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News | page 2

The Student-Run Independent Newspaper at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

uwmpost.com

Monday, February 23, 2009

Volume 53 | Issue 20

UWM sees decline in applications Hunger simulation provides new perspective

‘Pink Zone’ promotes breast cancer awareness

Sports | page 8 Top 10 dream sports vacations

fringe | page 11

The Klotsche Center was dressed in pink Thursday as part of “Pink Zone,” the breast cancer information fair. Post photo by Alana Soehartono By Danielle Schmidt Special to the Post news@uwmpost.com

The UW-Milwaukee Panthers Athletic Department held a Breast Cancer Information Fair at the Klotsche Center before the women’s basketball game on Thursday, Feb. 19. The fair focused on the “Pink Zone” initiative to promote breast cancer awareness and raise money for the Norris

Health Center on campus. The money will be used to provide women’s health screenings and treatment. UWM Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Helen Mamarchev handled the raffle tickets. “This is to raise awareness and have some fun. All the proceeds will go to help the students,” Mamarchev said. “The vendors want to give important education to the people of the community.”

Boys will be girls and girls will be boys. Annual UWM Drag Show is a hit

“We have women as young as 25 dying from breast cancer. It is very important now to be informed.” – Lavinia Matias, Milwaukee Breast and Cervical Cancer Awareness Program The first 1,000 attendees were given free “Pink Zone” tshirts at the door. The event featured a silent auction, 50/50 raffle, free food catered by Qdoba Mexican Grill and plenty of educational information.

“Vagina Monologues” celebrate womanhood at UWM

Organizations present were the Milwaukee Breast and Cervical Cancer Awareness Program, the American Cancer Society, After Breast Cancer Diagnosis (ABCD),

See PINK page 

Editorial | page 18 Holmes: Why Obama isn’t the answer

Hughes resigns at Student Association Senate meeting Three presidential appointments approved By Kevin Lessmiller News Editor news@uwmpost.com

The Feb. 22 meeting of the UW-Milwaukee Student Association (SA) Senate saw the resignation of Vice President Tommy Hughes and the appointment of his successor in Treasurer Kristi Anderson. The meeting also featured a special guest presentation, two other presidential appoint-

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ments, two vacant Senate seat appointments and eight pieces of legislation. SA President Tyler Draheim began the meeting with comments on various issues, including the death of a UWM student. Details have yet to

prayers,” Draheim said to the SA Senate. Following reports by SA officers, Michael Moscicke, United Council (UC) of UW Students university affairs director, gave a PowerPoint presentation on current UC initiatives.

“I’d like to commend Tommy Hughes on his hard work this semester.” – SA President Tyler Draheim

Shift of power

be released, but Draheim said that a UWM student who lived in Sandburg Hall passed away Friday Feb. 20 at an off-campus location. “Keep the family in your

SA Vice President Tommy Hughes took the podium during his allotted comment period. He spoke on happenings that occurred in the SA executive branch during the past two weeks, including being banned from the SA office by Draheim. Despite the action, Hughes commended Draheim. “I’d like to thank President

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SA Vice President appointee Kristi Anderson. Post photo by Sam Hogerton Draheim for his leadership,” he said. Draheim had voiced similar appreciation for Hughes during his opening comments. “I’d like to commend Tommy Hughes on his hard work this semester,” said Draheim.

blog.uwmpost.com

After roughly three minutes of discussion, Hughes closed his speech and left the Union’s Fireside Lounge. “I resign as Vice President of the Student Association, ef-

See SA page 

sports.uwmpost.com


 February 23, 2009

The UWM Post

News Briefs

Editor in Chief Jonathan Anderson

Editorial Editor Leslie Peckham

Account Executives Kurt Raether

News Editor Kevin Lessmiller

Production Editor Audrey Posl

Bryan Arnold

Asst. News Editors Marly Fink

Photo Editor Sam Hogerton

David Acker

Puzzle Editor Jonas Wittke

Fringe Editors Melissa Campbell

Advertising Manager Dena Nord Advertising Designer Heidi Cronce Distribution

Chief Copy Editor Katie Visser

Patrick Quast

Alex Rewey Asst. Fringe Editor Darin Kwilinski

Copy Editors Amanda Mitchell

Board of Directors Jonathan Anderson

Sports Editor Jimmy Lemke

Lindsey Millard

Melissa Campbell

Business Manager Simon Bouwman

Bryan Arnold

Asst. Sports Editor Tim Prahl

Phone: (414) 229-4578 Fax: (414) 229-4579 post@uwmpost.com www.uwmpost.com

Bryan Arnold

Audrey Posl Kevin Lessmiller

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Union Box 88 UWM P.O. Box 413 Milwaukee, WI 53201

THE UWM POST has a circulation of 10,000 and is distributed on campus and throughout the surrounding communities. The first copy is free, additional copies $.75 each. The UWM Post, Inc. is a registered student organization at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an independent nonstock corporation. All submissions become the property of The UWM Post, Inc. The UWM Post is published Mondays in the fall and spring semesters, except during spring break and exam periods. The UWM Post also publishes once in late summer. The UWM Post is written and edited by students of the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee and they are solely responsible for its editorial policy and content. The University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee is not liable for debts incurred by the publisher. The UWM Post is not an official publication of UWM. The UWM Post is a student organization at UWM.

The First Amendment Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

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Milwaukeean makes Idol finals

Obama makes first foreign trip to Canada

For the first time since the show began, a Milwaukeean has made it to the “American Idol” finals. Danny Gokey, 28, was selected to a finalist position Wednesday Feb. 18 after performing Mariah Carey’s “Hero.” One of Gokey’s motivations for pursuing an “Idol” run was the death of his wife Sophia last year. She had urged him to try out.

President Obama visited Canada Thursday, Feb. 19 to meet with Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper. It was Obama’s first foreign trip. Obama and Harper reportedly discussed issues ranging from remedies for the global economic crisis to foreign policies issues like Afghanistan. Canada recently voted to remove its troops from Afghanistan by 2011 while Obama approved an increase in U.S. troop presence there.

Violent crime down in Milwaukee Statistics released by Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn and Mayor Tom Barrett Wednesday Feb. 18 showed a 10 percent drop in violent crime during 2008. The reductions included a 32 percent drop in homicides, a 10 percent drop in robberies, a 9.5 percent decrease in aggravated assaults. Major crimes in general dropped 6 percent.

Saul Williams lecture this Wednesday Spoken word artist and actor Saul Williams will be appearing at UWM Wednesday, Feb. 25 as part of the University’s Distinguished Lecture Series. Information on uwm.edu describes the lecture presentation as “an evening of poetry.” Following the lecture, Williams will host a reception and book signing.

Police Reports UWM Police were alerted to a fight outside Sandburg Hall’s Emporium convenience store at around 3:30 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 15. Two intoxicated UWM students were issued underage drinking citations.

permission Wednesday, Feb. 18 in Johnston Hall. The suspect then began tearing paper off of a bulletin board, spoke in a foreign language believed to be German and proceeded to run away.

An intoxicated female student was taken to a hospital shortly after midnight on Monday Feb. 16. She was reported to have been punching walls in her Sandburg Hall North Tower residence.

UWM Police were alerted to two suspicious people looking in garages on the 3200 block of North Bartlett Avenue at about 3 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 19. Police arrived at the scene but were unable to find the suspects.

A UWM student was arrested for stealing $696 worth of textbooks from the UWM Bookstore Wednesday, Feb. 18. The student was also charged with resisting arrest.

Two heavily intoxicated UWM students were issued underage drinking citations in Sandburg Hall around 10 p.m. Thursday Feb. 19. When asked by police what month it was, one student replied, “Maypril.”

A student and a faculty member reported someone taking pictures of them without their


3.00” uwmpost.com

Student information releasable to public, corporations PAWS offers choice to opt to opt out By Jordan Kalb Staff Writer news@uwmpost.com

“The university is required to comply by Wisconsin law to release student directory information.” – Beth Weckmueller, UWM executive director of Enrollment Services But, Weckmueller noted, UWM does not release personally-identifiable academic information like grades. “We never release confidential, personally identifiable academic information such as a student’s grades, specific class schedule, etc.,” Weckmueller added. Many UWM students are not familiar with the option to restrict third-party access to their

public information through UWM’s Panther Access to Web Services, or PAWS, web portal. This preference would then exclude a student’s information from showing up in the annual student directory, as well as external party request lists. Tyler Draheim, UWM Student Association president, said that not all students know they can restrict public access to their personal information. Draheim said more could be done by the university to make the student body aware. In 2008, UW-Madison released the information of over 45,000 students to one of the country’s biggest list brokers, American Student List LLC. 345 additional vendors also purchased information from the university as well in 2008. At UWM, Weckmueller estimates there are between 40 and 50 requests per year from thirdparty vendors.

CLIENT: RUN DATE: AE:

Academic Year

UW System Enrollment

Total Incoming Freshmen

A recent decline in applications to UW-Milwaukee is not necessarily seen as a problem according to university administrators. Last week the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported on the decrease of applications for most public universities in the Wisconsin system. The main reasons for the drop are the state of the economy and the decrease of outgoing high school students. UWM Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Rita Cheng said the drop in applications is not necessarily an indication of lower enrollment. “I wouldn’t characterize the decreased applications as a problem, but we are aware of fresh-

“We need to be aware of recruitment and outreach. We are reminding people of the quality and affordability of education here at UWM.” – Rita Cheng, UWM Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs in the number of applicants is a recent trend. “UWM’s application trend has been moving upwards for the past decade,” she said. “Last year was the first year

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edited by students of the University of WisconsinMilwaukee and they are solely responsible for its editorial policy and content. The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is not liable for debts incurred by the publisher. The UWM Post is not an official publication of UWM. The UWM Post a student organization at UWM.

Not necessarily a problem, says Cheng

men outreach and have these programs in place,” she said. Beth Weckmueller, UWM’s Executive Director of Enrollment Services, said that the downturn

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To restrict public access to your directory information, sign into paws.uwm. edu, scroll to the bottom of the page and click on Change Contact Information The UWM Post is written and Restriction.

UWM sees decline in applications

By Caitlin Penzey Moog Staff Writer news@uwmpost.com

Featuring….

we experienced a decline.” The decrease of applicants comes at a time of great economic struggle for America. But the economy is not the only factor contributing to the decline according to Weckmueller. “Demographics are changing. There will be less high school students coming out of school - a nine percent projected decrease over the next 10 years,” Weckmueller projected. “Even though that is a slow decline of outgoing high school students, that in itself is a reason UWM may be experiencing less applications received.” Enrollment of new freshmen for 2008 was only slightly less than 2007. That year 4,535 new freshmen enrolled, UWM’s highest number of new enrolled stu-

See ENROLLMENT page 

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Businesses such as credit card companies and loan lenders are able to obtain students’ personal contact information from UW System campuses, but students have the choice to restrict access. The information, including students’ names, home and email addresses, telephone numbers, enrollment statuses and awards received, is releasable under Wisconsin’s public records law. “The university is required to comply by Wisconsin law to release student directory information,” said UW-Milwaukee Executive Director of Enrollment Services Beth Weckmueller. The public records law allows campuses to charge a fee to cover processing costs, but no profit is made. The information released by UW campuses is collected from students’ applications for admission and becomes public upon registration. The same in-

formation is also located in the student directory which anyone may pick up without an official request. A student’s directory information is not restricted under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), a federal privacy law applicable to educational institutions that accept federal funding, thus making it generally available to the public.

February 23, 2009 

DESIGNE AE AD MANA


 February 23, 2009

The UWM Post

Hunger simulation to be held Wednesday 30-minute maze aims at education on budget decision By Marly Fink Assistant News Editor news@uwmpost.com

On Wednesday, Feb. 25, students will have the opportunity to learn about poverty through a hunger simulation activity organized by the UW-Milwaukee Center for Volunteerism and Student Leadership (CVSL).

U-Pace provides course materials online, so students can work ahead at their own speed. Post photo illustration by Jared Guess

U-Pace provides new approach to learning

learning, students gain more control over their learning and develop confidence in their abilities. “If you believe that Introduced in 2006 by UW- you can succeed, your behavMilwaukee Psychology pro- ior changes,” Reddy said. The fessor Diane Reddy, the U- philosophy is that students Pace program is a conceptual will study and inherently learn model of teaching that aims more when they think they will to “increase students’ learning succeed. and success and increase their “Amplified assistance” confidence and expectations.” means that students are reThe U-Pace strategy is cur- ceiving personalized suggesrently being applied to the tions and individual feedback Introduction to Psychology on their work. Students receive course at UWM. Key compo- this commentary via phone or HONE 414-229-5969 | FAX | E-include MAIL POSTADS@UWMPOST.COM nents of 414-229-4579 the program email at least once a week, to the ideas that learning is help them deal with negative “mastery-based” and that stu- thoughts or practices hinderdents receive “amplified assis- ing their performance. tance with learning,” Reddy This is an alternative to a explained. traditional classroom, where Through mastery-based many students are often hesiBy Savannah Hunnicutt Staff Writer news@uwmpost.com

tant to raise their hands, attend office hours or ask for personal help. In Intro to Psychology on-line “the teaching assistants and the professor are always there to help,” says Amy Gorski, a UWM freshman taking the course this semester. Reddy also said that she can monitor students’ progress in the course and administer extra assistance when necessary. The self-paced course requires students to learn the material on their own, but allows them to do so on their own time. Students must master the material, by earning a 90 percent (an A), before they can move on with the course

“We decided that poverty would be a really good issue to focus service on because it is so prevalent in Milwaukee” – Laurie Marks, UWM CVSL director The 30-minute hunger simulation maze will take participants on a journey through a life of poverty by giving them the identity of a working family living in poverty. They will be given a limited amount of money and will have to make decisions on how and where to spend it, facing various obstacles along the way. Laurie Marks, Director of CVSL, feels that this event will give students a small understanding of what povertystricken people face each day. Another purpose of the event is to illustrate and educate students about the purpose of volunteer service and about a problem that is apparent in Milwaukee and throughout Wisconsin. “We are hoping the simulation will teach people how fam-

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Continued from page 

dents ever. In 2008, the number dropped to 4,050 new freshmen enrolled. The figure, even with the drop from the previous year, was still the third highest number of newly freshmen enrolled in the history of the university. UWM is strengthening its outreach efforts to potential students and putting an emphasis on communication with new freshmen. Once students attend as freshmen, UWM is also making an effort to retain new students. Cheng and UWM Associate Vice Chancellor Ruth Williams are focusing on programs that

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ilies are put in these positions where they have to make these decisions on a very limited budget,” Marks said. Marks added that poverty is a particularly important issue in a city like Milwaukee. “We decided that poverty would be a really good issue to focus service on because it is so prevalent in Milwaukee,” she said. “There’s a lot of opportunity for us to make a difference in this area through food drives and service at food pantries.” According to the Hunger Task Force of Milwaukee, 24.4 percent of all Milwaukee residents live in poverty, making our city the seventh-poorest in the United States. The CVSL spends the majority of the spring semester focusing on issues of poverty with events like the Hunger Clean Up and the Hunger Simulation, while the fall semester is spent organizing volunteers to work with Big Brothers, Big Sisters, various environmental agencies, etc. The simulation will be held in the Union Concourse on Feb. 25 from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Students can come as they please, and a free bowl of soup will be provided to all participants. “There’s a lot of misconception about poverty, and one of the things that we hope to do is sensitize people to who this effects,” Marks added. “It really occurs across the board, especially in a state like Wisconsin, and we want to inspire people to take action.”

reinforce these goals. “There are a lot of initiatives right now,” said Cheng. One example is the recently launched “Awesome. Affordable.” advertising campaign put in place to attract potential students. “It has been very effective,” Williams said of the campaign. “There is a lot of traffic on UWM’s Web site by people who want to know about the school.” While the number of applications received dropped, the Chancellor’s office is proactive in its recruitment of new freshmen. “We need to be aware of recruitment and outreach. We are reminding people of the quality and affordability of education here at UWM,” said Cheng.

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On the road to recovery for human rights Speaker emphasizes rebuilding American morality By Tammy McCubbin Staff Writer news@uwmpost.com

Guest speaker Dr. William F. Schulz, Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress, expressed his passion for domestic and international human rights issues in his lecture entitled “Human Rights: Restoring Moral Authority.” The event was held Feb. 17 in the UW-Milwaukee Union Ballroom. As the former executive director of Amnesty International USA and a traveler to 70 countries, Schulz brought life experience and knowledge to the table. “Human rights emerged out of the common misery of human kind,” Schulz remarked. He spoke on a broad range of human rights issues, from as

far back as the founding of America to the current Obama administration. Looking back on the past eight years of the Bush administration, Schulz shared his opinion that many human rights issues were ignored and violated during the

“The United States has made an enormous number of mistakes. As we awaken from the bad dream, human rights has a warmer hearing in this new administration.” – Dr. William F. Schulz period. “The United States has made an enormous number of mistakes,” said Schulz. “As we awaken from the bad dream, human rights has a warmer hearing in this new administration.” He also stated that Obama

is “stepping towards a broader right” concerning topics such as economic security and freedom poverty. Though equipped with a positive disposition, Schulz noted that “the tough human rights challenges didn’t disappear with Bush and won’t go away with Obama.” Schulz also covered international human rights issues from the Middle East to Darfur to Europe. He stated that the United States must “clean up our act on conducting the War on Terror.” According to him, there is great need currently for “smart, strategic ways on [sic]C advancing human rights,” both M domestically and abroad. Schulz’s lecture was part ofY the 2009 Great Decisions lecture CM series at UWM.  The next lecture MY in the series is titled “Energy and CY the Economy: Fostering a Green Recovery,” which will be held CMY Tuesday, Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. in the Union Ballroom.  Admission isK free to UWM faculty, staff and

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University Housing, SHAC at odds over general body dissolution Dispute over constitutional powers and procedures continues By Kevin Lessmiller News Editor news@uwmpost.com

UW-Milwaukee’s University Housing department and the Student Housing Administrative Council (SHAC) are disputing the legitimacy of the recent dissolution of SHAC’s general body. Because University Housing doesn’t recognize the dissolving of the SHAC general body, which is SHAC’s legislative body, legislation and the SHAC spring 2009 budget that were passed at the Feb. 15 SHAC meeting will not be implemented. “The campus would be very concerned if we’re allowing just anything to happen and the bylaws aren’t being followed,” said Scott Peak, UWM Director of University Housing. “We’re simply stating you need to follow your guidelines as an organization, and that’s the bottom line.” In a Jan. 28 letter from University Housing to SHAC members, Peak and UWM Associate Director of University Housing Kelly Johnson wrote that SHAC did not follow its own constitutional rules for removing officers. Article 3 Section 6 of the SHAC constitution describes procedures for removing SHAC members from office. University Housing claims that those procedures were not followed correctly. Mia Steinemann, former

SHAC director who was involved in the dissolving of the general body, disagrees with University Housing administration. Steinemann believes the constitutional rule refers to issues like impeachment and individual officer removal – not the general body as a whole. “The process is outlined for individual people. We decided to wipe the slate clean and start over,” Steinemann told the Post. The SHAC executive board further contends it has the power to dissolve the general body because of Article 5 of the SHAC constitution, which reads, “Any power not defined by this constitution or any of the SHAC bylaws is so reserved for the executive board. The executive board has the power to make all the constitutional interpretations.” “Power not delegated by our constitution falls to the executive board,” said Alex Dunn, current SHAC Director. Peak said that University Housing drafted the letter after they heard that the SHAC executive board was dissolving the general body because of quorum issues last semester. Dunn told the Post that SHAC only passed one piece of legislation last semester because of not being able to meet quorum. “Rather than deal with that individually, they decided to remove everyone,” said Peak regarding SHAC’s quorum problems. “That’s what really prompted our action.” Johnson said that University Housing has a small role in overseeing SHAC’s actions. “We have to be very mindful of not going beyond what the boundaries are, and there are reasons why there are separations,” she said. “[But] I think we do have a certain role, in particular when

it comes to budget matters, because we are obligated to make sure that the money that is in the state budget is spent according to procedures.” Steinemann and Dunn said that after notifying members of SHAC that the general body would be dissolved, they sent out applications to former members. All applications were accepted. Peak said he took issue with the way the process was presented. “They weren’t really clear when they offered the applications to everyone that they were going to accept everyone,” he said. Quorum issues last year were largely the result of a dispute between SHAC and the UWM Student Association (SA), particularly a piece of SA legislation entitled “A Resolution Defining [SHAC].” The bill made SHAC a standing committee of SA rather than a separate governing body. Former SHAC Director Nikki Senrick fought the legislation and pursued a University Student Court (USC) case. The case was decided in favor of SA. Dunn said that overall, the SHAC executive board thought it would be best to dissolve the general body and start anew. “The problem was, last semester we just weren’t meeting quorum and we weren’t getting anything done,” Dunn said. “We thought it would be in the best interest of the organization.” Steinemann also said she thought the action was in the best interest of SHAC. “We want SHAC to be a well functioning organization again,” she said. To download the SHAC constitution, visit uwmpost. com.

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 February 23, 2009

The UWM Post

AROUND THE UW | WHITEWATER

Technology Park to bring student opportunity By Corey Hasler of the Royal Purple

The Whitewater University Technology Park Board interviewed Ruedebusch Development & Construction Tuesday, as a potential building contractor for the park.

“We’re currently talking to two potential clients outside of Whitewater who would occupy part of the building” – Richard Telfer, UWWhitewater Chancellor and Technology Park Board President “We think we are a perfect candidate for the UW-Whitewater Technology Park,” RDC Senior Vice President Michael Mathews said. “We can take this community vision and turn it into a fully developed technology-based business park with resources for the university, as well as K-12 students.” Chancellor Richard Telfer, who is also serving as Technology Park board president, said the board plans to build one main building that would be the an-

Puzzle solutions Last week’s In-Word solution In-Word: EPISODE

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RESCUE: “IT TAKES MANY NAILS TO BUILD A CRIB BUT ONLY ONE SCREW TO FILL IT” T

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Try your hand at this week’s puzzles, turn to page 23

Last week’s crossword solution

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chor of the park. “We’re currently talking to two potential clients outside of Whitewater who would occupy part of the building,” Telfer said. “The rest of the space would be used as an ‘innovation center’ to give faculty and students the opportunity to take work they’ve been doing in their garages and develop it into a real business.” Mathews said building an “entrepreneurial network,” or a chain of buildings, will offer a different type of workspace for different entrepreneurial ventures. The design of the building included different sized rooms or moveable walls for the need of collaborative space and the expansion or contraction that could occur within individual businesses, Mathews said. Finding and getting the “garage entrepreneurs” to bring their businesses into the innovation center was the last item discussed. “Unfortunately, you can’t seek out entrepreneurs in the Yellow Pages, they need to come to you. That is the challenge,” Mathews said. Telfer said offering high school students a first-stage internship would be one way to promote the park. The board also plans to register the park with the Association of University Research Parks to gain national recognition.

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This week’s Sudoku solution

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Post photo by Alana Soehartono

PINK

Continued from page  Gilda’s Club and the Wisconsin Breast Cancer Coalition. ABCD came to provide information regarding their “Dream the Cure” program. The new initiative is focused on bringing breast health and cancer awareness to Wisconsin’s Native American tribes. “Native American women have the highest death rate [due to breast cancer] out of any group. A lot of the Native American community is affected by breast cancer,” said Deb Ushakow of ABCD. Lavinia Matias of the

Milwaukee Breast and Cervical Cancer – Awareness Program, which provides free health screenings for Milwaukee area women ages 45-64 who don’t have insurance, said cancer is affecting women of all ages. “We have women as young as 25 dying from breast cancer. It is very important now to be informed,” said Matias. “We do everything women need for free.” The “Pink Zone” initiative started last year on campus as part of a Saturday women’s basketball game and will continue to be present at other women’s sporting events in the future. Other sponsors of the event included Noodles & Company and Whole Foods Market.


February 23, 2009 

uwmpost.com

STATE NEWS

Budget cuts to hit UWM $174 million to be slashed from UW System By David Acker Assistant News Editor news@uwmpost.com

In an address on Tuesday, Governor Doyle announced proposed budget cuts and a comprehensive plan for Wisconsin’s financial future, which included moves that will directly impact the UW System. The proposal from Doyle includes a $174 million cut from the UW System budget and a tuition freeze in which families making less than $60,000 per year would not see an increase in their tuition costs. “Our university system is going to have to be more resourceful, but this budget makes sure that more students in Wisconsin have a shot at a higher education and that tuition stays within the means of Wisconsin families,” Doyle said. The day after Doyle’s projected budget cut was announced, UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Carlos E. Santiago sent an e-mail message to all students. “It is not yet clear how this cut will be applied to individual campuses, and we await specifics on this matter from the UW System leadership,” Santiago wrote. In the e-mail Santiago outlined a number of key points that will affect UWM: • Tuition increases are expected during the next two years. • State employees will be provided domestic partner benefits. • Funding for the first phase of UWM’s Growth Agenda is included in the budget; funding for the second phase is not. • Santiago said he is optimis-

U-PACE

Continued from page 4 and take two quizzes a week on that information. Gorski says she usually needs to take a quiz once or twice to receive the required grade. Other coursework includes viewing presentations, readings in the text, viewing videos on-line and participating in games and activities on the course’s Desire2Learn site. While the coursework is difficult, Reddy believes many students master the information more successfully through this style of teaching. Gorski believes it’s a little more difficult when compared to her other classes. “But it’s like any class,” she says. “If you take the time to understand the material and put in the effort you’ll do well.” And this is exactly what Professor Diane Reddy had

tic that the final budget will include funding for “at least portions of the Growth Agenda.” • No layoffs or furloughs of state employees have been proposed for the budget. • No state employees will receive salary increases during the 2009-2011 biennium. • State employees “should expect to make higher contributions” for retirement and health insurance. Santiago finished his email address by stating that Milwaukee and the entire state of Wisconsin rely on UWM. “Yes, we will need to find different ways to fulfill our mission and achieve our goals. And our progress may be slowed,” Santiago wrote. “But this city, region and state need UWMilwaukee, and we must continue to deliver regardless of the obstacles before us.” Omer Farooque, board chairman for the United Council of UW Students, a state student association representing 17 UW campuses, weighed in on Gov. Doyle’s tuition freeze proposal. “Freezing tuition has been our number one priority, and we applaud the governor’s courage in reaching out to students who would otherwise be cut out of a college education by rising costs,” Farooque said. Doyle’s proposed plan would also target smokers as it includes a state-wide smoking ban in all bars, restaurants and work places. The governor’s plan also contains a cigarette tax increase that would take Wisconsin from 15th to third in the nation for cigarette tax rates.

in mind: that students would take the time to master material, and therefore earn better grades and learn more. Reddy also believes that this method of learning empowers students, and helps them to be more outgoing in the classroom, because they are used to conversing regularly with their TA and professor. In a study with psychology students from the U-Pace course and the classroom-led course, U-Pace students received 12 percent higher than the other students on the same exam. This is not only a testament to the U-Pace course’s ability to teach students more effectively, but also to improve their test-taking skills. No prerequisites are required for enrollment in the course. Access to a computer with high-speed Internet is strongly recommended.

SA

Continued from page  fectively immediately,” said Hughes. Later in the meeting, Draheim appointed Anderson to the position. After taking questions from the SA Senate, Anderson was approved and took her seat at the front table as the new SA Vice President. “Thanks to Tyler for this great opportunity,” she said. Draheim made two other presidential appointments at the meeting. SA Secretary Amanda Voigtlander was appointed to a position as associate justice of the University Student Court (USC). After Anderson’s appointment, SA Senator Anthony Dewees was appointed to treasurer, previously held by Anderson. Following the three presidential appointments, the SA Senate filled two vacant College of Letters and Science seats. Daniel Carpenter, current SA legislative affairs director, and UWM freshman Brandon Reed were approved by the SA Senate to fill the vacancies.

Lengthy debate over eight bills Prior to deciding on whether or not to approve eight pieces of legislation, the SA Senate attempted to remove current Independent Elections Commissioner (IEC) Dan Bahr from office. SA Senator Jon Weimer voiced disapproval of the idea that Rob Grover, previously denied by the SA Senate for the position of IEC, would indeed by overseeing the April SA elections as Deputy IEC, to be appointed by Bahr. “It seems like an abuse of power,” said Weimer, reiterating that the SA Senate had already denied Grover to over-

see the elections. The motion failed in a roll call vote. Bahr remains IEC. The first item of new business was “An Act to Permanently Establish the [UWM SA] Code of Ethics.” Authored by Dewees and SA Senator Emily Grotz, the legislation passed without objection. The next piece of legislation up for approval was “An Act to Reform the [IEC] Bylaws.” The only change to the bylaws was when the UWM student body would hold a referendum on UC membership. The changes, which also passed without objection, eliminated a stipulation that the referendum could not be held during SA elections. Third, SA Senator Kyle Duerstein and USC Associate Chief Justice Jacob Martin spoke on “An Act to Amend the Bylaws of the [USC].” The legislation sought to remove outdated bylaws regarding parking citation appeals. A roll call vote passed the bill with an amendment that complaints or appeals must be filed within 30 days rather than the original 60 days. The legislation will now go to USC Chief Justice Mike Roberts for final approval. The fourth proposed bill, “Constitutional Separation of Powers Amendment Act,” sought to add a referendum to the upcoming SA elections that would prohibit SA Senators from also holding office in either the executive or judicial branch of SA. Weimer authored the bill, which had support from SA Senator Stuart Gavin. “We think the students should decide on this issue,” said Weimer. SA Senator Katie Jesse agreed. “Bringing it to the students is a very democratic way to solve this issue,” she said.

SA Speaker of the Senate Tyler Kristopeit temporarily stepped down from his spot at the front table, saying he had very strong beliefs about the issue. “Experience is what’s needed a lot of times in the Senate,” he said in opposition to the legislation. Following a roll call vote, the legislation failed. The fifth piece of legislation, authored by Weimer and Gavin, was named the “Independent Election Commission Reform Act”. Among other things, the bill sought to form an election commission of five voting members, rather than one single IEC. “The Independent Election Commission is currently not really a commission,” said Weimer. Reforms in the bill also included moving SA elections to Mondays and Tuesdays, as opposed to the current Thursday and Friday schedule. Weimer said such a change would result in increased voter turnout. “I think we can all agree we want the highest voter turnout possible,” he said. The measure ultimately failed in a roll call vote. Finally, Kristopeit motioned to package and approve the final three pieces of legislation – “President George Washington’s 276th Birthday Commemorative Resolution,” “President Abraham Lincoln’s 200th Birthday Commemorative Resolution” and the “Facebook Status Donation Act.” The latter formally asks SA Senators to use their Facebook accounts to promote SA initiatives. The vote to package and approve the three bills passed. The meeting was adjourned at 8:47 p.m., lasting roughly two hours and 15 minutes.


 February 23, 2009

The UWM Post

An educating experience

Senior-laden Bison drop Panthers By Mitch Gallagher Staff Writer sports@uwmpost.com

The UW–Milwaukee Panthers couldn’t overcome the hot shooting of the North Dakota State Bison on Saturday as they fell, 77-69. The Panthers played well, having five players score more than 10 points. Milwaukee was led by James Eayrs and Ricky Franklin who had 14 points each. They made few mistakes throughout the evening, com-

mitting just five turnovers and grabbing 17 offensive rebounds. The Panthers couldn’t find the bottom of the net, however, shooting just 36.8 percent from the field. The Bison, on the other hand, put on a clinic. In basketball, you always want the high percentage shot, and many of North Dakota State’s points came off easy layups both on the fast break and from the half court set. Mike Nelson scored 22 points for North Dakota State and the Bison shot 52.5 percent from the field. The Panthers were able to stay with the Bison for the first half, making baskets when it counted to keep it close. “It came down to a difference

between their fifth-year seniors and the battles that they’ve been through and the lessons that they’ve learned, and we’re still learning a few,” said Milwaukee head coach Rob Jeter. The score was 34-31 at halftime. The Bison then assumed control early in the second half when they extended their lead to 44-31. After that the closest Milwaukee got was 57-52 with 7:30 left in the game. It seemed every time Milwaukee would get within five, the Bison would have an answer right back for them. The Panthers now finish the regular season on the road with a pair of games starting with Wright State Thursday night.

Panthers roller coaster ride continues

Senior guard Avery Smith drives to the basket during the Panther’s 6360 victory over Butler. Post photo by Jared Guess

The bigger they are… First home win over top-25 team in regular season history By Tim Prahl Assistant Sports Editor sports@uwmpost.com

It was a state of absolute euphoria and chaos rolled into one. People of all ages were running around, just trying to share their joy with whomever possible. What caused this sudden outburst of bromance? The UW-Milwaukee men’s basketball team notched their first ever regular-season win over a ranked opponent Wednesday night, as they defeated 21st ranked Butler University 63-60. “I really don’t know what to say; I guess I’m speechless,” Panther Head Coach Rob Jeter said after the celebration on the court. “I’m just so proud of the guys, how they’ve handled themselves over the week. I’m so proud that they really fought from the beginning. We just had timely plays by everyone, not just one guy. The entire team deserves to enjoy this.” Milwaukee came out of the gates and really took it to the Bulldogs. From the opening tip on, the Panthers showed they were not afraid of Butler’s national ranking or top spot in the league. At halftime, this game resembled something the Big Ten would put out on the court. Neither team shot the ball well, which led to a 29-23 lead by Milwaukee at the break. Coach Jeter must have really

given his guys a boost though, as they came out of the locker room with an 8-2 run to stretch their lead to 37-25. The Bulldogs had plenty of fight in them though, and were not about to go down that easily. Sophomore phenom Matt Howard seemed to will his team back into the game, maneuvering his way for 20 points overall. “He’s a lot quicker than me, but I think I’m a littler stronger,” said James “Big Lumber” Eayrs after the game. “I thought we played defense for the whole 40 minutes, and our intensity was out of this world.” But when the pressure was at its highest, the Panthers didn’t fold under its weight. With 1:36 to play, Milwaukee’s lead was whittled down to just two. Avery Smith made a huge steal, and Tone Boyle rebounded his own miss before Butler finally fouled Ricky Franklin with 5.9 ticks left on the clock. Franklin only made one though, leaving the prolific three-point shooting program from Hoosier-ville one last chance. Zach Hahn’s last-second shot didn’t get off before the buzzer, however, and the game was over. Or was it? It appeared the clock started a bit before it should have, but the officials said they couldn’t tell from monitor review and the game was over. “Who knows what happened out there,” Jeter said when asked about questionable clock running. “It was so crazy.”

Sophomore guard Ashley Imperiale draws her defender to the arc during the Panther’s Thursday night bout with Loyola. Post photo by Jared Guess

Ramblers knock off Milwaukee at home By Steve Manske Staff Writer sports@uwmpost.com

When the Panthers women’s basketball team took the court last Thursday night they expected to come away with their first two-game winning streak since November. However, the Loyola Ramblers (7-16, 2-11) were unwelcome guests, defeating the Panthers 70-66 at the Klotsche Center. The Ramblers took their first lead at 4-2 with 17:56 to go in the first half and would never trail after that. The Panthers were in trouble when they fell down as many as 13 points late in the first half at 27-14 before cutting the lead to 35-28 at intermission. The Panthers would continue their comeback effort by tying the game for the last time at 43 with 8:36 to play. Shortly after tying it, the Ramblers would go on a 15-5

run that put the Ramblers up 58-48 with 4:17 to play. Coach Sandy Botham commented on how frustrating it was never to take the lead. “We [tied the game] but then missed layup, missed jumper. Then they come down and hit a three. That was kind of it; that’s what we’ve been struggling with, making plays down the stretch and executing consistently,” Botham said.

“We [tied the game] but then missed layup, missed jumper. Then they come down and hit a three. That was kind of it; that’s what we’ve been struggling with, making plays down the stretch and executing consistently.” – Sandy Botham, Head Coach The Panthers would make one last effort to come back, but eventually time ran out and they lost. What made things so disappointing was that this

was the first loss to Loyola in 11 games and it was the first time Loyola won in Milwaukee in 21 years. After the game, Botham gave credit to the Ramblers for their hard-fought victory. “Loyola played really well. Give them a lot of credit. They imposed their will on us and shot extremely well. Their strength is shooting, and they did it well. We had a tough time guarding it. We made great runs, but it’s the story of our season, just not being able to finish it,” she said. One of the few consistent forces on Milwaukee’s side was Traci Edwards, who tried to carry the team on her shoulders to victory with 32 points and 14 rebounds. The other key Panther contributors were Lindsay Laur with eight points and Markita Barnes with seven. The Ramblers were led by Maggie McCloskey who garnered 18 points, including four three-pointers. The loss dropped the Panthers to 11-14 before their game against UIC on Saturday night. The Panthers will finish up their conference schedule on the road against Butler, Valparaiso and Green Bay.


February 23, 2009 

uwmpost.com

#6 Arizona State Senior spectacular burns Panthers Baseball begins season on wrong end of sweep By Jimmy Lemke Sports Editor sports@uwmpost.com

As they traveled to Arizona to open their season, the last thing on the minds of the Panthers was the warm weather (at least in comparison to Wisconsin). They were fixated on trying to come away with a win or four in Tempe to start their season off on the right foot. That didn’t happen, however, as the Milwaukee Panthers baseball team were burnt by the Sun Devils, 15-3, 13-5 and 14-1 this weekend in Arizona. Milwaukee’s offense got off to a horrendous start, getting shutout for six innings to open the season by Sun Devil ace Josh Spence. Spence struck out six Panthers in the first game of the series. While the Panthers’ offensive strength was in check, it certainly was an offensive performance for Arizona State. The Sun Devils belted a two-run home run in the first inning, then jumped all over Milwaukee starter Brad Lusti with four more round trippers in the second. That was all the offense ASU would need, starting the game 6-0 and not looking back.

In the first game of the Saturday doubleheader, the Panthers struck first, scoring off of a single by Ben Long that brought home Cole Kraft. The Panthers would give the lead away quickly, with the Sun Devils scoring three runs off of Andy Hetebrueg in the bottom half of the first. Hetebrueg would go on to give up eight runs in the contest, which proved too much for the Panthers’ bats to overcome, 13-5. The Panthers would collect two runs in each of the seventh and ninth innings in the game. The nightcap showed another Sun Devil pitching gem. Seth Blair pitched nearly six shutout innings for Arizona State, the second time in as many days that they did as such. Blair gave up the lone Panther run at the end of his sixth, a single by Shawn Wozniak that drove in Andy Gerhartz. The final game of the series was played after the Post went to print. All in all, the Panthers got to see what a national title contender looks like in their first series. Their warm weather games continue this weekend, as the Panthers head to the Jacksonville Invitational to take on Michigan, Akron and Jacksonville.

A Wink and a Nod

CC Who? By Brett Winkler Columnist sports@uwmpost.com

We expected CC Sabathia to sign a huge contract with the Yankees, who are fighting to stay under the salary cap currently set at infinity. We expected Ben Sheets to limp his way out of Milwaukee after eight years with the club (though we didn’t expect him to read a few chapters from the “How to end your career with a Wisconsin sports team” handbook, written by Brett Favre, edited by Gary Sheffield, with illustrations by Javon Walker). We expected a long, cold and uneventful winter, rather than a huge splash in the shallow, costly free agent waters. The question is: what can we expect from the Milwaukee Brewers starting rotation in 2009? Yovani Gallardo returns this spring with both knees intact and plans to be the Brewers’ ace, regardless of what Ken Macha will have you believe. Manny Parra will take his lumps along the way, but the lefty will likely prove to be a reliable starter for the Crew this season.

A look at the Brewers’ new starting rotation Blending in nicely with the promising youngsters are journeymen Jeff Suppan and recently acquired Braden Looper. The Suppan signing, aside from the fact that it showed the Brewers’ willingness to spend some money and turn the fortunes of the franchise around, has obviously been a mistake. Soup will eat up roughly $25 million of the Brewers’ payroll

After struggling through much of April and May last year, Bush developed into a very productive pitcher for the Crew. Under the shadow of a 6-foot7-inch, 290-pound godsend, Bush quietly had himself an excellent summer, including a 4-0 August with a 2.12 ERA. over the next two years, and at that price he’ll need to do better than the 22-22 record and 4.78 ERA he’s amassed so far in Milwaukee. Fortunately, Doug Melvin’s love of the 2006 Cardinals

See WINK page 10

Four Panthers reach double figures on Senior Day By Jimmy Lemke Sports Editor sports@uwmpost.com

It was quite a fitting exit. When she was replaced late in the second half of Milwaukee’s 70-49 victory over UIC, senior center Traci Edwards got a standing ovation from the crowd. It was the least they could do for the first player in state history to rack up 2,000 points and 1,000 rebounds in a career. The only thing that would have made it perfect is if Edwards were to leave another double-double on the court. She only had seven rebounds, good enough to lead the team. Unlike many games over the past four years, UWMilwaukee didn’t need her to have a double-double. The Panthers ran out of the gates to a 25-9 lead just 13 minutes into the game. With the 16-point lead, the Panthers looked to put the game away early, but a Flames’ run brought the game within 10 points. Milwaukee, which has buckled under opposing runs several times this season, responded with one of their own, going on a 10-2 run to bring the first stanza to a close, 34-17. Milwaukee forced the Flames into 18 turnovers and just 25.8 percent shooting, which kept UIC at bay for the rest of the game. A lot of the Flames’

Senior guard Markita Barnes pushes down-court during the UWM’s 7049 victory over UIC, Saturday. Post photo by Steve Taylor struggles had to do with the absence of Shameia Green, the team’s point guard and one of their leading scorers. The Panthers were led not by Edwards but by Lindsay Laur, who scored 15 points to go with her five rebounds on 7-10 shooting. Edwards had 11 points and 7 boards, while Turquoise McCain had 14 points and four rebounds

and Markita Barnes had 10 and six. Of the four, only Laur was not a senior. Following the game, Sandy Botham said, “It was just a good win to go out for our seniors, too, with all they’ve committed to this program over the four years that they’ve been here. So, it’s nice for them to go out with a win.”


10 February 23, 2009

The UWM Post

WINK

f the w o t e a t

pect Bush to emerge as the leader of the rotation. He’s no Sabathia or Sheets, but Bush can do much more than be the only white guy on the team who looks good in a Milwaukee Bears throwback uniform. After struggling through much of April and May last year, Bush developed into a very productive pitcher for the Crew. Under the shadow of a 6-foot-7-inch, 290-pound godsend, Bush quietly had himself an excellent summer, including a 4-0 August with a 2.12 ERA. His struggles on the road are well-documented, thanks to the monumentally awesome home/away platoon between Bush and Seth McClung last season, but the discrepancy between his home (3.50 ERA in ‘08) and away (5.14) numbers should narrow as he becomes more consistent this season. Bush doesn’t walk a lot of batters and if he can continue to avoid giving up the big inning, the Brewers might be not be in bad shape on the mound in 2009 after all. If Bush or Suppan or any (Suppan) of the other pitchers (Suppan) don’t come through (Suppan), McClung is always an option, as is Trevor Hoffman’s possible understudy, Carlos Villanueva. Losing Sabathia and Sheets is tough, but when all is said and done, we can expect this Brewers’ rotation to exceed expectations.

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led him to pick Looper out of the Continued from page  bargain bin at a modest price. Looper bounced back from a rough 2007 to put together a solid 2008 campaign, and his career 3.93 ERA and experience are welcome additions to the rotation. Macha’s reluctance to put too much pressure on Gallardo could open the door for Looper to become the go-to guy, if not for one other pitcher: David Thomas Bush. While Gallardo serves as the ace-elect, ex-

Tennis swept IUPUI 7-0 on Saturday. The last time the Panthers lost at home in the Paley Tennis Center was April 16th, 2008.

Cheeks

My top 10 dream vacations Sports travel, part one By Ken “Cheeks” Ryan Staff Writer sports@uwmpost.com

Due to the fact that February is an incredibly slow sports month, my next two columns will focus on a somewhat fun topic, sports-related travel. Next week’s installment will focus on the 2009 Wisconsin Sports Summer Calendar. As for this week, here are 10 events I would love to attend before the good Lord taps me on the shoulder. 10. Daytona 500: I’m not a big NASCAR fan whatsoever, but it’s one of those deals that I’d like to do just to say I did it. It’s in Florida over the winter, there’s plenty of beer- and whiskey-consumption and it’s a big-time event. Works for me. Put me down for one (and only one). 9. National Championship in Pasadena: Like NASCAR, I hardly pay much attention to college football due to the Bowl Championship Series, in addition to all the other bells and whistles that make it amateur hour. But I would like to see the “championship” played in one of the most scenic and historic venues in all of sports: the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif. 8. Kentucky Derby: Girls in fancy hats tend to be very proper. You’ll find all of that and then some at the pinnacle of horse racing at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky. Take a flyer on a pony with long odds and see if you can’t go home with a boatload of cash thanks to what is known as the “two most exciting minutes in sports.” 7. The Masters Tournament: Four weeks a year, I turn into a huge golf fan (if Tiger Woods is healthy and in contention). The Masters Tournament in Augusta, Ga. combines one of the most challenging courses in golf with the coveted Green Jacket prize, white uniforms for the caddies, phenomenal outdoor beauty and landscaping and one of the coolest logos in sports - a pin sticking through Georgia. The first of four major tournaments each year, it’s the only one that does not rotate sites. 6. Baseball East Coast swing: I have a buddy that made this trip a couple summers ago, and it sounded pretty awesome. All of the following have relatively new stadiums or historic stadiums with incredible skylines. The itinerary: fly into Cleveland, rent a car and attend a game at Jacobs Field. From there it’s off to PNC Park in Pittsburgh, then to the nation’s capital for a game at Nationals Park. After

that, head up I-95 to Camden Yards in Baltimore, Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia, New Yankee Stadium (with a stop at the site of the past mecca) and New Shea Stadium in New York City before cashing in that rental with a stop at historic Fenway Park in Boston. That’s eight memorable baseball stadiums in just eight days. 5. British Open at Royal St. Andrews: For an international feeling, a trip to the very birthplace of the game is essential for any golf follower. Ancient history fills the air each time the Open Championship returns to Royal St. Andrews. 4. A UWM Division One Football Game: Unfortunately, this might be the most unrealistic on the list since, you know, UWM doesn’t have Division I football despite enrolling 30,000 students in a football-crazy state. I say hack down the Downer Woods and build a useable stadium on it. It’s no secret there is a lack of student spirit here. Being the college students that we are, we are pulled in a million different directions. Receive a few donations from alumni, institute a football program and that will change very quickly. 3. Clinching the NFC Championship at Lambeau: Perhaps a few of you reading this were at the NFC Title tilt against New York in January 2008, only to see the heartbreaking overtime defeat. What if that was Mason Crosby in the next couple years delivering the game-winning field goal? Lambeau would be a madhouse, tears would be flowing as free as the beer and I wouldn’t sleep for a week. It’ll be freezing cold, no doubt, but a Packers Super Bowl send-off would provide goose bumps to last a lifetime. 2. A Brewers World Series Game: Imagine game seven at Miller Park with Yovani Gallardo on the bump. Or a border war in the Minnesota Twins’ new ballpark next year. Milwaukee has been to just one World Series since the Milwaukee Braves in 1958 – the fabled second-place team of 1982. If this city has half the juice it had 27 years ago, it would be insane. 1. Packers Super Bowl: The pinnacle of sports dreams. Imagine being in San Diego, Phoenix or New Orleans all week with a bunch of your buddies as our beloved Packers set to gain St. Vince’s trophy. Hell, it could be Siberia and it would still be the time of your life. Being there as the Green and Gold capture the NFL crown would be a moment one would never forget. There you have it, my top 10. Care to comment or provide yours? email me at krryan@ uwm.edu.


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12 February 23, 2009

The UWM Post

The king of fighters returns QCF+P never looked so good By Darin Kwilinski Asst. fringe Editor fringe@uwmpost.com

The phrase “the more things change, the more they stay the same” is an accurate way to describe “Street Fighter IV.” While the series hasn’t deviated far from its core game play since the wildly popular “Street Fighter II,” the latest installment offers new mechanics that keep it fresh. This sets it apart from other fighting games and makes it the only one you’ll need for a long while. As in a majority of fighting games, the story exists solely as a reason for the fighters to congregate and duke it out. “Street Fighter IV” does this as well and with style, giving each character an anime beginning and ending.

The game retains many of the familiar faces from “Street Fighter II” but adds some new ones to the mix, four to be exact, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. Through the traditional arcade mode you’ll fight six random opponents, your rival and then the new boss Seth, who is mixture of all of the fighters in the game. The rival fight is given special treatment, as each fighter is granted an in-game cut

Balrog unleases a flashy Focus attack on newcomer Abel. Image courtesy Campcorm Entertainment. scene to set the stage. It’s a nice touch that adds another layer, albeit a thin one, to the short arcade mode. Beyond arcade you have the traditional time attack, verses and survival mode, as well as training and trial modes where you can practice your skills. Lastly, online battles are present, with ranks, medals, titles and battle points (another measure of a player’s skill) awarded to give you more purpose to play against a human opponent. All of these offerings are fairly basic for any fighting game, but it’s the fighting system that has changed slightly. You still have powered up EX moves, but you can modify them into EX Focus

moves, allowing you to stop a special move mid–attack and follow up with some devastating combos or super moves. Also new is the Focus attack, which not only looks cool, but adds more variety to the fights. Depending on how long you charge the Focus attack you’ll get different results, ranging from armor breaking to absorbing an attack. It’s an invaluable asset to an already deep fighting system. The game retains many of the familiar faces from “Street Fighter II,” but adds some new ones to the mix, four to be exact, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. Ken and Ryu’s master Gouken is just one of the

nine unlockable characters. However, wthe Xbox 360 controller makes pulling off the cinematic Ultra combos more difficult than fixing the economy. The D-Pad and analog stick just aren’t up to the task of supplying a decent avenue of success. It’s not impossible to play the game with the basic Xbox 360 controller, but the hardcore gamers will look for other gamepads to bypass the frustration of losing. The computer can also be a little unfair at times. Watching Ken get pile-driven by Zangief on the medium difficult five times in a row gets old fast and the boss Seth is not shy about using his throw over and over

again, either. Beyond that, the game is golden. Its new 3-D aesthetic on a 2-D playing field looks great, the game play is fast and furious and it’s a blast to take online. It’s accessible for newcomers but deep enough for the committed. “Street Fighter IV” has changed its look and added some new moves to its arsenal, but its fighting roots shine through and it remains the best fighting game around.

Street Fighter IV Platforms: Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 Cost: $59.99

What a drag (show)! Where boys will be girls and girls will be boys By Melissa Campbell fringe Editor fringe@uwmpost.com

LGBT Resource Center staff hand out condoms and take donations for its youth organization, Project Q, in a large yellow bucket at the door on Saturday night at 8 p.m. The show isn’t set to start for another 30 minutes, but already the 500 seats are packed. Pop songs from Pink, Britney and Christina entertain them.

Jo Mama and Isis kicked off the two-hour show before providing plenty of witty drag smack between each performance. “She looks good in orange,” Isis commented of queen Jessica Property. “Maybe it’s because she’s round like a pumpkin.” And just like any award show, Isis made no less than four costume changes throughout the show. The show featured a healthy mix of drag kings and queens, a balance that the emcees mention

The real showstopper of the night in both her performances was the 11-year drag show veteran Lady Gia, whose mostly naked body would make any girl jealous and any boy salivate. “We are grateful that you braved the Wisconsin winter,” says LGBT Resource Center Director Jen Murray. Obviously, several inches of snow and poorly plowed roads couldn’t keep them from UW-Milwaukee’s Annual Drag Show. The events charming emcees

throughout. One notable king was Charlie Walker, whose enigmatic performance of George Michael’s “Faith,” complete with leather jacket and shades, was a crowd pleaser. Some handed him tips, or placed them in the buckets, but one woman held a dollar bill in her mouth, which

he happily removed with his. Two performers, Anastasia and Beija, made long-distance trips just to appear this night, the former from Florida and the latter from Denver. Anastasia came out in a long fur coat performing Sheila E’s “Glamorous Life,” echoing perfectly the song’s first lyric: She wears a long fur coat of mink. But she revealed the real surprise when she dropped the coat—a barelythere leotard and perfect set of legs. The crowd went visibly wild. The real showstopper of the night in both her performances was the 11-year drag show veteran Lady Gia, whose mostly naked body would make any girl jealous and any boy salivate. Her first outfit consisted of a blue glitter top, and nothing but a carefully placed pasty down below. Later she wore the same style top, this time in rainbow fringe, with a thong and kneehigh leg warmers in matching material.

See DRAG page 21

Photographers go wild as a model shows his stuff during Saturday night’s drag show in the UWM Ballroom. Post photo by Daryl Stoll


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February 23, 2009 13

“I Love the Eisner” does it again Vintage Cuban theme a hit By Kate Pociask Special to the Post fringe@uwmpost.com

The Eisner American Museum of Advertising & Design held its fifth annual “I Love the Eisner” event on Friday, Feb. 20. “I Love the Eisner” is in actuality a fundraiser, but one would never know because it feels more like a great party. In fact, it is the Eisner’s ability to throw a really great party that has saved it as an institution. The first fundraiser was held in 2004, after MIAD had to cut the museum’s funding due to a budget deficit. The museum is the only one of its kind in this country, the kind of establishment that would seem to put Milwaukee on the map.

Museum directors were anticipating another successful turnout this year due to excitement about its theme: “1950s Cuban Getaway.” Local ad professionals volunteered to be part of a 22-person advisory committee to save the museum and oversee it during its fledgling years. The first “I Love the Eisner” event was hugely successful, generating $50,000 and doubling museum membership. Museum directors were anticipating another successful turnout this year due to excitement about its theme: “1950s Cuban Getaway.” The event always includes a silent auction, where attendees bid on art and items that range from quirky “I love meat” sticker sets to educational zoo and museum passes to luxurious salon and spa services. With this year’s theme, the event also featured Cuban food,

music, dancing, cigar girls (with chocolate cigars) and casino gambling. The invitation promised to transport revelers back to the glamour and excitement of a Cuban vacation in the 1950s. Nine area restaurants tried their hand at traditional Cuban food. Fare included pulled pork with black beans and rice, and appetizers like plantain chips. Many of the caterers, like The Milwaukee Ale House and Palms Bistro, are the Eisner’s neighbors in the Third Ward. It’s a shame that Hemingway’s Habana Vieja in Walker’s Point is closed; their extraordinary plantain chips would have been right at home at this event. The excitement level shot up when everyone piled upstairs into the Upper Gallery, where the casino gaming tables opened up and the salsa band started tuning their instruments. Each guest got $200 in chips at the door to toss around at craps, pai gow, poker and blackjack tables or the roulette wheel. Clave y Afinque, a nine-piece Cuban band complete with bongos and flute, kept the dance floor energy high with their electronic and synthesized salsa and merengue. The “I Love the Eisner” themed tradition that began in 2006, when the event fell near Valentine’s Day, featured an Aretha Franklin impersonator, go-go dancers and “kissing bandits” as Eisner Program director Katie Sorensen called them. Last year, the event was carnival-and sideshow-themed and featured an appearance by a bearded lady. The creative minds at the Eisner set the bar a little higher this year with their Cuban night. The “I Love the Eisner” event happens once a year, but is definitely worth the price of admission. When the Eisner throws a party, they go all out, palm fronds and all.

Celebrating womanhood “Vagina Monologues” delights and disarms

Post photo by Lia Manning By Lia Manning Staff Writer fringe@uwmpost.com

On Thursday, Feb. 19 and Friday, Feb. 20 the UWMilwaukee Women’s Resource Center sponsored a production of Eve Ensler’s “The Vagina Monologues,” just one of many benefit performances across America in honor of VDay, a global movement to end violence against women. UWM’s performance raised money and awareness for Milwaukee’s anti-

gender-violence groups and the Republic of Congo. I wasn’t completely thrilled to see it ahead of time, but I thought of the show as a way to step out of my comfort zone. I felt that as a woman I should see it, and I’m glad that I did. The production value was superb, the themes resonated with me and it was refreshing to see a large diverse crowd, including sign language interpreters who took the show to a new level for deaf viewers.

See MONOLOGUES page 21

Cuban themes drew large crowds to the Eisner Museum Friday night, as part of the “I Love the Eisner” event. Burger Boy photo by Sam Hogerton and Interior of The Eisner by Kate Pociask


fringe

14 February 23, 2009

The UWM Post

From Gucci to Prada “Shopaholic” perfect for the burgeoning fashionista

bring a smile to your face. Any girl who knows what it feels like to stare longingly through a storefront window at a pair of hand-crafted Italian leather boots can relate to Beck’s reaction to her empty wallet. Her high-class taste is a product of an unrealistic and heightened reality which a select group of people in society actually embody. But her ridiculous fashion choices are nevertheless endearing, much like those of “Sex and the City’s” Carrie Bradshaw.

Any girl who knows what it feels like to stare longingly through a storefront window at a pair of hand-crafted Italian leather boots can relate to Beck’s reaction to her empty wallet.

Still courtesy of Touchstone Pictures By Savannah Hunnicutt Staff Writer fringe@uwmpost.com

When self-acclaimed shopaholic Rebecca “Becks” Bloomwood (Isla Fisher) finds herself literally Prada-bags-deep in

credit card debt, she looks for a job to pay her bills and help her roommate Suze (Krysten Ritter) with the rent. After being turned down by high-profile fashion magazine Allete, Becks settles for a less glamorous job at a financial journal. Based on Sophie Kinsella’s novel, “Confessions of a Shopaholic” is a must-

see for any girl who appreciates fashion and knows what it’s like to shop on a budget. The story will hit close to home for any girl, whether thoroughly fashion-obsessed or personally affected by a job loss or pay-cut during this economic crisis. This feel-good film will no doubt

Through a hilarious sequence of events, Becks lands a regular column and finds herself the talk of New York City as anonymous columnist “The Girl in the Green Scarf.” Becks wins over the hearts of New Yorkers, and eventually her boss Luke (Hugh Dancy), with her incredible wit and honest attitude. You will laugh at what Becks will do for a pair of purple cashmere gloves or Gucci boots, and you may even swoon, whether at her adorable houndstooth coat or at Dancy’s signature smile. Even the men who get dragged along might find themselves smitten with Fisher’s charm and endearing sense of humor. When Becks is forced to confront a persistent debt collector, as well as her crippling shopping addiction, the audience can empathize with her economic troubles and admire the sassy attitude with which she takes them on. Joan Cusack and John Goodman also star as Becks’ frugal parents who help her overcome her addiction and realize what’s really important in life.

More than just a bloody good time Swedish film tells strange vampire love story By Melissa Campbell fringe Editor fringe@uwmpost.com

Tomas Alfredsson’s “Let the Right One In” (2008) is probably the sweetest and most endearing vampire movie you will ever see.

Even when dripping with blood, there is sadness to her violence that pulls at the heartstrings. That being said, the Swedish film, showing Feb. 27 through March 1 at the UW-Milwaukee Union Theatre, doesn’t skimp on blood or gore. A woman who has recently turned into a vampire spontaneously combusts when exposed to sunlight. A victim’s bloody hand reaches around the corner, its dying fingers smearing the crown molding with blood. But at its core is the unconventional love story that Alfredsson crafts be-

tween 12-year-old Oskar (Kåre Hedebrant), a bright yet isolated child who is constantly bullied at school, and his mysterious new neighbor Eli (Lina Leandersson), who is “twelve, more or less.” Coupled with lush landscape photography, the result is a film as chilling as it is charming. From the very beginning, we know something is strange about Eli—she sits in the snow for hours in short sleeves and bare feet. When Oskar asks, “Aren’t you cold?” she replies, “No, I guess I’ve forgotten how.” The story unfolds slowly, with long shots that build tension as they frustrate. We know what is afoot, yet we must wait through quiet moments between Oskar and Eli before our suspicions are confirmed. First, Eli’s father attacks a young man in the woods, hanging him upside down in a tree, cutting his throat and draining the blood into a milk jug using a funnel. Three teens, searching for their dog, interrupt him, and he is forced to leave the scene emptyhanded. Though his screen time is brief, he is the saddest character in the film, as his attempts to feed his daughter’s growing appetite are never fulfilled.

Still image courtesy Magnolia Pictures The film shines in its portrayal of Oskar and Eli’s relationship, which is set against a backdrop of a small town turned upside down by a rash of attacks (at the hands of Eli and her father). The moments between the two are neither grand nor monumental, but it is their simplicity that gives them poignancy. Oskar gives Eli a Rubik’s cube one evening, and much to his amazement, he finds it the next day, completed. Show me how you did it, he asks. I just twisted it, she replies. Later, he decides to teach Eli Morse code, so that the two can converse at the wall they

share. Long, short, long spells out their budding romance. A lonely boy finds solace in the arms of a vampire. Not your typical love story, but the surprising performances by Hedebrant and Leandersson make us believe it. They bring aching realism to a film otherwise rooted in fantasy. Hedebrant especially shines in the scenes where he is being bullied. Despite the fact that he has very little dialogue, he conveys a lot of emotion with very small actions, no small feat. Likewise, Leandersson conveys the inner turmoil and constant pain of someone forced into that life at such a young age.

Even when dripping with blood, there is sadness to her violence that pulls at the heartstrings. While it has all the components of a horror film, “Let the Right One In” does what few of them do—it tells a great story about a boy and a vampire.

If you go “Let the Right One In” Friday Feb. 27 @ 7 & 9:30 p.m. Saturday Feb. 28 @ 4:30, 7, & 9:30 p.m.; Sunday March 1 @ 4:30 & 7 p.m. $4 students, $6 general public.


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February 23, 2009 15

Eagles of Death Metal fly but don’t quite soar Live set hardly a match for flawless recordings By Alex Rewey fringe Editor fringe@uwmpost.com

In their extremely short career, quasi-joke-bandturned-70s-rock-champions Eagles of Death Metal should be quite proud of their catalogue of energetic, sleaze-drizzled Southern cockrock. However, despite their characteristically wild shtick, their Feb. 15 performance at the Rave’s Eagles Club felt distinctly lacking in parts.

Ditching some of his trademark shrill and precise pitches found on nearly every Eagles track, Hughes’ vocals came off as rather flat by comparison.

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Fueled by the childhood friendship of frontman Jesse Hughes and Josh Homme of Queens of the Stone Age and front man Jesse Hughes, EoDM is well-known for the simple, infectious fuzz riffs, as well as the nostalgically sexual lyrics from their powerhouse debut “Peace Love Death Metal.” Their 2008 junior release “Heart On” even proved the duo capable of breaking form with their QotSAheavy musical style. However, due to Homme’s ongoing commitments to his original band, he rarely tours

with the group, leaving a sizable hole in the stage lineup. Instead, Hughes relies on an accomplished touring group including former Danzig drummer Joey Castillo. Emerging to Kool and the Gang’s “Ladies Night” and sporting one of his own “Mustache Rides” tour shirts, the eccentric Hughes launched briskly into the disgustingly likeable “Cherry Cola” from 2006’s “Death by Sexy.” The raucous track serves as a kind of microcosm for the group’s uniquely vintage persona, which Hughes and company delivered with vigor. However, the opening high seemed to abruptly subside as it became apparent that this live performance would be a bit different than their recordings. Ditching some of his trademark shrill, precise pitches found on nearly every Eagles track, Hughes’ vocals came off as rather flat by comparison. It was precisely this lax approach that seemed to numb otherwise sensationally unruly tracks like “Bad Dream Mama” and “English Girl.” While the pristine guitar work from Hughes and Dave Catching remained intact for the most part, the lackluster vocal work sadly drained some of slinkiness from what would have been a stellar set list. Mainly sticking to cuts from their first two albums, only a


16 February 23, 2009

fringe

The UWM Post

The melancholy of M. Ward Americana’s beloved troubadour triumphs with latest release By Trapper Schoepp Special to the Post fringe@uwmpost.com

For Portland-based singer-songwriter M. Ward, sorrow seems to hold a special place in writing. After the success of his side project, She & Him, and his acclaimed 2006 release “Post-War,” M. Ward is back with another assortment of heartfelt folk anthems. In “Hold Time,” Ward poignantly moves from song to song showcasing a deep nostalgia for music of the past. M. Ward, who substitutes Matt for just the initial M., is known for his raspy, reverb-filled vocals, which often resemble the sound of singing into a megaphone. Ward often keeps his songs to sparse, acoustic arrangements that shuffle their way into recurring, spacey choruses. While his music is wholly original, it often resembles early R&B and shows many traces of a calmed Tom Waits. Ward takes many cues from his musical elders on “Hold Time,” while also throwing a few covers into the mix. Ward, alongside alt-country legend Lucinda Williams, successfully made Don Gibson’s “Oh Lonesome Me,” their own. The two raspy singers compliment each other nicely, finding a perfect balance within the heartbreaking country classic. Ward also tries out “Rave On,” a love song popularized by the late Buddy Holly. Ward mixes bluesy rhythms with his signature vocal tones and echoing guitar riffs to create a completely unique take on the timeless Buddy Holly tune. While the covers on “Hold Time” are exceptional, it’s his original compositions that stand out from the rest. Ward’s lyrics focus heavily on the subjects of morality, love and death, and they are not always easy to take in. Diverse ranges of emotion thrive throughout the record. The collection as a whole feels almost like a short-lived mood swing by its end. On the opening track, “For Beginners,” Ward delivers biblical insights in his almost-whispering voice, accompanied by his soft acoustic guitar. He sings, “They say the original sinners never felt a drop of pain/ Until that second in the garden, then they felt it each and/ every day.”

Cover art courtesy of Merge Records

“Hold Time” M. Ward Released Feb. 17, 2009 Before the eminence of the opening track can be processed, a lively kick drum moves the listener into the most upbeat song of the album, “Never Had Nobody Like You.” Gleefully reflecting on a relationship, Ward sings alongside She & Him member Zooey Deschanel in Jackson Five style, “And it’s just like ABC/ Life’s just like 123.” The song conveys the thrills of attaining new love. Ward’s voice sounds almost giddy, in complete contrast with the first song on the album. The displayed optimism quickly changes in the next song, “Jailbird,” whose chorus repeatedly pleads, “Help me, help me.” The trend of emotional ups and downs continues throughout and the album coming to a heartrending peak in “Blake’s View.” Ward discusses death in lines like “Birth is just a chorus, death is just a verse,” and “you say you lost your one and only, could it possibly get/ any worse?” After two minutes and 30 seconds the song abruptly ends, possibly in respect to the suddenness of the death discussed. Though the songs on “Hold Time” often sound like they were crafted in a different era, M. Ward really makes it work. In “Stars of Leo” Ward croons, “I get so low I need a little pick-me-up I get so high I need a bring-me-down.” M. Ward offers both of these remedies in his latest release and has made a record that will, truly, hold time.

Cover art courtesy Anti Records

Mission accomplished …sort of N.A.S.A. launches star-studded, so-so debut By Jacob Schneider Staff Writer fringe@uwmpost.com

Forming an instant bond around their mutual love for Brazilian funk and soul records after meeting at an industry party seven years ago, L.A.’s Sam Spiegel, aka “Squeak E. Clean,” and Sao Paolo’s Ze Gonzales, aka “DJ Zeegon,” have released their debut album, “The Spirit of Apollo.” As N.A.S.A., an acronym standing for North America/ South America, the duo look to show the rest of the world what the Western hemisphere is musically capable of.

Understandably, one of the drawbacks of an arsenal of guest performers is N.A.S.A.’s inability to showcase their own talents. Giving music lovers the best of both worlds, N.A.S.A. takes both East and West Coast hiphop acts and pairs them up over world beats, while also throwing world class guitarists, vocalists and DJs into the mix. That being said, the album’s guest list reads like the lineup of any major music festival. Featuring cameos from more than 40 artists, guests include Kanye West, M.I.A. Chuck D., David Byrne, Ol’ Dirty Bastard, John Frusciante, KRS-One, Method Man, Karen O., Tom Waits, RZA, Ghostface Killa, Qbert, Scarface and George Clinton just to name a few. At the beginning of the project, Spiegel and Gonzales wrote a “dream team” list of artists they would like to work with on a dry erase board in their studio. Five years later, 80 percent of those requests were fulfilled. It would seem that organizing studio time for that many contributors would be impossibly difficult, not to mention

“The Spirit of Apollo” N.A.S.A. Released Feb. 17, 2009

extremely expensive to accomplish, but in Spiegel’s case, it didn’t hurt that his older brother just so happens to be famed music video director Spike Jonze. Understandably, one of the drawbacks of an arsenal of guest performers is N.A.S.A.’s inability to showcase their own talents. The majority of the beats are fresh, but in most cases they lack scratching, there are no skits and there is only one instrumental on the entire album. In effect, N.A.S.A. chose to ignore the success that artists like DJ Shadow and Gorillaz have had using these types of formulas. Regardless, with a surplus of talent this large, at the end of the day there are bound to be moments that shine. A deserved mention is the Karen O, Fatlip and ODB track titled “Strange Enough.” Karen O handles the hook while Fatlip and Dirt Dog trade rhymes about kicking bad habits. Strangely enough, it turns out that this was one of the final tracks that Ol’ Dirty recorded prior to his death. Some of the combos that work really well on this album aren’t surprising at all. On the Kanye West and Santogold futuristic space jam, “Gifted,” West’s finely tuned lyrics and Santi’s vocals flow perfectly over its rolling bass line. The highlight of the record sure to be a favorite among critics is undoubtedly, “Spacious Thoughts,” featuring the unlikely duo of Kool Keith and Tom Waits. Keith’s bizarre and inexplicable nonsense rhymes about “James Brown’s pockets stuffed with Jolly Ranchers” are haunted by Waits’ smokehouse growl that paints the backdrop and the chorus. Unfortunately the ADD quality of the mixing quickly causes the album to often lose its fo-

See NASA page 17


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February 23, 2009 17

Long live the King Blues legend still at the top of his game By Michael Ray Staff Writer fringe@uwmpost.com

Haunting and emotional, B.B. King’s latest offering, “One Kind Favor,” finds the sweet spot and proves that the 83 year old is still at the top of his game. His voice feels raw, cutting the listener with simple yet heartbreaking lyrics. “Today’s been such a long, lonesome day/I’ve been just sittin’ here thinkin’/ with my mind a million miles away,” he cries in “Blues Before Sunrise.” Throughout, King looks back at his life, his love and his loss, and delivers a record that stands as one of his best.

His ability to make listeners believe those words makes his music particularly effective, and his somber yet hopeful inflection leaves us feeling sorry for a man who knows the answer to his own questions. Billed as a return to blues standards, “One Kind Favor” sets high expectations for itself and then sees fit to exceed every one of them in a delivery that is both timeless and innovative. King’s voice and guitar drive the album flawlessly. The backup band is superb but never overpowering, allowing this record to achieve a perfect balance rarely seen in an industry where every musician wants to be in the spotlight. King is given his due, and the songs are pure blues.

EAGLES

Continued from page 15 few “Heart On” songs managed to sneak into the lineup of its own promotional tour. The uncharacteristically melancholy ballad “Now I’m a Fool,” as well as the fist-pumping “Secret Plans,” came through flawlessly, despite the group’s overall restraint. Nevertheless, Hughes remained intent on once again parlaying his well-publicized “Devil” stage presence, flirting with audience members and even combing his mane and mustache in the reflection

NASA

Continued from page 16 cus. On “The Mayor,” Ghostface Killa’s East Coast grime and Scarface’s southern swagger are overshadowed by an unwelcome up-tempo beat that does more justice for the Cool Kids who handle the chorus. “Old School” finds KRS-One

Cover art courtesy of Interscope Records In “Tomorrow Night,” King exposes the transience of love and how all good things seem to fade away. “Tomorrow night, will you be with me when the moon is bright?/Tomorrow night, will you say those lovely things you said tonight?” Now, lyrics alone do not make a B.B. King song. His ability to make listeners believe those words makes his music particularly effective, and his somber yet hopeful inflection leaves us feeling sorry for a man who knows the answer to his own questions. So the brokenhearted King moves on beyond those questions. “The lonesome days, they have gone by/Why should you beg me and say goodbye?/But now she’s gone, I don’t worry/ I’m sitting on top of the world,” he sings in “Sitting On Top Of The World.” The tone is melancholic, and King’s voice is obviously pained, his self-deception apparent but comforting. We all do the same thing; at least he is

transparent about it. Lastly, King faces his own mortality in “See That My Grave Is Kept Clean.” “Well, my heart stopped beating/and my hands are cold./I believe just what the Bible told.” At his age, King is allowed to be a little retrospective, though the effect is chilling. As listeners, we also have to face the reality that the man whose name is synonymous with blues won’t always be with us. “Did you ever hear a church bell tone?/Then you know that the poor boy’s in the ground.” Luckily, King will leave behind a lifetime of music that runs the length of the emotional spectrum and has inspired countless musicians for generations.

of Catching’s polished steel Gibson between sets. Despite the lukewarm energy from the rest of the band members, the group still managed to deliver an eerie lead guitar duel on “Already Died,” as well as a hauntingly bizarre solo performance by Hughes of the group’s decadent murder riff “Midnight Creeper.” True to his classic rock roots, Hughes coaxed the rest of his band into an encore with an audience participatory cover of The Rolling Stones’ “Brown Sugar,” before launching into a final “Peace Love” push with hit “I Only Want You” and the supercharged hip-shaker “Speaking

in Tongues.” Eagles of Death Metal have already made a tremendous name for themselves due to their shameless representation of Hughes and Hommes’ most beloved era in music. While their animated alter-egos would suggest a rather unique live show, the absence of Homme as well as Hughes’ apparent struggles with reproducing some of his musicianship, ultimately put a slight damper on the performance as a whole. While Hughes and company certainly didn’t deliver a bad performance, those looking for the full get-up-and-shake experience of “Peace Love” may want

getting shown up lyrically by Fatlip and Slimkid3 of the Pharcyde. “Tha Teacha” comes off as a washed-up hip-hop veteran, with outdated grandpa rhymes trying to stay relevant in 2009. Not sure how this one made it on the final cut of the album. Perhaps the packed recording schedule excluded retakes. Ultimately, “Spirit of Apollo”

tries to pick up where Handsome Boy Modeling School left off, mixing and matching the who’s who of today’s music industry into a series of unforeseen collaborations expecting hip hop’s next mainstream breakthrough album. The final result delivers a collection of singles, some of them lackluster, but the majority should stand the test of time.

“One Kind Favor” B.B. King Released Aug. 26, 2008

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18 February 23, 2009

The UWM Post

Solidarity | Working class perspective

Darwin clearly correct Lack of scientific thinking plagues America By Nathan Johnson Columnist editorial@uwmpost.com

We recently celebrated the 200th birthday of historic scientist Charles Darwin. The occasion was used to revisit the smoldering debate on evolution versus creationism and other unscientific views. It isn’t the purpose of this editorial to explain step by step why evolution is correct. I don’t want to give creationism or “intelligent design” a semblance of validation by condescending to “defend” evolution. Anyone with a working understanding of science knows that the theory of evolution is as irrefutable as the fact that the earth is spherical and orbits the sun, while rational arguments and mountains of scientific evidence will never dissuade creationists, who page through their Bibles using opposable thumbs that look strikingly similar to those found on chimpanzees. Instead, the purpose of this editorial is to expose the roots of America’s ignorance regarding science. I have to admit that I was taken by surprise to see just how widespread this ignorance is. A Gallup poll just last week indicated that only 39 percent of Americans believe in “the theory of evolution” while 36 percent are undecided. In other words, less than half of Americans have a solid grasp of scientific thinking. Unsurprisingly, the more educated elements of society are more likely to believe in evolution – 21 percent for those with a high school education, 53 percent for college graduates and 74 percent for postgraduates. Of course, the majority of evolution deniers are hypocrites. For instance, when an evolution denier falls ill with a disease, all of a sudden scientific thinking is in style—the patient demands scientifically manufactured pills that will save his or her life. Essentially every commodity that we use in our daily lives was manufactured with the help of applied science. Science surrounds us, and yet for many it is only accepted on a pick-and-choose basis; it’s easier to drive that SUV without moral backlash if you can deceive yourself into believing that global climate change isn’t happening. What are the roots of this profound ignorance of scientific principles, which impoverishes the minds and culture of our nation and threatens the health

of our planet? Well, social consciousness reflects social being. If a society and mode of production are governed by irrational laws (what could be more irrational than putting profit before people?), you can only expect to see widespread irrational social consciousness. In the early years of capitalism, it was necessary to foster scientific understanding among the working class for the purposes of expanding industry. Once an upper layer of the working class had been developed to provide this necessary intellectual labor, the push for science diminished to such an extent that, according to a 2008 Christopher Swanson report called “Cities in Crisis,” some of the largest U.S. cities today have an average high school graduation rate of barely over 50 percent. The scientific community was atomized from the rest of the working class through the division of labor and relatively higher wages. Critical scientific thinking applied to improving efficiency in the means of production, developing more profitable commodities, and producing technological innovations, is one thing, while critical scientific thinking applied toward a critique of class society and its machinations is quite another. In short, knowledge is power, and scientific knowledge is revolutionary: The ruling class has no interest in producing a public thoroughly educated in science. The scientific revolution was made possible by commodity production but was at the same time limited by its contradictions. Intellectual and scientific labor requires a degree of imagination and critical thinking, while the atmosphere of commercialism, alienation and false consciousness created by profit-based production does not promote independent thinking. Further, the accumulation and centralization of capital reached in post-war capitalism greatly reduces intellectual labor toward a variety of commoditized wage-labor. Our postmodern culture nourishes phantasmagoric ideologies in the economic, political and social spheres. Postmodern culture is an impoverished, barren culture that stands in the way of scientific and critical thinking. The working class’ intellectual poverty gives bureaucratic political leaders the right of way to wreck havoc the world over. This has to change. It’s not because it benefits the working class that scientific thinking is correct, but because scientific thinking is correct that it ben-

Stimulating Americans pockets Is this stimulus bill “Change We Need” By Cordelia Ellis Special to the Post editorial@uwmpost.com

It’s a new year, but the U.S. economy is still a reflection of the past. President Obama took initiative as commander in chief to try to fix the United States economy by proposing a $787 billion dollar stimulus bill to Congress, which was signed Tuesday, Feb. 17 according to the Associated Press. Yet, many Americans are asking whether the bill really will help and what they will exactly receive. Has President Obama come to the country’s rescue with the stimulus bill or dug our financial grave? MSN Money reports millions in America’s working force will receive a $400 tax credit (couples will receive $800) and see an extra $13 in their paychecks beginning in June. Initially, an extra $13 in your paycheck doesn’t seem like much, but it’s intended for Americans to spend. Most Americans right now would likely rather save than spend, and this seems like a forceful tactic to encourage American spending. Some question how this is good for anybody. Shouldn’t Americans be given the opportunity to use the full $400 or $800 as they desire? Nevertheless, an extra $13 in paychecks is beneficial; it could be used to get those couple extra gallons of gas to get to work or to buy a few more grocery items. If the extra $13 a week isn’t enough for you to start spending, the stimulus bill also offers an $8,000 tax credit for first-time homebuyers who purchase a home by Dec. 1, 2009. Also, if you purchase a

new car by the end of 2009, the sales tax could be written off. Yet, this should not give people the idea to go buy cars and homes without being able to pay for them; we need to remember that’s how the U.S. economy got in this mess.

An extra $13 in your paycheck doesn’t seem like much, but it’s intended for Americans to spend. It could be used to get those couple extra gallons of gas to get to work or to buy a few more grocery items. There is something for college students in the stimulus as well. They will benefit from the increase in the tuition tax credit to $2,500 and making it 40 percent refundable, so families that don’t earn enough to pay income tax can still get up to $1,000 in extra tuition help. Also, the Pell grant that makes it possible for lowestincome students to attend college will increase its limit to $5,350 starting July 1 and increase again to $5,550 in the 2010-2011 school year. This increase will allow for 800,000 more students to qualify for the Pell grant. This economic stimulus bill, despite disapproval from Republicans, will benefit many Americans. One of the most important programs supported by the bill will help out police programs. Many Americans aren’t in college or couldn’t

Have SometHing

care less about college, but safety is something important to everyone. Students at Marquette University and UWMilwaukee can testify as to the unsafe events occurring around campuses, and most citizens in urban Milwaukee know how unsafe the city can be. The stimulus bill set aside $3.7 billion for police programs, with a major part going toward hiring new officers. $765 million of that is set for law programs for rural police officers, general criminal justice grants, youth mentoring and fighting Internet crimes against children. Other parts of the stimulus bill include money to repave highways and implement new steel and concrete bridges that have been wore down by vehicles over the years. With funding going into these programs, hopefully streets can be much safer. Obama’s stimulus bill is a lifeline to those who have been hit the hardest by the economy. Citizens who receive unemployment checks will receive them longer, with an extra $25 in those checks. Americans who get social security income and poor elderly, disabled, or blind, will get a onetime extra payment of $250. The list of ways this bill will benefit the American people goes on and on. It looks beneficial for many Americans, at the very least the ones struggling to make it in this economy. However, everyone should look at the components of the bill and decide how it will affect them. We voted President Obama in, and we need to make sure his decisions reflect his campaign.

to

Say?

The UWM Post is currently accepting applications for atlarge members of the new editorial board. Starting later this semester, the Post will be running editorials expressing its opinion on matters of public interest. If you’re a student, enjoy debating, and can write proficiently, we want to hear from you! Visit uwmpost.com/join for more information on how to apply.


February 23, 2009 19

uwmpost.com

Why Obama isn’t the Answer

Mis en Scene | The Politics of Art

The end of an era

Post-election race relations By Brian Holmes Special to the Post editorial@uwmpost.com

How the record shop went the way of the dinosaur By Leslie Peckham Editorial Editor editorial@uwmpost.com

In case you haven’t heard, Atomic Records, the ultra-cool local record store on East Locust Street, is closing its doors. I remember my first time in that shop. I was a freshman, and it was the first week before school really started, orientation week. My roommate and I skipped the festivities one day and instead roved around the neighborhood checking out potential eateries and interesting shops. We found Atomic Records on the way home. I don’t remember if I bought anything that day, but I do know that the last time I bought a CD I got it there. That was probably four years ago.

In other words, buy stuff. Yeah, I said it; go ahead, consume. Just do it smartly. Do it for the guy running his own business in the face of this economical nightmare. I know I’m part of the problem. I’m a former torrent fiend. I’ve ripped whole discographies at a time and not been sorry. If I had hard drive space I might still be doing this. But I’m trying to be an adult now and as the effects of the digital revolution begin to show, I understand the dangers and downfalls of this kind of behavior. There is a shifting of times. The old must go under so the new can come up, but considering what’s lost, I’m pretty sad

to see this establishment go. The accessibility of online media and the effortlessness of stealing it is tantalizing. Why bother getting dressed when you can buy most things from Amazon anyway? Truth is, the local economy is greatly affected by this kind of attitude. Even if you’re contributing to the economy, you’re feeding the fat cats instead of the local alley cats that need it more. Take Harry W. Schwartz for instance. A successful local chain of book stores is closing now because it’s so easy to buy things online. Consider this: writers don’t get the same dollar amount for their work if you buy it from BigChain.com. Musicians don’t get any money if you steal their songs. It’s time to get over the fact that these people have the money they need or want and just pay forward all the good things that we’ve enjoyed for free. In other words, buy stuff. Yeah, I said it; go ahead, consume. Just do it smartly. Do it for the guy running his own business in the face of this economical nightmare. I get that times are tight for everyone and that saving a buck at BigChain can mean buying more. However, consider the value in buying the one CD or book you really want and helping someone out in the process. Later this afternoon, I’m going down to say farewell, but there’s no way to atone for this. All I can do is hope that as this economical situation blows over, as I graduate and hit the pitiful job market and as artists everywhere struggle to make their way doing the things they love, somehow this will work out. Perhaps in this way we can save a little local color from being completely smudged out.

Being politically correct is no longer an option in this day and age. Issues must be addressed the way we truly see them. Adults should be past the point of sugar-coated baby talk, and unfortunately race is generally the most watered down subject in the U.S. today. Many Americans seem to think that after this historical election all will now be good with the world. I am here to tell them that it’s not that simple. Jan. 20, 2009 sparked a new era for race relations. We have now proven that a black man can be elected president of the United States. Sky’s the limit, right? Not so fast. Maybe we need to slow down a bit. I don’t mean to piss on your parade, America, but is a black president going to make a difference for the millions of AfricanAmerican males who are eight times more likely to be imprisoned than their white counterparts according to USA Today? Is a black president going to single-handedly put young black males to work in our nation’s large cities? In the greater Milwaukee area alone more than half of African-American males are unemployed, putting us second only to Buffalo, NY according to a study done by UW-Milwaukee’s very own professor Marc V. Levine. Milwaukee is also ranked highest in terms of the gap between black and white unemployment; although we lead the pack, similar conditions exist in most of America’s large cities. These reasons among others are prime examples why the election of Obama will do little for race relations as the federal government is too far removed. These are issues that must be addressed by state and local authorities. As long as a glaring racial gap remains, as long as AfricanAmerican neighborhoods fall primarily below the poverty line, as long as wacked-out conservatives like Milwaukee County Executive Scott Walker continue to push their ultra-conservative agenda by slashing the transit system and thus keeping the area segregated, race relations will not move forward. The fact that African-Americans make up almost half of the population in the city of Milwaukee seems to be lost on many. Such an astounding jobless rate for such a large portion of our community is a problem for all Milwaukeeans. This leaves the growth of the city stagnate and without much of a property tax base. Due to this problem, Milwaukee Public Schools do not stand a chance in regards to competing with wealthier communi-

ties! If we cannot educate our youth what will become of our city? Obama is an inspiration to all of us who are willing to work hard and don’t have the luxury of family connections, like a certain past president whom I need not name. Although a black president is a huge step for the African-American community, new leadership must emerge. Obama already has a commitment to all of the American people – whether they’re black, white, brown, red, yellow or purple. The problems of the AfricanAmerican community are a problem for all American communities. White folks can no longer retire to their bedroom communities ignoring this issue when such a significant part of the population is lagging behind in jobs and education, especially in cities such as Milwaukee, Detroit and Buffalo. And the suburbs are nothing more than an extension of the urban center. If the urban center fails the suburbs will soon follow. Obama has a chance to make history, not just by being the first black president but by being the president with an opportunity to help America out of one of its biggest financial crises in history. In regards to this more immediate issue, current racial disparities will likely be temporarily put on the back burner, though we would do best to acknowledge their constant presence. Unfortunately, they will likely outlive us and Obama... Living together in relative harmony takes understanding and acceptance, which can never happen if one group is hopelessly eclipsed by another.

Job market pressures college students Complacency may be the key By Lacy Kutz Staff Writer editorial@uwmpost.com

College students are feeling the pressure from family, friends and advisors more and more these days, with unemployment rates nearing 8 percent. Students now have to start networking, finding resumé— builders and securing internships with much more urgency than ever before. However, pressures from the “old” and “wise” to conform to the cutthroat, non-complacent ways of the business world might not be the best tactic to mobilize college students. The Collegiate Employment Research Institute (C.E.R.I.) at Michigan State says, “Students

– freshman through senior – cannot be complacent during this time.” This of course seems like good advice for anyone during these hard times. But, when competition is fierce and networking is key, and there are only a small number of actual jobs to be obtained, then college graduates are going to have to learn to be complacent. College graduates will need to come to the daunting realization that the diploma does not automatically equal the job. I’m not saying that students and graduates should not try their hardest to get what they want in life. I’m saying that no matter how hard some try, they may not be quick to get that dream job they’d been expecting to land straight out of college. Who knows, maybe for some not getting that dream job will be a blessing in disguise. Maybe the dream

job for some is not a dream of their own but societal pressures propagating a dream for them. C.E.R.I. says that “In light of the employment dynamics now in play, students need to be: FOCUSED, DIRECTED, and CONNECTED.” Focused, directed and connected potentially right into a path that they may not have ever questioned, tested or even understood.

make was what to major in. After graduation, society tells them to “get a job.” Not any job of course, but a job that pays well, has good benefits and provides opportunities for advancement. Here is where things get sticky. For the first time in some people’s lives, society is not allowing them (college graduates) to do the very thing that society has been preparing them to do their en-

For the first time in some people’s lives, society is not allowing them (college graduates) to do the very thing that society has been preparing them to do their entire lives – get a job. Since middle school or even since birth, society has been breeding mostly college students. For some, they never had to question whether they would go to college or not, and the only decision they had to

tire lives – get a job. Complacency may be the only thing that will keep people afloat during these hard times. If people are never complacent, never satisfied with their job, their car, their bank state-

ment, their looks or their lifestyle, how can anyone ever be happy? Without complacency, we would never be able to enjoy what we have or who we are because we’re always looking for more. We’re always looking for a way to make things better because society says they’re not good enough. It took me a long time to understand that complacency is not necessarily a bad thing. After all, complacency means being pleased with one’s self or situation. Society tells us something different though. Society tells us never to be complacent and always to strive for something better. I don’t need or want pressure from society to get a job. I’m perfectly fine with taking all the time and experiences I need to figure out what I truly want, not what someone else tells me I should want.


20 February 23, 2009

The UWM Post

In new timeslot, Conan’s act will change By Andrew Wible

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. (U-WIRE) – Say goodbye to Preparation H Raymond, the Fed Ex Pope and Sexual Harassment Skeleton. Sadly, after 15-and-a-half years, Late Night with Conan O’Brien goes off the air tonight, marking the end of one of the great eras in comedic history. Sure, Conan’s going to return to the air in June as host of the Late Show, but it won’t be the same; his act will be forced to change. Instead of appealing to the crowd normally awake at 1 a.m. (i.e. us college students), Conan will have to adapt to the new timeslot and the subsequent older audience. Instead of performing for mainly college students and young adults, Conan’s viewership will stretch across a wider, more conservative demographic (i.e. older folks and younger children). Conan will have to be careful not to offend his viewers and advertisers, so no more Horny Manatee, Quackers the poopeating duck or Triumph the Insult Comic Dog. They’re just too risqué for the 11:30 p.m. timeslot. Of course we’ll still get to see staples like “In the Year 2000,” the string dance and La Bamba, but a part of our young lives is coming to an end, and,

I gotta say, it’s making me feel kind of old. My GPA has probably taken a couple percentage points hit because of Conan distracting me from my studies, but it was worth it. No matter how crappy a day I had had or how many problems were running through my head, I always knew at 12:30 I could forget all my worries and just laugh for an hour of pure comedy. We grew up with Conan, and he’s grown with us. The first three years of his show left a lot to be expected. He looked nervous on camera and was so inconsistent his contract with NBC had to be renewed on a weekly basis. But then he found his niche, and it just so happened to mesh perfectly with our generation. As a whole we like thoughtless, spontaneous humor, and Conan delivered. Who else would drink a 40 of Olde English with Martha Stewart on the air? Who would fly down a zip line to kick John Wilkes Booth before he could assassinate Abraham Lincoln? Who came up with the Walker Texas Ranger lever long before Chuck Norris became synonymous with God on college campuses? One man: Conan. For graduating seniors like myself, maybe this is a good

Landing an internship comes with a price tag By Richelle Buser

Conan O’Brien move. Instead of having to stay up until 1:30 to catch the end of Conan, we’ll be able to catch one of the funniest talk shows on television and still be in bed in time to get up for work. But something definitely will be missing. Conan will still be there, as will Max Weinberg and the Max Weinberg Seven, but the edge will be gone. I’m sure Conan will still be funny -- he is after all a gifted humorist -- but it will be a different kind of funny. Hopefully I’m wrong, but deep down I know I’m right. So be sure to set your DVRs and savor this last episode, because if there’s one thing we can expect from Conan it’s that we never know how far he’ll go to get a laugh. And thanks to political correctness, we may never laugh this hard again. This editorial was originally published in the Daily Collegian at Pennsylvania State University on February 20, 2009.

LAWRENCE, Kansas (UWIRE) - Parents, student and others gladly pay thousands of dollars in college tuition to ensure a financially sound existence after graduation. The American dream is founded on the ideal that if a person works hard enough, he or she can achieve anything. A student must spend countless hours studying, network like crazy, land a few internships along the way, complete a degree and then maybe with some luck a job offer will appear. Persevere, we’re told, and it’ll pay off. But what if no matter how much effort you put into your aspirations, there were people out there without the grades, ambition or skills who could still snatch up opportunities you deserve? Turns out there’s a fast track where some students get to skip over all the aches and pains, but still achieve the goals of their more dedicated peers. Starting-level jobs achieved through internships are a common form of employment for fresh graduates. For most of us, achieving our dream jobs will require a combination of experience, personal zest for a subject and a decent GPA. Pretty soon “a few extra thousand dollars” may be added

to that list. In her article “Internships For Sale” in the Wall Street Journal, Ellen Gamerman exposed the disturbing tactic some are using to get ahead. Rather than applying for an internship position the oldfashioned way, ritzy parents now have the option of buying their child an internship at auctions across the United States. Of course these auctions are usually found at only the most elite universities and high schools. These parents are willing to spend ridiculous amounts of money. For example, a one-week internship at Electronic Arts sold for a whopping $4,000 during an auction at the Urban School of San Francisco. This is an absolutely unfair advantage. Sadly, auctions are just the beginning. Timothy Noah of Slate magazine writes in his article “Opportunity for Sale” that organizations like University of Dreams will guarantee an internship — for a price. Of course, University of Dreams says students are simply paying a “tuition fee” ranging from $5,000 to $10,000. That’s not far from the cost of in-state tuition for a semester at the University of Kansas. As if those who can afford to buy internships

See INTERNSHIP page 21


February 23, 2009 21

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INTERNSHIPS Continued from page 20

Vs MONOLOGUES Continued from page 13

Student-director Matthew Scott Belopavlovich added movement to the usually stagnant performance and succeeded in created a whole world using only chairs, binders and of course, the classic microphone. The monologues themselves were quite varied in message and delivery, some comedic, others serious. My personal favorite was “My Angry Vagina,” performed by Nacia Schreiner. She brought a comedic timing to the piece unmatched by the other actresses. Another standout was Suchismita Banerjee’s performance of “The Workshop,” which expertly mixed comedy with drama. As proof that great things really do come in small packages, Krisha Williams delivered the best line of the night during the short “Happy Fact.” After explaining that the clitoris, with its 8,000 nerve bundles, is the only organ that

exists purely for pleasure, Williams compared the organ to a penis, saying, “Who needs a handgun when you have a semi-automatic?” The show wasn’t meant only to entertain, but to educate as well. I learned that in some states selling a vibrator is illegal and punishable by up to two years in prison. I learned about the rapes of women during war, in the Middle East, the Congo and in Japan. And I learned what many women already know but don’t want to admit—that so many of us are ashamed of what we have down there. While I don’t think I’ll be celebrating “it” anytime soon, I won’t be embarrassed or afraid anymore. If you missed “The Vagina Monologues,” no worries. The Women’s Resource Center has more to offer. For instance, check out “That Takes Ovaries!,” a performance of real-life stories that intertwines art and activism, followed by an open forum on Friday, Feb. 27 at 7 p.m in the Helene Zelazo Center for Performing Arts.

aren’t already benefiting from their financial stability (i.e., affording the best universities, tutors and housing). With the current economic situation, many students are feeling the pressure to ensure jobs after graduation. Terrified at the thought of another summer without an internship, desperate students may do whatever it takes to build a resume and eventually land a job, even if it means forking out some extra cash. Companies taking advantage of students’ desires to succeed by selling internships is just wrong. I thought the point of an internship was to give students experience that would assist them when establishing a career — not put them deeper in

DRAG

Continued from page 12 But Lady Gia and Anastasia weren’t the only ones taking their clothes off. Pet It and king Pretty Boy also did some undressing. Equally sexy but fully clothed was king Leo Long, whose suave moves during the O’Kaysions’s “I’m A Girl Watcher” would put any man to shame. Many of the queens and kings showcased their athletic talents. Tempis Heat did a front flip during her number, Kerry Mizuno dressed as Ugly Betty this year, leapt off the stage in the opening moments of her performance of Dragonette’s “The Boys” and did a cartwheel later. The show ended behind schedule and with some techni-

debt. I can’t imagine how these companies justify exploiting an adolescent’s goals. But the students are at fault, too. After all, what is the point of spending so much money to attend college if you still have to buy your way into the work world? I also can’t help but wonder how much respect interns who got their positions via mommy and daddy’s money would have if their peers were aware of their situation. If you can’t land an internship on your own, maybe you should re-evaluate your dedication to school and your major — not take opportunities away from qualified individuals or encourage dishonorable companies. This editorial was originally published in the University Daily Kansan at the University of Kansas on February 20, 2009.

cal difficulties in the last performance, a mini-skirt clad Vanity Monroe lip-syncing Jennifer Hudson’s “Spotlight.” But the crowd seemed to love every minute of it and rewarded the performers with frequent trips to the stage, dollar bills in hand. Despite the crowd’s enthusiasm, I couldn’t help noticing that during the show some of the girls around me were trying to spot hidden girl parts or boy parts. But the very act of drag itself defies gender. The boys look like girls and the girls look like boys. As a result, we are forced to examine male and female, and wrestle with a definition that goes beyond a mark on a birth certificate or driver’s license, and of course, the parts between our legs.


22 February 23, 2009

PRESSED

The UWM Post

RYAN PAGELOW

Pet of the week Miley Miley’s interests include: long walks on the beach, eating cheeseburgers, reading the Twilight book series and trying on clothes.

PILED HIGHER AND DEEPER

CORPORATE HORROR

JORGE CHAM

JOSEPH KUENZLE

Send us photos of your pet(s), with their name(s) and a little about them to post@uwmpost.com.


February 23, 2009 23

uwmpost.com

Word Search & Rescue

Sudoku

INSTRUCTIONS: Words from the list may appear forwards, backwards, horizontally, vertically, or diago-

INSTRUCTIONS: Fill in the squares so that every row, every column,

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nally in the grid. When all words from the list have been circled, place the remaining UNCIRCLED letters in the “RESCUE,” in order (starting with the top line, reading left-to-right), to spell out a familiar saying!

‘LEAVE ME A LOAN’ Word List BORROWER COLLATERAL CONSOLIDATE CREDIT DEFAULT DISCHARGE GUARANTEE

INTEREST LENDER PARTNERSHIP PRINCIPAL REPAYMENT UNSECURED

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and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 exactly once.

www.WordSearchMaker.com

RESCUE:

solution from last week found on page 8 wordsearchandrescue@yahoo.com

©2009 Jonas Wittke

THE UWM POST CROSSWORD ACROSS

1

1 Fastener 6 Alphabet 10 Indian skirt 14 Queen-like 15 Applaud 16 Dolt 17 1997 Madonna movie 18 Zeus’ consort 19 Iridescent gem 20 Wet wiggler 21 You can mail packages here 24 Mr. Herman 26 Porn 27 City in Japan 30 Actor Wesley 34 Gab 37 Paper towel maker 39 Horse sound 40 Only 41 Punishment 43 Also 44 Irate 46 Ten cents 47 Facilitate 48 Gobi, for example 50 Table lights 52 Wiener schnitzel ingredient 54 Verse 58 You can mail packages here 63 Color 64 Mr. The Terrible 65 Vivacity 66 Participate in a bee 68 Chime 69 Grade 70 Picture holder 71 Otherwise 72 Large flat-bottomed boat 73 Toboggans

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Radiohead song Dike Quick Took a load off

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words. When you’re finished, unscramble the circled letters to find the missing word from the quip! Solutions are published in the following issue.

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RACKEN

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50 54 61

WADGEN

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INSTRUCTIONS: Unscramble the letters below to spell out everyday English

CEITH

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46 49

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©2009 Jonas Wittke

DOBUN 30

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Jonas Wittke, 2009

5 Dishes 6 Be sore 7 Cheese type 8 Complains 9 Tic 10 Beamer-upper guy 11 Dog food brand 12 Lion sound 13 Resting 22 Pull really hard 23 “It’s Always ___ in Philadelphia” 25 Chinese pan 28 Friendly 29 Gain 31 Flat bread 32 Selves 33 Sneaker 34 Frog’s cousin 35 Green Gables dweller 36 Lower limbs

Q: What is the most dangerous food to eat?

A: “ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___

___ ___ ___ ___ ”

ANSWERS FROM LAST WEEK: FILTH, BEACH, LAWMAN, WOOLLY “HALFWAY”

In-word

THIS WEEK’S IN-WORD: LAUNDRY

INSTRUCTIONS: Find as many words as possible using only the letters 38 41 42 45 47 49 51 53 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 67

___ mater Glass kitchenware Pace Montezuma’s ___ Compass pt. Givers’ counterparts Search groups Spring flower Demonstrative pronoun Like theme paper Shouts Arsonist’s passion Malevolent Fogelberg and Rather Military alliance Remembered Buddy

last week’s solution found on page 8

from this week’s IN-WORD. Words must be four or more letters long. Slang words, proper nouns, and contractions are not permitted. Only one form of a verb is permitted. Words that become four or more letters by the addition of “s” are not permitted. Solutions are published in the following issue.

Can you find 17 or more words in “LAUNDRY?”

©2009 Jonas Wittke

last week’s solution found on page 8

UWMTRIVIA What does “SAC” stand for in the web address sac.uwm.edu? a) System Advisory Committee b) Special Assistance on Campus c) Student Accessibility Center Answer c) Source: http://www4.uwm.edu/sac/

DOWN

2

Solution found on page 8

©2009 Jonas Wittke


24 February 23, 2009

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