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HARTFORD DOWNTOWN REVITALIZATION PLAN

Jordan Brown | Paula Priebe | John Schroeder | John Vogt | Michael Weber


Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Acknowledgements

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e are thankful to the many people who took an active role in the creation of this plan. Significant input and direction were provided to us throughout this process. The contributions of all on this list helped make this plan a successful document. Thank you for your time and input. To our Clients from Hartford and the Business Improvement District: you came to Milwaukee for three meetings at the University of WisconsinMilwaukee and answered many phone and email questions. • Karin Buhle, BID Executive Director • Bill Bode, Property Owner • Timothy Purman, First National Bank Hartford • Justin Drew, Hartford Director of Community Development • Ray Stelzer, Scoop DeVille Ice Cream Shop • Kathryn Berger, WEDC • Brenda Johnston, Schauer Arts and Activites Center • Robyn Wilkinson, Schauer Arts and Activities Center

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We would like to thank the City of Hartford, especially Mayor Joe Dautermann who gave us an entertaining and enlightening tour of the City on a very cold and windy February day.

We greatly appreciate the Schauer Arts and Activities for letting us host the public meeting in the Pikes Peak room on March 18. The public meeting was attended by 19 engaged downtown Hartford stakeholders. Your input was invaluable to the crafting of the recommendations seen in this plan. Our Applied Planning Workshop 2014 professors, Carolyn Esswein and Nancy Frank guided us in this process. At every step your feedback challenged us to improve our work. Thank you for making our work better. Sincerely, The Hartford Team Jordan Brown Paula Priebe John Schroeder John Vogt Michael Weber


Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Table of Contents

Executive Summary 5 Introduction 9 Public Input Meeting 17 Retail Needs and Opportunities Study 23 Recommendations 29 Action Steps 85 Appendix 88 Sources 104 3


Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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hile the City of Hartford, Wisconsin continues to grow and develop at the edges, a renewed focus on the downtown district will help to keep “the heart of Hartford” strong. Downtown is currently facing several challenges including a lack of pedestrian connectivity throughout the district, a need for more signage and wayfinding measures, and the presence of several vacant or underutilized properties. This revitalization plan provides nine recommendations to address those challenges. The traditional planning process was followed in the creation of this plan. Research and analysis, along with a public input meeting, provided the foundation for the recommendations proposed. A Retail Needs and Opportunities Study was conducted to evaluate the existing market conditions and to suggest prospects for new businesses in the trade area. Nine recommendations were chosen to address the issues of Downtown Hartford. The nine recommendations can be understood as falling within three overarching categories: Wayfinding, Aesthetic Activation, and New Development. A Retail Needs and Opportunities study was conducted in order to assess the current economic state of Downtown Hartford. Rather than develop an overarching solution, the study is intended to be a preliminary analysis into the potential areas of business growth as well as supplement the recommendations detailed in this plan. The results of the study are based on specific tools

and techniques developed by academic resources to utilize both qualitative and quantitative data collected to accurately estimate demand and supply within a determined study area. For an effective analysis of the data gathered, the selected study area captured all of the businesses that affect the Downtown Hartford business climate. The data consisted of current business inventory, sales volume, business square footage, and other pertinent figures to yield a final, comprehensive result. The final figures developed within the study show where gaps in business sectors exist, and the overall size (based on square footage and number of businesses) of those gaps. The study also shows the overall “pull factor” of Hartford, compared to other similar municipalities within Wisconsin.

Executive Summary

The wayfinding alternative proposes two different wayfinding orientations; signage for pedestrians and signage for vehicles. Wayfinding is important for attracting and routing traffic, whether pedestrian or vehicular, through the downtown and providing a clear and convenient way to reach destinations. While wayfinding is important to navigating throughout the downtown, it will also foster district cohesion by integrating design elements that create a unique sense of place while providing a neighborhood identity.

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Executive Summary

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Aesthetic activation encompasses four alternatives which include parking lot improvements, identification of an east-west corridor for bicycles and pedestrians, streetscape design, and rear facade improvements. As a requirement for a business district to survive, adequate parking is paramount. However, parking should be well designed and oriented to accommodate vehicles while providing a safe and attractive environment for pedestrians to travel through. Our recommendation for parking lots in Hartford include attention to landscaping, lighting, screening, and new pathways to connect key areas of the district to attract more pedestrian traffic. New pathways create an east-west connector from the heart of downtown to the Schauer Arts Center. This corridor connects two previously proposed projects in the downtown, the revamping of the walkway adjacent to City Hall and the addition of a pedestrian bridge in the park adjacent to the Hartford Fire and Rescue building. This connector creates a continuous pedestrian oriented environment that stretches from the terminus of an established walkway along the Rubicon River, allowing for a complete unobstructed route through downtown.

While Hartford currently utilizes many streetscaping elements that make Main Street an attractive place to walk and shop, additional attention to streetscaping, especially to other downtown streets, could enhance the downtown environment and foster a cohesive sense of place. Streetscaping elements like public art, unique crosswalks, landscaping, street trees, sitting areas, updated signage, and lighting establish the downtown as a destination and foster walkability and activity. Finally, the rear facades of downtown buildings are important to enhancing an attractive downtown environment. Our recommendation is to address Hartford’s rear facades by encouraging business owners to utilize the backside of their businesses by installing rear windows, awnings, signs, and allowing rear entry. Additionally, many communities have addressed this issue with facade improvement programs where grants are awarded to property owners. This is a step that the Hartford Business Improvement District should research in more detail.


Three sites were identified as options for The impacts of our recommendations, aesthetic redevelopment and four project concepts activation, streetscaping, wayfinding, and new were designed to provide insight on how new development, will transform Downtown Hartford development would fit within the current context of and will continue to foster its image as an attractive Hartford’s downtown. The City sites chosen as potential and enjoyable place to live, work, and play. of Hartford redevelopments are located along the span of Main Enhancement of streetscaping and rear facades City Hall Street, one north of the railroad, one centrally will maintain Hartford’s image as an attractive Community Center located at Jackson St, and one south of Hwy 60, and pedestrian oriented place. Additionally, Town Hall Police Department the North Bookend, Mole Hole Site, and the the establishment ofCity anHalleast-west corridor for welcome to Community Center Parking Lot South Bookend respectively. The “Bookend” sites bicycles and pedestrians will enhance downtown anchor the district on the northern and southern Police Department Rubicon River connectivity and parking lot improvements will borders. These catalytic projects will reactivate make crossing these locations safer and more the edges of downtown and foster investment enjoyable for people to navigate. The installation of and redevelopment throughout the surrounding new wayfinding signs will establish a neighborhood neighborhood. Additionally, located in the center of identity and will also increase connectivity. ATE.2 CAMPUS.2 CAMPUS.3 CAMPUS.1 downtown, the Mole Hole site is currently blighted NT VIEW FRONTÊVIEW FRONTÊVIEW FRONTÊVIEW Finally, developing strategic locations will increase and underutilized. The development concept downtown population density, provide quality proposes a mixed-use development to reactivate the housing options, new commercial space, and will space while being thoughtful of the current urban encourage additional investment in the downtown. context that exists around this site. We recognize that these recommendations are not groundbreaking; however, by working together they provide a comprehensive approach to addressing Hartford’s challenges and sustaining its future.

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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his revitalization plan is focused on Hartford’s downtown area. The downtown is directly affected by the greater community, and thus an understanding of the greater community is necessary to the success of any downtown revitalization. This broader perspective includes some general information about the City of Hartford, an analysis of demographic data for the City, and knowledge of other relevant plans which affect the area. General Information The City of Hartford encompasses just over eight square miles along the Rubicon River in Washington and Dodge Counties. Hartford rests in the Kettle Moraine region of Wisconsin and has the varied moraine landscape the area is known for. The city government is led by a Mayor and a Common Council made up of nine aldermen. In addition to the downtown area with its historic, small town character, Hartford is home to the Wisconsin Automotive Museum and the Schauer Arts and Activities Center. Key events which take place in Hartford include holiday parades through downtown, an annual classic car show, and an outdoor farmer’s market in the summer and autumn. Hartford is also home to the Mineshaft Restaurant and Bar, the largest restaurant in Wisconsin, which is a

Introduction Above: A 1927 Kessel automobile in front of the Wisconsin Automotive Museum in downtown Hartford. (wisconsinautomuseum.com) Below: The Mineshaft Restaurant and Bar sits at the corner of Hwy 60 and Hwy 83, the busiest intersection in downtown Hartford.

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Introduction

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major regional draw to the community. A large industrial park in the City provides employment to many Hartford residents and others who commute to Hartford for their job. Many well known industrial businesses are located in Hartford including Quad Graphics, Signicast Investment Castings, Broan-Nu Tone, and the Steel Craft Corporation. Manufacturing is the industry which employs the most people in the community.


Opposite Top: The orange line on the map of downtown Hartford marks the boundary area for this revitalization plan. Opposite Bottom: Cars park at an angle for the annual Classic Car Day downtown. Below: Pike Like is the best place in the county to go birdwatching according to www.eBird.org.

Demographics The City of Hartford had a population of 10,905 in 2000 and 14,223 in 2010, according to the decennial census. The overall trend in population growth has been positive, with a few plateaus and small dips during the recent economic recession. In 2012, according to the American Community Survey conducted by the US Census Bureau, the population was 14,104. Of that total, 45.2% were male, 54.8% female and 10,300 were over the age of 18. Hartford is a community which is family friendly with a high percentage of family households and a large number of school-age children. The 14,104 people who lived in Hartford in 2010 lived in 5,723 households. Of these households, 66% lived in fam-

ily households and 34% lived in nonfamily households, where a person lives alone or with people they are not related to, such as an unmarried partner or roommates. The number of people in Hartford who were over 3 years of age and enrolled in school in 2010 was 3,551, or 25% of the total population. Of the population age 25 and over, 91.3% had a high school degree or higher and 21.9% had a bachelor’s degree or higher. Of the population age 5 and over, 93.4% speak only English at home. Data regarding workers and industries in Hartford helps give a picture of the local economy. The population over 16 years of age was 10,720 in 2010. Of that 72.6% were in the labor force, and 27.4% were not in the labor force. Of those in the labor force, workers, 81.5% commuted to work by driving their own vehicle alone, 11.4% by carpooling, and 1.2% walked. The average commute time was 23.1 minutes. In 2010, the median household income was $57,316, the mean household income was $63,796, and per capita income was $26,157. Of all the workers who lived in Hartford in 2010, 85.9% worked in one of the seven industries in the table below. Industry Manufacturing Educational Services Retail Trade Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Professional, Scientific, and Management Construction

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Introduction

Workers in Hartford 24.6% 21.2% 10.3% 8.0% 7.9% 7.0% 6.9%

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Introduction

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In 2012, there were 6,139 housing units in Hartford, 5,723 occupied and 416 vacant. The majority of the units, 54%, were one-unit detached housing, while 24% lived in developments of three or more units. Recent population growth shows that 43% of the housing units were built after 1990. Of the occupied units, 68% were owner-occupied and 32% were renter-occupied. The population in Hartford is fairly mobile, as 72% have moved into their home after the year 2000. Of the owner-occupied units, the median home value was $190,200. Of the renter-occupied units, the median gross monthly rent was $767. The City of Hartford is projected to see significant population growth in the coming years according to the Wisconsin Department of Administration’s Population and Household Projections which were produced in 2013. The table below shows the projected population and a percent change over each five year period. Year

Population

2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

14,630 16,030 17,350 18,530 19,230 19,580

Change over five years 2.86% 9.57% 8.23% 6.80% 3.78% 1.82%

The projected population growth is reflected in the other area plans and must be taken into account in this plan. New housing units must be built to accommodate new population growth. Downtown, because of its amenities, is a logical place for new housing.

Relevant Area Plans Hartford Comprehensive Plan The City of Hartford has a comprehensive plan in its 2030 Smart Growth Plan. This document guides land use decisions within the City of Hartford and fulfills the Wisconsin Comprehensive Planning Law. The plan is separated into the following 9 chapters: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Issues and Opportunities Housing Transportation Utilities and Community Facilities Agricultural, Natural & Community Resources Intergovernmental Cooperation Economic Development Land Use Implementation

Due to the breadth and scope of this plan, downtown Hartford is not given particular detailed consideration. Three of the goals of the Smart Growth Plan which are relevant to downtown are included below. “Provide a wide range of housing choices throughout the city that meets the needs of all persons” This goal includes offering a range of options in housing such as rental housing, townhouses, apartments, and live-work units, as well as units for seniors. Further, high and medium density residential development is encouraged along the transit corridors and in commercial service areas.


“Promote alternative forms of transportation, including transit, bicycle, and pedestrian modes of transportation.”

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

This goal calls for a wider array of options for residents and workers to travel to and around Hartford beyond cars. The Rubicon River Corridor Trail is mentioned and could be expanded. Also, there is a call to improve sidewalks in all new commercial and residential developments. “Encourage the expansion of existing industry and commerce within the City of Hartford and attract additional industrial, commercial and residential development.” This is a goal with many considerations including providing affordable housing options and a high quality of life. The Business Improvement District is mentioned as a key partner in enacting this goal along with the Hartford Chamber of Commerce. Also, use of Tax Incremental Financing is elevated as a key tool in helping to finance new industrial, office, and downtown developments.

RIght Top: The City of Hartford 2030 Smart Growth Plan provides a long-range planning framework. Right Bottom: The future land use plan for Hartford from the 2030 Smart Growth Plan is used by the City to judge future rezoning decisions and development proposal approvals.

Introduction

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Washington County Plan Washington County has a comprehensive plan, adopted in 2008. Since the City of Hartford has a comprehensive plan for the municipality, it is not addressed in great detail throughout the county plan. The large goals of the county plan reflect the attitudes of the region and should be considered in planning activities in Hartford. One of the major goals stressed in the county plan is the need to appropriately provide housing for the population growth expected in the next 20 years. Several of these goals are included below.

Introduction

“Communities with urban service areas should plan for new residential development at urban densities, including infill or redevelopment in traditional downtown neighborhoods.” (369) “Promote a range of affordable housing choices for all income levels, age groups, and special needs groups in the County.” (369) “Accommodate the projected growth in Washington County’s population, households, and employment though the comprehensive plan design year 2035.” (650) “Promote the addition of an adequate number of housing units to the current housing stock to meet housing demand through 2035.” (651)

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These goals emphasize the need to provide new housing units and options for the expected increase in population over the next 30 years. Cities like Hartford are expected to densify to allow for more

Above: The Washington County Comprehensive Plan covers a very broad area and thus does not include many details directly relevant to downtown Hartford.

people while also preserving the agricultural land outside the City boundaries. The future land use section of the county plan covers the entire county, including Hartford. The map of future land use “indicates where certain types of urban development should be encouraged while preserving agricultural and environmentally significant land and resources” (350). The future land use map is a land use plan for the year 2035. Downtown Hartford is marked for Medium Density Urban Residential and General Commercial.


BID Operating Plan The purpose of this Business Improvement District is to promote the orderly development of the City of Hartford by providing an organization and funding vehicle to develop and promote the downtown area for the economic benefit of all businesses and property owners within the District. Additionally, the BID makes recommendations to the Common Council regarding parking, beautification and other infrastructure improvements, thereby making downtown more physically and economically attractive for use by all citizens and property owners in the city. The goals of the BID include implementing marketing strategies to promote a vibrant image of downtown, guiding the physical development of downtown to ensure its commercial viability, and organizing events which bring people to shop and spend time downtown.

Above: The future land use map for all of Washington County. Right: Zoomed in on the Washington County future land use map to see the details for Hartford.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Introduction

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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n Tuesday, March 18, 2014, a public input meeting was held in the Pikes Peak Room of the Schauer Arts and Activities Center in Hartford at 6:00 pm. The purpose of the two hour meeting was to gather feedback from key downtown stakeholders regarding the direction of the plan’s recommendations. Invitations were sent to the 130 members of the downtown Business Improvement District, and 19 people attended the meeting. The meeting began with a short presentation introducing the team conducting the plan analysis, the focus of the plan, and the study area. wThere were three primary activities during the evening and ample opportunity for comments and discussion. The participants first filled out a survey asking for five words they would use to describe the downtown Hartford today and five words that would describe their vision of Hartford five years down the road. The results of this survey were compiled during the meeting and discussed as a wrap-up activity at the end. The word clouds show the words used and their frequency. The purpose of this activity was to understand how participants feel about downtown and learn what they would like to see change to improve their community. The second activity was an image preference survey given as a presentation. This survey asked participants to rank a series of 60 images based

upon whether a) they like it and b) they feel it fits in downtown Hartford. Participants marked their rankings on individual scoring sheets. After all of the rankings were finished, a series of compilation slides allowed for large group discussion on the images. Ten images were presented showing a variety of developments in each of the following six categories: residential, commercial, parking, public space, streets, and signage. Scoring sheets were collected after this activity and final results were tallied. The purpose of this activity was to show the character of development and community spaces the stakeholders prefer for downtown Hartford. Public Input Meeting

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan Below Top: Word cloud showing what words describe how stakeholders view downtown today. Below Bottom: Descriptive words explain how stakeholders want downtown to be in the future. Both generated from results of the survey at the public meeting.

Public Input Meeting

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The final activity had the participants breaking out into four small groups. These groups held discussions around a series of maps at the center of their tables. Each group was facilitated by a team member who led the discussion around the topics of a) key nodes of downtown activity, b) gaps and wayfinding, and c) retail and mixed-use development ideas. After a half-hour of group


discussions, all the groups came together to discuss the key conversation points as a large group. The purpose of this activity was to get participants to interact with a map of the space and draw out how they use the space, which parcel are underutilized or subject to change, and where they would like to see redevelopments take place.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

The participants were actively involved in each of the three activities, providing lots of valuable feedback. There was general consensus around several discussion points. First, there is a lack of connection for pedestrians from Main Street to the arts complex. Second, the downtown would benefit greatly from a unified identity, signage, and wayfinding scheme. Finally, they would like downtown to be a destination where people would come to spend time shopping, eating, and being outdoors. The input provided during the meeting provided the foundation for the recommendations made throughout this plan. More detailed results from the surveys at the public meeting can be found in the Appendix.

Public Input Meeting

Left: The highest ranking image in the Parking category of the Image Preference Survey. Screening of parking was a high priority to the stakeholders present at the meeting. Above Top: A high ranking image in the Streets category. Above Bottom: The highest ranking image in the Commercial category of the Image Preference Survey.

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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he following Retail Needs and Opportunities Study is intended to assess the current retail business climate within the City of Hartford, Wisconsin. This study is based on the tools and techniques described within a paper completed by the University of Wisconsin Extension in conjunction with the Ohio State University and the University of Minnesota Extension titled “Downtown and Business District Market Analysis”. The tools used—with minor variations to accommodate Hartford—are intended to estimate the gaps in retail segments located within a defined study area for the Hartford area. The study will ultimately yield a preliminary analysis of potential business opportunities within the study area based on both qualitative and quantitative factors from various sources, both government and private, to measure supply and demand.

City also conducts popular events such as farmers markets, block parties, parades, and various others throughout the year within the downtown business district that help attract customers from all over the state. These activities help market the city and provide increased spending to the local businesses within the downtown. The City of Hartford has a state highway running through the southern end of the downtown district. State Hwy 60 is the main arterial that connects the City of Hartford to larger state highways, increasing access and exposure to an increased potential customer base.

According to Wisconsin Department of Transportation, the 2013 annual average daily traffic (AADT) count for the intersection of Main Street near the center of Downtown Hartford and State Hwy 60 is 21,100 vehicles. Travel speeds through the Unlike current trends occurring within small town downtown area corridor along State Hwy 60 are 25 downtowns throughout the United States, the City miles per hour. AADT for central Hartford business of Hartford has not experienced a mass exodus or district along Main Street is 5,500 vehicles, a stark disappearance of smaller businesses due to larger big indication that potential consumers are more likely box retailers locating nearby or lack of demand. to travel past rather than through the downtown Based on a tour of the downtown and immediate business district. vicinity, the city appears to have been able to retain its businesses and maintain a low level of vacancy In order to sufficiently assess the current business (15 percent according to the Hartford Business and economic climate of Downtown Hartford, a Improvement District) within its retail space. The study area had to be established to effectively capture

Retail Needs and Opportunities

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Retail Needs and Opportunities

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Based on the established study area, it was determined that there are certain niche markets. Niche markets often occur when clusters of similar business types locate within a small geographic area in larger numbers, such as the automotive industry in Detroit throughout the 20th century. In the specific case of Hartford, some examples of the niche markets or business types (categorized by It was determined that from the center point, a NAICS codes) that are currently occurring within three-mile radius would be a sufficient distance to the study area are beauty salons (NAICS 812112), effectively analyze the economic climate. Certain full-service restaurants (7221), and professional, factors such as the overall concentration of businesses, reasonable drive time, and complexity of scientific, and technical services (NAICS 541). the analysis were considered. The businesses located The Retail Needs and Opportunities Study was within the established study area play an integral conducted for the City of Hartford in order to part in the commercial activity that occurs in and determine any potential for business growth within around the Downtown Hartford business district. the downtown business district. As briefly discussed earlier within the Retail Needs and Opportunities Current Business Mix Study section, sources for this study include both Approximately 541 businesses are currently located public and private entities such as: • ESRI Business Analyst, within the determined study area. To effectively • the US Census Bureau, manage and group businesses, the North American • Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS), Industry Classification System (NAICS) was used • the International Council of Shopping Centers as the standard for the analysis. The Gap Analysis (ICSC), and charts in the Appendix show the list of current • The Urban Land Institute (ULI). business types, listed by their respective NAICS Any data collected from public sources, unless codes as well as the total estimated square footage of otherwise noted, was collected in 2012, and is the the business category within the study area. most up-to-date data available. For the overall study, two business gap analyses were completed. The first analysis considers typical The initial Hartford business inventory was collected using ESRI Business Analyst. Extracted data small downtown retail establishments (NAICS codes 44-45, 51-54, 71, 72, and 81), and uses specific includes business name, location, SIC Code, NAICS code, estimated sales volume, employee count, business types. The second focuses on a larger, less and estimated size of business by square footage. specific, overview analysis using all of the available NAICS business types (11-81). In order to effectively Annual updates of the business data provided by ESRI Business Analyst are performed to ensure the determine the gaps, the first analysis was used. any potential externalities that affect the economic outlook of Hartford. The center of the study area was established at the corner of North Main Street and East Jackson Street. This intersection is approximately the center of the downtown business district, the key area for this study.


best possible accuracy. In order to fully complete the analysis, further business data, such as average store sizes and average sales by business type, was taken from the ICSC/ULI publication “Dollars and Cents of Shopping Centers®/The SCORE 2008”. This publication provided the majority of the information required to determine the potential sales of the study area.

on aerial photography via Google Earth. Study Results

The first result from the Retail Needs and Opportunities study is the “Pull Factor” analysis. The analysis shows the effectiveness that communities have in attracting outside consumers. Hartford was compared with two similar communities within Wisconsin: Oconomowoc The 2012 American Community Survey (ACS) population and income data for the City of Hartford and Watertown. Taxable sales per community from the Retail Trade Census collected every five years indicate the capacity for spending within the study were used to determine each community’s ability area. Due to the minimal difference in geographic to historically retain and draw consumers. For this size and shape of the study area to the city limits analysis, any data point above one indicates that of Hartford, the average per capita income and a community draws consumers, rather than loses population were assumed to be of negligible difference and therefore determined to not adversely them on a net basis. Based on the calculations, each of the communities compared show they attract affect the analysis. Combined with sales data consumers. from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recorded into categories by NAICS codes, determinations towards demand figures within the analysis could be Based on the local population, per capita income, business inventory, sales figures, and other key formulated. data collected, it was determined that the City of Hartford and remaining area within the allotted Throughout the data gathering process various drawbacks to this study were recognized. Due to the study area can support additional businesses, particularly within certain categories. vast quantity of business data retrieved from ESRI Business Analyst, it should be assumed that minor, uncontrollable errors may occur within the data set. Although a preliminary analysis, this shows that business gaps exist, both in amount as well as However, it was determined after a quick accuracy square footage. More research may be required to examination that any errors are deemed negligible and should not affect the overall results of the study. ensure further accuracy, but this analysis provides an overall view of the current business climate in Another drawback of this methodology also the study area. From the analysis, it was determined includes how the business square footage was that there are currently 27 business gaps, supporting determined. In a traditionalw market study, square the notion that increased business activity can be footage of businesses are relatively accurate. absorbed. However, due to the time intensive process of gathering such data, best estimates were made based

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Retail Needs and Opportunities

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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The chart to the left illustrates the pull factor analysis which was one of the results of the Study. Results above 1.00 mean that the community “pulls� customers from outside their city limits. Hartford’s pull factor has shown some variation over the fifteen years analyzed, but always remained above the 1.00 line.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Detailed tables of the Retail Needs and Opportunities Study calculations can be found in the Appendix.

Retail Needs and Opportunities The table to the left shows the top five business gaps identified in the Retail Needs and Opportunities Study. A gap exists in the trade area in these five business categories. New businesses in Hartford could take advantage of these gaps and take advantage of the current market which is not being met by existing stores. For clarification, home centers sell new home repair and improvement materials such as lumber, plumbing goods, tools, hardware, etc.

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n order to comprehensively address the challenges facing downtown Hartford, nine recommendations are proposed which fall into three categories.

Recommendations Table of Contents

Category one is wayfinding. The two recommendations in this category are pedestrian wayfinding and vehicular wayfinding. Wayfinding addresses the challenges people visiting Hartford face in finding their way around, locating routes between places within the downtown, and creating a cohesive downtown identity.

Pedestrian Wayfinding 31 Vehicular Wayfinding 35 Parking Lot Improvements 39 East West Route 43 Streetscaping Recommendations 47 Rear Facade Improvements 53 North Bookend Development 59 Mole Hole Redevelopment 75

The second category has four recommendations which address aesthetic activation downtown. These recommendations include parking lot improvements, a path between the east and west sides of downtown, streetscaping, and improvements to the rear facades of businesses located on Main Street. Aesthetic activation will beautify the downtown as well as activate currently underutilized spaces. The final category includes three new development recommendations. Three sites were identified as potential locations for catalytic downtown revitalization projects. These sites are located north of the railroad tracks, at the former Mole Hole building, and south of Highway 60. These new developments will give an idea of how the underutilized spaces could be transformed.

Recommendations

South Bookend Redevelopment 79 29


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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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edestrian wayfinding assists visitors walking or biking the Downtown District with orientation and navigation of Downtown attractions. In contrast to vehicular wayfinding, the graphics, maps, and signage of a pedestrian wayfinding system must provide information to users at a more intimate, human scale that be easily read and understood from a short distance, ranging from a few feet away to approximately a half-block away.

Tier 1: “You Are Here” Kiosks The pedestrian wayfinding system should feature a series of “You Are Here” kiosks with maps that facilitate users with spatial information in relational proximity to where they are currently standing. A comprehensive list of the entire downtown district’s retail, commercial, dining, and entertainment attractions, with icons placed on a corresponding map,

Recommendations Pedestrian Wayfinding

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations Pedestrian Wayfinding Legend “You Are Here” Wayfinding Map Wayfinding Sign Location

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should be included as a clearly readable key. The kiosks should be placed conspicuously at major nodes of congregation where people can find information to make navigational decisions or to find learn more about the tenant mix in the downtown. The maps herein identify several recommended locations for “You Are Here� kiosks.

Tier 2: Signage Network Next, a network of approximately 10-20 signs, that point to specific destinations or clusters of businesses, should be placed at key locations and intersections to assist pedestrians with navigation. The Pedestrian Wayfinding Map in this section identifies 12 recommended locations that will provide Downtown visitors with a visible, consistent, and userfriendly system of pedestrian wayfinding tools .

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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Restaurant A

Retail A

Entertainment A

Restaurant B

Retail B

Entertainment B

Restaurant C

Retail C

Entertainment C

Restaurant X

Retail X

Entertainment X

Restaurant Y

Retail Y

Entertainment Y

Restaurant Z

Retail Z

Entertainment Z

CIVIC City Hall

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Cary Downtown Godbold Park Bond Park

N

ewcomers and residents visiting the downtown business district from all directions by vehicle need information about their proximity to major downtown attractions and the closest available parking. Tier 1: “Front-Door” Signage

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

welcome to

hartford

Godbold Park Bond Park

the Town of Cary, North Carolina) because of its bright and inviting colors and style. Ideally, the text would be white or other painted surface material that reflects car headlights at night. Any plantings should be placed in such a way so as not to obscure the information.

welcome to

hartford

GATE.1 FRONT VIEW

Tier 2: “Gateway” Signage For drivers entering Hartford, a vehicular wayfinding system should announce the presence of the Major intersections with the highest traffic counts downtown district even before a person arrives in directly adjacent to the downtown district should the downtown. These “front-door” signs serve two be designated “gateway” intersections and should purposes. First, they alert drivers and passengers receive a prominent architectural design treatment that Downtown Hartford is nearby and should begin watching for similarly-designed street signs that will Town Hall Town Hall direct them to their desired destination and closest Campus Campus parking. Large signs with highly visible text, color, Chamber of City Hall Commerce and memorable design should be placed approxiwelcome to Cary Downtown Community Community Community mately ½ mile outside downtown along Community all major hartford Arts Center Arts Center Arts Center Arts Center Godbold Park arteries. Second,Godbold these “front-door” signs establish Park the aesthetic style of the remaining wayfindingBond Park Bond Park system that gives drivers consistent cues which will ultimately guide them to their final destination.

GATE.2 FRONT VIEW

Urban Park

Community Arts Center

Recommendations Town Hall Campus Wayfinding Vehicular

Chamber of Commerce City

City Hall

Commun

Note: The final design should be selectively chosen to express the desired character of Downtown Hartford (see Public Meeting section) as this signage creates the first impression of the District. For purposes of illustrating this recommendation, an example wayfinding system has been employed (based on VDIR.1 FRONTÊVIEW

welcome to

hartford

Police De

Parking L

Rubicon R

35 VDIR.2 FRONTÊVIEW

GATE.1 VDIR.3 FRONT VIEW FRONTÊVIEW

VDIR.4 FRONTÊVIEW

GATE.2 VDIR.5 FRONT VIEW FRONTÊVIEW

CAMP DEST.1 FRONTÊVIEWFRONT


Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

that celebrates the arrival of visitors and welcomes guests and tourists. Gateway signage communicates a message that Downtown Hartford is a dedicated commercial Business District distinguished from the surrounding neighborhoods. The ideal location for these “gateway” signs is the point just before the intersection. Placing the gateway signage before the intersection gives the driver a slight warning to start paying attention for signs that point to parking

To Downtown

To Downtown

Do wn to wn

Note: At certain intersections, additional signage may be required to route “through-traffic” around

To Downtown

Main Street

To

options. To facilitate quick decision-making, there needs to be clearly marked signage pointing in the respective directions of closest parking and several prominent destinations. For recommendations on vehicular wayfinding signage locations, see the Vehicular Wayfinding Map in this section.

Recommendations Vehicular Wayfinding To Industrial Park

To Downtown

To Downtown

Legend Vehicle Wayfinding Sign Location

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To Downtown

To Downtown

Parking Lot


welcome to downtown. Such a condition exists at the interMuseum) depending on the prominence of certain section ofhartford Hwys 83 and 60 (south of Main Street) destinations. In other cases, a general descriptive which accommodates an average daily traffic count term such as “Dining” or “Shopping” can be used inof 21,100 vehicles per day including heavy trucks stead. On all signage, the parking symbol (P) should City of Hartford City of Hartford west-bound for Hartford’s Industrial Park to the be included to direct drivers efficiently and quickly City Hall City Hall northwest. Here, a sign pointing straight ahead (that to the closest public parking lot. Community Center Community Center is, continuing west along STH 60) will help these Town Hall Police Department Town Hall Police Department trucks and to City Hall welcome to find the Industrial Park most efficiently welcome Parking Lot Community Center Parking Lot prevents congestion along the Main Street corridorCommunity Center ord hartford River Police Department Rubicon River (Highway 83) to the North.Rubicon East-bound truck traf- Police Department fic coming from west of Hartford will need similar directional signage at a point much earlier along the west leg of Highway 60 so as to avoid Main Street. GATE.2 CAMPUS.2 CAMPUS.3 CAMPUS.1 GATE.2 GATE.1 CAMPUS.2 CAMPUS.1 AdditionalFRONT research outside FRONTÊVIEW the scope of this projectFRONTÊVIEW FRONT VIEW FRONTÊVIEW VIEW FRONT VIEW FRONTÊVIEW FRONTÊVIEW may involve communication with GPS-unit manufacturers to avoid the problem of trucks navigating by GPS through Main Street north which causes them to make turns at tight intersections.

l

of e

ity er

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

City Hall

CAMPUS.3 FRONTÊVIEW

Tier 3: “Reminder” Signage

Urban Park

A third tier of vehicular wayfinding signage serves asTown a network of “reminder” signage that continuHall Community Campus Center ously orients drivers toArts their final parking option(s) nearest to the destination of their choice. In some welcome to cases, labels with the name of the facility should PUBLIC be Town Hall Community PARKING hartford Arts Center Chamber of (e.g., SchauerCampus Chamber included Arts Center, City Hall, Auto of Commerce

Commerce

City Hall Campus

Recommendations Vehicular Wayfinding

PUBLIC PARKING

Comm. Center

Comm. Center

City Hall Campus

Rubicon River

Chamber of Auto Museum Commerce

City of Hartford PUBLIC PARKING City Hall

PUBLIC PARKING

4

D o w n t o w n

Main Street

C a r y

C a r y

Police Department

Town Hall

Parking Lot

Community Center

Rubicon River

Police Department

S t r e e t s c a p e

S t r e e t s c a p e

hartford

INFORMATION

4

D o w n t o w n

Main Street

Community Center

welcome to

Rubicon River

Chamber of Auto Museum Commerce

City Hall

37 GATE.1 VDIR.4 DEST.1 FRONT VIEW FRONTÊVIEW FRONTÊVIEW

GATE.2 VDIR.5 PARK.1 FRONT VIEW FRONTÊVIEW FRONTÊVIEW

PARK.2 DEST.1 FRONTÊVIEW FRONTÊVIEW

CAMPUS.1 PARK.3 PARK.1 FRONTÊVIEW SIDEÊAÊVIEW FRONTÊVIEW

CAMPUS.2 PDIR.1 PARK.2 FRONTÊVIEW SIDEÊAÊVIEW FRONTÊVIEW

CAMPUS.3 KIOSK.1 PARK.3 FRONTÊVIEW SIDEÊAÊVIEW SIDEÊAÊVIEW

PDIR.1 SIDEÊAÊVIEW

S


Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

P

arking lots are a staple of modern life. They can be unattractive vast seas of asphalt or varied spaces which provide greenery and shade to break up the monotony. Improving a parking lot creates a more pedestrian friendly environment amidst the vehicles. A few tools are necessary to improve parking lots in this fashion. One is to add landscaping, such as trees, shrubs, and flowers. These add visual stimuli and color to the usually bleak space. A second tool is light fixtures. Improved lighting will increase pedestrian safety and comfortability. Pedestrian safety is also increased when pedestrian pathways are included.

These tools break up the large areas of asphalt to create smaller parking lots within the space. They serve to beautify the parking lot in a way that is also functional. The islands and swaths of green space that are added can help manage and clean stormwater on the site as well as decrease the area impervious pavement. Current Conditions Hartford has several large municipal parking lots, located adjacent to the museum and behind the shops on Main Street to the east and to the west. These lots are currently laden with worn down asphalt and faded parking lines. Landscape islands exist along the edges of the parking lots, but consist of uninspiring dirt and grass. In front of the museum, a few small trees add the only greenspace in the parking lot.

Recommendations Parking Lot Improvements

Recommendation The images shown provide an example of what the Wisconsin Automotive Museum, Schauer Arts and Activities Center, and Recreation Center could look like if the parking lot was adjusted with a few improvements. A pedestrian path was added through the lot to give a safe space to walk among the cars and to add lighting at the pedestrian scale with

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations Parking Lot Improvements

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bollards. Benches can be added as an amenity to enhance the experience for people walking through the lot and to create a park-like environment along with trash receptacles to help maintain the overall cleanliness of the district. The improvements increase the attractiveness of the area and create an inviting atmosphere for potential visitors.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

These improvements will remove approximately 21 parking spaces from the lot. This could be an issue on special event days, but on a typical day it would not impact accessibility to the buildings. The pedestrian paths that are part of the improvements will provide a link to the proposed East West Route, and consequently to the large parking lot across the river which can act as overflow parking for the big events which need additional parking.

Recommendations Parking Lot Improvements

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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ne of the major challenges in Hartford today is getting from Main Street to the Schauer Arts and Activities Center on foot. This recommendation proposes a distinct, established route to help pedestrians and bicyclists traverse the space. It seems like a vast distance, but in truth, it is less than 2/10 of a mile, or a three minute walk. The path will encourage a “park once” culture in downtown Hartford. The proposed route is more than a new sidewalk. An attractive, safe path will promote more use. Distinct lanes could be marked for pedestrians and bicyclists. Visitors and customers can use the path to get between the downtown shops and the major destinations on the west side.

the street pattern to cross the Rubicon River, rather thank taking a much shorter route. Recommendation The map on the next page shows the proposed location for the route. The path is wide enough to include separate lanes for bicycles and pedestrians. The route and lanes are well marked and lit at the pedestrian level. Landscaping and benches are placed along the path, so users can stop and rest comfortably if they desire. Signs are included along the path to inform users of the direction and distance to the various desinations around downtown.

Current Conditions

The landscaping and signage matches that used throughout the rest of the district and the parking lot improvements to establish a unified identity.

It feels like downtown and the west end destinations are very far apart due to the large parking lots separating them. The current layout between Downtown and the west end destinations creates a large perceived distance, leading patrons to choos an unnecessary route to their destination. The parking lots are unattractive and do not have any safe space for pedestrians to travel. No signage exists to help visitors find their way from downtown to the Wisconsin Automotive Museum or the Schauer Arts and Activities Center. Pedestrians currently follow

A “park once” culture should be encouraged once the route is built. Imagine a family coming to a show at the Schauer center. Bbefore the show they park in the lot between Johnson Street and the Main Street businesses. They have dinner at the Mineshaft before the show, then walk to the Schauer Arts and Activities center for their event. After, they return downtown for ice cream at Scoop DeVille. In this scenario, the family only parks once, but is able to take advantage of all downtown has to offer by simply walking between destinations.

Recommendations East West Route

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations East West Route

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations East West Route

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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he streetscape is the environment and visual character of a street, including the building facade, signage, street furniture, and landscaping. A well developed streetscape will create an active and inviting street.

ish traffic and parking congestion, contribute to a greener Hartford, and improve the health of local residents.

A pedestrian’s experience along with street helps the individual downtown businesses thrive along with the district as a whole. A welcoming street will encourage visitors to window-shop and spend time downtown for the pleasant experience. Activating the street through streetscaping techinques creates a sense of place and a district identity.

The existing streetscape in downtown Hartford has room for improvement. The primary block of Main Street (from Hwy 60 to the railroad tracks) has main streetscape elements including “The Heart of Hartford” banners and planters on lightpoles along with minimal street furniture like benches and trash bins. The only regular landscaping is in the form of midsize trees at regular intervals. Some of the storefronts have adequate glazing and signage, but others would benefit from more windows and landscaping.

Streetscaping creates and intiving, safe, and defined pedestrian realm. Elements such as crosswalks and lighting fixtures improve safety, identify paths and bike routes, and give pedestrians confidence to freely move about downtown. Adding multimodal infrastructure such as bike paths and bike racks encourages people to navigate throughout and around downtown by means other than a personal car. These additions can diminRight: This image from Main Street in Hartford captures the current conditions. Some elements are seen, such as banners and some street furniture like a bench and a rubbish bin. Other elements could use improvement. Landscaping is minimal and the street does not feel inviting.

Current Conditions

Along Main Street, north of the railroad tracks, fewer streetscape elements are currently present. There are several buildings with blank facades and minimal or no windows, few trees, no seating, small signage, and no awnings. This creates a bleak street environment and uninviting atmosphere. The remaining streets downtown have very few streetscaping elements. Johnson St, Jackson St, Rural St, Wisconsin St, Mill St, and State St would all benefit from streetscape additions. These secondary roads are well traveled and should be as inviting as Main Street.

Recommendations Streetscaping

47


Hwy 60 which runs east-west past downtown, is the major arterial that brings people into the area. As the first picture many people get of downtown Hartford, it does not project a friendly and welcoming image. Blank sidewalks and empty storefronts greet visitors. No landscaping or activated spaces can be found on this street near downtown. A few of the pedestrian crosswalks across Hwy 60 show evidence that they once were painted to increase visibility, however the paint shows wear and no longer stands out vividly.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations

Above: The streetscape along the west and east sides of Main Street at State Street need improvement. The lack of glazing and plain grey walls are uninviting. Below: The sidewalk in front of the Mineshaft would benefit from seating and landscaping.

Recommendations Streetscaping

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The key to improving the streetscaping in downtown Hartford is a unified approach which, in addition to beautifying the area, will give the district a cohesive identity. The banners are the only streetscaping element consistent across the district currently. It could be an opportune time to redesign or replace the “Heart of Hartford� banner, as this is an occasion that exists to match the banners and the recommended wayfinding signage. Seating is another elements which can make a big difference in the pedestrian experience along the streets downtown. In addition to more benches, functional seating could be added. Functional seating provides a place to sit as part of another feature. Wide fences or some public art installations are examples of this. Seating is especially important to the street experience as it encourages people to come and spend time downtown. The inclusion of seating creates a place-to-be out of a place-to-pass-through. When adding landscaping to a downtown it is important to consider the types of plants used. A


variety of greenery may provide color over a long time period when plants bloom at different times. However, using the same few plants throughout the district may be a unifying element. The cost and maintainence of the plants should be considered. Think about including some trees and shrubs which remain green during the winter to brighten the grey and snowy months. Consider permanent landscaping as well as temporary options like moveable planters and hanging baskets.

crosswalks are shared by vehicles and pedestrians. Using special markings or unique paving details will alert cars to be cautious of their surroundings, improving the safety of all parties. It is also an opportunity to does something fun or unique to add color and creativity to the district. Some communities have turned crosswalks into many different paths including piano keys, zippers, railroad ties, and many other designs.

Special paving and street markings which deliniate shared spaces add to the pedestrian realm such as

Below: The streetscape in Valpariso, IN has many of the elements Hartford should include, such as perpendicular signage, attractive sign lighting, and outdoor seating.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations Streetscaping

http://www.nwibq.com/

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Bicycle racks are another piece of street furniture needed in Hartford. Several people commented in the public meeting on the lack of bike racks downtown. Promoting bicycles as a means of getting to downtown will also increase pedestrian activity.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Other streetscaping options include public art. Parks which include sculptures were the highest ranked public spaces on the image preference survey. Pedestrian-scale lighting fixtures improve safety and encourage activity later into the night. http://www.oaklandnet.com

Recommendations Streetscaping

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Right Top: A parklet in Oakland, CA provides seating, landscaping, and bicycle parking in what was once parking space. Right Middle: Crosswalks can be painted in creative ways, like this zipper, to make them stand out. Right Bottom: Jamestown, NY painted their name across the colored crosswalk to add a welcome sign. Below: Stamped pavement is a permanent means of making a crosswalk stand out. This example is from Boston.

http://www.uncustomary.org

http://northstarideas.blogspot.com

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Boston_-_Crosswalk.JPG


Outdoor racks such as flowerstands and newsracks may increase sidewalk activation as well.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Parklets provide a way to add public space in the downtown by taking parking spaces away from cars to use as pedestrian spaces. These can be temporary and taken down during the winter months to allow for plowing of the street. Right: In Holland, MI landscaping, seating, bollard lighting, and public art work together to create an inviting space to spend time. Below: The streetscape in Holland, MI shows an example of functional seating, where a wide barrier fence doubles as seating.

http://www.holland.org

Recommendations Streetscaping

http://www.holland.org

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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Below: Examples of potential rear facade improvements mproving the look and feel of the back of a including screening parking and dumpsters, seating, and downtown store can have a dramatic effect on signage. the downtown as a whole and the businesses which comprise it. Rather than thinking of these areas as simply the back of stores, we will call them the rear facades. When rear facades are not asthetically pleasing they isolate visitors and create a blighted environment. When these facades are improved and design recommendations are implemented, they become attractive areas and inviting second entrances to businesses; increasing foot traffic and sales in the process.

Improvements to rear facades often provide wide ranging benefits to downtowns. Improvements increase the ease with which people circulate around downtown as well as increase access to parking. They help establish store identity and provide customers with a convenient second entrance. The business is increasingly activated because it is now addressing where the majority of the customers are parking. Addressing the rear facades of the buildings in Downtown Hartford is critical in the BID’s aesthetic activation strategy. The majority of parking in downtown is located behind the businesses along Main Street and immediately adjacent to the rear facades. The rear facades are often the first impression visitors get of Downtown Hartford. These visitors park

Recommendations Rear Facade Improvements

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations Rear Facade Improvements

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behind the buildings, then walk around to the shops. Addressing the experience customers have between their car and their shopping destination is a critical component to the revitalization of Downtown Hartford. Improvements to a business’ rear facade has to potential to attract customers who may not drive along Main Street. Current Conditions The rear facades of the businesses of Downtown Hartford have potential for improvement. Many of Above: Current condition of rear facades on the east side of downtown. Below: Current conditions of rear facades on the west side of downtown. Below: An example of an attractive rear facade in Zeeland, MI which showcases improvements such as landscaped screening of utilities, signage, windows, and a patio with seating.

the buildings have rear sides that seem forgotten or overlooked, creating unattractive and uninviting areas. This is a key issue as most of the available parking downtown is adjacent to the rear of the buildings, making the rear facades a very high visibility.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

The rear facades to the east and west of Main Street create a blank wall feel. The businesses are not clearly marked making it difficult for potential customers to identify which businesses occupy which buildings. The rear facades do little to enhance the character of the downtown and do not create a sense of place. They do not invite pedestrians into the shops and not a place people feel comfortable spending time. In addition, the wall of concrete and brick makes it difficult for people to move from one side of downtown to the other, creating a pedestrian barrier.

Recommendations Rear Facade Improvements

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations Rear Facade Improvements

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Recommendations The rear entrance of the building should be treated as a second front. This means using similar design standards and materials on the back as used in the front of the building. The addition of windows invites and provides an oportunity for pedestrians to view the activities taking place inside of the building. The utilities in the rear of buildings should be screened from view. This can be done with fencing or landscaping such as potted plants or bushes. These techniques will break up the rear facades of Left: An example of a rear facade from Zeeland, MI which showcases attractive signage awnings, large windows, and a landscaped seating area. Below: Examples of rear facades in Zeeland, MI which showcase improvements such as small landscaping elements, signage on windows, awnings, and large signs, and many windows.

buildings creating a sense of place and making an inviting space for pedestrians and customers.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Businesses should be encouraged to place signs and awnings on their buildings which will alert customers to the activities taking place with in the business as well as orient them with the rest of downtown. Awnings also provide and opportunity to take advantage of excess space in the rear of the building. They create an inviting atmosphere and could be used as an extension of business activities such as a seating area for a cafe. Many communities have utilized a Rear Facade Grant Program to help improvements to these often overlooked areas. Such programs are often found in Business Improvement Districts and provide matching funds to businesses which improve their rear facade according to BID design guidelines.

Recommendations Rear Facade Improvements

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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he North Bookend site is located at the corner of Main Street and W State Street at the northern edge of downtown Hartford. This site is currently home to several stores including a nail salon and a Mexican grocery store. Two different development proposals were developed for this site. Version One is a smaller mixeduse building and a few townhomes. Version Two shows a larger mixed-use building and a second apartment building. The different versions provide development options at two different densities. The North Bookend Version One development consists of one mixed-use building at the corner of Main Street and State Street along with four townhomes along State Street. The massing of this building matches the building across Main Street. It holds a strong street corner. The mixed-use building at the corner of Main and State has 6,900 square feet of commercial space on the first floor and 12 apartment units on the second and third floors. Parking for residents of in the development is located beneath the building and can be accessed through a garage entrance at the rear of

Right: An overview of the North Bookend Version 1 development. One mixed-use building, four townhomes, and public parking along Main Street are included.

the building via the surface parking lot. A public parking lot is located behind the mixeduse building and is accessible from Main Street, as seen in the image on the left. The parking lot along Main Street maintains a firm street edge by utilizing decorative fencing and landscaping to separate and screen parking from the street. Landscaped islands within the parking lot break up the large space to add visual appeal, shade, and stormwater management. The four townhomes along State Street are located to the west of the larger building and help the development blend into the larger, more dense Main Street into the residential neighborhood located further to the north and west. The townhomes each have a screened back yard and a single car garage located at the rear of the building. The images on the next two pages show the current conditions of the North Bookend site. An aerial image and three street level images provide context for what the new development proposals will replace.

Recommendations North Bookend

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations North Bookend

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations North Bookend

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations North Bookend

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

The North Bookend Version One shows what a medium density development could look like on the site. Ample public parking is provided for customers of the commercial space behind the building. The mixed-use building sits immediately along the sidewalk with no setback, staying consistent with the character along Main Street. Each of the units in the mixed-use building have a private balcony. The south-facing units have wide views which range from the Mill Pond to the Recrecation Center.

Recommendations North Bookend

The townhomes are set back three feet from the sidewalk and are elevated three feet to differentiate them as private space.

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations North Bookend

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This is a view of the North Bookend Version One from State Street just west of Main Street. Here you can see the current context as well as what the street edge will look like with the new development built. This angle shows how the scale of the building decreases as you move away from Main Street along State Street. Commercial storefronts line the street in the mixed-use building then transition to townhome frontdoors.


Looking south on Main Street from State Street, the buildings are currently unbalanced, with a threestory buiding opposite a one-story building. The proposed development will balance the street with a similar sized building. The first floor commercial space will increase activity along both streets.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations North Bookend

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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A public parking lot is located behind the buildings and is accessible from State Street, as seen in the image on the left. The parking lot is at the same elevation as State Street and the first floors of the buildings. A retaining wall can be seen from the railroad tracks, because of the elevation change. The wall A public plaza is located at the corner of Main Street is screened by landscaping elements like trees and shrubs. Landscaped islands within the parking lot and State Street. This space includes landscaping and shaded space, seating, and bicycle parking. This break up the large space to add visual appeal, shade, and stormwater management. space would be ideal for a small outdoor performance. he North Bookend Version Two development consists of one mixed-use building along Main Street and an apartment building along State Street. The massing of this development is consistne with the building across Main Street.

The mixed-use building on Main Street has 7,621 square feet of commercial space on the first floor and 14 apartment units on the second and third floors. Parking for residents in the mixed-use building apartments is located beneath the building and can be accessed through a garage entrance along Main Street. The building along State Street is a 19 unit apartment building. Street parking is available for visitors and customers of the commercial space next door. Parking for the residents of this building is located beneath the building and can be accessed from a garage along North Johnson Street. Right: An overview of the North Bookend Version 2 development. One mixed-use building, an apartment building, and outdoor public cafe space are included.

Recommendations North Bookend

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

North Bookend Version Two showcases a potential higher density development.

Recommendations North Bookend

All of the residential units in the mixed-use building have private balconies, as do most of the units in the adjacent building. A public plaza holds the corner of Main and State Streets. This space provides a pedestrian friendly gathering space with trees providing shaded seating areas along with bike racks. This development helps to make downtown more walkable by connecting the commerical space extends futher south along Main Street. It also holds a strong edge along Main Street.

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations North Bookend

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations North Bookend

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Most of the parking in this development is completely hidden from the street to create a more pedestrian friendly environment, although a few spaces are included along State Street. Public parking is located behind the buildings as it currently is now, but elevated and with some landscaped islands. Private parking for the residents is located under the buildings off Main Street or Johnson Street.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

A semi-public seating area is provided at the southern of the mixed-use buliding. This space could be used by residents, as cafe seating for a restaurant located in the building, or as event space.

Recommendations North Bookend

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations North Bookend

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This is a view of the North Bookend Version Two from Wisconsin Street just east of Main Street. Here you can see the current context as well as the same view with the development built-out. Due to the change in elevation along Main Street, two options are present for pedestrians: continue to walk up the sidewalk as usual, or take the new stairwell up to the retail shops which line Main Street. Outdoor seating for a potential restaurant is visible from this view, located above the underground parking entrance.


When standing at the intersection of Main Street and State Street [looking southwest], a nail salon and Mexican grocery store are currently visible. The North Bookend Version Two proposal will replace that building with a mixed-use development along Main Street. The blank facades are replaced with large windows and public space at the corner. The new development is at a similar scale to the building opposite along Main Street and will provide excellent views of downtown from the southern side of the building.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations North Bookend

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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he Mole Hole is a site in the middle of downtown which is susceptible to change and has potential for catalytic redevelopment. The Mole Hole building, named after a former tenant, is located at the corner of Main Street and E Jackson Street. This site is also located across from City Hall and adjacent to the Rubicon River. The proposal is for a mixed-use building which will consist of 3,570 square feet of commercial space on the first floor and four apartment units on the second floor. Off street parking is provided behind the building; one space for each apartment unit. No parking is provided on-site for customers of the commercial space. However, a large municipal public parking lot is located across Jackson Street and is a short walk from the large parking lot behind the Hartford City Hall. By utilizing the shared parking these municipal lot provides, parking is maximized without sacrificing cost. The Mole Hole Site is located at a prominent location. It is situated along the proposed East West Pedestrian Route, near City Hall, and within site of the new Library. Activating this block of Main Street will enhance the pedestrian experience in the district by creating a series of continuous storefronts for shoppers.

Recommendations Mole Hole Site

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Recommendations Mole Hole Site

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The Mole Hole building is currently vacant and in disrepair. The building holds the corner and street edge well, but has limited glazing along Jackson Street. The proposed development will activate the Jackson Street with the inclusion of large storefront windows and an entrance for a commercial tenant.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

The view below is from Main Street looking south. The existing facade is very intricate, well articulated, and consistent with the historic downtown character. However, the building is in such poor condition that it cannot be feasibly restored. This proposal places a more contemporary building in its place to give a conceptual idea of what development would look like on the site.

Recommendations Mole Hole Site

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Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

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he South Bookend site is at the corner of Hwy 60 and Main Street. There are currently five buildings and two large parking lots on the site. The former post office along Hwy 60, the tropical pet store at the corner of Hwy 60 and Hwy 83, the Pour House, and a building which includes Domino’s Pizza and St. Vincent DePaul as tenants. All of these properties would be razed to make way for new development in this conceptual proposal. A large mixed-use building is proposed for the corner of Hwys 60 and 83. This building will be three stories tall, with 11,800 square feet of commercial space on the first floor and 22 apartments on the second and third floors. Public parking is included behind the building to the south. Public parking is included behind the building to the south and tenant parking is located underneath the building in a garage that is accessed from a rear street. Additionally, an outdoor plaza space is located to the east of the building along Highway 60, which has been shown to be utilized as cafe seating for a restaurant, proposed as semi-public space. A second building, located along Branch Street, is two stories tall and includes nine apartments. Resident parking is located underneath the building in a garage that is accessed from the adjacent public parking lot.

This building is of a smaller size to ease the transition to a residential scale to the south and east. The residential building sits along Branch Street creating a more solid street edge than the parking lot which is currently located on this site. A large parking lot is located between the two buildings to provide public parking as required in the Municipal Zoning Code. The parking lot is broken up by landscaping and a pedestrian path which breaks up the pavement and creates a safer environment for pedestrians. Additionally, the parking is screened from the street by trees, shrubs, and ornamental fencing, to provide a pleasant experience for pedestrians along Main Street. Running through the site is a one way street connecting Main Street and South Street. This is proposed as a connection to the adjacent neighborhood and runs parallel to Hwy 60. A one way street has been added just south of the larger building to provide a connection between Main Street and South Street, as suggested by the Mayor.

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One of the main goals of this recommendation was to improve the initial impression visitors and people driving through Hartford will get from the building on the southwest corner of Hwy 60 and Hwy 83. The current condition of that building, with the tropical pet store at street level and vacant floors above, does not provide a strong first impression. New commercial space on this highly visible corner will activate the street and will enhance vistas from Main Street and Highway 60.

The residential building, to the south along Branch Street, is at a smaller scale and incorporates typical residential facade. The entrance of the building is located off of Branch Street, limiting the setback and providing building form that transitions well into the urban context of the downtown. While parking access to this building is located through the parking lot off Main Street, the pedestrian entrance is located along Branch Street.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

The building facade was designed to mimic a series of different buildings to add visual diversity to the space. Streetscaping elements, such as trees, railings, and seating, will activate the street and will provide a welcoming environment.

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he Initiatives and Action Steps suggested below are intended to be a guide in helping to implement the recommendations in this plan. They represent a series of activities which will inform, accomplish, or supplement the recommendations. They are not a comprehensive list of all the actions which could be taken to revitalize downtown Hartford.

Pedestrian Wayfinding • Work with a local graphic artist to design signs with a unique Hartford identity. • Use both “You Are Here” kiosks and directional signs to help orient pedestrians. • Have local businesses sponsor the kiosks to offset costs. • Give sponsoring businesses advertising space on the sign for a more prominant label or logo. • Host special events like downtown scavenger hunts to encourage people to visit all the destinations downtown to become comfortable walking between them. • Create a new printed downtown map with a design consistent with the new signage that pedestrians can take with them. Vehicular Wayfinding • Make gateways and corridors a positive statement about the district. • Improve gateways through redevelopment strategies, architectural solutions, and urban design techniques, such as signs, banners, landscape elements, and special paving materials, etc. • Consider special “truck route” signage to help heavy truck traffic avoid driving along Main Street. • Work with a local graphic artist to design signs with a unique Hartford identity.

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• Consider installing public education placks which tell the history of Hartford or of famous people in Hartford past. Parking Lot Improvements • Host elements of downtown events along the • Make the parking lots safer by adding pedestrian path, such as booths and stalls during events like sidewalks and improved lighting features. Classic Car Day and holiday parades. • “Green” the parking lots by adding landscaped • Consider using fruit trees and berry bushes to buffers, shrubs, and trees. green the route to create an edible landscape. • Work with the City to increase the landscaping • connections to other area trails. Make requirements in new parking lots and lot renovations and resurfacing. • Add paths through large parking lots to facilitate Streetscape Enhancements pedestrian movement between destinations. • Add buffers and landscaping to screen unsightly • Encourage property owners to improve identity features, create a street-friendly appearance, and uses and utilites from view. add amenities. • Improve stormwater management practices by • Create streetscape guidelines for the BID, proupgrading parking lots to include rain gardens, viding ideas and options approved by the BID bioswales, pervious pavement, etc. for a unified streetscape image and experience. • Sponsor farmer’s markets and seasonal markets • Work with the Garden Club on landscaping in the large parking lots. projects. • Use landscaping features to divide parking lots • Activate the streets by adding seating, outdoor into smaller areas. cafe spaces, playscapes, and landscaped patios. • Improve pavement markings. • Promote public art as an activating use of • Add decorative fencing and landscaping to the streetscaping space. edges of parking lots to hold the street edge. • Make the district more friendly for bicyclists and pedestrians. • Encourage differentiated paving materials and East-West Route distinct markings for pedestrian crossings that • Use special paving and route markers to distinadd visibility and whimsy to the area. guish this path from regular sidewalks. • Work with local businesses on their building • Place wayfinding stations along the route for signage to keep it current and in good condition. ease of navigating through downtown. • Encourage awnings and perpendicular signs • Encourage public art along the route. which increase visibility and visual appeal. • Install benches and creative functional seating • Add bicycle racks near key destinations such as elements along the link to encourage pedestrians the Library, the Schauer Center, and along Main to stop and linger. Street to encourage residents to use alternative • Add bollard lighting to make the route safe and means of transportation and increase pedestrian comfortable for pedestrians at night.


• • • • •

activity. Fill vacant storefronts with advertising or other appropriate display material. Work with the City allow for parklets to transform some on-street parking spaces on Main Street into active, pedestrian zones. Encourage activation of street frontages, such as outdoor cafes and sidewalk sales. Use trees and bushes which allow for a year round green landscape. Work with the City to reduce or elimiate the existing “five foot rule” which effectively prohibits outdoor cafe seating in the district.

Rear Facade Improvements • Add buffers and screening to hide unsightly areas and utilities. • Activate the back of storefronts though seating areas, cafe space, and landscaped patios. • Encourage businesses to utilize a rear entrance to their store, which will activate both sides of the building. • Work with the City to get buy-in for rear facade improvements and increased signage to the rear of buildings. • Create a rear facade grant program to enourage businesses to invest in their rear entrances and help them finance the improvements. • Sponsor awards for Most Improved Rear Facade, Best Rear Window Design, and Exceptional Rear Landscaping. New Developments • Design buildings to maximize property values and land use potential.

• Form a BID Development Committee to organize improvements. • Work with the City to reduce barriers to new developments and mixed-use development proposals. • Encourage a mix of new housing options in all downtown developments. • Use Tax Incremental Financing to help fund new developments. • Work with the City to establish Planned Unit Development zoning areas to faciliate new development and ease of permitting. • Put together a document of funding resources available to assist developers interested in building in downtown Hartford. • Establish design guidelines for all new construction that maintains the historic small town character of the district. • Renovate or demolish buildings which detract from the corridor to make room for new developments. • Encourage shared and “park once” strategies to minimize the need for customer parking. • Encourage the City to develop a downtown Master Plan to guide development in the downtown district in the future.

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he following documents and images were used in the public meeting to gather input from key downtown stakeholders.

The sign-in sheet shows who attended the meeting. The hand out for the Visioning Downtown Hartford activity was used to generate the word clouds of what Hartford is like today and what the attendees would like it to be in five years. The highlights of the results of the Image Preference Survey are included. This includes the highest and lowest ranking image in each of the six categories. The list of the questions which were used to guide the small group map discussions is provided. A summary of the discussion points follows.

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Questions to guide discussion during the small group map activity

Key pieces of input which came out of the small group and large follow-up discussions.

1. Key Nodes of Activity • Where are the active spots within the Hartford BID? • Where are the inactive spots? • What spots have potential but are underutilized? • Does it change throughout the seasons? If so, where and when? • How are the parks used and are they used differently?

• Paths and signage to direct people from the arts complex to downtown, and vice versa, are needed.

2. Gaps and Wayfinding • Describe how you would get to • i. Schauer Arts and Activities Center • ii. Mill Pond/Library • iii. Downtown Main Street • Where do you park and why do you park there? • How can you better utilize the connection between the West side and the East side? • How would you describe to someone unfamiliar with Hartford…

• A need exists for housing downtown, higher quality multi-family housing, and increased population density to support downtown businesses.

3. Retail and Mixed-use Ideas • What developments have been successful? • Identify properties that are susceptible to change. • What is missing? • What types of uses do you want to see downtown? • Do you prefer mixed-use retail/office/residential?

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• Unified lighting fixtures to will tie the district together should be included. • Signage is needed along HWY60 to alert people to the presence of downtown and the amenities located in Hartford.

• The plan should work toward creating a destination where people and families will spend time at shops, outdoor places, and eating establishments rather than just driving in, patronizing one store, then leaving.

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Below Top: Word cloud showing what words describe how stakeholders view downtown today. Below Bottom: Descriptive words explain how stakeholders want downtown to be in the future. Both generated from results of the survey at the public meeting.

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Residential Images Most Preferred

Least Preferred


Commercial Images Most Preferred

Least Preferred

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Parking Images Most Preferred

Least Preferred


Public Space Images Most Preferred

Least Preferred

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Signage Images Most Preferred

Least Preferred


Streets Images Most Preferred

Least Preferred

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Trade Area Gap Analysis - Number and Square Feet of Businesses Report: Hartford, Wisconsin

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NAICS Name 44111000 New car dealers 44112000 Used car dealers 44121000 Recreational vehicle dealers 44122000 Motorcycle, boat, & other motor vehicles 44130000 Automotive parts, accessories, & tire stores 44210000 Furniture stores 44220000 Home furnishings stores 44311000 Appliance, television, & other electronics stores 44312000 Computer & software stores 44313000 Camera & photographic supplies stores 44411000 Home centers 44412000 Paint & wallpaper stores 44413000 Hardware stores 44419000 Specialized building material dealers 44420000 Lawn & garden equipment & supplies stores 44510000 Grocery stores 44520000 Specialty food stores 44530000 Beer, wine, & liquor stores 44611000 Pharmacies & drug stores 44612000 Cosmetics, beauty supplies, perfume stores 44613000 Optical goods stores 44619000 Other health care (vitamin, medical equip) 44710000 Gasoline stations 44811000 Men's clothing stores 44812000 Women's clothing stores 44813000 Children's & infants' clothing stores 44814000 Family clothing stores 44815000 Clothing accessories stores 44819000 Specialized clothing stores (dress, etc) 44821000 Shoe stores 44831000 Jewelry stores 44832000 Luggage & leather goods stores 45111000 Sporting goods stores 45112000 Hobby, toy, & game stores 45113000 Sewing, needlework, & piece goods stores 45114000 Musical instrument & supplies stores 45121000 Book Stores 45122000 Tape, compact disc, & record stores 45200000 General merchandise stores 45310000 Florists 45321000 Office supplies & stationery stores 45322000 Gift, novelty, & souvenir stores 45330000 Used merchandise stores 45391000 Pet & pet supplies stores 45392000 Art dealers 51213000 Motion picture & video exhibition 53210000 Automotive equipment rental & leasing 53222000 Formal wear & costume rental 53223000 Video tape & disc rental 53230000 General rental centers 54192000 Photographic services 71310000 Amusement parks & arcades 71390000 Other amusement (bowling, golf, fitness) 72210000 Full-service restaurants 72220000 Limited-service eating places 72240000 Drinking places (alcoholic beverages) 81111000 Automotive mechanical & electrical repair 81112000 Automotive body, paint, interior, & glass 81119000 Other automotive repair & maintenance 81141000 Home/garden equipment & appliance repair 81142000 Reupholstery & furniture repair 81143000 Footwear & leather goods repair 81149000 Personal goods repair (watch, boat, garment) 81211100 Barber shops 81211200 Beauty salons 81211300 Nail salons 81219000 Other personal care services (tatoos, spas, piercing) 81231000 Coin-operated laundries & drycleaners 81232000 Drycleaning & laundry (except coin-operated) 81291000 Pet care (except veterinary) services 81292000 Photofinishing

U.S. Sales Per Capita $ 2,280 $ 268 $ 65 $ 162 $ 249 $ 197 $ 172 $ 286 $ 68 $ 13 $ 447 $ 34 $ 68 $ 393 $ 123 $ 1,631 $ 62 $ 127 $ 671 $ 39 $ 27 $ 50 $ 1,499 $ 29 $ 134 $ 32 $ 281 $ 21 $ 40 $ 89 $ 103 $ 6 $ 119 $ 55 $ 15 $ 20 $ 61 $ 12 $ 1,919 $ 24 $ 77 $ 60 $ 37 $ 39 $ 32 $ 42 $ 153 $ 3 $ 31 $ 15 $ 32 $ 46 $ 214 $ 651 $ 618 $ 66 $ 169 $ 113 $ 52 $ 14 $ 6 $ 1 $ 30 $ 9 $ 102 $ 19 $ 27 $ 14 $ 30 $ 12 $ 8

Average Sales per U.S. Store $ 27,632,089 $ 633,563 $ 2,426,928 $ 1,039,132 $ 789,354 $ 1,271,871 $ 775,414 $ 1,437,590 $ 1,008,571 $ 1,034,341 $ 14,117,083 $ 1,024,804 $ 948,935 $ 2,014,250 $ 1,165,506 $ 3,570,309 $ 258,156 $ 877,029 $ 4,218,922 $ 116,573 $ 518,023 $ 218,306 $ 3,506,684 $ 696,349 $ 754,680 $ 675,687 $ 1,984,619 $ 231,336 $ 308,106 $ 803,282 $ 434,934 $ 544,354 $ 803,722 $ 650,609 $ 200,733 $ 552,036 $ 512,938 $ 434,504 $ 7,301,449 $ 160,175 $ 1,454,735 $ 199,283 $ 143,185 $ 674,074 $ 383,996 $ 2,475,216 $ 1,373,285 $ 373,468 $ 469,109 $ 529,977 $ 73,585 $ 1,612,717 $ 325,347 $ 753,543 $ 585,250 $ 272,183 $ 208,632 $ 272,517 $ 153,086 $ 80,522 $ 66,174 $ 61,281 $ 38,909 $ 25,983 $ 50,439 $ 34,935 $ 51,973 $ 169,403 $ 203,248 $ 52,185 $ 149,850

No. of No. of Potential Sales in Businesses Businesses Trade Area (Demand) (Supply)* $ 30,791,994 1.1 1 $ 3,615,717 5.7 3 $ 871,822 0.4 $ 2,183,464 2.1 1 $ 3,362,622 4.3 3 $ 2,658,382 2.1 1 $ 2,326,628 3.0 2 $ 3,864,712 2.7 4 $ 919,926 0.9 1 $ 178,627 0.2 $ 6,042,150 0.4 $ 455,321 0.4 1 $ 920,511 1.0 1 $ 5,306,736 2.6 7 $ 1,662,051 1.4 4 $ 22,022,160 6.2 2 $ 837,811 3.2 $ 1,715,380 2.0 4 $ 9,057,831 2.1 2 $ 527,232 4.5 $ 369,417 0.7 3 $ 675,505 3.1 1 $ 20,236,709 5.8 6 $ 393,166 0.6 1 $ 1,806,079 2.4 $ 430,058 0.6 $ 3,788,412 1.9 1 $ 286,099 1.2 $ 539,759 1.8 4 $ 1,201,256 1.5 $ 1,389,459 3.2 1 $ 87,452 0.2 $ 1,609,317 2.0 5 $ 736,284 1.1 2 $ 196,483 1.0 1 $ 266,922 0.5 1 $ 827,376 1.6 $ 168,012 0.4 $ 25,912,432 3.5 2 $ 325,822 2.0 2 $ 1,040,996 0.7 $ 811,765 4.1 1 $ 498,207 3.5 3 $ 532,342 0.8 $ 432,861 1.1 $ 568,877 0.2 1 $ 2,061,406 1.5 4 $ 45,149 0.1 $ 422,984 0.9 2 $ 205,831 0.4 $ 428,323 5.8 4 $ 621,215 0.4 $ 2,887,298 8.9 7 $ 8,787,691 11.7 19 $ 8,346,231 14.3 4 $ 894,803 3.3 9 $ 2,282,484 10.9 11 $ 1,522,480 5.6 2 $ 695,865 4.5 2 $ 187,238 2.3 $ 85,129 1.3 $ 13,862 0.2 $ 403,714 10.4 1 $ 115,642 4.5 1 $ 1,372,841 27.2 12 $ 251,337 7.2 2 $ 363,054 7.0 3 $ 190,285 1.1 1 $ 408,298 2.0 2 $ 163,471 3.1 2 $ 105,158 0.7 -

Assumptions: Trade Area Population Trade Area Per Capita Income U.S. Per Capital income

14104 $ 26,157 $ 27,319

indicates insufficient data indicates gap

Bus. Gap Sq. Ft. of Sq. Ft. of Sq. Ft. Gap (Demand - Businesses Businesses (Demand Supply) Demand) (Supply)* Supply) 0.1 2.7 0.4 1.1 1.3 19,448 18,750 698 1.1 4,974 25,000 (20,026) 1.0 8,506 7,750 756 -1.3 10,527 20,250 (9,723) -0.1 449 6,250 (5,801) 0.2 309 309 0.4 15,547 15,547 -0.6 0.0 6,373 6,250 123 -4.4 -2.6 4.2 45,957 7,750 38,207 3.2 3,920 3,920 -2.0 4,329 6,000 (1,671) 0.1 22,646 50,000 (27,354) 4.5 1,444 1,444 -2.3 1,039 14,000 (12,961) 2.1 -0.2 15,316 9,000 6,316 -0.4 1,509 6,250 (4,741) 2.4 7,077 7,077 0.6 1,363 1,363 0.9 11,170 6,250 4,920 1.2 815 815 -2.2 1,606 25,000 (23,394) 1.5 4,838 4,838 2.2 2,239 1,500 739 0.2 296 296 -3.0 5,865 21,750 (15,885) -0.9 3,199 12,500 (9,301) 0.0 1,409 6,250 (4,841) -0.5 1.6 3,587 3,587 0.4 575 575 1.5 185,234 265,768 (80,534) 0.0 1,328 3,000 (1,672) 0.7 5,145 5,145 3.1 4,443 1,500 2,943 0.5 0.8 2,265 2,265 1.1 892 892 -0.8 6,856 25,000 (18,144) -2.5 0.1 150 150 -1.1 2,554 12,500 (9,946) 0.4 405 405 1.8 1,348 6,000 (4,652) 0.4 7,822 7,822 1.9 -7.3 21,843 104,500 (82,657) 10.3 24,536 25,000 (464) -5.7 -0.1 3.6 2.5 2.3 1.3 0.2 53 53 9.4 3.5 643 1,500 (857) 15.2 5,799 30,750 (24,951) 5.2 1,433 3,000 (1,567) 4.0 1,178 9,250 (8,072) 0.1 2,523 1,500 1,023 0.0 2,760 12,500 (9,740) 1.1 0.7


42 153 3 31 15 32 46 214 651 618 66 169 113 52 14 6 1 30 9 102 19 27 14 30 12 8

14104 26,157 27,319

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,475,216 1,373,285 373,468 469,109 529,977 73,585 1,612,717 325,347 753,543 585,250 272,183 208,632 272,517 153,086 80,522 66,174 61,281 38,909 25,983 50,439 34,935 51,973 169,403 203,248 52,185 149,850

$ 71310000 568,877 0.2& arcades 1 -0.8 6,856 (18,144) Amusement parks $ 46 25,000 $ 1,612,717 $ 621,215 0.4 0.4 Area Gap Analysis $ 71390000 2,061,406 1.5(bowling, golf, 4 fitness) -2.5 Other amusement $ 214 $ 325,347 $Trade2,887,298 8.9 - Number 7 and Square 1.9 $ 72210000 45,149 0.1 0.1 150 150 Full-service restaurants $ 651 $ 753,543 $ 8,787,691 11.7 19 -7.3 $ 72220000 422,984 -1.1 2,554 (9,946) Limited-service 0.9 eating places 2 $ 618 12,500 $ 585,250 $ 8,346,231 14.3 4 10.3 Assumptions $ 72240000 205,831 0.4 405 Drinking places 0.4 (alcoholic beverages) $ 66 $ 272,183 405 $ 894,803 3.3 9 -5.7 $ 81111000 428,323 5.8 4 repair 1.8 1,348 (4,652) Automotive mechanical & electrical $ 169 6,000 $ 208,632 $ 2,282,484 10.9 11 -0.1 $ 81112000 621,215 0.4 0.4 7,822 7,822 Automotive body, paint, interior, & glass $ 113 $ 272,517 $ 1,522,480 5.6 2 3.6 $ 81119000 2,887,298 8.9repair & maintenance 7 1.9 Other automotive $ 52 $ 153,086 $ 695,865 4.5 2 2.5 Name$ 81141000 8,787,691 11.7 19 21,843 (82,657) Home/garden equipment & appliance repair -7.3 $ 14104,500 $ 80,522 $ NAICS187,238 2.3 2.3 New car dealers1.3 $ 81142000 8,346,231 10.3 24,536 Reupholstery &14.3 furniture repair 4 $ 6 25,000 $ 66,174 (464) $ 44111000 85,129 1.3 Used car dealers $ 81143000 894,803 3.3 goods repair9 -5.7 Footwear & leather $ 1 $ 61,281 $ 44112000 13,862 0.2 0.2 Recreational vehicle $ 81149000 2,282,484 10.9 -0.1 Personal goods repair (watch,11 boat, garment) $ 30 $ 38,909 $ 44121000 403,714 10.4 dealers 1 9.4 Motorcycle, boat, $ 81211100 1,522,480 2 3.6 Barber shops 5.6 $ 9 $ 25,983 $ 44122000 115,642 4.5& other motor 1 vehicles 3.5 $ 81211200 695,865 2 2.5 Automotive parts, Beauty salons 4.5 $ 102 $ 50,439 $ 44130000 1,372,841 27.2accessories, 12 & tire stores 15.2 $ 81211300 187,238 2.3 2.3 Furniture stores7.2 Nail salons $ 19 $ 34,935 $ 44210000 251,337 2 5.2 $ 81219000 85,129 1.3 services -(tatoos, spas, piercing) 1.3 Other personal care $ 27 $ 51,973 $ 44220000 363,054 7.0stores 3 4.0 Home furnishings $ 81231000 13,862 0.2 0.2 5344311000 Coin-operated laundries & drycleaners $53 14 $ 169,403 $ 190,285 1.1 1 0.1 Appliance, television, & other electronics stores $ 81232000 403,714 1 9.4 Drycleaning & 10.4 laundry (except coin-operated) $ 30 $ 203,248 $ 44312000 408,298 2.0 0.0 Computer & software stores 2 $ 81291000 115,642 4.5 1 3.5 643 1,500 (857) Pet care (except veterinary) services $ 12 $ 52,185 $ 44313000 163,471 3.1 2 stores 1.1 Camera & photographic supplies $ 81292000 1,372,841 12 15.2 5,799 (24,951) Photofinishing 27.2 $ 8 30,750 $ 149,850 $ 44411000 105,158 0.7 0.7 Home centers $ 251,337 7.2 2 5.2 1,433 3,000 (1,567) 44412000 Paint & wallpaper stores $ 363,054 7.0 3 4.0 1,178 9,250 (8,072) Assumptions: 44413000 Hardware stores $ 190,285 1.1 1 0.1 2,523 14104 1,500 1,023 Trade Area Population indicates insufficient data dealers 44419000 Specialized building material $ 408,298 0.0 2,760 (9,740) Trade Area Per 2.0 Capita Income 2 $ 26,157 12,500 44420000 Lawn indicates & gardengap equipment & supplies stores $ 163,471 2 1.1 U.S. Per Capital3.1 income $ 27,319 44510000 Grocery stores 0.7number and *$Based on 105,158 local data collection0.7 reflecting best- estimates of the 44520000 Specialty food stores size of buisnesses in trade area.

The table on the left details the Trade Area Gap Analysis for Hartford, Wisconsin, which shows businesses specifically related to retail trade. The assumptions below were used in the calculations in the table. The business categories highlighted in yellow have a gap in the Hartford trade area.

indicates insufficient data indicates gap

The map below shows the boundary of the study area. The trade area was defined using a three mile radius from the corner of Hwy 60 and Hwy 83 in downtown Hartford.

The table to the right shows the the number of businesses and total square footage of existing businesses in the Hartford trade area in each of the listed business categories.

44530000 44611000 44612000 44613000 44619000 44710000 44811000 44812000 44813000 44814000 44815000 44819000 44821000 44831000 44832000 45111000 45112000 45113000 45114000 45121000 45122000 45200000 45310000 45321000 45322000 45330000 45391000 45392000 51213000 53210000 53222000 53223000 53230000 54192000 71310000 71390000 72210000 72220000 72240000 81111000 81112000 81119000 81141000 81142000 81143000 81149000 81211100 81211200 81211300 81219000 81231000 81232000 81291000 81292000

7,822

-

Feet of Businesses

Beer, wine, & liquor stores Pharmacies & drug stores Cosmetics, beauty supplies, perfume stores Optical goods stores Other health care (vitamin, medical equip) Gasoline stations Men's clothing stores Women's clothing stores Children's & infants' clothing stores Family clothing stores Clothing accessories stores Specialized clothing stores (dress, etc) Shoe stores Jewelry stores Luggage & leather goods stores Sporting goods stores Hobby, toy, & game stores Sewing, needlework, & piece goods stores Musical instrument & supplies stores Book Stores Tape, compact disc, & record stores General merchandise stores Florists Office supplies & stationery stores Gift, novelty, & souvenir stores Used merchandise stores Pet & pet supplies stores Art dealers Motion picture & video exhibition Automotive equipment rental & leasing Formal wear & costume rental Video tape & disc rental General rental centers Photographic services Amusement parks & arcades Other amusement (bowling, golf, fitness) Full-service restaurants Limited-service eating places Drinking places (alcoholic beverages) Automotive mechanical & electrical repair Automotive body, paint, interior, & glass Other automotive repair & maintenance Home/garden equipment & appliance repair Reupholstery & furniture repair Footwear & leather goods repair Personal goods repair (watch, boat, garment) Barber shops Beauty salons Nail salons Other personal care services (tatoos, spas, piercing Coin-operated laundries & drycleaners Drycleaning & laundry (except coin-operated) Pet care (except veterinary) services Photofinishing

21,843 24,536

104,500 25,000

No. of Businesses (Supply)* 53 643 5,799 1,433 1,178 2,523 2,760

1 30 1 1,500 3 30,750 1 3,000 9,250 2 1,500 4 12,500 1 0 0 1 1 7 4 2 0 4 2 0 3 1 6 1 0 0 1 0 4 0 1 0 5 2 1 1 0 0 2 2 0 1 3 0 0 1 4 0 2 0 4 0 7 19 4 9 11 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 12 2 3 1 2 2 0

7,822 (82,657) (464)

Sq. Ft. of Businesses (Supply)*

Downtown Hartford Current Year Revitalization Plan Hartford, Wisconsin 14,104

53 (857) 18,750 (24,951) 25,000 (1,567) (8,072) 7,750 1,023 20,250 (9,740) 6,250

Trade Area Name Trade Area Population Trade Area Per Capita Income U.S. Per Capital income

$ $

0 0 6,250

7,750 0 6,000 50,000 0 14,000 9,000 6,250 0 0 6,250 0 25,000 0 1,500 0 21,750 12,500 6,250 0 0 265,768 3,000 0 1,500 0 0 25,000 0 12,500 0 6,000 0 104,500 25,000

Appendix Retail Needs and Opportunities 0 1,500 30,750 3,000 9,250 1,500 12,500

101

26,157 27,319


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NAICS 113 114 115 212 213 221 236 237 238 311 312 313 314 315 316 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 339 423 424 425 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 451 452 453 454 481 483 484 485 486 487 488 492 493 511 512 515 517 518 519 522 523 524 531 532 533 541 561 562 611 621 623 624 711 712 713 721 722 811 812 813

Name Forestry and logging Fishing, hunting and trapping Support activities for agriculture and forestry Mining (except oil and gas) Support activities for mining Utilities Construction of buildings Heavy and civil engineering construction Specialty trade contractors Food manufacturing Beverage and tobacco product manufacturing Textile mills Textile product mills Apparel manufacturing Leather and allied product manufacturing Wood product manufacturing Paper manufacturing Printing and related support activities Petroleum and coal products manufacturing Chemical manufacturing Plastics and rubber products manufacturing Nonmetallic mineral product manufacturing Primary metal manufacturing Fabricated metal product manufacturing Machinery manufacturing Computer and electronic product manufacturing Electrical equipment, appliance, and component manufacturing Transportation equipment manufacturing Furniture and related product manufacturing Miscellaneous manufacturing Merchant wholesalers, durable goods Merchant wholesalers, nondurable goods Wholesale electronic markets and agents and brokers Motor vehicle and parts dealers Furniture and home furnishings stores Electronics and appliance stores Building material and garden equipment and supplies dealers Food and beverage stores Health and personal care stores Gasoline stations Clothing and clothing accessories stores Sporting goods, hobby, musical instrument, and book stores General merchandise stores Miscellaneous store retailers Nonstore retailers Air transportation Water transportation Truck transportation Transit and ground passenger transportation Pipeline transportation Scenic and sightseeing transportation Support activities for transportation Couriers and messengers Warehousing and storage Publishing industries (except internet) Motion picture and sound recording industries Broadcasting (except internet) Telecommunications Data processing, hosting, and related services Other information services Credit intermediation and related activities Securities, commodity contracts, and other financial investments Insurance carriers and related activities Real estate Rental and leasing services Lessors of nonfinancial intangible assets (except copyrighted works) Professional, scientific, and technical services Administrative and support services Waste management and remediation services Educational services Ambulatory health care services Nursing and residential care facilities Social assistance Performing arts, spectator sports, and related industries Museums, historical sites, and similar institutions Amusement, gambling, and recreation industries Accommodation Food services and drinking places Repair and maintenance Personal and laundry services Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations

Average Sales Wisconsin Wisconsin per WI Store Sales Per Total Sales Wisconsin No. (000's) (000's) of Businesses Capita (000's) 3,424 5 $ 5.25 $ 685 3,800 4 $ 5.83 $ 950 53,022 148 $ 81.37 $ 358 172,556 14 $ 264.80 $ 12,325 5,825 4 $ 8.94 $ 1,456 615,772 69 $ 944.95 $ 8,924 2,045,989 1,000 $ 3,139.73 $ 2,046 898,108 241 $ 1,378.22 $ 3,727 2,136,968 1,875 $ 3,279.34 $ 1,140 2,577,571 154 $ 3,955.48 $ 16,737 598,653 26 $ 918.68 $ 23,025 44,204 10 $ 67.83 $ 4,420 15,869 15 $ 24.35 $ 1,058 10,237 6 $ 15.71 $ 1,706 50,170 7 $ 76.99 $ 7,167 459,683 61 $ 705.42 $ 7,536 6,290,113 82 $ 76,709 9,652.67 $ 1,023,418 179 $ 1,570.51 $ 5,717 247,220 9 $ 379.38 $ 27,469 773,486 38 $ 1,186.97 $ 20,355 1,073,786 78 $ 1,647.81 $ 13,766 177,578 55 $ 272.51 $ 3,229 893,616 42 $ 1,371.32 $ 21,277 2,491,070 330 $ 3,822.74 $ 7,549 1,237,279 193 $ 1,898.70 $ 6,411 938,186 52 $ 1,439.72 $ 18,042 513,650 41 $ 788.24 $ 12,528 406,260 29 $ 623.44 $ 14,009 407,038 90 $ 624.63 $ 4,523 1,188,425 215 $ 1,823.73 $ 5,528 14,994,411 954 $ 23,010.09 $ 15,717 7,766,903 359 $ 11,918.92 $ 21,635 628,317 54 $ 964.20 $ 11,636 4,146,902 554 $ 6,363.74 $ 7,485 510,122 246 $ 782.82 $ 2,074 530,662 284 $ 814.34 $ 1,869 2,145,925 480 $ 3,293.09 $ 4,471 2,557,529 464 $ 3,924.73 $ 5,512 637,300 379 $ 977.99 $ 1,682 914,128 234 $ 1,402.80 $ 3,907 825,673 459 $ 1,267.06 $ 1,799 440,790 365 $ 676.43 $ 1,208 1,614,614 188 $ 2,477.75 $ 8,588 785,049 773 $ 1,204.72 $ 1,016 394,258 67 $ 605.02 $ 5,884 40,054 14 $ 61.47 $ 2,861 11,414 4 $ 17.52 $ 2,854 696,404 285 $ 1,068.69 $ 2,444 224,216 106 $ 344.08 $ 2,115 55,395 9 $ 85.01 $ 6,155 1,772 6 $ 2.72 $ 295 113,776 152 $ 174.60 $ 749 8,417 8 $ 12.92 $ 1,052 95,062 50 $ 145.88 $ 1,901 830,156 95 $ 1,273.94 $ 8,738 127,878 73 $ 196.24 $ 1,752 501,885 106 $ 770.18 $ 4,735 723,224 147 $ 1,109.84 $ 4,920 211,110 55 $ 323.96 $ 3,838 29,295 15 $ 44.96 $ 1,953 − − $ $ 752,771 408 $ 1,155.19 $ 1,845 1,103,069 752 $ 1,692.75 $ 1,467 1,084,198 1,415 $ 1,663.79 $ 766 388,520 320 $ 596.21 $ 1,214 2,492 2 $ 3.82 $ 1,246 2,660,533 2,238 $ 4,082.80 $ 1,189 962,048 1,326 $ 1,476.34 $ 726 134,642 89 $ 206.62 $ 1,513 − − 1,320 $ 3,211,043 4,927.60 $ 2,433 455,372 153 $ 698.80 $ 2,976 169,388 342 $ 259.94 $ 495 126,906 165 $ 194.75 $ 769 185,960 135 $ 285.37 $ 1,377 581,343 442 $ 892.12 $ 1,315 573,442 284 $ 879.99 $ 2,019 1,428,676 1,874 $ 2,192.41 $ 762 663,435 1,141 $ 1,018.09 $ 581 415,967 1,445 $ 638.33 $ 288 − − $ $ -

Potential Sales in Trade Area $ $ 627,768 $ 1,906,555 $ $ $ $ 4,423,988 $ 3,893,955 $ 2,636,941.35 $ $ $ $ $ 2,975,576 $ $ 8,537,645 $ 6,506,895 $ 2,737,866 $ $ $ 1,900,044 $ $ 5,057,929 $ 1,873,613 $ 2,058,574 $ 5,976,351 $ 9,590,551 $ 5,027,194 $ 589,404 $ 1,690,971 $ 11,226,048 $ 14,486,043 $ $ 13,418,189 $ 5,323,249 $ 2,838,775 $ 3,459,719 $ 20,427,190 $ 2,057,418 $ 45,850,315 $ 1,876,597 $ 2,434,979 $ 2,790,219 $ 4,886,658 $ $ 2,686,847 $ 1,448,052 $ 3,668,723 $ 4,925,412 $ $ $ 455,589 $ $ 106,179 $ 19,059,036 $ 995,361 $ 8,860,597 $ 5,869,631 $ 1,751,473 $ $ $ 2,695,217 $ 9,958,683 $ 4,738,258 $ 4,449,829 $ $ 5,586,761 $ 4,472,595 $ 6,017,798 $ 2,234,555 $ 9,620,610 $ 531,832 $ 339,013 $ 4,359,500 $ 1,699,159 $ 2,113,164 $ 809,563 $ 4,515,653 $ 3,071,841 $ 2,600,456 $ -

No. of Businesses (Demand) 0.7 5.3 2.2 1.0 2.3 1.7 1.1 0.1 0.5 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.8 0.4 0.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 1.8 2.6 1.5 0.8 3.7 1.2 11.7 1.0 2.0 0.3 4.8 0.9 0.5 1.5 2.3 0.6 0.1 2.2 0.6 1.9 1.2 0.5 1.5 6.8 6.2 3.7 4.7 6.2 4.0 4.0 0.2 0.7 5.7 1.2 1.6 0.4 5.9 5.3 9.0 -

No. of Businesses (Supply)* 1 3 12 4 29 1 1 3 2 1 1 11 8 1 1 2 3 5 11 2 8 3 5 13 6 6 6 7 9 2 14 1 1 6 2 3 2 4 3 2 2 1 2 11 16 8 36 22 2 18 3 5 1 2 7 7 35 19 25 -

Bus. Gap (Demand Supply) -0.3 2.3 -9.8 -3.0 -26.7 0.7 0.1 -2.9 -1.5 -0.9 -0.8 -10.8 -7.7 -0.7 -0.2 -1.6 -2.9 -4.7 -10.3 -1.3 -6.2 -0.4 -3.5 -12.2 -2.3 -4.8 5.7 -6.0 -7.0 -1.7 -9.2 -0.1 -0.5 -4.5 0.3 -2.4 -1.9 -1.8 -2.4 -0.1 -0.8 -0.5 -0.5 -4.2 -9.8 -4.3 -31.3 -15.8 2.0 -14.0 -2.8 -4.3 4.7 -0.8 -5.4 -6.6 -29.1 -13.7 -16.0 -

Sq. Ft. of Businesses Demand) 16,520 7,983 14,325 11,429 29,081 112,145 7,081 8,509 340,828 863 112,611 46,790 23,728 8,281 34,394 44,969 3,258 4,645 16,460 8,872 25,640 28,024 8,052 10,685 8,493 13,357 17,605 5,812 10,474 43,172 18,645 23,478 3,172 28,151 30,853 10,448 3,467 13,632 7,103 35,089 29,826 11,408 9,130 10,184 27,635 22,907 21,898 29,142 15,414 38,082 4,840 23,512 8,502 11,564 18,649 5,456 28,981 15,849 27,281 -

Sq. Ft. of Businesses (Supply)* 25,000 4,500 79,500 43,750 364,500 64,303 6,250 300,941 1,423,486 6,250 473,708 2,073,643 591,151 25,000 44,928 250,623 75,000 75,920 253,500 26,500 114,426 32,750 26,500 179,500 13,750 65,500 9,000 39,000 46,750 265,768 54,250 25,000 6,250 112,500 26,500 51,500 124,159 25,000 37,500 37,500 50,000 25,000 12,500 16,500 71,500 50,000 167,750 104,000 7,750 28,000 173,324 81,250 171,750 1,500 18,750 81,250 95,250 171,250 57,000 75,500 -

Sq. Ft. Gap (Demand Supply) (8,480) 3,483 (65,175) (32,321) (335,419) 47,842 831 (292,432) (1,082,658) (5,387) (361,097) (2,026,853) (567,423) (16,719) (10,534) (205,654) (71,742) (71,275) (237,040) (17,628) (88,786) (4,726) (18,448) (168,815) (5,257) (52,143) 8,605 (33,188) (36,276) (222,596) (35,605) (1,522) (3,078) (84,349) 4,353 (41,052) (120,692) (11,368) (30,397) (2,411) (20,174) (13,592) (3,370) (6,316) (43,865) (27,093) (145,852) (74,858) 7,664 (135,242) (76,410) (148,238) 7,002 (7,186) (62,601) (89,794) (142,269) (41,151) (48,219) -


Supply)

(8,480) Gap 3,483 Supply) (8,480) 3,483 65,175) 32,321) 35,419) 65,175) 32,321) 35,419) 47,842 831 92,432) 47,842 82,658) 831 92,432) (5,387) 82,658) 61,097) 26,853) (5,387) 67,423) 16,719) 61,097) 10,534) 26,853) 05,654) 67,423) 71,742) 16,719) 71,275) 10,534) 37,040) 05,654) 17,628) 71,742) 71,275) 88,786) 37,040) (4,726) 17,628) 18,448)Year 68,815) 88,786)1992 (5,257) (4,726) 52,143)1997 18,448) 8,605 68,815)2002 33,188)2007 (5,257) 36,276) 52,143) 22,596) 8,605 35,605) 33,188)Year 36,276) (1,522) 22,596)1992 (3,078) 35,605)1997 84,349) 4,353 2002 (1,522) - 2007 (3,078) 84,349) 41,052) 4,353 - Year 20,692) 11,368)1992 41,052) 30,397)1997 (2,411) 20,692)2002 20,174) 11,368)2007 13,592) 30,397) (2,411) 20,174) (3,370) 13,592)

Assumptions: Trade Area Population 14,104 Trade Area Per Capita Income $ 26,157 (towns 10k-25k pop) WI Population (avg/town) 16,709 Assumptions: (towns 10k-25k pop) WI Per Capita income $ 21,310 Trade Area Population 14,104 * Based on local data collection reflecting best estimates of the number and Trade Area Per Capita Income 26,157 $ size of buisnesses in trade area. (towns 10k-25k pop) WI Population (avg/town) 16,709 (towns 10k-25k pop) WI Per Capita income $ 21,310 * Based on local data collection reflecting best estimates of the number and size of buisnesses in trade area.

Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

indicates gap indicates insufficient data

The table on the opposite page is the Trade Area indicates gap insufficient data Gap Analysis indicates for Hartford, Wisconsin which shows broad industry categories. It includes the number and square footage of businesses. The assumptions included were used in the calculations within the Gap Analysis. The business types marked in yellow represent those in which a gap exists in the Hartford trade area. For a detailed list of all the industries and NAICS Codes see the Bureau of Labor Statistics website at www.bls.gov/iag.

Pull Factors Wisconsin, Hartford, Oconomowoc, Watertown Wisconsin Population Retail Sales (000) 4,950,000 $ 38,350,527 5,100,000 $ 50,520,463 5,441,196 $ 59,978,700 5,726,000 $ 72,283,321

$ $ $ $

Wisconsin 7,748 9,906 11,023 12,624

Wisconsin 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

Watertown Population Retail Sales (000) 19,890 $ 173,437 20,627 $ 229,184 22,462 $ 280,253 23,028 $ 303,860

Retail Sales (NAICS 44-45) per capita Watertown Oconomowoc $ 8,720 $ 20,580 $ 11,111 $ 18,368 $ 12,477 $ 15,190 $ 13,195 $ 19,607 Pull Factor Watertown Oconomowoc 1.13 2.66 1.12 1.85 1.13 1.38 1.05 1.55

$ $ $ $

Hartford 11,745 10,280 15,952 13,699

The table at the bottom of this page shows the pull factors for Wisconsin and three comparable communities in south eastern Wisconsin, Watertown, Oconomowoc, and Hartford. The pull factors show the effectiveness of each community to draw consumers from outside their boundaries based on taxable sales per capita. Oconomowoc Population Retail Sales (000) 11,195 $ 230,391 12,053 $ 221,389 12,968 $ 196,981 14,358 $ 281,523

Hartford Population Retail Sales (000) 8,534 $ 100,235 10,312 $ 106,012 11,866 $ 189,281 14,104 $ 193,205

Pull Factors 3.00 2.50

Appendix Retail Needs and Opportunities

2.00 1.50 1.00

Hartford 1.52 1.04 1.45 1.09

0.50 0.00 1992

1997 Watertown

2002 Oconomowoc

2007 Hartford

103


Downtown Hartford Revitalization Plan

Austin, Texas Wayfinding Master Plan ftp://ftp.ci.austin.tx.us/npzd/Austingo/final_ wayfinding_masterplan.pdf

Market Analysis” tool http://fyi.uwex.edu/downtown-market-analysis/

Washington County, WI Multi-Jurisdictional ComCity of Hartford, WI Comprehensive Smart Growth prehensive Plan Plan http://www.co.washington.wi.us/departments. http://ci.hartford.wi.us/Municipal_Depts/Planiml?mdl=departments.mdl&ID=PLN ning_files/documents/Hartford%20Comprehensive%20Plan.pdf Wisconsin Department of Administration, Wisconsin Population and Household Projections Esri Business Analyst http://www.doa.state.wi.us/Divisions/Intergovhttp://www.esri.com/software/businessanalyst ernmental-Relations/Demographic-ServicesCenter/Wisconsin-Population-Projections/ Hartford, WI Downtown Business Improvement District website Wisconsin Economic Census reports from 1992 and http://www.downtownhartfordwi.com/ 1997 www.census.gov International Council of Shopping Centers’, “Dollars and Cents of Shopping Centers/The SCORE 2008 Book” report http://www.icsc.org/publications/item/dollarscents-of-shopping-centers-the-score-2008-book Town of Cary, North Carolina, Town Wayfinding Project Designs http://www.townofcary.org/Departments/Planning_Department/Projects___Plans/Wayfinding.htm US Bureau of Labor Statistics’ NAICS Code system http://www.bls.gov/iag

Sources

104

US Census Bureau’s American Fact Finder http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml UW Extension’s “Downtown and Business District

Profile for SARUP

Hartford BID Redevelopment Plan  

This revitalization plan provides nine recommendations to address those challenges. The traditional planning process was followed in the cre...

Hartford BID Redevelopment Plan  

This revitalization plan provides nine recommendations to address those challenges. The traditional planning process was followed in the cre...

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