Unfortunately, in the “real world” we cannot all work exclusively with other SciBus students or those trained in our field of specialization. ἀ ere will likely be a time when we are required to collaborate with Arts, Math, Environment, Engineering and/or Applied Health Science students. ἀi s is why I became involved with XnBiz.

XnBiz is an interfaculty organization run by students from the “and Business” programs offered at the University of Waterloo. Working with some of the top students (each a strong leader in their own right) from these programs, I have come to realize that they share in the ambition for success and improvement, but offer very different perspectives. Consequently, effective communication skills are paramount to productivity.

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Drew Brotherston “Get tough. Be tough. Stay tough.” Fraud Analyst, Suncor Energy Inc. BSc. Honours Co-op, Science and Business (Biotechnology) PAST EXPERIENCES: Study Coordinator, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Research Assistant, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Sales Analyst, Suncor Energy Inc. Distribution Analyst, Suncor Energy Inc. Customer Service Representative, Petro-Canada

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My interview with Joseph and forty-four other patients was part of a study to understand preferences for cancer treatment. It was during those interviews and at many other points during the last five-years I have occasionally paused to think “Never would’ve thought I’d be doing this”.

ἀi s is especially true once you entered the realm of co-op. Initially, during my internships at Suncor I didn’t even understand how to conduct myself in a corporate setting (FYI shoulder length hair is not a traditional look) or later how I would lead a $2M request for proposal. But, what I could do was apply the aforementioned skills along with that comfort in the unknown to go and talk to gate-keepers of this knowledge, learn the business and get people on my side. In doing so I was able to create some of those “didn’t think I’d be doing this” moments like delivering $900K in savings from that request for proposal or leading a proposal to build a wash station for railcars.

One of the great things about the Science and Business program is that this amazing feeling of doing something previously unimagined is something many of us have experienced it. However sure you might be of your capabilities or interests there are opportunities to challenge those boundaries. More than that, I think we are instilled with a belief that you should not be dissuaded from pursuing something just because you know nothing about it.

And when I found myself wanting to develop the scientific side of my professional experience I wasn’t hesitant to chase down an opportunity at Sunnybrook Hospital as a cancer researcher. ἀr oughout my time there I was constantly confronted by challenges in my level of knowledge, but my SCIBUS skills aided me in quickly closing those gaps and enabled me to eventually publish a journal article on the study I mentioned off the top.

And it begins from your very first Science and Business workshop. Our projects frequently centre on developing technology into a whole business, giving us the opportunity to learn how to estimate capital investment requirements, product growth curves and market penetration. In doing so you learn to be a problem solver, a critical thinker, a negotiator, a team player (oh yes, you didn’t think you’d do all that alone did you?), all those fundamental skills, we’ll call them SCIBUS skills, that carry forward to every aspect of your life.

Even now that I have returned to Suncor working in the Fraud Department I once again find myself heading down the rabbit hole, into a world dominated by information technology, which once again I know very little about…

“ et tough. Be tough. Stay tough.” A man named Joseph told me this motto- he is a boxer and I am happy to report that he is a cancer survivor of three years so far. He wrote this phrase on his refrigerator door to keep him going during his treatment. I could not help but jot it down in my notes.

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But that’s okay, because at the end of the day, what you don’t know today you can learn tomorrow or never, but as long as you use those SCIBUS skills you’ll get where you need to go.


Toyin Olawale Life after First Year of Science and Business Candidate for BSc. Honours Co-op, Science and Business (Biotechnology) CAMPUS INVOLVEMENT: International Genetically Engineered Machines Competition, Entrepreneurial Division – Team Waterloo Junior Executive, Science and Business Student Association Floor Representative, UWaterloo Rez Council Waterloo Retail Services Promotions Team FUTURE ENDEAVOURS: Plan to seek an MBA with my degree CO-OP (Winter 2013): Automotive & Impulse Category Intern, Suncor Energy Inc.

It’s crazy to think that in one year I’ve gone

from being just another wide-eyed first year to preparing for my first co-op work term with Suncor Energy Inc. You might be wondering how I did it. ἀ e answer is a whole lot of luck and the amazing Science and Business program! Having just completed my first year in the Science and Business program, I can’t help but think, “Whoa, that was fast!” First year was filled with ups and downs, but in the end what made it all the more enriching was being involved in extracurricular activities, like the Science and Business Student Association (SBSA). As a junior executive for SBSA, I not only had the opportunity to help promote the Science and Business program around campus, but I also met several upper year Science and Business students who passed on their words of wisdom on how to navigate through university life.

What I have come to appreciate during the coop process is how diverse the co-op opportunities are for Science and Business students. Unlike the majority of single disciplinary students, who can only apply to positions specific to their programs; thanks to the Science and Business program I have been able to apply to an array of co-op jobs. And I have also heard numerous stories of Science and Business students getting jobs all over the world and in various fields. In anticipation of my first co-op work term with Suncor Energy Inc., what I am looking forward to the most is applying all the models and strategies I have learned in the Science and Business workshops in real-world situations, where the stakes are much higher and I’m able to gain hands-on experience in a large and well-respected corporation. I know this is my first work term and I shouldn’t expect to get too much action, but who’s to say I can’t hope for the best. Hopefully, in next year’s edition I will get to tell you how well my first co-op work term went and how excited I am for what my future holds!

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2013 GRADUATE & ALUMNI EDITION

Going through the co-op process for the first time as a second year Science and Business student has been both exciting and terrifying at times. Juggling coop interviews, workshop presentations, chemistry labs, iGEM deadlines and life in general has been a challenging task, but knowing that these challenges are allowing me to grow as a person and professional, acts as motivation to push through. What also helps is how the Science and Business program is comparable to a family within the University of Waterloo community. Having my fellow Science and Business classmates around either going through the co-op process with me or passing on their past co-op experiences, has made the process much less intimidating.

Something that has really helped me throughout the co-op process is the different resources offered to co-op students at the UWaterloo by Career Services, such as the Professional Development class which taught me how to write a professional resume and cover letter I could be proud of. As a SciBus student, I was able to have my resume reviewed by our Science and Business Project Manager, our Program Advisor and the Science and Business Student Ambassadors. ἀ ese astounding resources granted me much more confidence in my chances of not only securing a co-op position, but being successful in the position as well.

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Mark Kryshtalskyj Mission, Vission, Values Candidate for BSc. Honours Co-op, Science and Business (Biotechnology) PAST EXPERIENCES: Direct Marketing & Supporter Services Volunteer, Nature Conservancy of Canada Network Planning Analyst, Suncor Energy Inc. Customer Service Representative, Suncor Energy Inc. FUTURE ENDEAVOURS: Apply to law school in the hope of pursuing environmental law

E

very year around Christmas, I get together with some of my high school friends and spend the day playing shinny and catching up over a Tim Hortons tea. One of my friends always talks about the crazy times he had at Western that semester, be it at Saugeen or his Richmond Street apartment. When it comes to my turn, I always get asked –out of all the places you could have gone, do you regret going to Waterloo? Good question. In the past it’s been an emphatic “no way!” followed by an explanation that I have the best friends in the world, and a program that’s one of a kind in Canada, that tailors to my passion for the environment. But to answer the same question this year, I have to look a little harder. In SCBUS 122 back in winter 2011, Professor Kashif talked to our class about an organization’s Mission, Vision and Values. Vision is your goal –what you see to be as the end result, or the desired outcome. Mission is what you’re going to do to get to realize your Vision. Values are what you believe in and what guides you. ἀ ey are what keep you focused on your Vision. Back then, these words really had no meaning to me, but now I would argue that they are the most important guidelines in business and in life. ἀ ey only gained meaning, however, through real-world experiences. In summer 2011 I worked my first co-op term at the Suncor Energy Mississauga Lubricants office as a Customer Service Rep. It was the best scenario I could have asked for: a caring staff and supervisors, a dynamic workplace, a role that challenged me and gave me the opportunity to prove my worth by taking on additional responsibilities. My term culminated in getting the chance to present my work to a panel of Suncor Executives. For a wide-eyed 18-year-old kid, this was the first step in the Mission – to get employers to notice what I was capable of. It was an incredible feeling. My second work term felt very different from my first. While I did learn invaluable skills in economic forecasting and planning capital investments, there were some elements that were out of my comfort zone. ἀ e office was very quiet, and my role was mostly a solitary one. ἀ e other thing that really rattled me was the fact that there was nothing to optimize or improve, like there was in Customer Service. I then realized that I needed a career that led to a greater good or higher goal. I would argue that this work term was my most important, for it helped me better refine my Vision. My summer 2B term started off with Professor Kashif recommending me to help co-chair the 2013 Science & Business Fusion Conference, and get the chance to run with the opportunity. I could not have been more excited. My term took a turn for the worst, however, when I

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was diagnosed with mononucleosis around early June. With only enough energy to get through five to seven hours per day, I was faced with a very scary reality –life goes on. I still had midterms to study for, lab reports to write up, and deadlines to meet. I also faced a second scary reality –my budgeted energy left me with little time for job hunting. For the first time in my life, I faced legitimate failure. ἀi s fall, I spent the majority of my time preparing for my LSATs, one of the requirements for my new Vision of getting into law school and becoming an environmental lawyer. I also ended up getting a co-op job the hard way –by attending the Green Jobs Forum and pitching myself to environmental employers, many of whom do not hire from Jobmine. While my position with the Nature Conservancy of Canada, Canada’s largest environmental conservation authority, is on a voluntary basis, it is nonetheless purposeful. In a month, I have already helped out in a variety of different Direct Marketing roles, faced with different meaningful challenges every time I walk through the door. ἀi s story is what motivated me to pitch the theme “Ignite Your Passion” to the other Fusion Conference co-chairs. I believe that if you’re truly passionate about something, nothing can stop you from achieving your goals and finding a way. ἀ e key is to finding something you care about so much that it connects with your Values and out of which you can formulate a Vision. Science & Business gave me the responsibility to co-chair this year’s Fusion Conference, and with it the chance bring my Mission, Vision and Values to life. With this responsibility, I hope to make it the most impactful and exciting conference yet –because that’s just who I am. So when I will sit down with my high school friends at Tim Hortons this Christmas, and they ask me if I regret my decision to go to Waterloo, I will again emphatically reply, “no!” Why? 1. Because no student community is as close as Science & Business. I have the best friends in the world, SciBus staff who care for me more than anyone, and Professor Kashif on Facebook. It doesn’t get much better than that. 2. Because this year I have learned immeasurable life lessons that I could not have learned elsewhere. Most importantly, I’ve learned that with a clearly defined Mission, Vision and Values, you can overcome anything life throws at you. I’m still the same wide-eyed kid that wants to do his part to protect the environment –just more practical and ironclad.


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ow into the seventh month of planning Fusion Conference 2013: Ignite Your Passion, the Executive Team is very excited about the prospect of growing our conference outside the borders of Science & Business, and attracting students of all programs and backgrounds.

SPEAKER LINEUP: Keynote & Endnote:

ἀi s year, ἀ e Fusion Conference is designed to explore the motivations that drive students and businesses to achieve their developmental goals and realize their potential. For a professional organization, this means having a passion that starts from the top-down, and influences the cutting edge of that organization’s idea, products, vision and values. For students, this means having a career centred around what matters to them, and constantly gaining experiences that lead to that end.

• ELYSE ALLAN, CEO at General Electric Canada • JAY INGRAM, Correspondent for Discovery Channel’s Daily Planet

Clinic • RODERICK SLAVCEV, Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at University of Waterloo • KAREN WILSON, Owner & Designer at Karen Wilson Handbags • ANDREA WOODS-CHIODO, Creative Director at Flying Monkeys Craft Brewery

All students and alumni are welcome and encouraged to attend the biggest, most exciting Fusion Conference yet! For more information and to register, please visit www.fusionconference.ca. We look forward to seeing you there! - Mark Kryshtalskyj, Fusion 2013 Co-chair SCIBUS.CA Issue 15

2013 GRADUATE & ALUMNI EDITION

ἀi s year’s conference features 12 passionate speakers from some of the country’s most innovative and industry-leading organizations. Breakout Sessions: Our goal was to have “something for everyone,” and we have delivered, with these professionals’ • STEVE BISHOP, Senior Partner at Grant Thornexpertise in the diverse fields of healthcare, inforton LLP • RYAN COELHO, Founder at #GameOn Leader- mation technology, the environment, leadership training, fashion, craft brewing, pharmaceuticals, ship Training • FRANCES EDMONDS, Director of Environmental entrepreneurial accounting and more. In addition, Programs at Hewlett-Packard Canada we have partnered with Suncor Energy to present • RORY FACCA, Senior IT Portfolio Manager at TD students with a multidisciplinary real-world case Canada Trust study unlike any other. Our goal is for all confer• ROBERT HUDAJ, Regional VP – Channels at ence delegates to leave the two-day event with Infor Canada either a newly sparked passion, a better under• BARBARA MARTINEZ, Principal – Health & Benefits at Mercer Human Resource Consulting standing of their passion, or a better idea of how • JOHN MOZAS, President & COO at Medcan to turn their passion into a career.

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SCIENCE AND BUSINESS MILESTONES 2012

2012 Excellence in Science Teaching Award (ESTA) The Science and Business Resource Centre is proud to announce that Kashif Memon, Science and Business Advisor received this year’s ESTA from the Faculty of Science. This award goes to two instructors of the Science Faculty, who have “demonstrated sustained, high quality teaching in their courses.” Barb Moffat, Associate Dean of Science (2011-2012) stated: “Kashif is recognized for the leadership, mentorship and teaching he has provided to the Science and Business program. The student nominators commented on the personal interest Kashif provides to train, guide and mentor them as they develop their personal goals. The result is a tight cohort of students who graduate with strong communication skills along with an excellent understanding of current business practices.”

2012 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Student Scholarship The McGraw-Hill Ryerson Student Scholarship Award is an annual award presented to students from different universities across Canada, who have helped “enhance the learning environment in their university”. This year Julia Chen, currently in the Biotechnology/Chartered Accountancy discipline of Science and Business, was one among 20 recepients of this award. There were more than 700 applications for the scholarship this year!

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2012 Suncor Emerging Leaders Award Every year Suncor Energy Inc. awards high school students, entering their first year at the University of Waterloo. These students are awarded for demonstrating leadership potential in the fields of science and business. This year the award was presented to Amanda Banh, a first-year Science and Business student, specializing in Biotechnology!

2012 Science and Business Shadow Day - The first of its kind!

The SciBus Shadow Day was a huge success with high school students shadowing 10 SciBus ambassadors. These students got the opportunity to visit a Science lecture, a lab, and our very own SciBus workshop - SCBUS 123, run by Kashif. In SCBUS 123, these students were exposed to the business cases and presentations made in first year, and got the chance to be part of a gruelling Q/A session between student investors and presenters!

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2013 GRADUATE & ALUMNI EDITION

The Science and Business Students’ Association (SBSA) implemented our first ever SCIENCE AND BUSINESS SHADOW DAY on November 20, 2012!

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Scibus.ca Issue 15 COVER: Melissa Savoury-Gittens Fusion 2012 photography, Anna Beard 2012 Fall Open House Photography, University of Waterloo student/laboratory PUBLISHER: Science and Business Program, University of Waterloo. January 2013 CO-EDITOR: Kashif Memon, Science and Business Program Advisor and Coordinator, kmemon@uwaterloo.ca CO-EDITOR AND LAYOUT PRODUCER: Pragna Chandrasekhar, Science and Business Project Manager, p2chandr@uwaterloo.ca PHOTOGRAPHY: New School Photography; Light Imaging; Anik Somani for 2012 SciBus Shadow Day SPECIAL THANKS TO DR. OWEN WARD, OUR ALUMNI NETWORK, AND OUR CURRENT STUDENTS, WHO CONTRIBUTED THEIR STORIES AND MADE THIS MAGAZINE POSSIBLE!


2013 Graduate and Alumni Edition