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a year in the life of

LIVE UNITED

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2007–2008 Annual Report


Our Mission: United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley brings our communities together to help improve people’s lives and strengthen the neighborhoods in our region.

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Table of Contents welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 timeline introduction . . . . . . 2–3 overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–5 housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–9 healthy child development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–13 increasing youth opportunities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14–17 sustainable employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18–21 timeline outro . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22–23 footprint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24–25 partner agencies . . . . . . . . . . 26–27 financials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28–29 board of directors . . . . . . . . 30–31 senior staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32


LIVE UNITED is a powerful, nationwide movement that is advancing the common good in Greater Boston and the Merrimack Valley.

Dear Friends: It’s a goal. It’s a credo. It’s a mission. During 2007-2008, LIVE UNITED brought a new voice and purpose to our vision of making our region the best place in the country for children. United as a movement, we are creating lasting change in our region by focusing on the building blocks of a better life for all. Together, we have ensured that more of our region’s children are nurtured and enter kindergarten ready to learn and succeed in school and life. We have transformed lives by providing our most at-risk young people with positive options and inspiring opportunities. We have made great strides toward ending family homelessness in our region. We have helped more people gain the skills and knowledge needed to create a better life for their children. And when layoffs, foreclosures and shrinking family budgets meant more of our neighbors, co-workers and friends were living on the edge, we stepped up to help, providing a safety net for those with no place to turn. I am proud to share a year in the life of LIVE UNITED, illustrated by a 2007-2008 timeline that shows the impact of our movement. As we look to the year ahead, we know that challenges and hardships will still be upon us, but I am confident that by uniting as a community, we can continue to make an impact in people’s lives and create a brighter future for all.

Sincerely,

Mike K. Durkin President and Chief executive officer ansin executive chair united way of massachusetts bay and merrimack valley (UWMB/mv)

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A YEAR IN THE LIFE OF

LIVE UNITED

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See the change you’re creating.

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Follow the

2007-2008 Timeline

With your support, we’re reaching out to build a better life for all.

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New Offices Open in Lowell

million invested o $1in Housing First

july 1, 2007 UWMB/MV celebrates its new regional presence with the announcement of a $1.5 million investment in 25 agencies that serve the Merrimack Valley.

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July 10, 2007 UWMB/MV announces the largest single private investment in nonprofit organizations that have adopted the innovative Housing First approach to ending homelessness.

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UNITED, WE CAN ACCOMPLISH MORE THAN ANY OF US CAN ALONE.

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Beal Challenge Announced

Community Care Day

September 2007 Business and community leader Robert L. Beal gives Tocqueville Society Members an incentive to step up their support through his generous challenge match grant program.

September 27, 2007 Nearly 1,500 corporate workers from 66 Massachusetts companies gather to make a difference in their communities as part of our largest show of volunteerism to date. supportunitedway.org/community-care-day

supportunitedway.org/files/bealchallenge.pdf Pictured on left: Robert Beal and Mountie Too

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Together, there’s nothing we can’t do. By uniting the hearts, minds, resources and collective will of a diverse and talented group of individuals and organizations, we’re making our region the best place for children and families. We do so by concentrating on interrelated impact areas: healthy child development, youth opportunities, housing and sustainable employment. Uniting those who help United Way brings together a regional network of more than 250 partner agencies to focus on shared goals, using proven strategies. Across our impact areas, these agencies create a continuum of support for children, youth and their families that extends well beyond the reach of any single organization.

Investing for results United Way has always been committed to ensuring that every dollar entrusted to us is invested to produce the greatest measurable impact. In 2007, this strategy was formalized into a new model of investment. For the first time, all funding of partner agencies is subject to stringent reporting requirements that are directly linked to the achievement of specific benchmarks. By measuring results and making accountability a priority, United Way is able to have a more significant impact on the issues facing our community. We also foster greater collaboration and innovation while streamlining efforts and creating more efficient service models.

Empowering innovation through venture funding Another integral part of our investment approach is to use “venture funding” to create the greatest possible impact on our focus areas. In its first year, this approach shifted $1 million to organizations that had not previously received United Way funding. By investing in the latest research and most innovative programs, we’re ensuring that more children, youth and families have the support they need to succeed.

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Creating ground-breaking partnerships United Way brings together schools, community organizations, government and business leaders to enable change that would not otherwise be possible. From joining with the City of Boston to promote healthy early childhood development to partnering with the financial services industry to help low-income families in Lawrence receive their Earned Income Tax Credit, we’re uniting people and investing in proven approaches that create lasting change.

Preventing problems from ever happening Financial counseling that heads off foreclosures. Early intervention that can prevent years of special education later on. Teen mentorship that fosters engaged, productive members of society. Or, creating the spark that inspires a young person to pursue a career in science and technology. United Way believes in taking on the root causes of our community’s most pressing issues. Our positive, proactive approach can be as cost-effective as it is life-transforming.

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Children: A New Kind of Investment

State Legislature passes strong foreclosure prevention laws

October 19, 2007 Private Equity, Venture Capital and Hedge Fund sectors partner with UWMB/MV to develop a plan and raise resources to address the urgent need for early intervention for children.

October 18, 2007 Bold measures protecting home buyers from predatory lending and help to those facing foreclosures are passed as a direct result of United Way’s advocacy.

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Pictured on left: Dr. Jack Shonkoff, Harvard University and Mike Choe, Charlesbank Capital Partners and UWMB/MV Board Member).

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housing

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Together, we’re working to end family homelessness and increase access to stable, affordable housing. LIVE UNITED means being part of that change. A safe, stable home is the foundation we all need to build a better life for ourselves and our children.

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This year in Massachusetts, more than 10,000 families and 20,000 children will experience homelessness. The costs of sheltering them will average between $11,800 and $45,400, depending upon length of stay.1 The long-lasting emotional costs, especially to children, are beyond calculation. Together with our partner agencies, we’re working to prevent homelessness from happening in the first place. Key to this goal is moving people out of homeless shelters as soon as possible and into stable living situations where children can attend school regularly and adults can receive support services such as skills training, financial counseling and quality child care. This Housing First philosophy, championed by United Way and its agencies, has transformed the way that we respond to homelessness in our region.

A recent study of eviction prevention programs by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services found that the average cost to prevent family homelessness was 1/6 the average cost of a stay in shelter.2

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C ulhane D. Ending Homelessness, What Will it Take? Presented January 2008. National Alliance to End Homelessness, The Ten Essentials.

Top lawyers unite to end homelessness

Today’s Girls…Tomorrow’s Leaders expands to Merrimack Valley

October 19, 2007 David Gergen, advisor to four presidents and director of Harvard’s Center for Public Leadership addresses more than 300 top legal professionals at the Lawyer’s Leadership Breakfast.

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October 25, 2007 The region’s businesswomen and philanthropists come together to discuss the challenges facing girls at the inaugural Women’s Leadership Breakfast in the Merrimack Valley.

Pictured on left: Ann-Ellen Hornidge, Mintz Levin; George Caponigro, HomeStart; Chris Mansfield, Liberty Mutual and David Gergen, Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

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women.supportunitedway.org/

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Pictured on left: Asianna Milord, Girls’ LEAP.

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Ending homelessness, one life at a time.

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This year, with the help of United Way venture agency funding, Father Bills & MainSpring exceeded their Housing First benchmark goals by placing 240 families in stable, permanent housing. A major study of this agency’s work found that Housing First reduced chronic homelessness in the Quincy/Weymouth area by 19 percent between January of 2006 and January of 2007.3 Among the chronically homeless, inpatient hospitalization decreased by 77 percent, and hospital emergency room visits by 83 percent. Most importantly, those helped reported an increased sense of independence, control of their lives, and satisfaction with their housing.

Tatjana Meschede, Ph.D., The Center for Social Policy, McCormack Graduate School at UMass Boston

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Real Estate and Building Industries Leadership Breakfast

financialedtoolkit.org November 15, 2007 Partnering with Bank of America and other agencies, UWMB/MV launches this online resource for financial education providers to address the economic challenges of the working poor.

November 9, 2007 Mayor Menino, Robert Mahoney, Robert Beal, Kevin Phelan and community experts join United Way’s campaign to end homelessness at this 14th annual event. Pictured on left: Robert Beal and Kevin C. Phelan

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housing

We all win when everyone has a place to call home. Throughout our region, United Way is partnering with community organizations, government and businesses to create a spectrum of support and strategies that work to end family homelessness and foster increased financial stability.

Housing First United Way invested more than $750,000 this year to enable our partner agencies to move toward this proven approach to ending homelessness. We continue to engage new leaders in Housing First, including bringing key recommendations to the Patrick Administration and convening a summit to raise public and political will for Housing First called, “Ending Homelessness in the Commonwealth.”

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Regional Foreclosure Education Center In response to the number of foreclosures affecting the communities that we serve, United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley joined forces with other United Ways in the Commonwealth to ensure that services reach individuals, families and agencies. This initiative will enable more than 300 individuals and families at risk of housing loss to gain the financial education and counseling they need to work out an affordable mortgage and remain housed. Funding Futures This asset development initiative is helping more than 200 low-income families in the Boston area establish Individual Development Accounts (IDAs). An IDA is an income-eligible savings account that can be used to purchase a home, invest in post-secondary education or start a business. Funding Futures matches a maximum of $2,000 of each account holder’s savings for earned income while providing intensive financial, economic, and asset-specific education.

Youth Venture invests in youth November 15, 2007 More than 20 youth came to UWMB/MV’s offices to pitch their social entrepreneurial ventures as part of this innovative leadership program for 12- 18-year-olds.

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Commission o onSpecial Afterschool and Out-of-School Time November 15, 2007 United Way served as a member of this commission that created a report proposing a more unified and coordinated response to supporting children and youth.

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13%*

invested in

Affordable Housing

YOUR INVESTMENT IN ACTION 11,103

4,023

retained or obtained affordable housing

served by partner agencies operating under the Housing First philosophy

7,256

housing units produced, preserved or in management

*$5.3 million invested annually

Boston’s Homeless Census Count December 15, 2007 More than thirty United Way staff and volunteers participate in the City of Boston’s Annual Homeless Census, which exposes the scope of the problem so that resources and programs can help those facing homelessness.

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January 12, 2008 Joining the growing trend of nonprofits utilizing social media, UWMB/MV launches SpeakUnited, a blog focused on community issues. speakunited.org

Pictured on left: UWMB/MV staff and volunteers

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SpeakUnited speaks out

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healthy child development

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Together, we’re working to ensure that all young children are nurtured and receive the help they need to enter kindergarten ready to succeed in school and life.

LIVE UNITED means being part of that change. Research shows that every $1 invested in early learning saves up to $17 down the road, with results measured in lower crime, fewer teen pregnancies and higher individual education and earning levels.4

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And while we know that 85 percent of a child’s core brain structure is formed by age three, less than 4 percent of public investments in education and development have occurred by that time.5 United Way and its partner agencies are changing the way we look at our investment in young children. We focus on assessing needs and providing help at the earliest opportunity, engaging parents as active partners while building a skilled early childhood workforce.

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Schweinhart, Lawrence J. (2005) The High/Scope Perry Preschool Study Through Age 40. Bruner, Charles. Child and Family Policy Center. “Early Learning Left Out: An Examination of Public Investments in Education and Development by Child Age.” 6  Pavelchek, David, Social & Economic Sciences Research Center–Puget Sound Division, Washington State University. (April 2005) “Teacher Perceptions for Preparedness for Kindergarten.” 4

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Ready for preschool

Welcoming Mike

January 15, 2008 United Way’s Sharon Brewster blogs on SpeakUnited about how she used knowledge gained at work to advocate for her own child’s healthy development.

January 17, 2008 Kathleen and Robert Mahoney, United Way’s Board Chair, host a small gathering of Tocqueville Society members in honor of UWMB/MV’s new president, Michael K. Durkin.

speakunited.org Pictured on left: Nia L. Brewster

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According to a national teachers report, 40 percent of children are not prepared for kindergarten.6

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Pictured on left: Mike Durkin

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Helping young children thrive in Mattapan

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This spring, as part of our “Thrive in Five” partnership with the City of Boston, United Way invested $300,000 in venture funding to provide Mattapan families with the support they need to ensure their children enter school ready to learn. The funding allowed for the expansion of five highly effective programs that support healthy child development and provide parents with the resources to become active participants in ensuring school readiness. Recipients include: The Family Nurturing Center; Boston Medical Center’s Healthy Steps; Family Connections, a component of The Children’s Hospital’s early head start program; Thom Child and Family Services; and Boston Medical Center’s Child Witness to Violence project. By bringing together fresh approaches and organizations that have not traditionally been United Way partners, we are empowering collaboration, creating new relationships and having a greater impact on the future of Mattapan’s children.

action o Pledging on Housing First

Lawrence Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)

January 23, 2008 More than 100 nonprofits join keynote speaker Lieutenant Governor Tim Murray at a leadership summit aimed at ending homelessness in the next five years.

January 18, 2008 UWMB/MV supports two tax prep sites to help more local residents and families file for the EITC to pay off debt, build savings and get ahead.

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healthy child development

Creating a brighter future, one child at a time. One-third of Massachusetts children are exposed to risk factors that threaten their healthy social and emotional development and subsequent success in school.7 United Way is creating innovative initiatives and partnerships to address this problem, ensuring that more young children get the support they need. Building a skilled early childhood workforce With more and more parents relying on child care for children age five and under, having highly skilled teachers and caregivers is critical. That’s why United Way is focused on providing professional development and enrichment opportunities to those who work with the youngest children. Our Connected Beginnings Training Institute is leading the way in the emerging field of infant and early childhood mental health, providing training that helps staff identify and address problems early. We al so partnered with the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care and the CAYL Institute (formerly known as the Schott Fellowship in Early Care and Education) to create Steps Forward—a blueprint that outlines clear career pathways for professionals and fosters ongoing learning and skill development opportunities.

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Early Childhood System of Care Families have complex needs that often transcend what any one agency can provide. Yet the current system for accessing early childhood mental health and other necessary services is fragmented, making it difficult for families to receive critical assistance in a timely way. In response, United Way launched the Early Childhood System of Care (ECSOC) initiative, which builds upon the existing support services of community-based agencies that serve young children and their families and eliminates gaps by more closely connecting service delivery. United Way plans to use the lessons learned from this pilot to launch similar systems in other neighborhoods in our region. Home Visiting Initiative Home visiting is an early childhood intervention that enhances parenting and promotes the optimal growth and development of young children. This initiative brings a spectrum of critical services into the home, overcoming challenges such as transportation, language and childcare that many parents face in seeking out help. A new partnership with members of the private equity, venture capital and hedge fund industry will support home visiting for 200 families with children under three by 2010.

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National Center for Children in Poverty, 2005.

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An evening with the Edgerleys

Summit on Youth

January 24, 2008 Paul and Sandy Edgerley hosted an intimate gathering of United Way’s Ordre de Liberté donors.

January 29, 2008 First Lady Diane Patrick and others unite to kick off inspire4life, a new multi-year engagement campaign to inspire everyone to be there for youth.

Pictured on left: Sandra Edgerley and Mike Durkin

inspire4life.org

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Pictured on left: Debra Knez and First Lady Diane Patrick

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YOUR INVESTMENT IN ACTION

18%* invested in

Healthy Child Development

20,938 young children served

1,296

young children with behavioral issues showed improvement after receiving additional supports

2,965

parents report being better able to support their children

*$7.4 million invested annually

Honoring Philanthropy February 13, 2008 Robert Beal and Myra Kraft co-host an evening with some of the region’s most notable philanthropists. Pictured on left: Robert Beal and Myra Kraft

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Links to Learning launched March 3, 2008 This training and professional development opportunity for agencies was created to connect schools with afterschool programs.

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increasing youth opportunities

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Together, we’re working to ensure that young people stay in school and graduate with opportunities to become responsible members of society.

LIVE UNITED means being part of that change. A support system that inspires academic achievement. A caring adult with encouraging words for the future. The chance to explore opportunities beyond the boundaries of your neighborhood. These are the things that teens at risk so desperately need.

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More than 5,000 Massachusetts young people are waiting to be matched with mentors.9

In 2006-2007, 11,436 Massachusetts students dropped out of high school.8 While countless studies show that positive adult relationships are key to ending this crisis, many young people in our state say they don’t have an adult outside of their family that they can talk to if they have a problem. United, we’re connecting the efforts of families, volunteers, school personnel, out-of-school program staff and state agency systems to create community solutions that support young people at all times. Key to this effort is ensuring that the important adults in a young person’s life have the skills they need to help them overcome barriers and achieve success.

Thrive in 5 March 12, 2008 United Way and the City of Boston launch a 10-year effort to align resources to ensure that all children will be ready for sustained school success.

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2006-2007 Indicators Report, Massachusetts Department of Education UMASS Donahue Institute, 2006. Mass Mentoring Counts Survey

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o Stable Tenancy Event

Pictured on left: Matt Fishman, Partners HealthCare; Jack Shonkoff, Center on the Developing Child, Harvard University; Mayor Thomas Menino; Lou Casagrande, Boston Children’s Museum; and Mike Durkin.

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April 4, 2008 Landlords and homeless service providers come together to learn strategies for keeping at-risk tenants stable.

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Engaging youth to inspire leadership and achievement

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United Way’s Youth Venture program invests in teams of young people, ages 12-18, to start social projects that will create positive, lasting change in their communities. Teams attend training workshops and learn how to write business plans. They then present their plans to a selection panel which awards seed funding of up to $1,000 and provides the guidance, tools and support to implement their ventures. Much of their mentoring comes from United Way’s Young Leaders program, young professionals who are committed to LIVE UNITED through community service. This year’s ventures included selling “lucky bamboo” to raise money to promote green initiatives in Chinatown, a youth-led radio station in the Dudley Square neighborhood, a Chinese language newspaper to help emigrant youth, and music videos that raised awareness about youth issues in the Hispanic community.

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Young Leaders (YL) Gala

Partnering with Families

April 26, 2008 More than 450 young professionals gather to celebrate an evening of “Cocktails and Starfish” at the New England Aquarium, supporting valuable programs for youth.

april 30, 2008 UWMB/MV launches an important initiative that demonstrates how early childhood agencies can work to more effectively support families with young children.

Pictured on left: Renita Bhatia and Elise Shutzer, YL Committee Members

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Pictured on left: Darrell Armstrong, New Jersey Department of Children and Families

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increasing youth opportunities

We all win when young people succeed in school and in life. By joining forces with the public and private sectors, focusing the efforts of our agency partners, and enlisting and training dedicated mentors and volunteers, we’re working to ensure that every young person graduates with positive options for a better life. Connecting Schools and Afterschools Grounded in findings from the Massachusetts Afterschools Research Study, this initiative improves outcomes for children and youth by fostering stronger relationships between schools and afterschool programs in Boston, Malden, Cambridge, Salem and Quincy. Math, Science and Technology initiative (MSTi) This innovative collaboration with the state’s life sciences, healthcare and technology industries aims at sparking an interest in science that will inspire children in grades 3-7 to pursue careers in these fields. This year, programs took place in 17 Boston and Merrimack Valley communities.

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Out of Harm’s Way This partnership with Boston Public Schools is working to reduce violence, improve school climate and foster learning and healthy development among middle school students. Summer Opportunities for Youth United Way is working to provide programs that keep them on track all year round, including the summer months. Our Summer Experiences in Greater Lowell (SEGL) program provides a variety of enriching learning and recreational experiences that develop leadership, social and academic skills. In 2007, more than 3,000 young people participated. Through our Summer Safety Collaborative, we helped more than 70 organizations expand their offerings to provide safe, supervised programs for more than 17,000 city youth. Today’s Girl’s ... Tomorrow’s Leaders (TGTL) TGTL addresses inequalities that create barriers for girls by supporting gender-specific or gender-sensitive programming that helps girls aged 7-18 achieve academic success and become responsible, involved members of society. This year, we invested $1.2 million in 45 community-based organizations that are working to promote healthy living and leadership skills in girls.

We’re #1!

$400,000 invested to prevent foreclosures

MAY 13, 2008 Reflecting its commitment and growth, UWMB/MV’s Alexis de Tocqueville Society is recognized as the top society in the U.S. by United Way of America.

MAY 7, 2008 Three Massachusetts United Ways join forces to collectively invest in a large-scale, coordinated initiative to enable more than 600 families to stay in their homes.

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YOUR INVESTMENT IN ACTION 36%* invested in

Increasing Youth Opportunities

143,821

5,957

youth served in quality programs

youth matched with supportive adult mentors

9,825

youth in programs that intentionally connect with schools

*$14.8 million invested annually

Child o Statewide Assessment Institute

“In Their Own Words� An evening with the Bergantinos May 14, 2008 Joe Bergantino and his wife, Candy Altman hosted more than 30 friends and neighbors in their home to raise awareness for family homelessness.

May 17, 2008 United Way co-sponsors first annual conference on child assessment with the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care for 200 early childhood providers from across the state.

Pictured on left: Joe Bergantino and Candy Altman

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sustainable employment

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Together, we’re working to ensure that everyone has the skills and opportunities to become financially stable and create a better life for their children.

LIVE UNITED means being part of that change. A good job. Skills that give you the opportunity to move up. The ability to save money and achieve financial stability. Along with a stable home, they’re the basics to building a brighter future.

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}

A high school diploma and a bachelor’s degree predict a respective 32 percent and 117 percent wage advantage.11

In today’s global economy, the skills needed to qualify for a living wage job have rapidly increased. Nearly 40 percent of all jobs require a college degree.10 Sadly, 1/3 of adult workers in Massachusetts lack the skills necessary to compete in an increasingly high-tech, knowledge-based economy. As the gap between the skilled and unskilled grows, more and more families are being shut out of the American dream. Together with our community partners, we’re working to break the cycle of poverty by helping more people acquire the skills and knowledge they need to become economically self-sufficient.

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United Way Golf Classic May 19, 2008 LPGA champion Pat Bradley joins Mike Durkin, hosts Maxine and Dick Charlton, emcee Billy Costa and more than 100 community leaders to raise nearly $300,000.

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MassFacts: Demographics, Statistics & Research Findings-MassINC, 2007 Young, “Off Welfare... Onto Independence.” pp. 44-45

$1.28 billion housing bond bill passed May 29, 2008 The Citizens’ Housing and Planning Association (CHAPA), a United Way-funded agency, helps pass a bill recapitalizing all Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) bond-funded programs.

Pictured on left: Dick and Maxine Charlton

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Helping low-income women become economically independent.

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In 2008, Crittenton Women’s Union became a United Way venture agency partner. United Way supports two innovative workforce programs dedicated to moving low-income and at-risk women out of poverty. “Woman to Woman” provides technology training, professional development, mentoring and career planning. A related program, “Hot Jobs,” connects them to training for high-demand jobs. By focusing on jobs that require less than two years training to earn self-sustaining wages, women move quickly toward financial independence.

Tocqueville Society May 31, 2008 UWMB/MV reaches 800 Tocqueville members and accomplishes Year 1 of the Beal Challenge.

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Skillworks Phase II Launch June 3, 2008 SkillWorks announces the launch of its five-year phase II plan to support workforce partnerships in growing economic sectors in Boston and public policy efforts across the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

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sustainable employment

We all win when every family has the opportunity to build a brighter future. United Way has joined with other community partners to invest in a network of services that helps families gain financial stability and achieve economic success. SkillWorks This $15 million, five-year, public/private partnership of philanthropy, government, community organizations, unions, and employers aims to create a workforce development system that helps low-skill, low-income residents move to family-sustaining jobs while helping employers find and retain skilled employees. SkillWorks has just concluded its Phase I work and launched its Phase II in June 2008. This innovative initiative is looking to invest an additional total of $10 million to support new workforce partnerships over the next five years. Financial Education Today, more and more Massachusetts families are living paycheck to paycheck. If their income is disrupted, 23 percent don’t have enough savings to cover expenses.12 In response, United Way is partnering with both the business community and community-based organizations to provide quality financial education programs. One example is financialedtoolkit.org, an online resource that makes it easy to learn how to budget, plan or save for the future.

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Earned Income Tax Credit The Federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a refundable tax credit available to low-income working individuals and families. With an average refund of $4,000, EITC can be a powerful tool to pay off debt, build savings, finance education and get ahead. As part of our mission to help low-income families build assets, United Way is reaching out to the estimated 20 to 25 percent of Americans who qualify for the credit but do not claim it, providing free tax preparation assistance and self-help information.

12

Promoting Economic Security for Working Families: State Asset Policy Initiatives. Fannie Mae Foundation, 2005.

Families Matter!

Dream in Science

June 10, 2008 Governor Deval Patrick joined leaders from the life sciences, healthcare and technology industries to honor young scientists participating in the Math, Science and Technology initiative (MSTi).

June 6, 2008 United Way and BOSTnet co-host a conference focused on creating family voice, empowerment and leadership opportunities to celebrate family involvement throughout child and youth development. Pictured at left: Suzanne Bouffard, panelist Harvard Family Research Project

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Pictured at left: Governor Deval Patrick

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12%* invested in

YOUR INVESTMENT IN ACTION 3,036

Sustainable people gained Employment basic skills

4,506

people obtained employment

9,921

people gained job skills

*$4.9 million invested annually

Day of Action

Education Action Agenda released

June 22, 2008 Hundreds of volunteers, community members, nonprofit organizations and others joined together on the Boston Common to celebrate the spirit of LIVE UNITED and the power of coming together.

June 25, 2008 Governor Patrick releases the findings of the School Readiness Project, a UWMB/MV-influenced agenda for raising achievement for all students to compete successfully in a global economy.

Pictured at left: Maria Nieves Sesma and Bridget Jevens

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Thank You

for creating opportunities and inspiring hope for a better tomorrow.

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The movement continues

When we reach out to one, we influence the condition of all. Every day, in hundreds of ways, United Way is working to advance the common good in our region. Join us. Together, we can accomplish more than any one of us can alone.

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give. advocate. volunteer.

live united

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challenges for 2009 and beyond. We recognize the great needs that still exist among children, youth and families in our region.

More than 1.5 million children are homeless annually in the United States— one in every 50 American children.1

Thirty percent of all families with children are considered asset poor.2

24

The number of personal bankruptcy filings in Massachusetts ballooned 41 percent in 2008 from a year earlier, according to a new report from The Warren Group.

On average, 159,964 children (17 and under) are “food insecure” in Massachusetts each year.3

America’s Youngest Outcasts: State Report card on Child Homelessness; National Center on Family Homelessness. 2007-2008 Assets & Opportunity Scorecard (2007), Corporation for Enterprise Development. http://www.partnershipforsuccess.org/docs/researchproject_foodinsecurity_200811_brief.pdf 4 http://www.nlihc.org/oor/oor2008/ 5 (The Homeless Census, US Department of Housing and Urban Development,) 6 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, national survey developed by the Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 1 2 3


The median renter wage in MA is $17.30/hour, yet to afford the average two-bedroom apartment one must earn $22.94/hour.4

The number of homeless families living in Boston has jumped for the fourth straight year, making children without a home

the fastest-growing group.5

Nationwide, 5.5 percent of high school students do not go to school because they felt unsafe at school or on their way to or from school.6

25

The Department of Children and Families recorded more than 23,000 cases of reported abuse and neglect of children last year—the highest total the state has seen in at least five years.

but Together, there’s nothing we can’t do. Throughout our region, our agency partners are helping us address these needs to make a difference every day.


Partner Agencies

26

Adelante Youth Center Agassiz Village* AIDS Action Committee of Massachusetts, Inc.* All Care Visiting Nurses Association of Greater Lynn* Allston Brighton Community Development Corporation American Cancer Society, New England Division* American Red Cross of Massachusetts Bay American Red Cross of Merrimack Valley American Red Cross of Northeast Massachusetts ARC of Northern Essex County Inc. Arlington Boys & Girls Club Arlington Community Trabajando Arthritis Foundation, Massachusetts Chapter* Asian American Civic Association Asian Center Merrimack Valley, Inc. Asian Task Force Against Domestic Violence Associated Early Care & Education Bay State Community Services* BELL (Building Educated Leaders for Life) Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Lowell Big Brothers Big Sisters of Massachusetts Bay Big Sister Association of Greater Boston Bird Street Community Center BOSTnet (Build the Out-of-School Time Network) Boston Area Rape Crisis Center* Boston Asian: Youth Essential Service Boston Center for Independent Living Boston Minuteman Council, Boy Scouts of America Boys & Girls Club of Greater Billerica Boys & Girls Club of Greater Lowell Boys & Girls Club of Lawrence Boys & Girls Club of Lower Merrimack Valley Boys & Girls Club of Lynn Boys & Girls Club of Woburn Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston Boys & Girls Clubs of Middlesex County, Inc. Boys Club of Haverhill (Haverhill Youth Collaborative) Bridge Over Troubled Waters

CAB Health and Recovery Services* Cambodian Mutual Assistance Association in Greater Lowell Cambridge Camping Association* Cambridge College Cambridge Community Center Cambridge Community Services Cambridge Family & Children’s Service Cambridge Family YMCA* Camp Fire USA–Eastern Massachusetts Council Camp Fire USA North Shore Council Career Resources Corp. Caritas Home Care* Casa Myrna Vazquez Catholic Charities Boston Child Care Resource Center (CCRC) Center House* Centro Latino de Chelsea Centro Presente Cerebral Palsy of Eastern Massachusetts Cerebral Palsy of Massachusetts* Charles River ARC* Charles River Public Internet Center Child Witness to Violence Project/ Boston Medical Center Children’s Services of Roxbury, Inc. Children’s Friend & Family Services Children’s Law Center of Massachusetts Chinese Progressive Association Citizens’ Housing & Planning Association (CHAPA) City Life/Vida Urbana City Year–Boston* Community Legal Services and Counseling Center (CLSACC) Codman Square Neighborhood Development Corporation Combined Jewish Philanthropies Committee for Boston Public Housing* Community Art Center Community Economic Development Assistance Corporation (CEDAC) Community Work Services Comprehensive School – Age Parenting Program (CSAPP)* Concord-Assabet Family and Adolescent Services* Council of Social Concern Crispus Attucks Children’s Center Inc. Crittenton Women’s Union D.E.A.F., Inc.* Dare Family Services*

Disability Law Center Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation Dorchester Youth Collaborative (DYC) DOVE (Domestic Violence Ended)* East Boston Ecumenical Community Council (EBECC) East Boston Social Centers East End House Elizabeth Peabody House Elizabeth Stone House* Ellis Memorial & Eldredge House Emmaus – Bethel Training Program Ensuring Stability through Action in our Community Family & Children’s Service of Greater Lynn Family Connections Family Nurturing Center Family Service of Greater Boston Family Service, Inc. Father Bills & MainSpring, Inc. Federated Dorchester Neighborhood Houses Fenway Community Development Corporation* Fidelity House* For Kids Only Afterschool (FKO) Friends of Youth Opportunity, Inc. Girl Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts Girls Inc. of Greater Lowell Girls Inc. of Haverhill (Haverhill Youth Collaborative) Girls Incorporated of Lynn Greater Boston Diabetes Society* Greater Boston Legal Services Greater Lawrence Community Boating Greater Lowell Family YMCA Greater Lynn Mental Health and Retardation Association* Greater Lynn YMCA Greater Medford Visiting Nurses Association* Gregg House Hale Reservation* Hallmark Health Visiting Nurse Association* Hattie B. Cooper Community Center Haverhill Partners for Literacy/ Community Action Haverhill Public Schools Learning for Life Program Heading Home, Inc. (f.k.a. Shelter, Inc.) Healthy Steps for Young Children – BMC Help for Abused Women & their Children (HAWC)* Home for Little Wanderers Home Health VNA


Homeowners Rehab* Homes for Families HomeStart HOPE Housing Families Inc. Hyde Square Task Force Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción (IBA) International Institute of Boston Jamaica Plain Neighborhood Development Corporation Jeanne Geiger Crisis Center, Inc. f/k/a Women’s Crisis Center Jewish Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Boston Jewish Community Center of the North Shore* Jewish Community Centers of Greater Boston* Jewish Community Relations Council Jewish Family & Children’s Service Jewish Family Services of the North Shore* Jewish Vocational Service JFY–Networks John F. Kennedy Family Service Center* John M. Barry Boys & Girls Club of Newton* La Alianza Hispana LASI (Latino After School Initiative, Program of CCRC) Lena Park Community Development Corporation LifeLinks, Inc. Lowell Association for the Blind Lowell Citizens School MAB Community Services* Mass. Community Development Corporation (MACDC) Madison Park Development Corporation Malden YMCA Mass Alliance on Teen Pregnancy Massachusetts Advocates for Children Massachusetts Afterschool Partnership (MAP) Massachusetts Alliance of Portuguese Speakers (MAPS) Massachusetts Association for Mental Health Massachusetts Coalition for the Homeless Massachusetts Immigrant & Refugee Advocacy Coalition (MIRA) Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (MSPCC) Melrose YMCA* Mental Health Association of Greater Lowell Merrimack Valley Catholic Charities Merrimack Valley YMCA Metro West YMCA* Minute Man ARC for Human Services*

Mujeres Unidas en Accion MYTOWN (Multicultural Youth Tour of What’s Now), Inc. Natick Visiting Nurses Association* Neighborhood Housing Services of the South Shore Neighborhood of Affordable Housing (NOAH) New England Shelter for Homeless Veterans* Newton Community Service Center North Metropolitan HomemakerHealth Aide Service, Inc.* North Shore ARC* North Suffolk Mental Health Association* Northeast Family YMCA (Haverhill Youth Collaborative) Northeast Independent Living Program Notre Dame Education Center Notre Dame High School Nuestra Comunidad Development Corporation Operation A.B.L.E. (Ability Based on Long Experience) Parents Helping Parents* Partners for Youth with Disabilities Pine Street Inn* Project Hope Quincy Community Action Program, Inc. (QCAP) Rape Crisis Services of Greater Lowell Raw Art Works Roca Roxbury Multi-Service Center, Inc. Roxbury Youthworks Salem Harbor CDC Salem YMCA (YMCA of the North Shore) Salesian Boys & Girls Club* Samaritans, Inc. Sociedad Latina Somebody Cares NE Somerville Homeless Coalition, Inc. Somerville YMCA South Boston Neighborhood House South Shore ARC* South Shore Day Care Services South Shore YMCA SPAN, Inc.* Special Fund for Emergency Financial Assistance* St. Ann’s Home, Inc. Straight Ahead Ministries STRIVE/Boston Employment Service, Inc.

The Boys and Girls Clubs of Dorchester (f.k.a. Colonel Daniel Marr Boys and Girls Club) The Brookline Center The Center for Teen Empowerment, Inc. The Greater Boston Food Bank* The Guidance Center, Inc. The James Place Child Care The Jimmy Fund of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley Collaboration Fund* The Mass Mentoring Partnership* The Medical Foundation The Salvation Army Thom Child & Family Services Transition House Travelers Aid Family Services Triangle, Inc.* Tri-Town Council on Youth & Family Services* 27 United South End Settlements Urban Edge Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts Victory Programs Vietnamese American Initiative for Development (Viet-AID) Visiting Nurse and Community Health* Visiting Nurse Association of Greater Lowell Visiting Nurse Association of Boston* Visiting Nurse Association of Eastern Massachusetts* Visiting Nurse Association of Middlesex East* VNA Care Network* Walpole Area Visiting Nurses Association* Waltham Boys & Girls Club Watertown Boys & Girls Club* West End House Boys & Girls Club West Surburban YMCA* Wilmington Family Counseling Service X-Cel, Inc Year Up YouthBuild Boston* YMCA of Greater Boston YWCA Boston YWCA Malden–Center for Women & Families YWCA Newburyport YWCA of Cambridge* YWCA of Greater Lawrence YWCA of Haverhill (Haverhill Youth Collaborative) YWCA of Lowell *Receives designations only


United Way of Massachusetts Bay, Inc. Statement of Financial Position All results reported in this book are as of June 30, 2008 (With Comparative Totals for 2007)

2007

2008

Temporarily Permanently Unrestricted Total Restricted Restricted Assets

(Noted 2) 2007 Total

Current assets Cash and cash equivalents

$ 4,338,662 $ 1,864,487 $

40,814 $ 6,243,963 $ 4,625,862

Receivables Contributions receivable, net of allowance for uncollectible pledges

38,500 18,060,113 18,369,221

9,186

-

-

9,186

13,650

Grants receivable

92,425

173,525

-

265,950

597,250

-

1,378,763

1,585,931

Other current assets

1,206,371

172,392

Investments

33,595,600

3,477,758

5,398,015 42,471,373 44,004,806

Total current assets

39,242,244 23,709,775

5,477,329 68,429,348 69,196,720

Property and equipment, at cost, less accumulated depreciation of $2,362,419 and $1,699,465 at June 30, 2008 and 2007, respectively

3,938,640

-

-

3,938,640

4,009,483

Investments in perpetual trusts

-

-

4,885,032

4,885,032

5,448,155

Scholarship and preservation pledges receivable, net of allowance for uncollectible pledges Other assets Total assets 28

- 18,021,613

Interest and dividends receivable

-

-

-

-

38,688

159,765

980,388

11,810

1,151,963

688,388

$ 43,340,649 $ 24,690,163 $ 10,374,171 $ 78,404,983 $ 79,381,434

Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued expenses

$ 2,637,779 $

172,762 $

- $ 2,810,541 $ 2,937,498

Program initiatives payable

3,929,944

-

-

3,929,944

2,088,183

Donor designations payable

-

2,663,449

-

2,663,449

3,027,532

Grant designations payable

-

73,030

-

73,030

322,884

Deferred revenue

-

623,687

623,687

893,403

Total current liabilities

6,567,723

3,532,928

- 10,100,651

9,269,500

Deferred lease incentive

2,003,026

-

-

2,003,026

2,200,825

Deferred rent

642,609

-

-

642,609

518,898

Total liabilities

9,213,358

3,532,928

- 12,746,286 11,989,223

General operations

13,515,128

-

- 13,515,128 12,137,520

Property and equipment

3,938,640

-

-

Commitments and contingencies

Net Assets 3,938,640

4,009,483

583,487

1,615,833

Designated by the Board of Directors Stabilization fund

583,487

-

-

Endowment fund

6,331,513

3,477,758

-

Program allocation reserves

9,758,523 17,679,477

Donor restricted Total net assets Total liabilities and net assets

-

9,809,271 11,110,656

- 27,438,000 27,916,049

- 10,374,171 10,374,171 10,602,670

34,127,291 21,157,235 10,374,171 65,658,697 67,392,211 $ 43,340,649 $ 24,690,163 $ 10,374,171 $ 78,404,983 $ 79,381,434


United Way of Massachusetts Bay, Inc. Statement of Financial Activities All results reported in this book are as of June 30, 2008 (With Comparative Totals for 2007)

2007

2008

Temporarily Permanently Restricted Restricted Unrestricted

Total

(Noted 2) 2007 Total

Public support Donor contributions

$

- $ 47,898,036 $

- $ 47,898,036 $ 47,673,847

Grant revenue

1,426,349

-

-

1,426,349

1,022,768

In-kind revenue and other income

560,651

5,339

-

565,990

666,041

Gross total public support

1,987,000 47,903,375

- 49,890,375 49,362,656

Provision for uncollectible pledges

- (2,169,248)

- (2,169,248) (2,243,882)

Donor designations, net of service fees

- (3,557,027)

- (3,557,027) (4,833,103)

Net total public support

1,987,000 42,177,100

- 44,164,100 42,285,671

Less

Net assets released from restriction 40,621,376 (40,621,376)

-

Total public support 42,608,376

- 44,164,100 42,285,671

1,555,724

-

-

Distributions and expenses Agency allocations and other distributions 28,107,903

-

- 28,107,903 26,810,438

Grant expenses

1,599,067

-

-

Total distributions 29,706,970

-

- 29,706,970 27,871,714

1,599,067

1,061,276

Functional expenses Community services

6,674,497

-

-

6,674,497

Fund-raising

6,694,776

-

-

6,694,776

6,834,324

Management and general

2,309,589

-

-

2,309,589

2,543,864

Total functional expenses 15,678,862

-

- 15,678,862 15,939,915

United Way of America dues

476,310

-

-

Total distributions and expenses 45,862,142

-

- 45,862,142 44,284,981

Surplus (deficit) of distributions and expenses from current operations over public support (3,253,766)

1,555,724

- (1,698,042) (1,999,310)

476,310

6,561,727

473,352

Endowment and investment activities Portfolio dividends and interest

1,905,750

159

Portfolio gain (loss), net of fees (2,500,044)

(665,151)

109

1,906,018

1,704,354

- (3,165,195)

4,057,415

Scholarship, preservation contributions and bequests to endowment

104,473

(7,985)

337,024

433,512

33,142

Distributions from funds held by others

1,355,825

-

-

1,355,825

1,079,067

Unrealized gain (loss) on perpetual trusts

-

-

(565,632)

(565,632)

556,499

Total increase (decrease) from endowment and investment activities

866,004

(672,977)

(228,499)

(35,472)

7,430,477

Increase (decrease) in net assets (2,387,762)

882,747

(228,499) (1,733,514)

5,431,167

Net assets Beginning of year 36,515,053 20,274,488 10,602,670 67,392,211 61,961,044 End of year

$ 34,127,291 $ 21,157,235 $ 10,374,171 $ 65,658,697 $ 67,392,211

These two pages include United Way of Massachusetts Bay, Inc.’s audited Statement of Financial Position and Statement of Financial Activities for Fiscal Year 2008 (July 1, 2007–June 30, 2008). A complete audit of United Way of Massachusetts Bay’s financial statements is conducted annually by the certified public accounting firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP. Copies of the full 2008 audited report are available from United Way of Massachusetts Bay, Inc.

29


United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley (UWMBMV) distributes undesignated funds to partner agencies based on an allocations process performed by the Community Impact Department and approved by the Board of Directors. The total amount available for allocations is calculated annually based on the undesignated amount raised in the fiscal year less program and overhead expenses. Designated funds are distributed less overhead expenses, which were 17.8% in fiscal 2008 unless a separate fee agreement was in place. For example, donations that are designated for other Massachusetts-based United Ways and their partner organizations are reduced by a contractually agreed to rate of 10%. Those gifts that are received by UWMBMV from other United Ways based in Massachusetts that are designated to UWMB partner agencies are reduced by a contractually agreed to fee of 5%. No membership dues or payments to UWMBMV are required from our partner agencies.

30


UNITED WAY OF MASSACHUSETTS BAY AND MERRIMACK VALLEY 2007 OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE The guidance, wisdom and support offered by United Way board of directors and executive committee members help to strengthen our capacity to provide thoughtful, targeted solutions that have real impact and meaning in the communities we serve. It is through their dedication and tireless work on our behalf that we are making real progress towards making our region the best place for children and families.

Chairman of the Board Robert M. Mahoney Executive Vice Chairman Citizens Financial Group

President and Chief Executive Officer and Assistant Secretary

Co-Chairman, Community Impact Committee Ronald A. Homer Chief Executive Officer Access Capital Strategies, LLC

Co-Chairman, 2007 Campaign*

Michael K. Durkin

David F. Lamere

President and Chief Executive Officer United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley

Vice Chairman The Bank of New York Mellon Corporation

Immediate Past Chairman

Jeffrey A. Leerink

Cathy E. Minehan Arlington Advisory Partners

Co-Chairman, 2007 Campaign* Founder, Chairman and CEO Leerink Swann & Company, Inc.

Co-Chairman, Development Committee

Co-Chairman, Development Committee

Kevin T. Callaghan

President Plazak Associates

Managing Director Berkshire Partners

Co-Chairman, Community Impact Committee Anna B. Colton Executive Vice President Bank of America

Secretary; Chairman & Secretary, Compensation Committee Robert E. Cowden, III, Esq. Partner Casner and Edwards, LLP

Treasurer Daniel Dennis, Sr., CPA

Kathryn F. Plazak

Co-Chairman, Governance & Nominating Committee Helen Chin Schlichte Consultant, Corporate Relations Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts

Chairman, Investment Committee Peter S. Voss

Chairman, Audit Committee Stephen K. Wagner Partner Deloitte

Daniel Dennis & Company

Robert L. Beal

Co-Chairman, Governance & Nominating Committee

Joseph P. Campanelli

Grace K. Fey

Chairman, Administration and Finance Committee John R. Grumbacher, Esq. Director Goulston & Storrs, P.C.

Principal The Beal Companies, LLP President & Chief Executive Officer Vice Chairman, Sovereign Bancorp

Carol Goldberg President The Avcar Group, Ltd.

Myra Kraft President The Kraft Group

Paul R. Murphy, Esq. Foley Hoag LLP

Thomas L. P. O’Donnell, Esq. Of Counsel Ropes & Gray

Diane B. Patrick, Esq. Partner Ropes & Gray

David A. Spina Thomas H. Tulip, Ph.D. Vice President & Global Brand Champion Bristol Myers Squibb

Assistant Treasurer John A. Ross Chief Financial Officer United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley

* Ex Officio

31


UNITED WAY OF MASSACHUSETTS BAY AND MERRIMACK VALLEY BOARD OF DIRECTORS P. Steven Ainsley

Debra S. Knez

Publisher The Boston Globe

Paul A. La Camera

Francis H. (Chip) Barnes East New England District Manager UPS

General Manager The WBUR Group Boston University

Weston P. Figgins

Dennis J. Langwell

Micho F. Spring

Edward E. Phillips

Managing Director Bain Capital

Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Liberty Mutual Group

Chairman, New England Weber Shandwick Worldwide

Charles V. (Chip) Bergh

Lawrence J. Lasser

Group President Global Personal Care Procter & Gamble/The Gillette Company

Ronald Logue

Former Chairman The Boston Globe

Steven W. Barnes

Michael L. Carson Former Vice President and General Manager WHDH-TV Channel 7

32

Director Emeritus

Chairman and CEO State Street Corporation

Stacey Lucchino Francis C. Mahoney

Martha Crowninshield

Managing Partner—Boston Office Ernst & Young LLP

Nancy L. Donahue

J. Keith Motley, Ph.D.

Sandra M. Edgerley

Chancellor University of Massachusetts—Boston

William Fine

Robert Rizzi

President and General Manager WCVB-TV/DT Channel 5

President Norfolk Council AFL-CIO

Robert E. Gallery

Ann Romney

Massachusetts State Market President Bank of America Private Bank— Eastern Massachusetts

Pamela Carrington Scott

Richard C. (“Bink”) Garrison Senior Vice President and Catalyst Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

President and Chief Executive Officer LVCC, Inc.

Hope Sidman

Randi L. Goldklank

Vice Chairman and Chief Operating Officer H2O Applied Technologies

President & General Manager WHDH-TV Channel 7

Peter L. Slavin, M.D.

Robert E. Griffin

President Massachusetts General Hospital

Executive Vice President Eastern Bank

Nickolas Stavropoulos

Andrew W. Hoar President/Co-Managing Partner CB Richard Ellis/New England

Carol R. Johnson Office of the Superintendent Boston Public Schools

David E. Johnson Managing Director Bain & Company

Michele Kessler Director Kessler Family Foundation

Cleve L. Killingsworth, Jr. Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts

Executive Vice President US Gas Distribution National Grid

Karen L. Webster President & Co-Founder Market Platform Dynamics

James Westra, Esq. Partner Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP

Leonard A. Wilson Regional President Sovereign Bank

Ellen M. Zane President and Chief Executive Officer Tufts-New England Medical Center and Floating Hospital for Children As of 3/08

Benjamin B. Taylor


UNITED WAY OF MASSACHUSETTS BAY and MERRIMACK VALLEY Senior Staff The passion, knowledge and commitment of United Way’s senior staff enhances our ability to respond to the needs of the community, develop innovative, targeted programs and initiatives, and improve the quality of life in our region. A shared vision for making our region the best place for children and families unites our senior staff, whose dedication to public service is exemplary. Each member of our senior team brings a wealth of experience—both in the private and public sectors—and expertise to his or her area of focus. The caliber of our team strengthens our ability to provide meaningful, targeted solutions—for children, youth and families—that will have a lasting and positive impact on the lives of the people we serve.

Michael K. Durkin President and Chief Executive Officer

José P. Ferrão

John A. Ross

Deborah Sinay

Chief Operating Officer

Chief Financial Officer

Chief Development Officer

33

Peter A. Thomas Senior Vice President Chief Professional Officer United Ways of New England

Jeffery J. Hayward

Nancy E. Powers

Senior Vice President Community Impact

Senior Vice President Business Integration & Support


Good for the planet. Great for the community. To help put every penny back into our work, we have made a conscientious choice to switch to electronic communication wherever possible.

51 Sleeper Street Boston, MA 02210-1208 P 617.624.8000 F 617.624.9114 59 Composite Way Suite 203 Lowell, MA 01851-5150 P 978.656.5000 F 978.656.5014

supportunitedway.org

Photography by: Casey Photography, Janet Stearns Photography and PEI Gillooly.

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