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2013-2014 Calendar


CONTENTS: Sessional Dates 2013 - 2014..................................................2,3 Mission Statement ....................................................................4 The Collegiate Faculty and Staff.................................................5 Admission Categories and Requirements...................................6 High School Program ...............................................................7 The Collegiate Academic Year...................................................7 Application and Registration Information...................................8 General Information .................................................................9 Fees.......................................................................................11 Scholarships, Bursaries, and Awards.......................................14 Course Descriptions................................................................18 Grade 9 Courses.....................................................................18 Grade 10 Courses...................................................................20 Grade 11 Courses...................................................................24 Grade 12 Courses...................................................................31 Dual Credit Courses................................................................43


SESSIONAL DATES 2013 April

29

May

8 20

Collegiate Graduation Exercises (2012-13) VICTORIA DAY - Classes Cancelled - University Closed

June

18 20 21-25 28

Spring Evening Session Exams Study Day Spring Day Session Exams Report Cards

July

1 2

University Closed: Canada Day Summer Session Classes Begin

August

5 7 8-9

Civic Holiday - Classes Cancelled - University Closed Summer Session Classes End Summer Session Exams

September

2 Labour Day - University Closed 3-4 Collegiate Late Registration for Fall/Winter Session 4 Orientation 5 Collegiate Classes Begin 9 Collegiate Evening Classes Begin 18 Fall Outing (Tentative) 26 Meet the Faculty Night

Spring (2013) Day and Evening Sessions Begin

October

14 21-24 23-24 25 29

Thanksgiving Day - University Closed First Term Exams Evening Session Mid-Term Exams SAG Conference: No Classes Academic Awards Ceremony

November

5 12

First Term Report Cards Meet the Faculty Night

December

11-12 11 12-20 23

Evening Session Final Exams Study Day Second Term Exams Holiday Break Begins

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SESSIONAL DATES 2014 January

6 10 16

February

6 Collegiate Open House 12-13 Evening Mid Term Exams 17-21 Mid-Term Reading Week – Day Classes Cancelled 24 Day Classes Resume

April

2-3 4 7 8-17 18 22 25 28

Evening Session Final Exams Last Day of Classes Study Day Final Exams Good Friday – University Closed Safe Grad Report Cards Spring Day and Evening Session Begins

May

7 19

Collegiate Graduation Exercises (2013-2014) Victoria Day - University Closed

June

19 20 23-25 27

Spring Evening Session Final Exams Study Day Spring Day Session Final Exams Report Cards

Collegiate Day Classes Resume / Winter Evening Session Begins Second Term Report Cards Meet the Faculty Night

NOTE: These dates are tentative, but will be adhered to as closely as possible.

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WELCOME FROM THE ACTING DEAN We hope that by browsing through our Handbook, and by attending our Open House or visiting The Collegiate, that you consider becoming part of our school community. Truly, “University at the Collegiate and Collegiate at the University” enables students to experience rich, diverse and accelerated programs and options within a unique environment. Students in Grades 9 through 12 experience an education in a safe , supportive and stimulating environment, free from distractions and disruptions that exist in many other educational environments. Access to the full range of University facilities such as libraries, computer labs and fitness facilities is provided to all Collegiate students. Our wide selection of Dual-Credit courses enables students to experience University-level courses in their Grade 12 year, while earning credits toward both High School and University graduation. Education at The Collegiate is a profound and enriching experience, one that prepares students for successful transition to post-secondary education, as well as providing them with the skills needed to thrive in life itself. We strive to provide programs that stimulate the “Mind, the Body and the Soul’, while challenging students to become the best that they can be while maintaining a balanced and healthy lifestyle. The Collegiate is a truly unique educational institution; there is really nothing like it in Canada. Please do not hesitate to contact us to arrange a tour or a visit!

R. Martin Acting Dean

OUR MISSION Collegiate tradition is one of academic excellence and accessibility, in an environment of critical thinking and community spirit. Continuing in its worthy traditions, The Collegiate at The University of Winnipeg is committed to offering Grade 9, 10, 11, and 12 students high school programs that provide a transition to post-secondary education. The Collegiate philosophy emphasizes the need for students to become mature individuals within an atmosphere of self-generated discipline, where students can discover freedom and its complement, responsibility. To foster our mission, The Collegiate strives to provide an environment of academic freedom, mutual trust, and support, and on-going professional development for Faculty. In a world of continuing change, The Collegiate Faculty strives to engage students in a rigorous curriculum that will prepare them for and encourage them to pursue a lifelong love of learning. We seek to enable our students to reflect upon moral and ethical issues, and to develop their concern for the welfare of others. The Faculty is committed to providing guidance and structure which results in our students’ intellectual, social, and personal development: in short, the education of the total person. We view accessibility as an important goal, compatible with our commitment to academic excellence. We strive to draw forth the best from our students.

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THE COLLEGIATE ADMINISTRATION Rick Martin Heather Singer Michael West Tara Dias Kristine Ramnarine Olaf Johnson

Acting Dean Associate Dean Associate Dean Office Manager/Registrar Administrative Assistant Office Assistant

THE COLLEGIATE FACULTY Peter Andrusiak Charlotte Arnold Jolene Braun Dominique Reynolds Timothy Cowan Rossana de McCormack Isabela Dueck Ian Elliott Derek Eidse Claude Garand Roberta Gottschalk Catherine Herd Jennifer Janzen Osaed Khan Lloyd Kornelsen Kelly Livesley Mike Lodewyks Mike Lukie Dena Martin Ishmael Mustapha Gerald Narynski April Pasieczka Robert Patterson Leslie Prizeman Wilfrid Schlosser JoAnne Small Marguerite Sveinson Robert Sveinson Bonnie Talbot Karen Tarr Jim Treller David Welham Gerri Zacharias Karen Zoppa

Drama and Debating Current Affairs, Global Issues and Biology English and Law French and Français English, Family Studies and Psychology Spanish English, History and Women’s Studies Mathematics and Science (Model School) English and Social Studies (Model School) Art, Chemistry and Science English (EAL) and History History and Scholarship Services Geography and History Mathematics and Physics Conflict Resolution and Global Citizenship Mathematics and Calculus Physical Education and Biology Mathematics, Physics and Science Mathematics Mathematics Mathematics and Physics Grade 9 Math, Science Chemistry English and Social Studies Computer Science Physical Education and Guidance Counselor French Mathematics and Computer English Biology Mathematics and Collegiate Tutor English English and Acting Director, Model School English, Philosophy and History

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ADMISSION CATEGORIES AND REQUIREMENTS The Collegiate may set minimum performance requirements which applicants must have met before unconditional admission is granted. Applicants who do not meet such minimum requirements may be admitted on the condition that they maintain set minimum attendance and performance standards while studying in The Collegiate. The Collegiate accepts students in five different admission categories. There are some variations in admission requirements depending on the category.

Regular Status Students applying for entrance into the Grade 9 class must include a copy of their most recent Grade 8 report card with their application. Normal minimum admission requirements for Grade 10 consist of completion of the five compulsory credits at the Grade 9 level: English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Physical Education. A complete transcript of all Grade 9 through 12 courses completed or in progress, must be submitted at the time of application when applying for admission to Grades 10 to 12.

Visiting Status There are two types of Visiting Status students: 1. A student who is enrolled in another high school may attend The Collegiate as a Visiting Student. Once courses are completed, the credit(s) will be transferred back to the home school. The application form must be signed by the principal, vice-principal, or counselor from the student’s home school. 2. A student who is taking an isolated course or courses and does not intend to seek graduation may also apply as a Visiting Student. A high school transcript and/or proof of graduation must also be submitted with the application. 3. Visiting students do not pay the application fee.

Mature Status To be admitted as a Mature Student, the applicant must be 19 years of age before the expected date of graduation. Mature Students will be required to complete a minimum of eight credits, although this number may be reduced if the student has previously completed high school credits, a G.E.D., or proof of Adult Basic Education. An application for Mature Status must be accompanied by a transcript of any high school credits or equivalent that the student has completed, along with proof of age. Normally, in order to be admitted to Grade 12 on Mature Status a student should have Grade 10 standing or the equivalent. Applicants registering as Mature students may be asked to complete an assessment to determine the most appropriate program of studies.

Accelerated Status High school students who have earned at least 22 credits in three calendar years or less, and who have completed at least one credit at the Grade 12 level, may apply to take a partial first year Arts and Science program while simultaneously completing the subjects necessary to meet high school graduation requirements and university entrance requirements. (Under some circumstances students who have completed fewer than 22 credits may also be considered at the discretion of the Registrar at The University of Winnipeg.)

Concurrent Status To be considered for Concurrent Status, a student needs three or fewer high school credits to fulfill regular university entrance requirements. The student will be required to register for these high school credits at The Collegiate at The University of Winnipeg. Registration at another high school or through Independent Study is not permitted. The main difference between Accelerated and Concurrent Status is that, while an Accelerated Student is in his/her normal Grade 12 year and is “accelerating� into university, a Concurrent Student has already completed his/her normal Grade 12 year and is upgrading to meet university entrance requirements. Concurrent Students do not fill out a Collegiate application form; instead they apply directly to The University of Winnipeg.

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HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM Graduation is obtained through the successful completion of 30 credits in the four-year High School Program. These credits will include the following compulsory credits. The Collegiate timetable and fee schedule allow for students who wish to study part-time or take less than a full program.

COMPULSORY CREDITS Grade 9

Grade 10

Language Arts 1 Social Studies 1 Mathematics 1 Science 1 Physical Education 1

Language Arts Geography Mathematics Science Physical Education

1 1 1 1 1

Language Arts History Mathematics Physical Education

Total compulsory

Total compulsory

5

Total compulsory 4

5

Grade 11

Grade 12 1 1 1 1

Language Arts Mathematics Physical Education Grade 12 Courses

1 1 1 2

Total compulsory

5

NOTE: In addition to the compulsory courses, a minimum of 11 elective courses are required.

THE COLLEGIATE ACADEMIC YEAR The Collegiate has an academic year conforming closely to The University of Winnipeg pattern, as a more adequate preparation for university studies. SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

FEB

MAR

Fall/Winter Day Session Fall Evening Session

Winter Evening Session

APR

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

Spring Session

Summer Session

(day and evening)

(day)

In the Fall/Winter Session student reports are issued in November, January, and April. Each student evaluation is based on a combination of term work and examination results. Final reports will be issued in late April.

graduating in Spring or Summer terms (June or August) will receive the appropriate documents through the mail, and, should they wish to attend the graduation exercise, they may do so the following year.

The Fall/Winter evening sessions will be divided into two semesters. Final reports will be issued in January for the first semester and in late April for the second semester.

The academic year is designed to give university-bound students an experience of the pace demanded in studies at the undergraduate level, while they are still under the close supervision and guidance provided in a secondary school environment.

Students who successfully complete the High School Program will be awarded a High School Graduation Diploma. Diplomas, Academic Awards, and Prizes, will be awarded at the Graduation Exercise in May. Students

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APPLICATION AND REGISTRATION INFORMATION Grade 9 and 10 Interviews

Spring/Summer Application Process

Due to the limited enrolment at these levels, all applicants are asked to take part in an interview with a Collegiate Dean. Once the application and application fee are received, students will be contacted in order to schedule an interview. Other than this additional requirement, the steps outlined below should be followed when applying for entrance to all grades. Students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. While applicants may meet admissions requirements, we are not able to guarantee a place in the program. Specific questions may be directed to the Dean or Associate Deans of The Collegiate at 204.786.9221.

The process for registering for Spring/Summer session courses is identical to the Fall/Winter application process except for tuition payment. Please include a full tuition fee payment with your application.

Fall/Winter Application Process 1. Complete a Fall/Winter application form available on The Collegiate website. 2. Pay a non-refundable application fee by cash, cheque, money order (payable to “The University of Winnipeg�), or Interac. (This fee is waived for students who paid the application fee in a previous year, Concurrent Status and for Visiting Status students.) 3. Submit an official transcript (not a photocopy) of all Grade 9-12 credits obtained. Include an interim report if you are currently in school. Grade 9 students must submit a Grade 8 report card. 4. Applicants for Mature Status must also provide official proof of date of birth. 5. Visiting Status students who are enrolled at another school must ensure that the application is authorized by the home school. 6. Submit complete application, by mail or in person, to: Dean of The Collegiate, 1W02 - 515 Portage Avenue Winnipeg, Manitoba R3B 2E9 7. Students who are accepted will receive an official letter of acceptance which will indicate when they will be expected to attend an in-person registration session. Note: Applicants for Concurrent Status do not complete a Collegiate application form, but apply directly to The University of Winnipeg. Once the application form has been received by The University Admissions Office the student will be contacted by The Collegiate regarding the registration/advising process.

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Application Deadlines Applications for all sessions are accepted on a first come, first served basis up to the start of classes. Enrolment is limited and applicants are strongly encouraged to apply early to ensure course selection. The Collegiate reserves the right to cancel any course for which there is insufficient enrolment, or to turn down an application for any course which is filled to capacity.

International Student Applications Please refer to the International Student View book for policy and procedures.


GENERAL INFORMATION Admission to The University of Winnipeg (Seamless Admission) The Collegiate and The University of Winnipeg have a seamless admission process in place that accelerates admission into first year university for Collegiate students. All Collegiate students meeting the academic requirements for attending The University of Winnipeg will receive an offer of acceptance in January. They will not be charged the regular application fee and they will be offered final acceptance in April, after their final Grade 12 marks are available. Students have the opportunity to plan their University timetable early, thus avoiding scheduling problems, and will automatically be eligible for University of Winnipeg Entrance Scholarships.

Appeals The Collegiate has established a policy and procedure to deal with requests for appeals against grades on individual items of work and for appeals against the final grade in a course. As strict deadlines are involved in launching an appeal, students are advised to get a copy of the complete Collegiate Appeals Policy and Procedure from an Associate Dean.

Attendance The Collegiate attendance policy is a key component in helping students prepare to handle responsibly the personal independence inherent in a post-secondary academic environment. Successfully monitoring and supporting attendance is an ongoing process that requires some teamwork. Students are expected to attend every class except for medical or other valid reasons. Instructors take attendance in each and every class, and submit their attendance records to The Collegiate office at the end of each week. Associate Deans monitor attendance and intervene when problems arise. Normally we do not call parents. In keeping with our philosophy of treating students as mature individuals, we always deal with the student first. Parents can help by regularly discussing school with their son or daughter and being attentive to evidence that the student is keeping up with regular homework. Make a note of when reports will be issued and when Meet the Faculty Nights are scheduled. Although we will rarely, if ever, contact parents directly about a student’s attendance, parents/guardians are always welcome to contact us.

Course Changes and Withdrawals Course changes and withdrawals must be approved by a Dean or the Office Manager/Registrar. Details as to the procedures will be published in The Collegiate Student Agenda (available the first week of classes).

(LISTED ALPHABETICALLY)

Counseling Services Course selection advice and academic counseling are provided to all students as part of their in-person registration. Students are free to drop in or make an appointment with one of The Collegiate Associate Deans for counseling on academic and personal matters. The Collegiate also employs a half-time Guidance Counselor, Ms. JoAnne Small, who is available to assist students on academic and personal issues.

Deferred Examinations A student may be required to defer the writing of a final examination in one or more subjects on the grounds of illness or other compassionate reasons. A student may request permission from a Dean to defer one or more examinations.

Examinations Students must write final examinations, where required. Those students who are absent from examinations will be given a grade of NP (no paper), except in the cases of students who produce evidence of having been prevented from writing examinations as a result of illness or for some other acceptable reason. In the case of application for deferred examinations on account of illness or other disability or affliction, notification of inability to sit for examinations must be made to the Dean within seven days of the onset of the illness or disability and must be accompanied or followed shortly by a medical certificate or an otherwise appropriate document stating the nature of the illness or other acceptable reason.

Grading Final grades in The Collegiate are in the form of percentage grades with associated values as below: Mark Value

Description

90-100

Exceptional

80-89

Excellent

75-79

Very Good

70-74

Good

65-69

Above Average

55-64

Average

50-54

Marginal Pass

Less than 50

Fail

No Paper

Fail

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GENERAL INFORMATION

(CONTINUED)

Graduation Diplomas

Student Agenda

A Collegiate Graduation Diploma will be awarded to each student who completes the requirements of the Manitoba High School program at The Collegiate, with the exception of visiting students.

A Collegiate Student Agenda containing helpful information about fee schedules, faculty, a campus map, fire regulations, and administrative procedures re: absence, illness, etc., will be distributed to all students during the first week of classes.

Graduation Exercise

Textbooks

Every student who completes the requirements for a Graduation Diploma in the April series of examinations may attend the Convocation Exercise in May.

Textbooks used are those recommended by the Manitoba Department of Education. The Collegiate will lend, free of charge, most of the texts used in courses with the exception of dual-credit courses.

Internet Access Included in their course fees, Collegiate students have access to the internet, along with support from The University of Winnipeg Help Desk (internet access provided). Once registered, students simply claim their user name and password from The Collegiate Main Office (1W02). Student accounts will provide access to all computer labs at The Collegiate, tutor centre, U of W Library computers and the uplink computer common on the fourth floor of Centennial Hall. Students should expect to sign a user’s agreement.

Plagiarism The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers defines plagiarism as “the act of using another person’s ideas or expressions in your writing without acknowledging the source.” Copying words or ideas from any source, including another student, constitutes academic “theft,” and may result in loss of marks for the assignment, loss of marks for the entire course, or even expulsion. The same penalties will result if a student is found guilty of cheating or contributing to cheating on any test, exam, or term assignment.

Services for Students with Special Needs Students with Special Needs will need to have detailed discussions with a Dean upon application to The Collegiate to ensure that supports and accommodations are available, and able to be put in place to ensure academic success. Some of the services that may be arranged include: • Academic advising - course selection and timetable arrangement • Admission and registration assistance • Examination supervision, including alternate exam formats and extended time • Orientation to The Collegiate and The University of Winnipeg • Access to University facilities • University advising

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Transcripts Every student is entitled to receive as many transcripts of high school marks as required at a fee of $10.00 CDN for the first copy and $5.00 CDN for each additional copy included in the same order.

Tutoring Services The Collegiate offers the services of certified Faculty to tutor students in both Arts and Science courses. Students may sign up for one-on-one or group tutorials at no additional cost. Collegiate Instructors also provide tutoring outside of regular class time. The Collegiate Tutoring Office is located in the lower level of Wesley Hall.

University and Scholarship Planning Services The Collegiate recognizes the exceptional academic, community, artistic and athletic achievements of our graduating students by offering a unique SCHOLARSHIP OFFICE. Individual, practical support is provided to graduating students applying to universities. This support includes general academic advising, identifying post secondary programs of interest, identifying and applying for entrance scholarship monies and editing draft applications. To register with University and Scholarship Planning Services, students can simply make an appointment with the Scholarship Officer in room 2W05.


FEES Collegiate fees may be paid by cash, cheque, money order, Interac, or online banking (through your financial institution). Cheques and money orders should be made payable to “The University of Winnipeg”. Please note: The University of Winnipeg Board of Regents reserves the right to change the schedule of fees and refunds without notice. Revenue Canada does not allow Income Tax deduction claims based on Collegiate fees.

1. Course Fees Collegiate students will pay fees calculated on the number of courses for which the student registers. This fee-per-credit covers the following items: • • • • • • • • • •

Course tuition Student association fees Student centre I.D. card fee Textbooks WI-FI access Access to University library services Access to tutoring Access to counseling and academic support services Access to the University and Scholarship Planning Office

Fee statements will show a breakdown of tuition fees, registration fee, and student association fees. Fall/Winter Session course fees for 2013-2014 are assessed at $790.00 CDN per credit; $395.00 CDN per half-credit for Canadian students. Spring Session 2013 fees are assessed at $670.00 CDN per full credit and $335.00 CDN per half credit for Canadian students. Full-time International students, those taking five or more credits, will be assessed a flat tuition of $12,500.00 CDN which will cover all of the courses taken from September 1, 2013 to August 31, 2014. International students taking fewer than five courses will be assessed course fees of $2,500.00 CDN per credit.

2. Additional Fees: a) Graduation Fee - All Grade 12 regular status students will be assessed a graduation fee of $50.00 CDN to cover the cost of cap and gown rental, diploma, and diploma cover. Students who graduate in June or August will be assessed a Graduation Fee of $25.00 CDN to cover the cost of the diploma and diploma cover.

the publication of final examination results, submit an appeal in writing to The Collegiate Appeals Committee, through an Associate Dean of The Collegiate. A fee of $15.00 CDN will be assessed for each course for which an appeal is entered. Should the appeal be sustained, the $15.00 CDN fee will be refunded. Appeals with respect to individual items of work should also be directed through an Associate Dean. c) Transcripts - For each order of transcripts (term or final grades) a fee of $10.00 CDN for the first copy and $5.00 CDN for each additional copy will be assessed per order. d) Application Fee - Canadian applicants must pay a $100.00 CDN application fee (non-refundable). International applicants must pay a $150.00 CDN Application fee (non-refundable). Returning students do not pay an application fee. e) N.S.F. Cheque Fee - Should any student’s cheque be returned for non-sufficient funds, the student will be assessed an additional $45.00 CDN. f) Library Fines - Students who incur library fines must pay the fines in full before final grades will be issued.

3. Fee Payment Canadian and returning International Students applying for Fall/Winter Session are required to pay 50% of the total course fees at the time of registration and the remaining 50% by January 30, 2014. Monthly payments can be arranged by contacting a Dean. Students who complete Early Registration (prior to July 31) MUST pay a deposit of $790.00 CDN (Canadian students) at the time of registration. The balance of the first 50% is then due by August 31, 2013. First time International students must pay full fees prior to receiving the final letter of acceptance. A student registering for only one credit MUST pay all fees at registration. Arrangements for alternate methods of payment may be made through a Dean or the Registrar where necessary. Fees for Spring and Summer courses must be paid at the time of application/registration. NOTE: For all sessions; students who have not paid all fees in full may not be permitted to write final examinations. Under special circumstances the Dean may grant permission.

b) Appeals - Every candidate may, within one week following

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FEES

(CONTINUED)

4. Refund Schedules a) Tuition fees will be refunded on the following schedule to all students who withdraw completely, or from any part of their study program. NOTE: If fees have not been paid in full, a credit will be applied to any outstanding balance before a refund is calculated.

Refunds for Fall/Winter Full Courses: Prior to September 5, 2013

100% of (tuition less registration fee)

From September 5 - September 13

90% of (tuition less registration fee)

From September 16- September 20

75% of (tuition less registration fee)

From September 23- November 22

50% of (tuition less registration fee)

After November 25

No refund

Refunds for Fall/Winter half-courses: Fall term: Prior to September 5, 2013

100% of (tuition less registration fee)

From September 5 - September 13

90% of (tuition less registration fee)

From September 16- September 20

75% of (tuition less registration fee)

From September 23- September 27

50% of (tuition less registration fee)

After September 30

No refund

Winter term: Prior to January 6, 2014

100% of (tuition less registration fee)

From January 6 - January 10

90% of (tuition less registration fee)

From January 13- January 17

75% of (tuition less registration fee)

From January 20- January 24

50% of (tuition less registration fee)

After January 27

NO REFUND

Refunds for Fall/Winter Evening courses: Fall term: Prior to September 5, 2013

100% of (tuition less registration fee)

From September 5 - September 13

90% of (tuition less registration fee)

From September 16- September 20

75% of (tuition less registration fee)

From September 23- September 27

50% of (tuition less registration fee)

After September 30

No refund

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FEES

(CONTINUED)

Refunds for Fall/Winter Evening courses (continued): Winter term: Prior to January 6, 2014

100% of (tuition less registration fee)

From January 6 - January 10

90% of (tuition less registration fee)

From January 13- January 17

75% of (tuition less registration fee)

From January 20- January 24

50% of (tuition less registration fee)

After January 27

NO REFUND

NOTE: If fees for full courses are paid in two installments, the credit will be applied to your account balance.

Refunds for Spring/Summer 2013 courses: Spring Day and Evening courses: Prior to April 29, 2013

100% of (tuition less $25.00CDN cancellation fee)

From April 29 - May 3

75% of (tuition less registration fee)

From May 6- May 10

50% of (tuition less registration fee)

After May 13

NO REFUND

Summer Day and Evening Courses: Prior to July 2, 2013

100% of (tuition less $25.00CDN cancellation fee)

From July 2 - July 5

75% of (tuition less registration fee)

From July 8- July 12

50% of (tuition less registration fee)

After July 15

NO REFUND

The following fees will NOT be refunded: • • • • • • •

Application fees Fees for unsuccessful appeals of examination grades Fees for transcripts Examination fees Fees paid by Bursary N.S.F. cheque fee Registration fee (assessed at $10.00 CDN per course)

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SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES, AWARDS The following awards are authorized by The University of Winnipeg Senate on the recommendation of The Collegiate Faculty Council. Awards are granted to students who are taking courses for the first time only. The Senate reserves the right not to grant an award if there is no candidate who meets a minimum requirement level. In the event that the Awards Committee decides to grant the same award to more than one student, any award money shall be equally divided between or among the recipients. The Collegiate reserves the right to alter all scholarship prize and award criteria, subject to approval of The Collegiate Faculty Council.

ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS The Special Entrance Scholarships are automatically offered to new students who meet the criteria below. These scholarships are offered without the necessity of a scholarship application. Averages for the purpose of Entrance Awards will be calculated on compulsory credits in Grade 8, Grade 9, Grade 10, or Grade 11. From Grade 8, the following four compulsory credits will be used in the calculation of Entrance Award averages: Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies and Science. From Grade 9, the following four compulsory credits will be used in the calculation of Entrance Award averages: Language Arts 10F, Social Studies 10F, Mathematics 10F, and Science 10F. From Grade 10, the following four compulsory credits will be used in the calculation of Entrance Award averages: Language Arts 20F, Geography 20F, Mathematics 20S, and Science 20S. From Grade 11, the following four compulsory credits will be used in the calculation of Entrance Award averages: Language Arts 30S, History 30S, Mathematics 30S, and one other 30S or 40S course.

New for 2013-14 – 80 new Entrance Scholarships for students entering The Collegiate! The Collegiate will be offering Special Entrance Scholarships to the top twenty new students who receive final acceptance into The Collegiate at each grade level. Ten scholarships of $1000 and ten of $500 will be made available per grade. Scholarships will be awarded to 20 new students who have the highest 20 averages over 85% in each grade. These scholarships are offered without the necessity of a scholarship application

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GRADE 10, 11, OR 12 The Collegiate Silver Jubilee Entrance Scholarships $1,000 CDN scholarships will be offered annually to new students who apply before July 30 and register for a minimum of five credits in the Fall/Winter Session. To be eligible for consideration students must have a minimum average of 85% and demonstrate financial need. The Collegiate Alumni Association Entrance Scholarship This scholarship is awarded on the basis of academic excellence and financial need to students entering Grade 10, Grade 11, and/or Grade 12 at The Collegiate. Howard Mathieson Entrance Scholarship To be awarded annually to students who register for a minimum of four credits in the regular session. To be eligible for consideration students must have a high academic achievement and the potential to excel as an athlete in a recognized Collegiate sport. GRADE 9 Collegiate Entrance Scholarship This scholarship will be awarded to the full-time Grade 9 student with the highest standing in a complete Grade 8 program. GRADE 10 Collegiate Entrance Scholarship This scholarship will be awarded to the full-time Grade 10 student with the highest standing in a complete Grade 9 program. William Rutherford Memorial Scholarship This scholarship will be awarded to the full-time Grade 10 student with the second highest standing in a complete Grade 9 program. GRADE 11 Collegiate Entrance Scholarship This scholarship will be awarded to the new full-time Grade 11 student with the highest standing in a complete Grade 10 program. Tomlinson Memorial Scholarship This scholarship commemorates Lorne A. Tomlinson, Dean of The Collegiate (1957-1970). It will be awarded to the returning full-time student in Grade 11 with the highest standing in a complete Grade 10 program. Irene Bennett Memorial Entrance Scholarship This scholarship commemorates Irene Bennett who managed Tony’s Canteen from 1977 to 1992. It will be awarded to the full-time student in Grade 11 with a demonstrated interest in the arts and high academic achievement in a full-time Grade 10 program.


SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES, AWARDS GRADE 12 Collegiate Entrance Scholarship This scholarship will be awarded to the new full-time Grade 12 student with the highest standing in a complete Grade 11 program. Tomlinson Memorial Scholarship Commemorating Lorne A. Tomlinson, Dean of The Collegiate (1957-1970). It will be awarded to the returning full-time student in Grade 12 with the highest standing in a complete Grade 11 program. The Collegiate Students’ Association, 1977-78, Entrance Scholarship Awarded annually on the recommendation of The Collegiate Awards Committee to a Grade 12 student registered for at least four credits in The Collegiate. Class of ’83 Entrance Scholarship Awarded on the recommendation of The Collegiate Awards Committee to a full-time Grade 12 student with high academic achievement in a full-time Grade 11 program. John De Jong Collegiate Alumni Scholarship Established by Daisy (De Jong) Webster in memory of her father, John De Jong, is to be awarded to a full-time Grade 12 student who completed a full-time Grade 11 program with high academic achievement and who intends to enter University. Charlotte Marie Kennedy Memorial Scholarship Established in 1986 by the family and friends of Charlotte Marie Kennedy, this scholarship is awarded annually to a full-time Grade 12 student who shows high academic promise and financial need. The recipient must have been a full-time Grade 11 student in The Collegiate in the previous year. John Bulman Collegiate Entrance Scholarship This scholarship is awarded to a Collegiate student continuing from Grade 11 who is actively involved in and committed to the life of The Collegiate and/or the community. Financial need may be taken into consideration.

BURSARIES A bursary is a grant based on financial need and is meant to supplement a student’s own resources for tuition. A copy of both parent’s previous year’s “Notice of Assessment” from Revenue Canada is required with all bursary applications. Students must maintain a satisfactory academic record and class attendance to continue to qualify for a bursary. Application for bursaries should be made by July 30th. However, students in financial need should not hesitate to contact

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a Dean regarding tuition assistance at any point during the school year. Application forms may be obtained from The Collegiate Office, Room 1W02 Wesley Hall. The Antenbring Family Bursary This bursary was established by the Antenbring Family to support a student or students with financial need, who otherwise would not be able to attend The Collegiate. Board of Regents Entrance Bursaries A number of bursaries are provided by The University of Winnipeg Board of Regents for students with financial need and good academic standing who are entering The Collegiate. Bruce Baragar Memorial Award This award was established by Dr. Robert Baragar in honour of his brother C.D. Bruce Baragar who attended The Collegiate in 1944. It will be granted annually on the basis of financial need to a deserving student. The Collegiate Dean’s Fund Full Tuition Bursary award established by The Collegiate Alumni Association, this special bursary provides full tuition to students with academic promise and outstanding personal qualities, while having demonstrated financial need. David Bruce Pitblado Memorial Collegiate Bursary Janice (Pitblado) Raleigh, University of Winnipeg Collegiate ’53, and Sandra and Jim Pitblado have established this bursary in memory of David Bruce Pitblado. This bursary will provide support to Collegiate students, or to those applying to The Collegiate, who have demonstrated financial need. Janice (Pitblado) Raleigh Bursary Established by Don Raleigh in 2006, in honour of his wife, Janice (nee Pitblado), University of Winnipeg Collegiate Class of ’53. The bursary will provide support to Collegiate students, or to those applying to The Collegiate, who have demonstrated financial need. The Dean’s Bursary Fund (In Memory of Dean A. Lorne Tomlinson) This bursary fund provides support to Collegiate students or to those applying to The Collegiate who have demonstrated financial need. The fund was established by Collegiate Graduate Dr. James D. MacDonald. The Douglas Family Bursary This bursary was established by the Douglas Family to support a student or students with financial need, who otherwise would not be able to attend the Collegiate.

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SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES, AWARDS Johnston Family Bursary The Johnston Family Bursary was established by Mr. David Johnston of Johnston Group Inc. to support a student or students in financial need who otherwise would not be able to attend The University of Winnipeg Collegiate. Leonard Asper Family Collegiate Bursary Created in 2006 by Leonard Asper (Collegiate Class of ’82), President & CEO of CanWest Global Communications Corp. and founding member of the University Of Winnipeg Foundation Board of Directors, this bursary will provide support to Collegiate students, or those applying to The Collegiate, who have demonstrated financial need. Marion More Memorial Award Established by the Prober family in memory of their mother, Marion More, this award will be granted annually on the basis of financial need to a deserving student. Marjorie Jean MacDonald Memorial Bursary Established by Dr. James MacDonald in memory of his mother, Marjorie Jean MacDonald, this award will be granted annually on the basis of financial need and demonstrated interest in creative writing to a deserving student. The Murray C. Coppinger Memorial Bursary Established by the Coppinger family in memory of Murray C. Coppinger. This bursary will be awarded annually at the discretion of the Dean, to a Collegiate student who is in financial need and has a disability. United College Collegiate Graduates Bursary This bursary, established by graduates of United College Collegiate, will be awarded on the recommendation of the Dean to deserving students who face unexpected financial need after completing the first term of a Fall/ Winter Session. United Church of Canada Entrance Bursary This bursary established by the United Church of Canada will be awarded on the recommendation of the Dean to a student of academic promise with financial need.

ACADEMIC AWARDS The following definitions apply for these awards: FULL-COURSE: a minimum of four credits completed at The Collegiate between May 1, 2013 and April 30, 2014. FULL-TIME: a minimum of four credits completed at The Collegiate during the Fall/Winter Session. NOTE: Students who are enrolled in an accelerated status program will be considered on an individual basis.

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Governor General’s Medal Awarded annually to the full-time graduate who achieves the highest standing in Grade 12 in a program leading to admission to University. University Medal Awarded annually to the full-time graduate who achieves second highest standing in Grade 12 in a program leading to admission to University. Dean’s Medal Awarded to a full-time graduate with high academic achievement and involvement in extra-curricular activities. The Collegiate Alumni Medal Awarded annually to the full-time student who achieves the highest standing in Grade 11. Wesley Medal Awarded annually to the full-time student who achieves the second highest standing in Grade 11, and who has completed at least four credits in the Fall/Winter Session. Chancellor’s Medal Awarded annually to the full-time student who achieves the highest standing in Grade 10. President’s Medal Awarded annually to the full-time student who achieves the second highest standing in Grade 10. Collegiate Grade 9 Gold Medal Awarded annually to the full-time student who achieves the highest standing in Grade 9. Collegiate Grade 9 Silver Medal Awarded annually to the full-time student who achieves the second highest standing in Grade 9. Dean’s Honour List Recognition for Highest Distinction is given to full-course students who have an average of 90%* or better. Recognition for Distinction is given to full-course students who have an average of 85%* or better. (*subject to revision) Collegiate Awards for Academic Excellence Collegiate Awards for Academic Excellence will be awarded to the student who obtains the highest final mark in a subject. To be eligible, a student must have completed the course within the 12-month period preceding the date of the award. Visiting Students are not eligible for these awards. Collegiate Subject Awards Subject Awards are awarded in each subject to the student who obtains the second highest final mark.


SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES, AWARDS SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS Robert A. Anderson Memorial Award This award will be awarded to the full-time student with high academic achievement and excellent all-round participation in the life of The Collegiate. Chemistry Achievement Award This award was established by Mrs. E. Johnston. It will be awarded on the recommendation of The Collegiate Faculty to the student who shows the greatest improvement in Chemistry 40S during the Fall/Winter Session. Collegiate Alumni Association Award Awarded to the full-time graduate who was registered as a full-time student in Grade 11 during the previous Fall/Winter Session and who showed a significant improvement from Grade 11 to Grade 12. Collegiate Twenty-five Year Award This scholarship, established by The Collegiate Alumni Association on behalf of the Class of ’75, is awarded to a student with good academic achievement and recognized extra-curricular activities during the academic year. Howie Goldberg Memorial Award Established in the memory of Howie Goldberg, a 1984 graduate of The Collegiate, is to be awarded to the fulltime graduate who intends to register at a Manitoba University and who achieves the highest standing in five 40S academic credits (including 2 credits of Grade 12 English). A minimum of five credits must be completed in the Fall/Winter Session. While the scholarship will be announced at Spring Graduation Exercise, it will be awarded the following September upon proof of registration at a Manitoba University. The Irving L. Hechter Memorial Award Awarded to a student with high academic standing, participation in extra-curricular endeavors in and out of school, and has been accepted to study in the Faculty of Education at any Manitoba Post-Secondary Institution.

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any University of Winnipeg course and another from The Collegiate, who have written the best essays promoting dialogue, understanding, and mutual acceptance between two or more religious traditions. Preference will be given to essays which consider both Eastern and Western religious traditions, or which promote the idea of non-violent ways of bringing about social change. The Odyssey: The Collegiate Creative Writing Award Awarded to a full-time student in either Grade 10, 11, or 12 who has demonstrated outstanding ability in creative writing. Lawrence F. Schmidt Memorial Award for Mature Students Awarded annually to a student who entered The Collegiate on Mature Status, who completed at least three credits at The Collegiate in any session(s), and who demonstrated good academic achievement and effort The Henry Rieff Stewart Memorial Scholarship for Adult Learners Awarded annually to a student who entered The Collegiate on Mature Status, who completed at least 3 credits at The Collegiate in any session(s), and who demonstrated good academic achievement and effort. John Ting Memorial Scholarship Established by friends and family in memory of John Ting. John was an exceptional instructor and administrator at The Collegiate from 1972 until his death in 2002. This scholarship will be awarded to the graduating international student with the highest combined mark in Grade 12 English and a Grade 12 science (Biology 40S, Chemistry 40S, Computer Science 40S, or Physics 40S). Derek Wong Memorial Award for Academic Excellence Given by the family and friends in memory of Derek Wong, a graduate of The Collegiate, who had a strong interest in leukemia research. It will be awarded to the full-time student who obtains the highest final combined grade in Biology 40S and Chemistry 40S.

R.O.A. Hunter Collegiate Alumni Award Awarded to a student with good academic performance and active participation in Collegiate athletic programs. Dr. Victor Leathers Award for Academic Excellence in Dramatics Awarded to a student in Dramatics, with an average of at least 70% in the course, who participates actively in the drama productions of The Collegiate. Shankar Memorial Prize These prizes have been established by Dr. Prem Shankar in memory of his parents Dr. Vishnu and Vachan Shankar. These awards will be given to two students, one from

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SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES, AWARDS THE DEAN’S BURSARY FUND (In Memory of Dean A. Lorne Tomlinson) This bursary fund was established by Dr. James (Jim) D. MacDonald, local business leader and University of Winnipeg Collegiate alumnus, through an unprecedented gift to The University of Winnipeg Collegiate. This bursary fund will enable those who may not have the financial means to share in an educational experience that will undoubtedly stay with them forever, according to Dr. MacDonald. Dr. MacDonald’s involvement with The University of Winnipeg began as a student in the 1960s. It was in fact, Lorne Tomlinson, Dean of The Collegiate, who interviewed the young Jim MacDonald and admitted him into Grade 11. As with so many Collegiate students, this meeting with Dean Tomlinson set MacDonald on a path of hard work and achievement.

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His association with his alma mater did not end with graduation. In the 1970s, he founded The University of Winnipeg Collegiate Alumni Association, and was its first President, serving for five years. Later in 2004, he took on the role of Chair for The Collegiate Appeal, a fundraising initiative within the overall University of Winnipeg Campaign. This hugely successful campaign raised over $5 million to be used to support Collegiate students in financial need in perpetuity. The Collegiate deeply appreciates the efforts of Dr. MacDonald and his colleagues on the fundraising board. A graduate of the Class of ’64, Dr. MacDonald has a long-standing commitment to Collegiate students and has made a number of previous and significant financial contributions in support of Collegiate student bursaries. His goal remains constant—turning more lives around through a University of Winnipeg Collegiate education.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS GRADE 9 COURSES ENGLISH 10F English 10F introduces students to a variety of approaches to the acquisition of language and literary skills. Reading, understanding, and sharing texts of all genres, including the visual and the literary text are an intricate part of the course. Students will be required to respond in creative as well as analytical methods to the texts. The selection of materials will include novels, short stories, drama, poetry, articles, film, and an introduction to several elements of the mass media. Materials will be clustered thematically. The course will include an opportunities to develop creative and academic writing skills. Assignments Evaluation is based on a variety of assignments such as a final exam, a research essay, oral presentations, group discussions, and various other activities which promote the acquisition of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and representation at the 10F level. Benefits This course is required before a student can take English 20F. It emphasizes and introduces many of the academic and personal skills required for students as they begin the credit system in English.

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FRANÇAIS 10F Ce cours est destiné aux francophones et aux étudiants du programme d’immersion. Les buts du cours. Ce cours permettra à l’élève de perfectionner son expression orale et écrite. Il / elle sera amené/e à développer ses habiletés langagières par l’étude de la grammaire, de la littérature et des textes non-littéraires. Le cours préalable Le cours de Français 8ième année est Le Cours Préalable normal. Les sujets à l’étude Ce cours a pour but de perfectionner et d’approfondir les connaissances grammaticales de l’élève. Il / elle fera donc l’étude systématique des verbes, de l’orthographe grammaticale et des parties du discours. Dans le but de développer son esprit de synthèse et d’analyse, l’élève sera appelé à faire la lecture de romans, de pièces de théâtre, de nouvelles, de poésie et d’une variété de textes non-littéraires. Les élèves verront un ou deux films français au cours de l’année. Les devoirs Afin de perfectionner l’écrit, l’élève fera des dictées, des exercices de grammaire et des rédactions. Pour améliorer son expression orale, il / elle devra participer aux discussions en classe, présenter des scènes ou des monologues dramatiques et faire des présentations orales sur les textes littéraires et non-littéraires à l’étude.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) Les exigences L’étudiant aura besoin d’un bon dictionnaire français, par exemple Le Petit Robert I. FRENCH 10G French 10G is part of the Core French Program (Français de base) beginning in grade 4. This program integrates four components- experience\communication, culture, language, and general language education- so that learners are able to apply practical linguistic knowledge at a personal level. (The Core French program is not designed to make students bilingual.) Objectives • To improve French language skills • To increase linguistic accuracy • To expand language learning strategies • To better understand French language speaking cultures Prerequisites Grade 8 Basic French Topics The following themes from Ca Marche 3 will be explored: • • • • •

Ma chambre ma vie (my room, my life) Mes tresors, mes souvenirs (my treasures, my souvenirs) Mission emploi (Mission Employment) Nous les Canadiens (We Canadians) Films a l’affiche (optional)

Linguistic topics include: Present, past, future of regular, irregular and reflexive verbs, personal pronouns, relative pronouns Assignments Students are evaluated on the development of their listening, speaking, reading, writing skills. Assignments include workbook exercises, communication activities, projects and presentations.

• • • • • • • • •

Statistics (graphing, statistical analysis, data collection) Number Sense (square roots, rational numbers) Powers and Exponents (exponent laws) Polynomials Linear Relations (solving for ‘x’) Circle Geometry 2D and 3D Geometry Probability Symmetry

Students will learn and apply new concepts through homework exercises, projects, tests, and exams. PHYSICAL EDUCATION 10F Physical Education 10F is a course developed for grade 9 students that introduces them to active and healthy lifestyle choices. The health component of this course will be completed on line, with students completing assignments in the areas of drug awareness, nutrition and human sexuality. The activity based component of this course requires students to complete a minimum of 10 activity blocks from the list below: Activity Blocks • Racquet Sports • Soccer • Ultimate • Flag Football / Rugby • Baseball / Team Handball • Basketball • Volleyball • Low Organized Games • Fitness • Weight Training • Floor Hockey / Lacrosse SCIENCE 10F

Benefits Research shows that second language students develop problem-solving skills, perform better in their native language, and become more open to other cultures.

Science 10F is an exciting multi-media approach to the sciences. Throughout the course, students will engage in a variety of science topics under the general framework of four major units:

MATHEMATICS 10F

• • • •

Mathematics 10F provides a foundation in mathematical skills that are required for all future years of study. This course will be integrated with Science 10F such that math theory will be taught in the context of application to real-life. A wide variety of subject matter will be explored, including:

Exploration of the Universe (Astronomy) Nature of Electricity (Physics) Atoms and Elements (Chemistry) Reproduction and Genetics (Biology)

Students will analyze and discuss the interaction between humans and the natural world. Classes will involve discussions, field trips, movies, guest speakers, and hands on activities. This course will be integrated with Mathematics 10F to provide an increased understanding of each subject.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) SOCIAL STUDIES 10F This course emphasizes the role that Canada plays in our contemporary world. The course is centered on a series of thematic clusters emphasizing the importance of becoming part of a learning community within those democratic foundations. The course is designed to emphasize the knowledge, values, and skills students need to become active, responsible citizens within the broader context of our Canadian society. Critical thinking and informed opinions about issues that concern us as Canadians and global citizens are developed throughout the course. The course integrates literacy, communication, problem solving, human relations, and technology into the activities. Assignments Evaluation is based on a variety of assignments such as a final exam, research projects, class discussions, group discussions and a variety of other activities which support the involvement of students in the democratic process and the role of Canada in our world. Benefits Social Studies 10f offers an excellent background for all collegiate courses in world issues, history, and geography.

GRADE 10 COURSES ART 20G Art 20G is an optional course. Emphasis is on artistic expression using technique with a variety of media. The student will develop basic skills in drawing, painting using acrylics as well as water paints, sculpture and pottery. Students will research art produced by various first nations groups around the world. Students will have the opportunity to observe and study a variety of artistic styles, both contemporary as well as from the past. They will begin to learn to critique and to discover how creative work is influenced by perception and experience. No artistic experience is required. COMPUTER SCIENCE 20S This is an entry level course and is designed for students who have an interest in computer science. Students should have strong problem solving skills, the ability to work independently on large projects and possess strong mathematical skills. No previous programming experience is required. Computer Science 20S will use a variety of current programming languages and environments to introduce students to the fundamentals of programming computers.

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The focus of this course will be on object oriented design and programming. This will prepare students for Computer Science 30S and Computer Science 40S where the focus will shift to programming for mobile devices. Prerequisite None, but please not the above-mentioned skills and expectations CURRENT AFFAIRS 21G The goal of this course is to develop a richer understanding of the world and its major challenges, so that we can become more enlightened global citizens. Topics • World Issues • The Messengers: Mass Media -- Impact of news media and role in world issues -- Bias and Propaganda -- Evaluating the “news” • The Powerful and the Poor: Issues of development in the South -- Present situation -- Historical background -- Global influences on development: trade, debt, transnational corporations -- Decisions facing the North and the South • The Warriors and the Peacemakers: Militarism in the 20TH Century -- History of war and warfare -- Why war? -- Struggle for peace • Ideas and Power: Political Ideologies -- What is political ideology -- Types of Ideologies: liberalism, communism, Nazism -- Historical and current examples • The Rights of People: Human Rights -- What is a human right? -- Case studies: Canada, El Salvador, East Timor -- International rights organizations Assignments The final mark in this course is based on you completing a variety of assignments that among others include, keeping a year-long journal and doing several research projects. A part of your final grade will come from your willingness to take part in class discussion, role plays, small group work, and bring to class news articles and reports.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) DIGITAL MEDIA I (WEB DESIGN 35S AND DIGITAL PICTURES 25S) Students in Digital Media I will explore a variety of digital media forms through the use of current software and web technologies. Digital Media I is divided, broadly, into 2 categories; content creation and content distribution. Content Creation The following is a list of possible course topics. • Students will create original graphics and modify existing graphics using current Vector and Bitmap programs. • Students will create original animated content using a current animation program. • Students will create and maintain an original blog using both an in-house blog tool and a web-based blog tool. • Student will create original podcasts consisting of audio, images and video. • Students will create original digital video content. Content Distribution • Students will create and maintain a website to publish their original content. This site will develop over the term and will make use of a variety of web techniques and tools. • Students will create and maintain a blog throughout the term. • Students will publish podcasts. • Students will use web based sites to share some of their original content. DRAMATIC ARTS 20G This course introduces students to the creative process by which Drama becomes a means of self-expression, to the study of theatre as an art form, and to the interpretation and analysis of written text. Objectives Students will gain a deeper awareness and appreciation of the interactive and expressive processes involved in theatre, as well as first-hand experience of being in a professional theatre environment.

Assignments Due to the participatory nature of the course, 100% attendance is mandatory. Students will be expected to participate fully in class activities, and should allow for additional out-of-class time for assignments and rehearsals. Benefits The study of Dramatic Arts develops mental agility, creativity, self-confidence, communication skills, cooperative skills, and physical and vocal flexibility. Students interested in pursuing a career in Communications, the Arts, Education, Law, Marketing, (or any career field which involves communication and presentations) or professional theatre will find this course useful. Special Requirements Students will be expected to dress in a manner appropriate to class activities. Specific requirements will be announced in the first class. ENGLISH 20F English 20F introduces students to academic approaches to reading, understanding, and sharing literature. Students will be required to analyze and evaluate the choices writers have made in a broad sampling of literary works including poetry, short stories, novels, and plays and to connect those choices to specific literary themes. Students will also become conscious of the manipulation of both written and oral language skills through a variety of tasks including academic and creative writing as well as oral, visual, and dramatic presentations. Assignments Evaluation will be based on a variety of assignments such as exams, research essays, argumentative essays, reviews, response journals, oral work/presentations, and other forms. Benefits This course is required before a student can take English 30S. It emphasizes the academic and personal skills required to be successful. FRANÇAIS 20F

Prerequisites None. Some dramatic experience, a keen interest in theatre, and a willingness to work with other students would all be assets.

Ce cours est destiné aux francophones et aux étudiants du programme d’immersion. À cause du nombre limité d’élèves, Francais 20F et Francais 30S pourraient être enseignés en même temps.

Topics The structure of the course will be flexible, to address the level and experience of the students and their interests. Students will, however, focus on improvisation as a means of exploring interactive action, characterization, scene analysis and presentation, and theatre study (types of theatre, stage management, lighting and sound, theatre terminology, theatre history).

Les buts du cours Ces cours permettront à l’élève de perfectionner son expression orale et écrite. Il / elle sera amené/e à développer ses habiletés langagières par l’étude de la grammaire, de la littérature et des textes non-littéraires. Les cours préalables Le cours de Français 10G

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) Les sujets à l’étude Ces cours ont pour but de perfectionner et d’approfondir les connaissances grammaticales de l’élève. Il / elle fera donc l’étude systématique des verbes, de l’orthographe grammaticale et des parties du discours. Dans le but de développer son esprit de synthèse et d’analyse, l’élève sera appelé à faire la lecture de romans, de pièces de théâtre, de nouvelles, de poésie et d’une variété de textes non-littéraires. Les élèves verront un ou deux films français au cours de l’année.

Benefits Research shows that second language students develop greater problem-solving skills, perform better in their native language, and become more open to other cultures.

Les devoirs Afin de perfectionner l’écrit, l’élève fera des dictées, des exercices de grammaire et des rédactions. Pour améliorer son expression orale, il / elle devra participer aux discussions en classe, présenter des scènes ou des monologues dramatiques et faire des présentations orales sur les textes littéraires et non-littéraires à l’étude.

GEOGRAPHIC ISSUES 20F

Les exigences L’étudiant aura besoin d’un bon dictionnaire français, par exemple Le Petit Robert I. FRENCH 20G French 20G is part of the Core French (Français de base) program beginning in grade 4. This program integrates four components—experience/communication, culture, language, and general language education—so that learners are able to apply practical linguistic knowledge at a personal level. (The Core French program is not designed to make students bilingual.) Objectives • To improve French language skills • To increase linguistic accuracy • To expand language learning strategies • To better understand French language speaking cultures Prerequisite French 10G Topics • Paroles et images (advertising and publicity) • Face aux défis (stress) • C’est tout un Canada (festivals and exchange programs) Linguistic topics include: le passé composé, l’imparfait, le participe passé, le futur simple, le conditionnel présent, le participe présent, les pronoms objets avec l’impératif, et le passé composé des verbes pronominaux. Assignments Students are evaluated on the development of their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Assignments include Voyages 1 workbook exercises, research, problem-solving activities, interviews, projects and presentations.

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Special Requirements This course is taught almost entirely in French. Students must be willing to participate, be resourceful, take risks, and feel frustrated - all essential aspects of acquiring a second language.

Geography 20F examines the geographic issues of the 21st century and the challenges of the contemporary world. Objective The purpose of the course is to understand the nature of geography and develop the skills needed to identify the problems and propose solutions to the many difficulties that affect North America and the world. Through study, the students will become aware of the importance of sustainable development and the implications of their personal choices. Prerequisite None Topics • Geographic Literacy • Food Production • Natural Resources • Industry and Trade • Urban Development • Globalization Assignments Term assignments will be an integral part of the Geography 20G program. Issue analysis, research, presentation skills, mapping, interpretation of data, discussion and debating will be emphasized in order to develop a wellrounded set of skills. Benefits An understanding of geography fosters an awareness and appreciation of the world in which we live. ESSENTIAL MATHEMATICS 20S Essential Mathematics 20S is intended for students whose post-secondary planning does not include a focus on mathematics and science-related fields. It is a one-credit course consisting of two half-credits each emphasizing consumer applications, problem solving, decision making and spatial sense. Students are expected to work both individually and in small groups on mathematical concepts and skills encountered in everyday life in a technological society.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) Assessment tools may include homework, hand-in assignments, group investigations, projects, tests and examinations. Topics Half Course I • • • •

Analysis of Games and Numbers Personal Finance Measurement 2-D Geometry

Half Course II • • • • •

Analysis of Games and Numbers Trigonometry Consumer Decisions Transformations Angle Construction

Prerequisite Grade 9 Mathematics INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED AND PRE-CALCULUS MATHEMATICS 20S Grade 10 Introduction to Applied and Pre-Calculus Mathematics 20S is intended for students considering post-secondary studies that require a math pre-requisite. This course provides students with the mathematical understanding and critical thinking skills necessary for post-secondary programs of study. Assessment tools may include homework, summative unit essays, demonstrations, presentations, learning logs, projects, investigations, reflective journals, portfolios, tests and examinations. Topics • Graphs and Relations • Number Sense • Linear Measurement • Trigonometry • Relations and Functions • Polynomials • Coordinate Geometry • Surface Area and Volume • Systems Prerequisite Grade 9 Mathematics MUSIC BAND (JAZZ) 20S Students enrolled in the Jazz Program will improve their knowledge of jazz and further develop their performance skills. Through a combination of study components including jazz ensemble, ‘jam’ session participation, jazz theory, ear-training and solo transaction units, project

work and private or semi-private instruction on their instrument, students will expand their knowledge of jazz. Students are required to attend a minimum of two live jazz concert performances by professional musicians as part of this course. All instructors are active and professional musicians. The Director is Janice Finlay. Pre-requisite Students must have a minimum of two years experience on their instrument. The ability to read music is a definite asset. All classes take place at the Manitoba Conservatory of Music and Arts, 211 Bannatyne at Main Street. PHYSICAL EDUCATION 20F Physical Education 20F is a compulsory course for grade 10 students that continues the study of active and healthy lifestyles begun in grade 9. The health component of this course will be completed on-line, with students completing assignments that focus on principles of fitness and first aid. The activity based component of this course requires students to choose a minimum of 10 activity blocks from the list below. Activity Blocks • Racquet Sports • Soccer • Ultimate • Flag Football / Rugby • Baseball / Team Handball • Basketball • Volleyball • Low Organized Games • Fitness • Weight Training • Floor Hockey / Lacrosse SCIENCE 20F Science 20F is a general science course which will investigate the nature of science as a study of natural phenomena. The four major curricular components are Biology (ecology), Chemistry (atoms and molecules), Physics (motion), and Weather. The ecology unit includes an overview of the ecosystem and environment focusing on sustainable development. The chemistry unit includes bonding, nomenclature, reactions, acids and bases, and balancing reactions. The physics unit covers motion terms of velocity, acceleration, displacement and time. The final unit, weather, examines a variety of weather related phenomena and includes sections on how weather is measured and interpreted.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) Topics • Science and Scientific Inquiry • Dynamics of Ecosystems • Chemistry in Action • The Physics of Motion • Weather Dynamics Evaluation Evaluation will involve laboratory work and assignments, research projects (including internet research), group work, and exams. Benefits Students will have an opportunity to acquire a “feel” for the specialized science courses in preparation for postsecondary studies and to acquire some basic laboratory and research skills. SPANISH 20F Spanish 20F is the initial course of a three-year program at the high-school level. This course introduces students to the basic principles of Spanish. The emphasis is on developing practical skills to communicate in everyday situations. The contents are covered through themes not only to develop receptive and productive language skills, but also to introduce the student to the diversity of Spain and Spanish American culture. For example, writing to hospitalized children in Lima, Peru. Students are evaluated on the development of their ability to speak, understand, read and write Spanish at a basic level. Objectives • To develop basic Spanish language skills to be used in a variety of situations and for a variety of purposes • To use Spanish effectively and competently at a basic level • To expand various language learning strategies • To introduce students to the geography of Spanishspeaking countries Prerequisites No prerequisites Topics • Greetings and introductions, the Spanish-speaking world • Home and school • Daily life • Family, friends and descriptions • Going around the city • Leisure time and future plans Assignments Workbook exercises, research, interviews, interactive activities, role-playing, project Mi álbum personal.

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Benefits There is significant evidence to suggest that learning another language enhances the use of the first language, promotes cognitive flexibility, creativity and develops awareness and sensitivity to other cultures. Moreover, in today’s workplace, it is an asset to communicate and interact effectively with different cultures.

GRADE 11 COURSES ART 30S This course emphasizes the artistic enquiry process and will focus on Canadian art trends. Students will have the opportunity to acquire an artistic vocabulary and to develop a personal style. This course is equally divided between teacher-directed projects and student initiated projects using a variety of media. BIOLOGY 30S The course introduces and refines the basic concepts of biology as a science through the use of written exercises, multimedia, laboratory exercises, text readings, research, internet exploration, DVD’s and project work. The main emphasis will be on human anatomy and physiology with extensions into the chemical basis of life. Objectives • A sound understanding of the major organ systems and their interactions in the human body • A better understanding of personal and local wellness issues • An ability to understand and explain the defense mechanisms the body employs for protection and control Topics • Introduction: Characteristics of Life and Biological Molecules • Wellness and Homeostasis • Digestion and Nutrition • Transportation and Respiration • Excretion and Waste Management • Protection and Control • Wellness and Homeostatic Changes Assignments Term assignments will be completed on a regular basis to develop and use the basic scientific skills (researching, graphing, designing experiments, using technology and analyzing results). Assignments will be completed to enhance and expand upon topics discussed in class.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) Benefits A student will benefit from this course in future career training and courses related to biology. A good basis in biological science is necessary for careers in medicine, physiotherapy, ecology, veterinary medicine, nursing, laboratory technology, dietary planning, and physical education. CHEMISTRY 30S Objectives This course is designed to prepare students for scientific study, inquiry and understanding interactions of matter. It is a rigorous course that requires students to apply mathematical and logical meaning to chemical reactions, while exposing them to sophisticated laboratory work. The course lays the foundations necessary for future studies in chemistry and the sciences and science related courses. Prerequisites Science 20S and Introduction to Applied and PreCalculus Mathematics 20S Topics • Physical Properties of Matter • Gases and the Atmosphere • Chemical Reactions • Solutions • Organic Chemistry Assignments Term assignments (Labs, projects, tests and written work) will be completed on a regular basis. Assignments will be designed to both engage and to assess learning. Benefits A student will benefit from this course in developing greater scientific literacy, lab and analytical skills. Students will receive the foundational necessary to pursue advanced Chemistry courses and careers in a wide variety of fields such as medicine, engineering, physics, chemistry, ecology and geology. COMPUTER SCIENCE 30S This course continues from Computer Science 20S. Students should have strong problem solving skills, the ab ility to work independently on large projects and strong mathematical skills. An understanding of basic programming and object oriented design is required. Students will begin to use specific tools to develop apps for mobile devices. Students will have a choice to work in Xcode (objective C) or Java to develop for iOs or Android devices. More traditional programs written to be used on computers will also be part of the student’s course work.

Computer Science 30S will use Java and Objective C programming languages primarily, although other tools may be included to introduce students to the fundamentals of programming graphic user interfaces on mobile devices and on computers. The focus of this course will continue to be on object oriented design and its application in the development of applications that use a graphic interface. This will prepare students for Computer Science 40S where the focus will shift to a large app development project. Prerequisite Computer Science 20S or instructor approval, strong problem solving and math skills as well as the ability to work independently. DEBATE AND CRITICAL THINKING 31G (HALF-CREDIT) Debate and Critical 31G thinking is an optional course which will involve both a theoretical and a practical component. This course aims to instruct students in the art of preparing arguments and examining the arguments of others. Learning to debate helps students to develop decision-making abilities and reasoning skills that can then be applied in all areas of their lives, careers and academic studies. An understanding of argumentation, reason, logic, critical thinking and discourse is important for all students. There is no pre-requisite for this course. Objectives: • To examine the role of Debate in a democratic society and understand the nature and function of debate. • Briefly examine the historical connection between philosophy and debate. • To develop Critical Thinking skills • To examine the components and structure or a good argument and to learn how to shape an argument for a particular audience • To understand and recognize patterns of public debate. • To gain familiarity with the rules of debate used for common formats (e.g. Cross Examination and Parliamentary Style) • To learn to conduct effective research on particular debate resolutions and how to design a plan of action in response to a resolution. • To construct an affirmative and negative argument for a given resolution • To engage in debates with other students in the class and with students from other schools • To analyze stylistic devices that contribute to the effectiveness of debate.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) DIGITAL MEDIA II (2-D ANIMATION 35S AND INTERACTIVE WEB SITES 35S)

be assessed on individual contribution, participation, and skill development.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the skills needed to design, create and implement animated content ranging from simple display animations to interactive animations controlled by user input. Students will be encouraged to think and learn independently. Problem solving skills will be developed. Self-starters will excel and self-discipline will be a key component to success in this course. Students will complete projects of varying lengths (ranging from single class to term long) throughout the course. These projects will serve as both assessment and a vehicle for students to enhance their ability and sophistication in working with digital media.

Benefits This course develops individual skill in theatre arts, contributes to increased self-confidence, and encourages collaborative decision making. Students will also increase their abilities to use their voices and physical body to communicate meaning and will gain a deeper understanding of theatre and dramatic form. Students interested in pursuing careers in professional theatre, the arts, communication, education or any field that requires presentation will find this course beneficial.

Topics Simple animations, interactive animations and interactive game design.

This required course examines a variety of literary selections including, short stories, poetry, novels, and plays. Students will take both an aesthetic and pragmatic approach to studying the genres. Students will learn to critically read the various works and be asked to respond in academic writing, creative pieces, group, and oral work.

DRAMATIC ARTS 30S Dramatic Arts 30S focuses on the technical elements of theatre and on the skills of acting with the voice and body. The class will work on several in class presentations and at least one major presentation. Objectives Students will learn how theatre is developed into a communicative art form, through active participation both in the classroom workshop setting and the preparation of their own individual, small group, and whole group presentations. Students will expand on their own ability to interpret dramatic text through the analysis of a variety of scripts. Prerequisite Students must have completed 20G or the equivalent. Topics The content and structure of Dramatic Arts 30S will be chosen to reflect the students’ interests and to extend acting techniques through practical experience. The course will emphasize script interpretation, scene analysis, characterization and construction of character, rehearsal techniques, scene blocking, vocal technique, physical technique, and auditioning techniques. Assignments Students will work towards at least one presented dramatic piece per term ranging from partnered scene work to monologues to collectively created plays. Commitment and willingness to work towards in class presentations and the production goals of this course are necessary; therefore 100% attendance is required. Students will be required to attend class, participate in the classroom/ workshop environment, and rehearse both within and outside of scheduled class time. Student’s progress will

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ENGLISH: LITERARY FOCUS 30S

Assignments Evaluation in Literary Focus 30S will be based on variety of criteria including creative writing, formal essay writing, oral presentations, occasional tests and exams. Benefits One Grade 11 English credit is required for high school graduation. English 30S is the normal prerequisite for Literary Focus 40S which, in turn, is necessary for entrance to many university programs. ENGLISH TRANSACTIONAL FOCUS 30E (EAL) Transactional Focus 30E is an entry-level course that introduces International/EAL students to the literature, culture and academic expectations of the typical English classroom. The “E” designation indicates that this course is specifically designed for those students who speak English as an additional language. The pace of the class, the material and reading selections studied, and the language skills taught in class will be adapted to meet the specific needs of ESL/International students. The primary objective of this course is to help EAL students develop the communication and academic skills needed to succeed in English 40S courses and ultimately at the university level. The focus of the course will be on both aesthetic and transactional forms. Initially, students will complete a review of English grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure and vocabulary. They will also focus on improving their general reading skills. As the course progresses, students will learn how to respond personally and critically to a wide variety of literary and artistic texts: short stories, poetry, novels, plays, and film.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) Students will also be introduced to transactional forms including memos, letters, and reports. Tests, oral presentations, creative writing, and group work are additional components to the course. Assignments Students will work on assignments that will challenge them to think, speak, read, listen, and write in a variety of academic and creative ways. In addition to essays, class discussions, tests, and oral presentations, students will be required to produce a variety of both written and oral assignments. Benefits This course will prepare EAL students for the Comprehensive and/or Transactional English 40S courses in the following year by addressing any difficulties the students may be having with English and by continual and focused skill development in all six language areas. ENGLISH TRANSACTIONAL FORMS 30S (CREATIVE WRITING) This course is based on the process, craft and experience of writing by studying various forms. Each term consists of 3 or 4 exercises with set objectives, journal work and class workshops, where students present their work and act as peer editors. This combination serves as the basis for evaluation. The December exam is a writing project and the final exam is a Writer’s Portfolio. FRANÇAIS 30S Ce cours est destiné aux francophones et aux étudiants du programme d’immersion. Les buts du cours Ce cours permettra à l’élève de perfectionner son expression orale et écrite. Il / elle sera amené/e à développer ses habiletés langagières par l’étude de la grammaire, de la littérature et des textes non-littéraires. Les cours préalables Le cours de Français 20F Les sujets à l’étude a Ce cours a pour but de perfectionner et d’approfondir les connaissances grammaticales de l’élève. Il / elle fera donc l’étude systématique des verbes, de l’orthographe grammaticale et des parties du discours. Dans le but de développer son esprit de synthèse et d’analyse, l’élève sera appelé à faire la lecture de romans, de pièces de théâtre, de nouvelles, de poésie et d’une variété de textes non-littéraires. Les élèves verront un ou deux films français au cours de l’année.

aux discussions en classe, présenter des scènes ou des monologues dramatiques et faire des présentations orales sur les textes littéraires et non-littéraires à l’étude. Les exigences L’étudiant aura besoin d’un bon dictionnaire français, par exemple Le Petit Robert I. FRENCH 30S French 30S is part of the Core French (Français de base) program beginning in grade 4. This program integrates four components—experience/communication, culture, language, and general language education—so that learners are able to apply practical linguistic knowledge at a personal level. (The Core French program is not designed to make students bilingual.) Objectives • To improve French language skills • To increase linguistic accuracy • To expand language learning strategies • To better understand Canadian and international French language speaking cultures Prerequisite French 20G Topics The following themes from Voyages 2 will be explored: • Portes ouvertes (travel) • On s’exprime (artistic expression) • Bien dans sa peau (healthy lifestyle) • Ça décolle! & Face à l’avenir (life after high school) Linguistic topics include: le plus-que-parfait, le futur antérieur, le conditionnel antérieur, l’infinitif présent, l’infinitif passé, et le subjonctif présent. Assignments Students are evaluated on the development of their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Assignments include Voyages 2 workbook exercises, research, problemsolving activities, interviews, projects and presentations. Benefits Research shows that second language students develop greater problem-solving skills, perform better in their native language, and become more open to other cultures. Special Requirements This course is taught almost entirely in French. Students must be willing to participate, be resourceful, take risks, and feel frustrated - all essential aspects of acquiring a second language.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) CANADIAN HISTORY 30E (EAL) This required course introduces students to the social and political history of Canada. The “E” designation indicates that adaptations will be made to the pacing and content to accommodate the language needs of EAL students. History content and themes will be used as a vehicle to help EAL students improve their language, research and thinking skills. Students may be placed in this course after placement testing or consultation with instructor of the EAL program. Due to the adapted pace of the course, significant changes will be made to learning outcomes and the number of topics covered in the standard Manitoba Canadian History curriculum. The content therefore will focus on the following broad topics or units: • Canadian Geography • First Peoples of Canada • The Northwest Passage • Arrival of the Europeans • Life in New France • The Fur Trade • The Struggle for Canada • The Loyalists • Life in Upper and Lower Canada • The Great Migration • Canada Today • Famous Canadians: Past and Present Canadian Culture When appropriate, accommodations will be made to encourage ESL/International students to apply their thinking skills to analyze issues and topics from their own nations as well as those from Canada. Assignments Students can expect a variety of assignments such as oral presentations, reports, tests, and inquiry-based learning projects. Students will go on a number of outings to visit sites of historical and educational significance. Benefits History 30E will help International students to become better informed about Canada and it will also serve as a support to help them improve their communication and language skills. This course is compulsory for a Manitoba High School Diploma. CANADIAN HISTORY 30S Students in this course will learn and apply principles of historiography to the history of Canada, from archaeological, anthropological and traditional indigenous accounts of its pre-European history through its development into the contemporary multi-cultural constitutional democracy. Topics can include Pre-European Civilizations, New France, Indigenous-European Relations, the Fur Trade, French-

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British Competition for North American Supremacy, British North America, Confederation, Immigration, the Wars, Canada-USA Relations, Post-War Economic and Diplomatic Relations, Constitution Crisis and First Nations Reconciliation and Justice. Students are expected to read independently, apply research skills, support opinion with evidence and reason, and engage in discussions of contemporary consequences of this history for modern citizens. APPLIED MATHEMATICS 30S Grade 11 Applied Mathematics (30S) is intended for students considering post-secondary studies that do not require a study of theoretical calculus. It is context driven and promotes the learning of numerical and geometrical problem-solving techniques as they related to the world around us. It builds upon the foundation knowledge and skills from Grade 10 Introduction to Applied and PreCalculus Mathematics and builds a foundation for Grade 12 Applied Mathematics. Primary goals of Applied Mathematics are to have students develop critical–thinking skills through problem solving and model real-world situations mathematically to make predictions. These goals may be attained in a number of ways. Students may collect data in experiments and activities and then develop mathematical concepts by analyzing that data. They are encourages to learn and demonstrate effective communication skills through a variety of media. Students are expected to become proficient in both oral and written communication skills. Topics • Problem Solving • Quadratic Functions • Research Project • Proofs • Statistics • Systems of Inequalities • Trigonometry • Scale Prerequisite Introduction to Applied and Precalculus Mathematics 20S Special Requirement A graphics calculator is mandatory for any Applied course. It is recommended that students purchase Texas Instrument ESSENTIAL MATHEMATICS 30S Grade 11 Essentials Mathematics 30S is a full-credit course open to all students. The primary focus of the course is to empower students so they can become mathematically literate. Students today require the ability to reason and communicate, solve problems and


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) understand and use mathematics in different contexts. Course topics relate to the use of mathematics in everyday living. This course is not designed for students who wish to continue mathematics or science courses beyond the high school level. Topics • Interest and Credit • 3-D Geometry • Statistics • Managing Money • Relations and Patterns • Trigonometry • Design Modeling Assignments Term marks will be based on homework assignments, quizzes, term tests and projects. Prerequisite Grade 10 mathematics Special Requirement A scientific calculator is mandatory for the course. PRE-CALCULUS MATHEMATICS 30S Pre-Calculus Mathematics 30S is designed for the above-average mathematics student and/or the student who wishes to pursue the study of mathematics or related courses at the post-secondary level. It is basically a deductive approach, which means that you first study the theory and then learn how to apply it to a specific example. Prerequisite Pre-Calculus 20S Topics • Sequences & Series • Absolute Values • Radicals • Quadratic Functions • Inequalities • Trigonometry • Rational Function • Reciprocal Functions

PRE-CALCULUS MATHEMATICS 30S / 40S (MATURE) These courses are designed for students who have had some difficulties in mathematics who have been away from mathematics for some time. The courses meet every day during the entire school year to provide an intensive, consistent mathematics experience. The Mature Mathematics 30S course covers all the topics needed for the student to be successful in Mathematics 40S. The Mathematics 30S is taught during the Fall Session and the Mathematics 40S is taught during the Winter Session. The successful student will earn 2 credits; one for Mathematics 30S and one for Mathematics 40S in one school year. Topics All the topics in the regular 30S and 40S curriculum are covered in this course. Evaluation will be based on tests and final exams. Prerequisite Introduction to Pre-Calculus & Applied Mathematics 20S MUSIC BAND (JAZZ) 30S Course participants will improve their knowledge of jazz and further develop their performance skills. Through a combination of study components including jazz ensemble, ‘jam’ session participation, jazz theory, eartraining and solo transaction units, project work and private or semi-private instruction on their instrument, students will expand their knowledge of jazz. Students are required to attend a minimum of three live jazz concert performances by professional musicians as part of this course. All instructors are active and professional musicians. The Director is Janice Finlay. Pre-requisite Music Band (Jazz) 20S or a minimum of three years experience on their instrument or permission for the instructor. The ability to read music is strongly recommended. All classes take place at the Manitoba Conservatory of Music and Arts, 211 Bannatyne at Main Street.

Assignments There will be daily assignments given for homework. To be successful a student must take the time to complete these assignments. Term marks, however, will be based on the results of weekly assignments, quizzes, and term tests. Benefits Mathematics 30S covers all the topics necessary for Mathematics 40S. Therefore it is strongly recommended that any student wishing to study Mathematics 40S first complete Mathematics 30S THE COLLEGIATE | 2013-2014 CALENDAR

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) MUSIC CHORAL (ADVANCED) 30S The Advanced Choral/Vocal Program (ACVP) is designed for students who want to pursue advanced choral and vocal training at the 30S and 40S level to prepare for university admission, work toward an ARCT in vocal performance or who are seeking a high level, comprehensive choral/vocal training experience. The program is open to singers 16 year of age or older by September 2010, working at a grade 7 RCM level or equivalent and recommended to the program by their voice teacher. Students not taking individual voice lessons at the Conservatory may be considered for the ACVP program, subject to a satisfactory interview and audition. ACVP students must continue to take a minimum of 30 minutes of voice lessons throughout the year with their individual voice teacher. Taught by qualified MCMA faculty members, the ACVP program includes choral, staging and ensemble classes as well as diction and sight-singing classes, master classes, workshops and recitals. High School credit and ACVP Certification will be given subject to completion of all program requirements and achievement of satisfactory evaluations by MCMA voice faculty. Students in the Collegiate ACVP program can expect to spend an average of 3.5 hours per week in class between September and April, plus group practice times and external assignments. Most of this time is scheduled between 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. on Saturdays. To be considered for ACVP Certification the student must attend an additional 6 weeks in May and June. PHYSICAL EDUCATION 30F: ACTIVE HEALTHY LIFESTYLES This compulsory full-credit course is designed to help youth take greater ownership of their own physical fitness, to encourage them to seek out activities that interest them, and to engage in active lifestyles into their futures. Students will study topics related to fitness management, mental health, substance use and abuse prevention, and the social impact of sport. The focus of this content will be on health and personal planning. These topics will make up the core 25% IN-class component of the course content. The IN-class component of the course will be delivered on-line. Students will be required to develop and implement the remaining 75% of the course on their own time in a personal physical activity plan as part of the physical activity practicum. Students will be introduced to safety and risk management planning to minimize the associated risks of the activities they have chosen.

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As part of earning a credit for this course, students will be required to submit a personal fitness portfolio containing elements such as a fitness plan, physical activity log, or journal entries. Students will be graded for completion of the course with a Complete or Incomplete designation. NOTE: Parents/guardians will be required to review the student’s physical activity plan and sign a Parent Declaration and Consent Form acknowledging their approval of the chosen activities and acceptance of the responsibility for risk management, safety, and supervision. Parents/guardians will also be required to verify the entries of the student’s physical activity log through a sign-off procedure. PHYSICS 30S Physics 30S is the course intended for students who have not previously studied physics. It is the first half of a joint 30S-40S course. The Physics 40S course is not independent of the 30S course, but a continuation of it. Physics is the study of the principles governing the physical world. It deals with the causes, effects, and relationships of natural physical phenomena. An understanding of physics is achieved by learning to describe the real world around us, both in words and in mathematical language. Experimental activities will play a role in the development of this view. Objectives The major purpose of this course is to introduce students to scientific ways of thinking about the world around them. One of the problems here is to learn to view the world and to discuss it in unambiguous language. Emphasis is on incorporating the physical description of the world into the students’ everyday experience of the world. The use of mathematics in describing events in the real world is developed. Students will also acquire a basic knowledge of experimental lab techniques in physics. Prerequisites Pre-Calculus or Applied Math 20S as well as Science 20S are recommended. Students should also plan to enroll in Pre-Calculus or Applied Math 30S concurrently. Topics In the first part of the course, models and scientific theories are intertwined with motion concepts such as position, displacement, velocity and acceleration. These concepts are then developed to describe motion of objects in the real world and are expanded to include the study of kinematics. The second part of the course focuses on dynamics, the forces that cause motion, with applications to the world around us. Electric, Magnetic and Gravitational fields and forces are introduced at this time as well. The final part of the course focuses on one and two dimensional waves as they relate to both light and sound.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) Assignments Students can expect regular tests, as well as occasional short quizzes and assigned problems to check daily work (which is emphasized). Laboratory work to demonstrate understanding and develop technique is also involved.

• • • • •

Benefits Physics helps students understand and describe the world in which they live. The skills acquired studying physics apply to many subject areas. Describing, measuring, analyzing, inferring, and reporting are useful in daily life. Physics is a requirement for many professional areas including engineering, medicine, science, and technology. Consult your university calendar for complete details. Physics 30S is the prerequisite for Physics 40S, and a number of post-secondary programs, such as various Technical Certificates. There are a variety of occupations that need some knowledge of physics, perhaps only at the 30S level, where Physics 30S serves as a basis for developing more particular skills.

Assignments Workbook exercises, research, interviews, presentations, interactive activities and problem-solving, role-playing, a short novel, project El mundo de habla hispana.

Special Requirements Students require a geometry set and a non-programmable scientific calculator (sin, cos, tan). SPANISH 30S Spanish 30S is the second year of the three-year program at the high-school level. This course expands upon student knowledge and background in Spanish 20F. Interactive activities, role-playing, magazines and audio and video material will continue to be used; one such activity is letter exchanges with young people in Lima, Peru. Thus students are expected to participate actively. The course focuses on pertinent language points, as well as providing selected literary passages from Spanish texts and the opportunity to develop research skills. Students are evaluated on the development of their ability to speak, understand, read and write Spanish at an intermediate level. Objectives • To improve Spanish language skills to be used in a variety of situations and for a variety of purposes • To use Spanish effectively and competently at an intermediate level • To maximize the effectiveness of language learning strategies • To explore the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world Prerequisites Spanish 20F (from a three year program) or Spanish 10F (from a four-year program) Topics • Activities and weather • Extra-curricular activities: leisure time and plans

Shopping and fashion Social life: friends at home and abroad Food and restaurants Vacations: nature excursions and ecology Sports and health

Benefits There is significant evidence to suggest that learning another language enhances the use of the first language, promotes cognitive flexibility, creativity and develops awareness and sensitivity to other cultures. Moreover, in today’s workplace, it is an asset to communicate and interact effectively with different cultures

GRADE 12 COURSES ART 40S Art 40S is a project based course. Students will be encouraged to explore various media to develop and refine their personal artistic style. Themes include art history, art appreciation and the importance of art in society. Students will be expected to participate in field trips to various galleries. Students intending to enter a post secondary art based program will have the opportunity to work on formal portfolio projects. BIOLOGY 40S This course presents students with a survey of the diversity of living things and the nature of their interactions. Broad themes to be covered include evolution, and the transmission, expression, and technological applications of genes. Emphasis will be placed on the historical and social impact of biology and biotechnology, and upon the connectedness of life science with other disciplines. Objectives • To increase student awareness and understanding of basic biological concepts in selected topics, as listed in the course outline. • To enable the student to develop and apply the skills of scientific methods and research. • To promote scientific literacy and interdisciplinary thought. • To promote an understanding of the relationship between biology and technology, and their impact upon the individual, society, and the environment. Prerequisite Although there are no prerequisites for the course, the completion of Biology 30S and/or Chemistry 30S would provide the student with significant advantages.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) Course Outline Part I Genetics • Understanding Biological Inheritance • Mechanisms of Inheritance Part II Biodiversity • Evolutionary Theory and Biodiversity • Organizing Biodiversity • Conservation of Biodiversity Assignments Course activities include lectures, reading assignments, class discussions, independent research, group projects, problem solving, video, multimedia presentations, and use of the Internet and web-based learning communities. Benefits This course provides a sound foundation for future courses and careers related to biology, and serves to increase awareness of the living world around us. A background in biology is especially useful for those seeking careers in medicine, nursing, physiotherapy, dentistry, pharmacy, laboratory technology, and other science-related disciplines. CHEMISTRY 40S Chemistry 40S is a continuation and enhancement of the Chemistry 30S course, ideal for students who intend to take science courses in university or other postsecondary institutions. Objectives The objective of the course is to have students develop and demonstrate their understanding of chemical concepts. Students will have an opportunity to engage in practical and inquiry-based activities. The goal of the course is for students to see the relationships and patterns in the reactivity of substances. Topics • Aqueous Reactions • Atomic Structure • Kinetics • Equilibrium • Acids and Bases • Electrochemistry Prerequisite Chemistry 30S (It is strongly recommended that students take 40S Pre-calculus Mathematics concurrently with Chemistry 40S) Assignments Term marks will be based on tests, quizzes, laboratory work and projects.

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Benefits A background in chemistry is especially useful for those seeking careers in dentistry, engineering, laboratory technology, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, physiotherapy, and other science-related disciplines. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY 42U : CHEM 1111/3 AND CHEM 1112/3 This dual credit university course provides the opportunity for motivated Collegiate students to enroll in the first year university Chemistry course with the smaller class sizes and more personal environment at the Collegiate. Students have the option of using this course as 6 credits of university credit and/or as a high school credit. Objectives This course provides students with the foundations required for second-year chemistry courses. Students will study atomic structure and how this relates to the physical and chemical properties of compounds. In the second half of the course students will study chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, acid/base and oxidation/ reduction chemical reactions. The lab component provides students with lab techniques to prepare them for future studies in chemistry. Prerequisites Chemistry 40S and Pre-Calculus 40S or Applied Mathematics 40S; or CHEM -0100(3). The mathematics courses can be taken as a co-requisite upon instructors’ approval. Topics • Atomic and molecular structure • Periodicity • Chemical bonding and chemical reactivity • Properties and reactions of gases • Solutions and intermolecular forces • Chemical kinetics • Chemical thermodynamics and equilibrium • Acid/base and oxidation/reduction chemical reactions. Assignments The course is split into two half courses and material is assessed through assignments, laboratory work and term tests and final examinations. Benefits The fundamental concepts of chemical reactivity covered in this course provide the essential foundation for students who wish to continue with Chemistry or Biochemistry as a major, and for students of biology, physics, physical geography, environmental studies and experimental psychology. This is a challenging course and students can benefit from taking it at the Collegiate to ease their transition to first year university.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) COMPUTER SCIENCE 40S Computer Science 40S is an advanced course in computer science. Students will apply the skills that they have developed in Computer Science 20S and Computer Science 30S to complete a large year long software development project. Students will be responsible for every phase of the development of a finished product, from the initial concept to the final roll out. In Computer Science 40S students will choose the programming environment, Java, Objective C, C++, Action Script, etc. that they will use to develop their software project. Topics will be addressed as they emerge and students will be expected to draw on a variety of sources to develop solutions and solve problems that arise in the course of their project. The focus of this course will continue to be on Object Oriented Design and its application in the development of applications that use a graphic interface. Students will be expected to apply what they have learned in Computer Science 20S and Computer Science 30S as well as develop new skills as required for their specific project. Prerequisite Computer Science 30S or instructor approval, strong problem solving skills and math skills, as well as the ability to work independently. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS 42U: ACS-1453/3 Introduction to Computers is a half-credit course designed to enable the student to become competent in the use of the four major components of the modern office software suite. Students learn to use Microsoft Office 2010 Word (word processor), Excel (spreadsheet), Access (database) and Powerpoint (presentations). This course involves learning both the nature of the software itself and how to use the software. Topics Word • Creating Formatting and Editing a Word Document with Pictures • Creating a Research Paper with Citations and References • Creating a Business Letter with a Letterhead and Table

Current Internet and Computer Interactions • A look at current features and implications of the Internet and their implications as well as advances in computer control and interaction. Evaluation Students will be assessed through two tests and the completion of assignments. University of Winnipeg Dual Credit Introduction to Computers 42U is equivalent to The University of Winnipeg course ACS-1453/3 Introduction to Computers. This course can be registered as a first year university credit as well as a Grade 12 credit. ADVANCED DEBATE AND ADVOCACY 41G (HALF-CREDIT) Advanced Debate and Advocacy 41G is designed to further instruct students in the art of rhetoric and the varying conventions of many traditional styles of debate, and to fine-tune skills necessary to become strong advocates for important causes that they wish to support. Topics • Detailed history of rhetoric and its major theorists • Commonly used debating devices • Styles of debates • Debate formats • Research for debate preparation • Adopting and changing beliefs in society • Activism Assignments Students will engage in a wide variety of assignments including conducting research, entering speech and debate tournaments, and supporting recognized and appropriate political, social, special interest or advocacy groups. Prerequisite Debate and Critical Thinking 35G

Excel • Creating a Worksheet and an Embedded Chart • Formulas, Functions and Formatting Access • Databases and Database Objects: An Introduction • Querying a Database Powerpoint • Creating and Editing a Presentation with Clip Art • Enhancing a Presentation with Pictures, Shapes and WordArt

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) DRAMATIC ARTS 40S Dramatic Arts has working successfully as a member of dramatic troupe and performance as its two main focuses. The class will work on at least two productions, chosen to build the dynamics of the class and to challenge and built the acting skills of individuals. Objectives The students will learn how theatre is developed into a communicative art form, though active participation in at least two productions, as well as through partnered scene work and individual monologue work. One of two productions will use collective theatre techniques, where students create, develop, and rehearse their own dramatic presentation. The second production will offer students the opportunity to interpret, rehearse, and presented a scripted one act play chosen, cast, and directed by the course instructor. Prerequisite Students must have completed Dramatic Arts 30S or the equivalent. Topics The content and structure of each production will be chosen to reflect the students` interests and abilities and to extend acting techniques through practical experience. The course will emphasize characterization, scene analysis, script interpretation, stage blocking, rehearsal techniques, and communication with an audience. Interested students will be allowed to experiment with production aspects such as make-up, costume, stage management, house management, and promotion. Assignments Commitment and willingness to work towards the production goals of this course are necessary; therefore 100% attendance is required. Students` progress will be assessed on individual contribution, participation, and skills development. Significant additional time will be required for rehearsal and presentation of the one act play during the last weeks of March. Benefits This course continues to develop students` creative theatrical abilities, critical analysis skills, collaborative decision making skills, as well as their ability to use their voices and physical bodies to communicate meaning in a dramatic and artistic form. Students who are interested in pursuing careers in education, the arts, communication, professional theatre or any field require presentations will find this course beneficial. ECONOMICS 40S Economics 40S will provide an introduction to the principles of economics. It will show how economics is

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a part of daily life through examinations of individual, corporate and governmental decision-making. It will include economic models, methodology and indicators of economic performance. The course will regularly focus on current economic issues, be they national or international is scope. The material will be delivered in a lecture and discussion based format. Topics • Core Economic Concepts • Supply and Demand • Capitalism and Socialism • Efficiency and Competition • Production and Costs • Market Structures • Measures of Economic Activity • National Fiscal/Monetary Priorities • Canada in the Global Economy Assignments Assignments vary from year to year. They are intended to provide students with opportunities to critically examine the information discussed in class. There will be a variety of assignments that may include reports, presentations and essays. There will also be unit tests and term exams. ENGLISH LITERARY FOCUS 40S Literary Focus 40S is the required English course for graduation and the foundation of the electives. Students must demonstrate effective academic writing skills, speech, reading and comprehension skills through analysis, synthesis and discussion of course content. This will form the basis of the course evaluation. Literature is studied through a variety of forms – short stories, novels, plays, poetry and nonfiction. Course content is a balance of Canadian, world and historic sources. Assignments Assignments (evaluation) ranges from in class/personal responses to formal presentations. Academic essays to thematic (written) responses form the core of evaluation. Other types may include technical and stylistic skills. Benefits The basic life skills of research, organization, knowledge of form and audience and working within deadlines are the foundation for success in Electives as well as post secondary study. ENGLISH COMPREHENSIVE FOCUS 40S (EAL) This course provides opportunities for students to use, compare, and compose a wide range of both pragmatic (practical) texts and aesthetic texts (language that creates an imagined reality) Students will learn to


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) express themselves clearly, effectively, and extensively as they communicate for various audiences.

• To enhance the clarity and artistry of communication • To celebrate and build community

Learning Outcomes Students will work through interconnecting themes during the course that will help them to achieve a number of learning outcomes. They will:

Assignments Speeches, oral presentations, group discussions, note taking, research, visual representing, reports, letter writing and expository and persuasive essays are all included in this course. The writing process will be reviewed through a number of writing assignments that will address particular needs of EAL students.

• Explore thoughts, ideas, feeling, and experiences and express them clearly • Comprehend a condensed selection of literary forms and apply the skills of critical response through analysis and interpretation • Explore a wide variety of texts and forms of communication used in North American society • Respond personally and critically to oral, print, and other media texts • Enhance their ability to communicate clearly, effectively, and accurately • Understand and apply the writing conventions used in our academic settings Assignments Student will do a variety of writing assignments, a thematic selection of readings, oral and written responses, critiques, group discussions, test, projects, oral presentations, and a research paper. Requirements Students must have the necessary prerequisites from their home country and/or demonstrate their language competence through a written test. ENGLISH TRANSACTIONAL FOCUS 40S (EAL) Transactional Focus emphasizes the pragmatic or practical uses of language. Informing, directing, persuading, analyzing, arguing and explaining are the major tools used to gain information or discern another point of view, to compare and weigh ideas, and to conduct daily transactions. Students will be required to participate in a variety of learning activities and assignments that will help them to explore various forms of communication. Objectives Students will experience a variety of learning techniques to help them acquire and demonstrate satisfactory skills in a number of related areas outlined in the provincial curriculum documents. Students will read, write, listen, speak, view and represent to accomplish the following goals: • To explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences • To comprehend and respond personally and critically to oral, print and other media texts • To manage ideas and information

Requirements Students must have the necessary prerequisites from their home country and/or demonstrate their language competence through a written test. ENGLISH LANGUAGE & GLOBAL LITERARY FORMS 40S Global Literature will consider works that are written by writers from various cultures and geographic locations. Course objectives are to heighten students’ awareness and appreciation of various forms of literature as well as engage in critical and comparative study. Students will be expected to read the literature, attend and participate in classes, complete assignments in a timely fashion and engage in meaningful dialogue. Possible course work will include: essays, presentations, book talks, book reviews, reading journals and a major independent research project. ENGLISH LANGUAGE & TRANSACTIONAL FORMS 40S Language and Transactional Forms 40S makes students aware of the theory and practice of effective communication. Students become skillful at presenting ideas confidently and efficiently to specific audiences for specific purposes. Also, effective communication from history, literature, and popular media is examined. Assignments Assignments include writing letters, resumes, reports, proposals, memos, analyses of popular media, research, and individual and group presentations. Process writing, which requires several drafts and the application of specific editing skills, is emphasized. In addition to a wide range of written and spoken assignments, students will be required to work in groups. Benefits The Transactional English elective helps students gain confidence in communicating in oral and written assignments. Many former students have remarked how helpful the course has been in preparing them for a postsecondary education and how practical the business component has been in their own search for employment. NOTE: Students may not take both Language & Transactional Forms 40S and Language & Transactional Forms 40S (Journalism) for credit.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) ENGLISH LANGUAGE & TRANSACTIONAL FORMS 40S (CREATIVE WRITING) The course requires that the student explore a variety of Writing forms to specific objectives. Each term has four exercises, journal work, class discussion of published work and workshops, where students present their work and act as peer editors. This combination serves as the basis for evaluation. The December exam is a writing project and the final exam is a Writer’s Portfolio. FAMILY STUDIES 40S Family Studies is the examination of roles and relationships in families and the way families are created and function within the context of the broader society. Objectives Students will gain an understanding of the family as a social unit and the development of individuals within a family setting. Topics Students will gain a comprehensive background in a variety of topics, including: • • • • • • • • • • •

education and selection of a vocation the Family Life Cycle family planning pregnancy and childbirth human sexual reproduction child and adolescent development family violence and abuse dating, cohabitation and marriage mate selection theories separation and divorce the impact of addictions on families aging, death and grieving

Assignments This course places a high degree of emphasis on combining theory with personal expression. This takes the form of in-class participation in discussion and debates. Students are expected to think critically and to write reflective responses on a wide variety of topics connected to family life. In addition to written work, inclass tests will be given periodically to assess student knowledge of relevant facts and theoretical concepts. Benefits Family Studies 40S provides students with a greater understanding of themselves, both as individuals and as members of their respective family systems. It serves as a social foundation for continued study in the Humanities, in Social Work, Psychology and Sociology, and in helping professions such as Medicine and Education. In addition, the course helps prepare students for future relationships, parenting and other life challenges.

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FRANÇAIS 40S Ce cours est destiné aux francophones et aux étudiants du programme d’immersion qui veulent approfondir leur connaissance de la langue et la littérature françaises. Les buts du cours Ce cours permettra à l’élève de perfectionner son expression orale et écrite. Il / elle sera amené/e à développer ses habiletés langagières par l’étude de la grammaire, de la littérature et des textes non-littéraires. Le cours préalable Le cours de Français 30S est le cours préalable normal. Les sujets à l’étude Ce cours a pour but de perfectionner et d’approfondir les connaissances grammaticales acquises au cours des années précédentes. Par le biais de romans, de films, de pièces de théâtre, de nouvelles, de poésie et d’une variété de textes non-littéraires, l’élève développera son esprit de synthèse et d’analyse. Les devoirs Afin de perfectionner l’écrit, l’élève fera des dictées, des exercices de grammaire et des rédactions. Pour améliorer son expression orale, il / elle devra participer aux discussions en classe, présenter des scènes ou des monologues dramatiques et faire des présentations orales sur les textes littéraires et non-littéraires à l’étude. FRENCH 40S French 40S is part of the Core French (Français de base) program beginning in grade 4. This program integrates four components—experience/communication, culture, language, and general language education—so that learners are able to apply practical linguistic knowledge at a personal level. Objectives • To improve French language skills • To increase linguistic accuracy • To expand language learning strategies • To better understand Canadian and international French language speaking cultures Prerequisite French 30S Assignments Students are evaluated on the development of their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Assignments include workbook exercises, research, problem-solving activities, interviews, projects, presentations, and role-playing.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) Benefits Research shows that second language students develop greater problem-solving skills, perform better in their native language, and become more open to other cultures. This course is taught almost entirely in French. Students must be willing to participate, be resourceful, take risks, and feel frustrated - all essential aspects of acquiring a second language. INTRODUCTORY HUMAN GEOGRAPHY I AND II 42U: GEOG-1102/3 & GEOG-1103/3 This dual credit, university course allows Collegiate students to take the first year Introductory Human Geography course in a small and personal setting. Motivated and dedicated students can begin their study of geography and prepare for future study in the Humanities. Students will have the option of using this course as 6 credit hours of university credit and/or as a high school credit. Objectives This course will introduce students to the major themes in human geography. Students will gain an understanding of the importance of culture and its role in determining the attitudes of peoples around the world. As well, the growth, settlement and migration of populations will also be addressed in order to understand how people earn a livelihood and how that impacts our environment. Prerequisites Successful completion of Grade 11 Social Studies (or equivalent) Topics • Geography and Culture • Geography of Language and Religion • Development and Globalization • World Population Growth • Population Migration • Origins of Cities and Modern Urbanization • Environmental Ethics Assignments Course material will be addressed through reading, research, individual and group projects and seminar leadership. Formal exams will make up a significant portion of course evaluation. Benefits Students will develop a broader perspective and understanding of our past, present and future development as a global community.

HISTORY 40S - WESTERN CIVILIZATION History 40S - Western Civilization examines the origins and developments of Modern Western Civilization, tracing the story from approximately 1500 right into the 20th century. This course surveys the major movements and movers that have shaped the western world over the past 500 years. Objectives At the end of the course, students should have knowledge of the political, social, religious, and economic institutions and ideas that have developed over the Modern Age. Students should have an understanding of the method of history, including such topics as the problem of causation in history and the impact of the individual in shaping historical events. Students should develop their researching and essay-writing skills. Topics • The origins of Western Civilization (WC) can be traced back to the Middle Ages. Thus, History 40S-WC begins with a survey of medieval Europe, concentrating on the predominant institution of the day, the Roman Catholic Church. • In the 16th century, the Church experienced a major upheaval known as the Reformation. The course examines the fragmentation of Western Christendom and the profound changes created by this religious upheaval. • In the 17th and 18th centuries, Europe was shaken by a series of political revolutions. This course examines the origins, developments, and repercussions of one of these upheavals — the French Revolution. • Over the 19th century, the Industrial Revolution took hold in Britain and then spread to the rest of the western world. This course examines the drastic changes that came with industrialization. • Our political, economic, and social systems, indeed even our attitudes, have been drastically altered by the major phenomena of the 20th century world war. This course focuses on the experience of World War I. Assignments Students will do a number of in-class assignments involving analysis of original sources. Students will complete at least two formal research essays over the course. In addition to the regularly scheduled exams, students can expect occasional tests. Benefits Although not a prerequisite, History 40S - WC provides a good background for study in any of the humanities at the university level - English, Philosophy, and, obviously, History.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) GLOBAL ISSUES: CITIZENSHIP AND SUSTAINABILITY 40S This course examines 21st century issues. The course focus and approach will vary according to the instructor.

This course is the foundation course of the Conflict Resolution Studies (CRS) program. Through this course students can begin to explore many of the dimensions and topics covered in the rest of the courses offered by CRS.

Objectives: We will conduct inquiry into the social, political, environmental and economic impact of a variety of contemporary and emerging issues in the world. Through this inquiry we focus on questions of quality of life locally, nationally and globally. The course is based on the principles of active democratic citizenship, sustainability, and ethical decision making.

LAW 40S

Prerequisite Successful completion of Grade 11 or permission from Instructor.

Topics • The Legal System • The Charter of Rights and Freedoms • Criminal Law • Torts Law • Family Law • Electoral Process

Topics: • Information literacy: The role of the media in shaping our perception of the world • Power in the age of corporate globalization. • Political and economic systems • International Development: Role of Aid, Debt and Trade • Conflict and War: causes of conflict, terrorism and question of violence • Creating a culture of peace • Genocide and Human Rights • Indigenous Issues: worldview, oppression and action • Gender Issues Assignments Assignments will vary according the instructor and may include journaling, research projects, class presentations, tests and exams. Benefits When we study global issues we become more effective and enlightened citizens of communities, and of the world. Because of its interdisciplinary approach, Global Issues provides useful background for university courses in economics, political science, women’s studies, history, geography, philosophy, and international development. INTRODUCTION TO CONFLICT RESOLUTION STUDIES 42U: CRS-1200/6 Introduction to Conflict Resolution is a first year university course. It provides an introduction to the roots and nature of human conflict, and to several models of constructive and appropriate ways to resolve or transform levels of inter-personal and group conflict. Important conflict factors (such as anger, violence and power) and forms of conflict resolution (such as negotiation and mediation) are examined from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students will also be introduced to the skills required for analysis and resolution of various types of conflict. 40

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This course is an introduction to Canadian Law and the legal system in Canada. Objectives At the end of the course the student should have some basic knowledge about the legal system in Canada and various aspects of law.

Assignments Term marks are based on homework assignments, tests and presentations. Students should be prepared to participate in class discussion. Occasionally, we may have field trips to various law related sites instead of class. Prerequisite None APPLIED MATHEMATICS 40S Grade 12 Applied Mathematics (40S) is intended for students considering post-secondary studies that do not require a study of theoretical calculus. It is context driven and promotes the learning of numerical and geometrical problem solving techniques as they relate to the world around us. Primary goals of Applied Mathematics are to have students develop critical-thinking skills through problem solving model real-world situations mathematically to make predictions. These goals may be attained in a number of ways. Students may collect data in experiments and activities to develop mathematical concepts by analyzing that data. They are encouraged to learn and demonstrate effective communication skills through a variety of media. Students are expected to become proficient in both oral and written communication skills. Topics • Sinusoidal Functions • Compound Interest • Probability • Polynomial Functions


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) • • • • •

Permutations and Combinations Investments Design and Measurement Research Project Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

Prerequisite Mathematics 30S Applied (preferred) or Mathematics 30S Pre-Calculus Special Requirement A graphics calculator is mandatory for any Applied course. It is recommended that students purchase a Texas Instrument TI-83 or TI-83 Plus. NOTE: University faculties and technology programs have different entrance requirements of either 40S PreCalculus and/or 40S Applied. Please check with a dean, or the specific faculty you are interested in to ensure the proper entrance qualifications. ESSENTIAL MATHEMATICS 40S This course is intended for students whose post-secondary planning does not include a focus on mathematics and science-related fields. Grade 12 essential Mathematics (40S) is a one-credit course emphasizing consumer applications, problem solving, decision making, and spatial sense. Course work includes investigations, projects and presentations dealing with mathematics in everyday living. The course is accepted for general admission to universities and colleges. Topics • Home Finance • Vehicle Finance • Probability • Precision Measurement • Career Life • Statistics – A World of Information • Geometry and Trigonometry • Business Finance Text T.B.A. The text will be supplied by The Collegiate. Assignments Term marks will be based on homework assignments, quizzes, term tests and projects. Prerequisite Grade 11 mathematics Special requirements A scientific calculator is mandatory for the course. PRE-CALCULUS MATHEMATICS 40S Pre-Calculus Mathematics 40S is a very demanding and fast paced course designed for students who intend

on taking calculus at a post-secondary institution. The content of the course focuses on abstract numerical concepts and places an emphasis on cumulative testing, mental mathematics, and higher level problem solving. Prerequisites Students entering Pre-Calculus Mathematics 40S should have taken Pre-Calculus Mathematics 30S. The student is expected to have a good understanding of trigonometry and the solution of first and second degree equations, including linear, quadratic, radical and rational functions. Topics • Circular Functions • Transformations • Trigonometric Identities • Exponents and Logarithms • Permutations, Combinations, Binomial Theorem • Radical, Rational and Polynomial Functions Evaluation There will be daily assignments given for homework; to be successful a student must take the time to complete these assignments. Term marks, however, may be based on the result of weekly assignments, quizzes, and tests. Students will also write a mid-term (December) and final examination (April). NOTE: University faculties and technology programs have different entrance requirements of either PreCalculus 40S and/or Applied 40S.. Please check with a dean, or the specific faculty you are interested in to ensure the proper entrance qualifications. PRE-CALCULUS MATHEMATICS 30S / 40S (MATURE) These courses are designed for students who have had some difficulties in mathematics who have been away from mathematics for some time. The courses meet every day during the entire school year to provide an intensive, consistent mathematics experience. The Mature Mathematics 30S course covers all the topics needed for the student to be successful in Mathematics 40S. The Mathematics 30S is taught during the Fall Session and the Mathematics 40S is taught during the Winter Session starting in January The successful student will earn 2 credits; one for Mathematics 30S and one for Mathematics 40S in one school year. Topics All the topics in the regular 30S and 40S curriculum are covered in this course. Evaluation will be based on tests and final exams. Prerequisite Introduction to Pre-Calculus & Applied Mathematics 20S and Pre-Calculus 30S. THE COLLEGIATE | 2013-2014 CALENDAR

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS 42U: MATH-1101/6 ACCELERATED Students at The Collegiate have a tremendous opportunity to take Introduction to Calculus, a rigorous first year university course. Very motivated students with a strong math background are encouraged to take this course. To prepare for this course it is strongly recommended that students use the following template to plan their high school mathematics courses. • Grade 10: • Grade 11: • Grade 12:

20S Pre-calculus (Fall/Winter Term) 30S Pre-calculus (Spring Term) 40S Pre-calculus (Fall/Winter Term) Intro to Calculus (Fall/Winter Term)

Objectives • To promote student understanding of mathematical concepts through the exercise of intuition, logical deduction, and problem solving. • To increase student awareness and appreciation of the practical applications of calculus. • To equip students with a strong foundation in introductory calculus in preparation for second year calculus. Prerequisites Above average standing in Pre-Calculus 40S Topics • Limits • Derivatives • Applications of the Derivative • The Integral • Applications of the Integral • The Natural Log and Exponential Functions • Techniques of Integration • Indeterminate Forms and L’Hopital’s Rule • Improper Integrals Assignments Students are expected to solve relevant problems to increase their comprehension of calculus concepts. Introduction to Calculus is a very demanding and fast paced course; students should expect homework varying from 1 - 1.5 hours nightly. Evaluation Term tests (35%) Midterm Exam (15%) Final Exam (50%) (written with all 1st year University Calculus students) University of Winnipeg Dual Credit Introduction to Calculus 42U is equivalent to The University of Winnipeg course MATH-1101/6 Introduction to Calculus. This course will be registered for a first year university credit (6 credit hours) as well as for one Grade 12 credit.

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MUSIC BAND (JAZZ) 40S Course participants will improve their knowledge of jazz and further develop their performance skills. Through a combination of study components including jazz ensemble, ‘jam’ session participation, jazz theory, eartraining and solo transaction units, project work and private or semi-private instruction on their instrument, students will expand their knowledge of jazz. Students are required to attend a minimum of three live jazz concert performances by professional musicians as part of this course. All instructors are active and professional musicians. The Director is Janice Finlay. Pre-requisite Music Band (Jazz) 30S or a minimum of three years experience on their instrument or permission for the instructor. The ability to read music is strongly recommended. All classes take place at the Manitoba Conservatory of Music and Arts, 211 Bannatyne at Main Street. MUSIC CHORAL (ADVANCED) 40S The Advanced Choral/Vocal Program (ACVP) is designed for students who want to pursue advanced choral and vocal training at the 30S and 40S level to prepare for university admission, work toward an ARCT in vocal performance or who are seeking a high level, comprehensive choral/vocal training experience. The program is open to singers 16 year of age or older by September 2010, working at a grade 7 RCM level or equivalent and recommended to the program by their voice teacher. Students not taking individual voice lessons at the Conservatory may be considered for the ACVP program, subject to a satisfactory interview and audition. ACVP students must continue to take a minimum of 30 minutes of voice lessons throughout the year with their individual voice teacher. Taught by qualified MCMA faculty members, the ACVP program includes choral, staging, and ensemble classes as well as diction and sight-singing classes, master classes, workshops, and recitals. High School credit and ACVP Certification will be given subject to completion of all program requirements and achievement of satisfactory evaluations by MCMA voice faculty. Students in the Collegiate ACVP program can expect to spend an average of 3.5 hours per week in class between September and April, plus group practice times and external assignments. Most of this time is scheduled between 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. on Saturdays. To be considered for ACVP Certification the student must attend an additional 6 weeks in May and June. PHILOSOPHY 41G Philosophy is literally the “love of wisdom.” This course seeks to introduce students to the western philosophical


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) tradition while developing a critically-aware philosophical method of inquiry. Students who love to discuss and debate ideas will find a welcome place in our seminar style class. The course is recommended to all students interested in a sustained and engaged reflection about the world in which we live. Topics Philosophy 41G will introduce students to formal logic and common fallacies in every day discourse. Students will read a selection of primary philosophy texts including Platonic dialogues, excerpts from Descartes, Locke, Kant, Nietzsche and others, and will learn how to reflect on the universal issues presented. During the course, students will examine philosophical issues in the contemporary context through cinema, art, and ethical dilemmas in current affairs. Assignments Students will write essays, formal philosophical reflections, and tests when relevant. In addition, they will conduct seminars and presentations where appropriate. Students will excel through mastery of content, clarity of thought and expression, and relevant appropriation of the philosophical issues. PHYSICAL EDUCATION 40F: ACTIVE HEALTHY LIFESTYLES This compulsory full-credit course is designed to help youth take greater ownership of their own physical fitness, to encourage them to seek out activities that interest them, and to engage in active lifestyles into their futures. Students will study topics related to fitness management, nutrition, sexual health, social/emotional health, and personal development. The focus of this content will be on health and personal planning. These topics will make up the core 25% IN-class component of the course content. The IN-class component of the course will be delivered on-line. For the remaining 75% of the course, students will be required to develop and implement, on their own time, a personal physical activity plan as part of a physical activity practicum. Students will be introduced to risk management planning to minimize the associated risks of the activities they have chosen. As part of earning a credit for this course, students will be required to submit a personal fitness portfolio containing elements such as a fitness plan, physical activity log, or journal entries. Students will be graded for completion of the course with a Complete or Incomplete designation. NOTE: Parents/guardians will be required to review the student’s physical activity plan and sign a Parent Declaration and Consent Form acknowledging their approval of the chosen activities and acceptance of the responsibility for risk management, safety, and supervision. Parents/guardians will also be required to verify the entries of the student’s physical activity log through a sign-off procedure.

PHYSICS 40S Physics is the study of the principles governing the physical world. It deals with the causes, effects, and relationships of natural physical phenomena. The concepts that emerge are normally expressed in mathematical language and are used to predict natural physical phenomena which in turn are the subject of experimental verification. Objectives The Physics 40S course is designed to give students an introduction to fundamental topics in physics. As well, a lab centred approach, including the use of real time and interactive computing, is used to help students relate scientific concepts to the real world. Prerequisites For students who have completed Physics 30S as described above (In exceptional circumstances students may be permitted to enroll in Physics 40S without having completed Physics 30S. Permission of the instructor is required.) Well-developed mathematical skills would be an asset. Applied or Pre-Calculus Mathematics 40S is the co-requisite for Physics 40S. Topics Topic 1: Mechanics • Topic 1.1: Kinematics • Topic 1.2: Dynamics • Topic 1.3: Momentum • Topic 1.4: Projectile Motion • Topic 1.5: Circular Motion • Topic 1.6: Work and Energy Topic 2: Fields • Topic 2.1: Exploration of Space • Topic 2.2: Low Earth Orbit • Topic 2.3: Electric and Magnetic Fields Topic 3: Electricity • Topic 3.1: Electric Circuits • Topic 3.2: Electromagnetic Induction Topic 4: Medical Physics • Topic 4.1: Medical Physics Assignments Students will be assigned questions from the textbook, provided with additional exercises, and expected to perform a number of laboratory exercises to verify certain principles of physics.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) Benefits Physics helps students understand the world in which they live. Many skills acquired studying physics can be valuable studying any subject area. Observing, measuring, analyzing, inferring, and reporting can be transferred to many of the things we do in our lives. Physics 40S is one of the prerequisites for a number of post-secondary programs, including pre-Medicine; pre-Dentistry; Engineering, Environmental Studies (preArchitecture), Pharmacy, and various technical certificates. PSYCHOLOGY 4OS This course serves as an introduction to the field of psychology, and as a preparation for further studies in the social and behavioural sciences. Objectives • To promote a better understanding of the self and of others • To increase student awareness and understanding of basic psychological concepts in selected topics • To enable the student to develop skills in and to apply various psychological research methods • To promote scientific literacy and interdisciplinary thought • To establish and develop skills such as problem-solving and critical thinking • To gain knowledge of the various careers and educational opportunities associated with psychology, and to be able to make informed decisions about pursuing further study • To work together with the instructor and other students in a cooperative learning environment Topics • An introduction to the Science of Psychology • The Nervous System, Sensation, and Perception • Consciousness, Sleep and Dreams, Psychotropic Drugs • Learning, Attention, and Memory • Intelligence, Thought, and Language • Motivation and Emotion • Developmental Psychology • Theories of Personality • Psychopathology and its Treatment • Health, Stress, and Coping Assignments Course activities include reading and writing assignments, class discussion, independent research, group projects, problem solving, quizzes and tests, videos, computerassisted instruction and multimedia presentations. Benefits The course provides a sound foundation for future courses and careers related to psychology and serves to increase awareness of the self and of others. A background in psychology is especially useful for those seeking careers in the various sub-fields of psychology, medicine, education, social work, and other human-centred disciplines.

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RELIGIOUS STUDIES 41G Religious Studies 41G examines the history of humanity’s response to the eternal question: what are we for? Through the examination of the history of religion, the course focuses on the birth of significant religious practices and traditions, often comparing and contrasting these developments. The course encompasses the study of the relevant social, historical, political, and philosophical influences that have shaped religions throughout the ages. Students with a genuine interest in the human condition will learn how to do academic research in the discipline, and to use the critical tools of scholarly investigation in Religious Studies. Through the survey of Animism, Shamanism, Myth Ritual Cults, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, the Hindu traditions, and Buddhism, students will be introduced to world history, philosophy, archeology, anthropology, and the social sciences. In method and content, the course provides a beneficial introduction to the post-secondary study of the Humanities. Assignments Assignments include: research reports, tests, essays, and some presentations. Benefits The philosophical, metaphysical, and historical emphasis in this course provides a sound preview of issues facing students who intend to pursue the Humanities - especially Philosophy, English, Political Science, Religious Studies, Medicine, Law, and Urban Studies. SPANISH 40S Spanish 40S is the final year of the three-year program at the high-school level. This advanced course allows students to engage in a number of interactive exercises, as well as in selected readings from a number of Spanish authors and text sources. The course provides students, as well, with the opportunity to expand their knowledge of Spanish language, culture and people. This course prepares students to enter university level Spanish courses. Students are evaluated on the development of their ability to speak, understand, read and write Spanish at an intermediate-advanced level. Objectives • To improve and refine Spanish language skills to be used in a variety of situations and for a variety of purposes • To use Spanish effectively and competently at an intermediate-advanced level • To maximize the effectiveness of language learning strategies • To build on the knowledge of the diversity of Spain and Spanish American culture. Prerequisites Spanish 30S (from a three-year program) or Spanish 20F (from a four-year program)


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CONTINUED) Topics • Knowing yourself and relationships • World of the future and the environment (transportation, driving, ecology) • Healthy mind in healthy body • Cultural diversity in Spanish speaking countries • Cultural celebrations and famous people from the Spanish world • The future: choosing a career (professions)

• Identity Politics and the Political Category of Woman • The Gender Police: Dominant Masculinities and Femininities • Gender and Human Rights • Gender and the Media • Gender and the Human Body: From Foucault to Lady Gaga • Difference and Identity in the Postmodern Era • Gender and Economic Inequality • Gender and Religion

Assignments Exercises, research, interviews, oral presentations, problem-solving activities, role-playing, a novel and four projects focused on the topics covered in class.

Assignments A detailed Assignment booklet is distributed at the first class. Reading responses, a research project, cultural studies essays, and formal exams make up the evaluation of the course.

Benefits There is significant evidence to suggest that learning another language enhances the use of the first language, promotes cognitive flexibility, creativity and develops awareness and sensitivity to other cultures. Moreover, in today’s workplace, it is an asset to communicate and interact effectively with different cultures. INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES 42U: WGS-1232/6 Gender is the most fundamental and powerful organizing principle in the world. From the moment of birth, people are placed into one of two categories: girl/woman or boy/man., categories that largely dictate how they are expected to think, act and behave. But how ‘natural’ are these categories and to what extent are they culturally constructed, used to maintain certain power structures in the private and public spheres, and used to rationalize economic inequities? How does gender intersect with other categories of identity like race, sexual orientation, socio-economic class and ability? Women’s and Gender Studies introduces students to the feminist theories and debate surrounding these questions. Students will examine the historical and contemporary experiences of women in many contexts both locally and globally. As Women’s and Gender Studies is an interdisciplinary field, students can expect lectures, course work and readings to draw from the inquiry of multiple disciplines including philosophy, anthropology, history, sociology, political science, psychology, law, film, literature and cultural studies. Prerequisites Successful completion of Grade 11 English and Social Studies Topics • What is Women’s Studies? • Feminist Thought and Critique • The Gender Binary: Sex, Gender and Desire • The Global Status of Women and Men

Benefits Raised consciousness and critical literacy University of Winnipeg Dual Credit Women’s Studies 42U is equivalent to The University of Winnipeg course WOM.1232/6 Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies. This course can be registered for first year university credit (6 credit hours) as well as for one Grade 12 credit. DUAL CREDIT COURSES Dual credit courses are introductory first year university courses for which qualified grade 12 Collegiate students may enroll. Upon successful completion of a dual credit course, students will receive the designated university credit AND the high school credit for the course. Dual credit courses offered by The Collegiate faculty are: • Academic Writing 42U: RHET 1105/3 • Introduction to Calculus 42U: MATH 1101/6 • Introduction to Chemistry 42U: CHEM 1111/3 and CHEM 1112/3 • Introduction to Global Issues 42U: HRGS 1200/3 • Introduction to Computers 42U: ACS 1453/3 • Introduction to Conflict Resolution Studies: CRS 1200/6 • Introduction to Human Geography I 42U: GEOG 1102/3 • Introduction to Human Geography II 42U: GEOG 1103/3 • Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies 42U: WGS 1232/6 Qualified Grade 12 Collegiate students can receive dual credit for successfully completing first year-university courses taught by university professors as well. *Please note: The Collegiate may also be offering Introduction to English 42U: ENG 1001/6 and/or Introduction to Philosophy 42U: PHIL 1001/6 in the fall of 2013. However, at the time this Calendar was going to press the arrangements had not been finalized or approved.

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The University of Winnipeg Collegiate - 2013 - 2014 Calendar