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UNIVERSITYofWINDSOR • DEC.19.2O12 • VOL#85 • ISSUE#25 • UWINDSORLANCE.CA

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Getting frosty with Arkells

• photo courtesy Arkells | edit Stephen Hargreaves

SARAHOWIE arts editor ___________________________

T

he Juno award winning, Arkells are bringing their combination of true rock sensibilities, amazing stage presence and hard work to headlines the University of Windsor’s Frost Week next month. Based out of Hamilton, Ont., Arkells have just travelled across Europe and are planning to go back early next spring. They’ve played alongside everyone from Billy Talent, Anti-Flag and Joel Plaskett to Shad and Ke$ha. In January, they go on tour with the Tragically Hip. But Phog Lounge in Windsor was the site of Arkell’s first show outside of their hometown in 2006. “We played Phog Lounge,” said Max Kerman, lead vocalist and guitarist. “It’s

becoming a legendary venue. I know [Phog Lounge co-owner] Tom [Lucier] really cares about Canadian music. It’s definitely a fond memory for us.” Since then, the band has been living out of suitcases for months on end. Not seeing anyone familiar save bandmates and a few other people for that amount of time can be tough, but the band insists they love the experiences and different audiences that come with touring. “There are perks to every kind of venue, and there are challenges to them,” said Kerman. “We opened for Billy Talent in Germany and those were really big venues and halls. That was a really great challenge and we looked forward to it and really enjoyed doing it.” “When we do our own shows on a club level, those are also really fun for a bunch of different reasons. They’re re-

ally intimate, and hot and sweaty. We have a really good time.”

It’s been more than year since Arkells put out their last record, Michigan Left, but they’re working through some new material. “We’re sort of hacking away at songs. We really don’t have much time to get down to the nitty-gritty,” said Kerman. “Eventually we plan on stopping and hunkering down.” “It’s pretty collaborative,” said Kerman said of their creative process. “We start with a bare idea, lyrics or a chord melody which is usually me. Then I bring it to the guys ... You get to a point where you couldn’t even imagine doing something like that yourself. It’s the awesome thing about any band, the collaborative nature of it.” The group’s process has resulted in some notable songs, including “Whistleblow-

er,” featured in EA Sports’ NHL 2013 video game. Listeners will have to wait to see if a new LP is in the groups New Year’s resolutions. Kerman was laughed at by Mike DeAngelis, guitarist and vocalist, when he asked what the band’s New Year’s resolutions were. “I think I know my personal New Year’s resolution. I room with Nick [Dika], our bass player most of the time, and he always gets up early in the morning to jog before we leave our hotel. I should probably start doing that because Nick looks really great with his shirt off and I think that’s a lesson,” laughed Kerman. ___________________________ Arkells play UWindsor Frost Week concert at the CAW Student Centre Jan. 7. Doors open at 8 p.m. and music kicks off at 9 p.m. with local opening act The Walkervilles.


opinion an open letter to Larry Horwitz Dear Larry,

Congratulations, you did it again. You took it upon yourself to do what you do best; put your own interests ahead of the community. It’s great to be creative, I’d typically encourage that. However, before you pitch your pilot to Comedy Central, let me tell you what’s wrong with your video. It has absolutely nothing to do with Windsor. It sure is great to toot that clout you have as the chair of downtown Windsor’s Business Improvement Association, but maybe it’s that leadership that’s to be questioned in the first place Larry. Hey don’t get me wrong, I like hearing about imaginary doctors with no names and learning fake words that I’ll be able to bring up at fancy dinner parties in the land of make believe. But the video goes to show how out of touch you really are with your own city. Aside from the potential of a great idea, a pro-Windsor viral video campaign crafted to get back at American comedian Stephen Colbert, rather than work with your community, you went rogue. But hey, that’s cool, no hard feelings, why would you include everyone? I mean, anyone. The video is not about Windsor, it’s about Larry Horwitz. And what’s with the Tim Horton’s cup? You know they’re not Canadian anymore? Good thing no one sees you drink out of it! And ketchup chips? All dressed? That is supposed to lure him specifically to Windsor, because, oh, I get it! They’re only available in Canada, right? Well it’s a good thing at least Walker’s Candies and Tunnel BBQ sauce got a shout out. Oh, and Moose Droppings! Shout out to Moose Droppings! I only wish I got to see you drive to hockey practice in a Chevy. Why Larry, you didn’t even tell us about the poutine! The video, which is weak in dialogue, lacking in character depth and has no real ending, is somewhat reminiscent of your 2008 federal election campaign. The way it all ends with you sitting in front of the graffiti— trés cool Larry, you’re so cultured! Who knew? Oh Larry, here’s an idea, how about we go take a tour of Willistead Manor? You could blindfold me and tell me it’s Central Park. Oh Larry, it would be such a dream! Don’t worry Larry, the important thing is this: you got some great news coverage. If you’re lucky, maybe Colbert will even know your name. That would be so crazy, what if he mentions you on his show? Larry! You old dog, you really went above and beyond on this one. Well here’s an idea and maybe it’s just crazy, but hear me out: if you make it big and famous and you get your own show on Comedy Central, promise not to forget us next time?

DEC.19.2O12• UWINDSORLANCE.CA/OPINION// O2

VOL.85 • ISSUE25

the Christmas

DECEMBER 19 2O12

contradiction Once again, as it happens every year, Christmas and all the other wintertime holidays are upon us. For the last few years the debate has raged from the all-too politically correct crowd that insist that “Merry Christmas” should be dropped in favour of “Happy Holidays,” all the while staunch traditionalists claim that “Merry Christmas” is somehow the only seasonal saying that should be used. The inherent truth of the matter is both are fraught with paradoxes. “Merry Christmas” is a saying that Christmas is in our collective consciousness as Canadians, especially old world idyllic Canadians. It conjures up the idea of snowmen on powder white front lawns, evergreen trees strung with pretty twinkling lights and covered with glass bulb ornaments, and no Christmas could be forgotten without that jolly and ever so portly man who delivers presents to all the little good girls and boys, Santa Claus. The problem with all this is that it actually has absolutely nothing to do with Christmas. Most of what we in the West perceive as Christmas is a mash up of pagan and Germanic rituals and traditions some of which that date back before Christ, you know that guy that Christmas is named after. In fact, many scholars believe that if Jesus Christ was a real person he would have been born around March, ironically just as the winter season was ending. On the other hand, we have those lovable politically correct scamps that say we should be saying “Happy Holidays.” When one looks at the imagery that continues to surround that particular saying, it rarely is inclusive of Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Diwali or Ramadan. While not all these holidays fall in December, they are still happy holidays nonetheless. In fact, “Happy Holidays” is still usually placed on top of the image of snowmen and Santa Claus. If the PC crowd was to be inclusive, why do we rarely see menorahs in public? Can anyone who doesn’t observe these holidays even identify the symbols of Kwanzaa or Ramadan, for instance?

Sincerely,

So what should we be collectively saying during this cold and usually snowy time of year? Well, maybe it doesn’t matter. Maybe the traditional idea of Christmas we should be remembering is peace on earth and good will towards men. If we’re only going to be nice to each other one time of the year, Why not make it during the coldest?

Damian Piper

-Jay Verspeelt

{ {

}

My New Year’s resolution is to get back to reading and finding new music, let go of stress and have more fun.

{

2O12staff

I resolve to stop working eight days-a-week, spend more time with the best person I know, and start something new.

editor-in-chief • NATASHAMARAR editor@uwindsorlance.ca • ext.3909

}

}

My resolution is to stop worrying about the things that don’t matter, manage my time better and start new art projects.

{ } { } { } My New Year’s resolution is to be less cynical.

My New Year’s resolution is to lose weight and quit smoking.

I resolve to watch every Woody Allen movie.

managing editor • STEPHENHARGREAVES me@uwindsorlance.ca • ext.3932 art director • STEPHENHARGREAVES me@uwindsorlance.ca • ext.3932 news editor • DARRYLGALLINGER news@uwindsorlance.ca• ext.3906 arts editor • SARAHOWIE arts@uwindsorlance.ca • ext.3910 sports editor • JOHNDOHERTY sports@uwindsorlance.ca • ext.3923 multimedia editor • media@uwindsorlance.ca • ext.3932 features & opinions editor • JONLIEDTKE features@uwindsorlance.ca • ext.3932 advertising manager • VICTORMACERA ads@uwindsorlance.ca • ext.3604 business manager • VICTORMACERA ads@uwindsorlance.ca • ext.3905 illustrator • QILI circulation manager • JOEYACOTT tel. 519.253.3000 ads. 519.971.3604

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mission statement The goal of the Lance is to produce a weekly news paper that

provides informative and accurate accounts of events and issues relevant to the University of Windsor, its students and the surrounding community. The Lance acknowledges its privileged position in being free from commercial and administrative controls. We strive to protect that position by vigorously defending our editorial autonomy. Our mandate is to cover issues that affect students. However, we believe that no subject need fall outside the grasp of the student press, and that we best serve our purpose when we help widen the boundaries of debate on educational, social economic, environmental and political issues. The Lance and its staff shall, at all times, strive to adhere to the Code of Ethics of the Canadian University Press. Any material containing a racist, sexist or otherwise prejudicial substance or tone will not be printed. The Lance is published by the University of Windsor Students’ Alliance and prints every Tuesday of the fall and winter semesters. Its offices are located in the basement of the CAW Student Centre. Unsigned editorials are produced by the Lance editorial board, or printed with their permission, and may not reflect the beliefs of all its members. Opinions expressed in the Lance are not necessarily those of the University of Windsor or the Students’ Alliance. Submissions are welcome and become the property of the news pa per. Submissions must be e-mailed. The editor reserves the right to edit for space and clarity. Letters will be accepted until the Thursday before publication and must include the writer’s name, major of study and phone number. Contents ©2012. Reproduction in any way is forbidden without the written permission of the Editor-in-Chief. The Lance is a member of the Canadian University Press.

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Comments, concerns or complaints about The Lance’s content are to be e-mailed to the Editor-in-Chief at the address above. If the Editor-in-Chief is unable to resolve a complaint it may be taken to the Lance Editorial Board. If the Editorial Board is unable to resolve a complaint it may be taken to the non-partisan University Ombudsperson. The Ombudsperson can be reached at 519.253.3000 ext.3400.


news

DEC.19.2O12• UWINDSORLANCE.CA/NEWS // O3

Grad talented in finding talent

University of Windsor and The Next 36 alumni sets high bar for 2013 cohort DARRYLGALLINGER news editor ___________________________

A

recent University of Windsor business graduate is receiving national attention and funding for her start-up tech venture, accolades she credits to her time in The Next 36 entrepreneurial program. Cushman was selected as one of the top 100 most powerful women in Canada this month by the Women’s Executive Network for her work with Kira Talent and her accomplishments with Students in Free Enterprise Windsor. Now known as Enactus Windsor, it’s a student-run UWindsor club that uses entrepreneurship to create positive change in the community. Emilie Cushman, CEO of Kira Talent, founded the Toronto-based company in March with Konrad Listwan-Ciesielski. Kira Talent offers a web service that allows employers to pre-record interview questions and send them out to job candidates, who record their timed responses through a webcam. The company promotes the ease of use of its service and promises to find talent “better and faster” by “revolutionizing the next generation of talent search.” The company boasts investors such as Anthony Lacavera, chairman and CEO of Globalive Communications and WIND mobile service. They have secured contracts with Hong Kong University, Richard Ivey School of Business and the Rottman School of Management. Cushman said entering The Next 36 program last year played a big role in getting her business off the ground. “Your network was unreal. You could contact any CEO in the country and they would respond in the hour because you were affiliated with The Next 36,” she said. The national entrepreneurial program selects 36 promising undergraduate students each year and offers them up to $80,000 in seed funds, nine months of mentoring and other business, technical and legal support for their start-up company.

“The network of the students who get into the program are the best and the brightest. It’s good to bounce ideas around ... the network, the seed money, the mentors... it made such a difference,” said Cushman. Fourth-year UWindsor business student Alyssa Atkins has been accepted into the program for 2013. Claudia Hepburn, executive director and co-founder of The Next 36, recognizes Cushman’s success and is excited to see what Atkins will bring to the program. “Emily Cushman was a star performer in our 2012 cohort,” said Hepburn. “Her business, Kira Talent, won our outstanding award in 2012 and has a terrific track record of attracting fantastic investors. We’re really excited to see what Alyssa does this year.” “[Cushman] has done amazing work,” said Atkins. “They’re just taking off. Everybody in this cohort wants to be the next Kira Talent.” The Next 36 selects puts students into teams of three and challenges them to create a business that revolves around mobile technology. The program promises to push the would-be entrepreneurs to the limit. “Our goal is to develop Canada’s next generation of great entrepreneurs because we feel that Canadian prosperity is dependent on producing really great entrepreneurs,” said Hepburn. “The United States has more of the Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerbergs and Steve Jobs ... Canadian prosperity is dependent on building those great entrepreneurs: Jimmy Pattison, Paul Desmarais and Research in Motion.” “We believe that by identifying some of the most entrepreneurial and smart undergraduates who are driven and passionate about the idea of building businesses, we can ... dramatically increase their chances of building successful businesses,” Hepburn added.

Members of the 2013 cohort of The Next 36 hope to emulate the success of program alumni Emilie Cushman, who founded Kira Talent • photo courtesy Emilie Cushman

lenge and drove herself harder to secure an acceptance for the 2013 cohort. “I was ecstatic,” she said of her acceptance. “This is one of the best things happening in Canada right now ... it’s helping people realize you can start a business and have it running in nine months.” “Ideally, I’m hoping to walk away with a real business that I’ll be building with a team,” said Atkins. Atkins and her team members are already working on an idea that will use mobile technology to tackle an industrial problem, but she is unable to disclose details at the moment.

For Atkins, being selected for the program is a dream come true. She was turned down when she applied for last year’s class, but she took it as a chal-

Hepburn said most of the successful candidates are high-achieving students who also excel outside the classroom in athletics or not-for-profit initiatives, and

Facility Services in 2002.

other housekeepers.

Tina brought warm and dedication to the campus areas she serviced, including The Lance offices.

Tina took a real interest in the newspaper, and we often spent time just chatting about life and university politics. Tina was such a personable woman and dedicated employee. Over the next year, she would be reassigned to work in other areas of the student centre. Sometimes, I would learn, she had not been around because she ill. Tina was battling breast cancer.

they are often already entrepreneurial successes. Atkins ran a window-cleaning company for three years through CollegePro. She is also president of Women in Leadership, a UWindsor club that builds up young female leaders, and vice-president of administration of the University of Windsor Students’ Alliance. The Next 36 program is only in its third year, and most of those who have gone through the program are just graduating and starting to build their businesses. Hepburn explained that students who go through the program don’t always stick with the business they developed during the program, but usually develop new entrepreneurships, both for-profit and not-for-profit.

Campus staff member will be missed NATASHAMARAR editor-in-chief ___________________________

T

he University of Windsor community lost one of its own last week.

Tina MacInnis-Westlake didn’t reside in one office, but entered the offices and lives of many on campus. The custodial staff member and long-time university employee died last Monday. She was 37. An Assumption High School graduate, Tina started working at the university first in Food services as a server in 1990 and then a cashier in 2000. She moved to her recent position as a custodian for

When I started work at The Lance in June 2011, our office space in the CAW Student Centre needed an overhaul. Over the summer, old furnishings would be removed from the office to make way for renovations before a new staff was brought in. Those first few months were very stressful and lonely as I worked to prepare the newspaper for its rebranding and relaunch that September. Tina provided a daily source of support and service to me, helping to clean the office and co-ordinate help from the

This semester, Tina reappeared in The Lance office, much to my surprise. She was sporting a shorter hairstyle— evidence of the cancer treatments. But she looked healthy and said she was happy to be back at work, even though

it wasn’t full-time. Tina serviced our office a couple more times before we stopped seeing her. I assumed she had been reassigned again until I read a notice about her death. The cancer that Tina quietly fought would ultimately take her young life. She died in hospice care on Dec. 10. Working at the university, I encounter many people each day without regard. With Tina, I was always greeted with kind exchanges, her commitment and the occasional story idea for the newspaper. As the newspaper has grown in the past year, The Lance staff recognizes and is thankful for Tina’s early and ongoing support.


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Aboriginal community ‘Idle No More’

First Nations peoples are demonstrating in cities across Canada against the controversial Bill C-45, including last Friday in Windsor’s Dieppe Park • photos Jon Lietdke

DIANATROJANSEK lance writer ___________________________

A

round 150 Windsorites and dispossessed First Nations peoples from Southern Ontario gathered in Dieppe Park for the Idle No More rally last Thursday to protest bill C-45. The protestors claim the proposed amendments violate their inherent treaty rights and the UN Declaration of Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which demands that a country consult with its indigenous people before changing anything within their treaty. It also endangers the rivers and lakes that provide Canadians with safe drinking water. “The Federal Government is supposed to consult with us in regards to changing that legislation, but right now we don’t see any free, prior and informed consent,” said Andrea Landry, one of

the organizers of the rally. The protestors expressed their outrage at being ignored by the government at the rally with signs saying, “Stephen Harper, Don’t Sell Us Out!” and “Where’s My Voice in Bill C-45?” They chanted “Kill Bill C-45!” as the rally marched down Ouellette Avenue. Several chiefs and other members of the First Nations community took the megaphone to share their opinion of the new legislation and motivate the crowd. Bill C-45 was passed Dec. 6 by Parliament and on Dec. 14 by Senate. It makes changes that include the Indian Act, pensions for members of Parliament and employment insurance. The changes within the bill that are specific to the First Nations people include taking away many of their territorial waters, redefining Aboriginal fisheries,

and empowering the aboriginal affairs minister to call a band meeting to propose ceding aboriginal territory back to the government. Other changes to legislation proposed in the bill concern the protection status of Canada’s waters. The Navigable Water’s Protection Act now only offers protection to 97 of Canada’s approximately 32,000 major lakes. “It’s taking away our natural resources, like the water that you drink, the water that runs through the [Detroit] River, the lakes, they’re all supposed to be protected for a reason,” said Annissa Hill from the Oneida Reserve. “Stephen Harper is trying to run this right under our noses.” Lorena Shepley, another organizer of the rally, agreed. “It isn’t right what they did with these bills. They lumped

it all into this omnibus bill; they didn’t ask our permission for anything.” “Our government respects its duty to consult. Every year our government conducts over 5,000 consultations with First Nations,” said Jan O’Driscoll, press secretary for Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development. “We will continue to work in partnership with First Nations to support strong, self-sufficient and more prosperous Aboriginal communities.” This rally was just one in the Idle No More movement that has been sweeping across Canada since the bill was passed. Attawapiskat chief Theresa Spence has been fasting since last Monday to protest Bill C-45. First Nations people across Canada have taken to supporting her by fasting for 24 hours last Friday. across Canada joined her fast for 24 hours last Friday.

Frost week to heat up campus DARRYLGALLINGER news editor ___________________________

T

he student association has a slew of events planned to break the ice for the winter semester.

The University of Windsor Students’ Alliance’s Frost Week runs from Jan. 7 – 11. “We’re trying to make something for everybody, and have a mix of party events and dry events,” said Alyssa Atkins, vice-president administration. Paula Soll and Luise Rodrigues, exchange students from Brazil, are looking forward to Frost Week as an exciting start to the semester. “It makes us feel like we’re part of the university and the community here,” said Rodrigues, a fourth-year electrical

engineering student.

Soll attended the Avicii concert during Windsor Welcome Week, which has her enthused about these events. “It was amazing, it was a great concert,” said Soll, a third-year communications student. Around 5,700 students turned out to see Avicii at the Coming Home Music Festival in September. The event ran just over $250,000. After pulling in revenue of over $200,000, the total cost to the UWSA for the event was about $40,000.

campus-centric, unlike the Avicii show, which targeted the community as well as the campus.

was such a huge success for frosh week, so we’re definitely doing Dirty Bingo again,” Atkins said.

“We got really great feedback from students on what they want,” said Atkins, referring to online polls and comments on Facebook. “There was an overwhelming demand for Arkells.”

Atkins was excited to announce that students will have one last party in the pub space formerly used by the Thirsty Scholar, located in the basement of the CAW Student Centre, on Thursday night. “We’re having a ‘One Last Song’ party at the pub before it gets demolished the next day,” Atkins said.

Rodrigues and Soll said that they don’t often see events like what they experienced during Welcome Week at their school in Brazil.

This concert is for students only, $10 in advance and $15 at the door. Josh Paglione, UWSA director of student life, said he expects a turnout of 400 to 600 students. Paglione wouldn’t disclose the amount being spent on Arkells, but pegged expenses for Frost Week at approximately $13,000. Revenue from concert ticket sales and Dirty Bingo will put a dent in expenses.

Hamilton-based rockers Arkells will be playing Monday, Dec. 7 in the CAW Student Centre commons. Events such as the concert are intended to be more

Tuesday during Frost Week, students are invited to an ice-skating event at Charles Clark Square, and Wednesday the dabbers are out for Dirty Bingo. “It

A deal between the University of Windsor and the UWSA will have the Bookstore move into the former pub space. Atkins said some of the Thirsty Scholar Pub’s assets have been sold off since it was closed last spring, but there are enough to successfully hold a party. Friday’s event has yet to be finalized, but Atkins suggested that there may be a party downtown.


arts& culture

DEC.19.2O12• UWINDSORLANCE.CA/ARTS

Windsor’s Sean Connery Supergroup is playing their last show, probably, at The Dominion House this Friday • photo courtesy Sean Connery Supergroup

Harbingers of the Apocalypse

SARAHOWIE arts editor ___________________________

T

here exists in every major metropolis ridiculous niche bands that can’t really be described on paper, such as Toronto’s Sheezer, the all female Weezer cover band (Blue Album and Pinkerton only). Windsor has its own Sean Connery Supergroup. The Sean Connery Supergroup is not a band that can be described without being seen live. Every member of SCS has a persona they play on stage, only to be topped by equally ridiculous costumes, ranging from 80s glam rock band to cavemen. SCS blends emo-core with dance pop, often playing one song after another that has no real musical connection to the first. The band doesn’t really have recordings of their music, certainly not professional quality ones, and lacks a cohesive album. The band doesn’t play many shows, and each one is often said to be their last, including the one they’ll play this Friday at The Dominion House. Two members are band are leaving Windsor, but they might try playing shows via Skype.

Connery Supergroup. Or, we’re sort of like the Power Rangers.”

kind of coalesce into a fireball,” said bassist Martin “The Fixer” Schiller.

SCS came together during the faculty strike at the University of Windsor four years ago. A bunch of friends went to Niagara Falls, got really drunk and formed a band.

Lefaive added, “A fireball comet that’s been wielding towards the planet since the beginning.” Coincidentally, their next show is the date of the presumed apocalypse, Dec. 21.

“It was all old friends,” said James Steinhoff, who goes by “The Chancellor” on stage and is credited online to “vocals and punishment.”

What works about the band is that the band totally doesn’t work. The whole experience is completely ridiculous and they probably aren’t going to go platinum on their next recording.

“We made an agreement at the start that no one can take this very seriously. If there’s something you don’t like, you can raise your voice but you really can’t shut it down. Unless the whole group doesn’t want it, you just have to accept things you don’t like,” said Steinhoff. Steinhoff said this led to the band not exactly having a fixed genre, although they call themselves “supreme party punk rock.” “Or erotic rock,” Steinhoff added. “We like to confuse people by putting the word ‘erotic’ in there.” Lefaive writes tons of screamo music. Some bandmates are into classic rock and hair metal, so that gets incorporated into the mix. The band includes funkpop numbers towards the end of each set because the audience loves to dance.

“We can talk philosophically about how art is corrupted off the need to make profit, and we can talk about how, in a sense, the band is pure art because we make no money,” said Steinhoff. It’s tradition that the door cover to see SCS is 25 cents, so oftentimes someone either steals the jar of quarters or it gets dropped, lost or forgotten. Lefaive said that sometimes the money also goes to purchasing beer pitchers for the audience. SCS wanted to give shots out to the audience for this show, but it’s apparently illegal. “We’re all about the spectacle, we don’t want to separate the spectacle from the content,” said Steinhoff. “I think we’re very 80s in that respect.”

(including some of the bandmates) and dance and everyone has a completely unabashed great time. “The support is really uncanny, we don’t know where it came from,” said Lefaive with a grin. To say that SCS shows are wild is truly an understatement. A girl once had an incident with a guitar and had to get stitches on her face, and the show did not stop. The girl came back to the next SCS show donning a hockey helmet with face guard. People are generally divided about the band. Some people really hate SCS, some love them, most are fairly confused. Hatred of the band actually led to SCS gaining a new member. “James [‘The Doctor”] O-L hated the band so much he started writing songs for Sean Connery Supergroup,” said Lefaive. “He vowed to destroy us from within because he hated it so much.” Love them or hate them, SCS isn’t about to cater to what is popular and insists people still come to their shows because they are the “true inheritors of rock and roll.” ___________________________

“It’s all about having a good time at the show. All these genres we play, they all

Going to any SCS show is always an experience. People get really drunk

Sean Connery Supergroup plays at The Dominion House on Dec. 21 with special guests The Nefidovs and This Machine Kills Robots. Doors open at 9 p.m. and cover is 25 cents.

KAT VON DEADMAU5 TWITTER PROPOSAL

BYNES FAILS AT TWITTER, MOVES TO INSTAGRAM

TEENAGERS TAKE TO SEXTING;WE FEEL OLD

GAY COUPLE ENGAGED AT WHITE HOUSE

In probably not the first to do this but still ridiculous news of the day, Deadmau5 and Kat von D are engaged. How did Mr. Mau5 pop the question? Twitter, of course. Deadmau5 tweeted @Kat with a picture of the ring, saying he couldn’t wait until Christmas. Kat said yes … via Twitter. Admittedly, the reception is going to be awesome.

The DUI accused former chid star Amanda Bynes apparently didn’t want to stay out of the public eye for very long. Her last tweet linked her fans to an Instagram account, which is just as bizarre as her Twitter. Updates include the same picture of her posted three different times, a picture of her chest with a vague reference to weight loss and a heavily distorted purple self-portrait.

Looks like your little brother’s new iPhone is getting more action than you. A new study has come out saying that sexting is way more regular amongst teenagers than any of us want to think. Twenty-eight per cent of teenagers have admitted to texting fully nude pictures of themselves to others. But sexting could be a particular problem in the United States, as sexters in some states could get charged with child pornography. The Internet is forever, folks!

U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Michael Phelps has something more than presents to look forward to in the next little while. Phelps proposed to his partner, Ben Schock, who said yes. The proposal made history, as Phelps is the first gay man to propose in the White House. We at The Lance had no idea that the White House was such a popular spot for proposals.

To quote Kyle “The Cush” Lefaive who plays vocals and guitar (and soul, according to their website), “Everyone is from a different band and they combined like Voltron to make Sean

pq trendingm


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do you concur?

w/DIANATROJANSEK

NOT GOING FOR GOLD For most people, success is defined by how many goals are accomplished, and during this time of year this rings especially true as people begin to think about their New Year’s resolutions. Traditionally, people create a new set of goals for themselves at the beginning of a new year, hoping to grow into a better person by striving towards their resolutions.

A self portrait of Cerah Steele for her daily Instagram sketch project • photo courtesy Cerah Steele

A PINT WITH ...

Cerah Steele SARAHOWIE arts editor ______________________________

W

indsorite Cerah Steele has her fingers in a lot of different pots, so to speak. She works as a hairdresser, lends her vocals to an EDM project, sculpts and draws. Frustrated with her lack of time to draw, Steele came up with Sketch-a-Day, a project where she draws in her sketchbook once a day for an entire year. Steele posted her work to Instagram. Almost 365 sketches and 22,000 followers later, Steele reflected on her year of sketches over a pint with The Lance. SARA HOWIE: How did the Sketch-a-Day project come to be? CERAH STEELE: As a New Year’s resolution; right around this time last year I figured, ‘Wow, I really don’t have time to draw anymore.’ I come from a family of artists and it’s a rule that the more you draw, the better you get. Same with anything, right? And I figured, if I make it a New Year’s resolution, I have to do it. SH: That’s true, but lots of people who set a New Year’s resolution don’t follow through. What’s made you stick through it? CS: I had just got my iPhone. It was the most beneficial artistic move I’d ever made. If I made it an online, interactive thing that people were waiting for or anticipating, I had a need to do it. Even if they weren’t, because at the beginning people really weren’t, it was just my friends on Facebook. So I just started, and I can’t believe it’s done! It’s a week or two away! Looking through the [sketchbooks] it feels like it was just yesterday that I started. Looking through the books before, it was like, ‘Oh my God, I have 300 days to go,’ and now it’s like, ‘Oh my God I only have 20 days to go!’ It’s crazy. SH: Are you going to try and continue the project, or do something new come January? CS: I’ve been pulling over a few ideas like something called Piece-aDay, where you just do something artistic and you just document it. So say I’m making dinner and I cut a cucumber in the shape of a rose, it’s like that’s my “something artistic” for the day.

By the time a goal is met, the time has come for them to set new goals to strive for, trapping someone in a never-ending cycle of aspirations. By living a goal-oriented life, it’s hard to be satisfied with yourself. Someone who is always working hard towards becoming better may never appreciate who they are in the present. Goals not only keep people from enjoying the present, but they put stress on people to constantly achieve something. Goals don’t always work out as planned, or are unrealistic. When this happens, the eventual failure is stressful and discouraging. By keeping goals constantly in mind, life becomes more work than enjoyment— people end up doing things that they don’t enjoy in order to move towards their goals, rather than doing what they love. This makes them unhappy, and as a result, their work suffers. The easiest way to escape the endless cycle of stress and disappointment that can come from living life according to set goals is to let them go and enjoy the present. Instead of worrying about what will happen in the future, enjoy each moment before it slips away forever. By embracing the present, a person can discover new opportunities and explore their life and world outside their previous goals. They can try new things that they never would have tried otherwise because it kept them from achieving their goals. If you’re always planning ahead and trying to accomplish your goals you will never achieve perfect happiness. Perfect happiness comes from enjoying what you have, rather than worrying about what you have yet to attained. When you’re happier, you achieve better results in everything you do.

ARTS CALENDAR WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 19 Marcel Pronovost Vollmer Recreation Complex, Lasalle, 6 p.m. Arts Council Windsor Region holiday karaoke Artspeak Gallery, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Big Night Out presents 5th annual industry Christmas party Venue Rock Parlor, 9 p.m. It’s legally Christmas The Bank Nightklub, 9 p.m. THURSDAY DECEMBER 20 Ho Ho Holy Shots Boom Boom Room, 10 p.m. The Rowley Estate wsg. Adelleda, Overtime Heroes and To The Strongest Dominion House, 7 p.m. Biblioasis Holiday Party Biblioasis, 5 p.m.-9 p.m. A Swingin’ Christmas with Toronto Big All Star Band Chrysler Theatre, $26, 7:30 p.m. FRIDAY DECEMBER 21 Sean Connery Supergroup Live at the End of the World wsg. Nefidovs and This Machine Kills Robots Dominion House, 25 cent cover New Adventures in Toyland Capitol Theatre, $20, 7:30 p.m. The Walkervilles Album Release Party The Loop Complex, $5, 9 p.m. End of the World Party Tabu Nightclub, 9 p.m. Kenneth MacLeod with the Windsor Salt Band Phog Lounge Aladdin Kordazone Theatre, by donation, 7 p.m. SATURDAY DECEMBER 22 Joe Strummer Day fundraiser Villains Beastro, by donation, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. 29 Park Christmas Party 29 Park, 10 p.m. Kenneth MacLeod with the Windsor Salt Band Phog Lounge Aladdin Kordazone Theatre, $15, 7 p.m. Green Door Nightclub Grand Opening Green Door Nightclub, 10 p.m. SUNDAY DECEMBER 23 Junior Bob wsg. Elos Arma, Ape Cassette and Joey Strasburg Milk Coffee Bar, $5, 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Junior Bob wsg. Elos Arma, Way Gone Phog Lounge, $5, 10 p.m. Aladdin Kordazone Theatre, $15, 2 p.m. Stacey Pullen Christmas Party Boom Boom Room, 10 p.m.

artsissue

... gather your visual arts, poetry, fashion design, short fiction, photography, graphic arts & whatever else we can print and send it to arts@uwindsorlance.ca If we like it we’ll print it.


sports

DEC.19.2O12• UWINDSORLANCE.CA/SPORTS // O9

Title pursuit one game at a time The two-time defending women’s basketball team isn’t taking its bid for another national title lightly

“In the past, they have had captains that naturally lead and they followed,” Vallée said. “Now, they too see and believe that they must lead.”

KIMELLIOTT lance writer ______________________________

L

ancers captain Jessica Clemencon and head coach Chantal Vallée are, arguably, the most under-spoken player and under-rated coach in CIS women’s basketball. Clemencon, CIS player of the year, is naturally shy and isn’t at all a vocal floor leader, and Vallée, who was named OUA coach of the year in 2009 and 2011, has yet to be named nationally even after leading her team to two CIS titles. Still, Clemencon is a leader. She leads by example. Vallée, the country’s coach of the year or not, has those two CIS crowns under her belt as well as a currently unbeaten Lancers team already poised to contend for a third. Despite their obvious strengths and the team’s good positioning thus far, Clemencon and Vallée see hurdles ahead in a tough second half to the regular season with stronger OUA teams. “The first semester of basketball showed that the OUA West teams have beat OUA East teams on average,” Vallée said. “So, the second half of our season is going to be tougher against predominantly OUA West teams.” According to Vallée, the fall session has seen the Lancers heavily scouted by the West division teams. Also, Windsor’s not alone at the top of the OUA West. Brock shares Windsor’s unbeaten record heading into the holidays at 7-0. “You must essentially win your conference to be guaranteed a berth in the CIS national championship, especially with a change in the rules this year, even

As for a chance at defending for a third Bronze baby, Vallée isn’t making any predictions.

Lancer Jessica Clemencon jumps above a Ryerson player en route to Windsor’s 83-58 win against the Rams Nov. 23 at the St. Denis Centre • photo Edwin Tam

Leadership was a concern at the beginning of the year

though there are still one or two at-large entries,” she said. Their unbeaten record didn’t come without challenges as Clemencon pointed out. “We had only two really close games against Carleton and Queen’s,” she said. “I think that we’ll get some tough games in the second part of the season. Brock is the only team undefeated other than us. The West usually offers us some good competition and I think this year will be the same.” Despite early fears of a leadership void created by the graduation of Lancers Emily Abbott and Iva Peklova, the Lancers have thrived this year. Two elements of success unify the team according to Vallée— leadership and character. “Jessica is our sole captain, and she has done a good job,” Vallée said. “As a coach, I also look to our fifth-year play-

JESSICACLEMENCON ers, and Bojana Kovacevic and Laura Mullins have gone outside of their comfort zones to be leaders as well. They have learned that to win.” “When players believe in what the coaches are telling them, with the experience of knowing what it takes to win, then they are more malleable and began to understand what to do.” “Leadership was a concern at the beginning of the year,” Clemencon said. “We still often talk about it during practices. I think that returning players understood the need to step it up and I think that we all have at different times ... I think it’s been successful so far but in the second semester we’ll still have to work on that point for sure.” Vallée has also been impressed with Miah-Marie Langlois and Korissa Williams, who have bought into the leadership approach and have been vocal on the floor.

“It takes patience,” she said. “When we get to playoffs there’s more positive energy and excitement since there’s more at stake. But we know we still must win the game at hand to get to the big game. Teams like Laurier, who were ranked 10th in the nation at some points in the first half of the season, are also talented, gritty and tough.” It’s one game at a time according to Clemencon. “We have goals and objectives for each game and we know that we’re still far from being ready for playoffs,” she said. “One game at a time is key. Yet, for each game we focus on ourselves rather than on the opponents. “Of course, the three-peat stays in our minds but it seems like we still have a long way to go before we get there. “ What will make the road to the title tougher is the Lancers’ ever-growing reputation as the team to beat. “We get every (team’s) best shot, because they get to measure themselves against us with nothing to lose,” Vallée said. “It’s a great position to be in. Despite the pressure, this is where you want to be. ” The journey continues Jan. 3 when Lancers take the Laurier Golden Hawks at the St. Denis Centre at 6 p.m. Before that, the Lancers will attend a three-day Concordia tournament in Montreal.


1O // DEC.19.2O12 • UWINDSORLANCE.CA/ARTS

Gervais up with ‘good vibe’ Lancers Forward finds similarities to 2008 jr. B champ Essex 73’s and Lancers

“Ferry shows a lot of leadership in the room and in school too— the guy’s a genius,” Gervais said. “Oliphant is also a pretty good leader in the room. They get the job done. And, they know how to play.” As for the tactical preparedness, Gervais gives Lancers head coach Kevin Hamlin credit for providing the team with the insight into their opponent’s game style.

JOHNDOHERTY sports editor ______________________________

F

“He does a lot of research on other teams— their strengths and weaknesses,” Gervais said. “Before we’ll go into the weekend practice we’ll get into methods of how to stop them and how to use their (weaknesses) to our advantage. That’s with every team we play.

ormer Chicago Hitmen and Essex 73’s forward Gabe Gervais of the Lancers Men’s Hockey team knows a winning program when he sees one. The 2007-2008 Essex rookie of the year played a season with the junior C champion 73’s, so he’s familiar with a team dynamic that wins titles.

“If we just had the same kind of game, teams would catch on to that. I don’t think a lot of teams know what our systems are. It’s changing. We look at the team’s objectives and base our game on that.”

“Right now, it’s a pretty tight knit group,” said the 22-year-old Gervais, who is in his second-year at the University of Windsor.

“I think we could go pretty far. With Essex, we won a lot of games and (the Lancers) have the same kind of good vibe and I think we’re a winning team.

There are no little cliques. Everyone’s on the same page GABEGERVAIS

With the 73’s, Gervais posted 17 goals and 45 points in a total 52 games, including two assists in a 3-2 overtime win in Game 7 of the 2008 Schmalz Cup series final against the Alliston Hornets. “Everyone knows everyone,” the Windsor native said of the Lancers. “There are no little cliques. Everyone’s on the same page, and we all get along. It’s fun. That’s the biggest part of it. When we’re on a roll, we’re just having fun, we’re just playing.” Following a season with the 73’s, Gervais spend two years with the junior B Chatham Maroons where he amassed 36 goals and 98 points over 129 games. The Maroons reached the Greater Ontario Junior Hockey League playoffs in both of those years and were semifinalists in 2010. In his final year of junior hockey with the Hitmen of the NAHL, Gervais recorded 17 goals and 32 points in 56 regular season games. For Gervais, the winning formula, at least in part, depends on familiarity and the bond that develops between teammates that have grown up through the same hockey system. “We have more locals on the team,” Gervais said of the No. 8 ranked Lancers. “For example, (D.J.) Turner, (Evan) Stibbard, I grew up with those guys.” Gervais also played two years on the Maroons with Lancer defenceman Evan

Windsor Lancer second-year forward Gabe Gervais • photo courtesy Marty Gervais

Makaric and a year each with forward Stibbard and defenceman Mitch Dunning. “We all know each other,” Gervais said. “And, the guys that came in that aren’t from here, we’ve welcomed them and we’ve become tight.” “I think before, there were a lot of OHL guys— A lot of OHL guys trickle down to CIS hockey. But now there are the locals— the 90-91 age group locally that are pretty good. Guys like me and Stibbard, we were just walk-ons. We made the team. Stibbard’s putting up great numbers. (D.J.) Turner was too,

but he broke his jaw.” There’s the bond of players that grew through the ranks together— that tops Gervais’ list of what make a team a success. But, Gervais is also quick to attribute the Lancers’ strength to good leadership from its senior players as well as a tactical awareness of their opponents. The leadership comes from seasoned players, such as captain Brett Vandehogan, Steve Ferry and Brett Oliphant, who know how to take care of the younger players.

It’s a winning formula that currently has the Lancers second in the OUA West behind Western by two points and ranked eighth nationally. “We’re on a pretty good role,” said Gervais, who is only vaguely concerned that the holiday break may slow down the pace the Lancers have created for themselves. “Everyone’s probably eating a lot, not working out. And we’re not on the ice as much. But, I think every team is going to go in after the break at the same level— everyone’s kind of doing the same thing, you know. Everyone is at home relaxing with family. But we’ll be ready to go.”


DEC.19.2O12• UWINDSORLANCE.CA/SPORTS // 11

the

lance Windsor Express picks up steam with weekend wins scoreboard KIMELLIOTT lance writer ______________________________

T

he Windsor Express is picking up steam heading into the yuletide season, especially since their recent roster shuffle. Newcomers Chris Commons, Darren Duncan and Lester Prosper most notably helped the team’s momentum in victory’s over the Moncton Miracles 102-98 Friday and the Montreal Jazz 104-95 Saturday which extended Windsor’s winning streak to three games. “For the first and second quarter, we played them a little better than even,” coach Bill Jones said of Friday’s win against Moncton. “And, then in the third quarter we came out and extended our lead. In the fourth quarter is was just a matter of hanging on for the win by making our foul shots and continuing to execute our plays.”

Express owner Dartis Williams declared cautious satisfaction when he said, “The win is good, but it’s how we win that is more important to me. Yet our record is improving on the basis of our new acquisitions, so the group that spotted and recruited the players did a good job.” Montreal dictated the pace, leading 31-18 at the end of the first quarter and 54-45 at the half, before finally being tied up 73-73 after three quarters. The Express primarily rode on the shoulders of Duncan and Commons once again. “We struggled early against a team that hasn’t been doing well,” Jones said. “They played hard and we weren’t ready to play. But we fought through it. Some of our bench guys came in and got us over the hump by playing hard.” Duncan finished with a game-high 31 points while Commons had 28. Raymond Kraemer chipped in with 13 points.

Duncan and Commons lead all scorers with 22 points apiece.

“Ray came out and played a good game for us,” Jones said.

“I thought the first half was ugly,” Duncan said. “We struggled maybe because it was the first time playing at home in 25 days for most of the players and the first time ever for me and a couple of our other guys.”

Four players were in double figures for the diehard Montreal Jazz. Guard Chris Hagan lead their balance attack with 18 points, Marc-Danie scored 16 points, Sani Ibrahim had 14 points and Juan Mendez added 12 points.

Commons played his second game with the Express and his first at the WFCU centre. “It’s good playing back in North America,” he said. “The level of competition over here has been much higher in comparison to than professional basketball in Finland.”

Former Lancer Issaac Kuon saw limited play over the weekend with the influx of new marquee players.

“We started getting the key factors going our way like defensive rebounds,” co-captain Anthony Johnson said of the game’s second half. “The win boosted the overall confidence of the team, as we proved to ourselves that our first win over the Miracles wasn’t just a fluke. And it also boosted my personal confidence when I scored 10 points because I’ve been in a bit of a slump lately.” Saturday’s win against Montreal wasn’t as impressive.

sport briefs Scholarship seminar The Sportsworx Scholarship Program will hold an open house with free seminars Saturday for student athletes in the Windsor-Essex region wishing to pursue scholarships. It takes place at Adie Knox Arena in the WMHA board room. Seminars run at 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m. Sportsworx is a newly offered program that helps student athletes and their parent pursue U.S. athletic scholarships. “I’m excited for all our talented athletes, moms and dads who are almost begging for this type of free information,” regional director Chris Janisse said. For more information, contact Janisse at 519-737-1895 or e-mail sportsworks.ca@ gmail.com.

“My current challenge is having to stay focused and a maintain a professional attitude while I try to earn more playing time in practice,” he said. Former Lancer Greg Surmacz, sidelined by a hand injury for the next six weeks, is also keeping busy off the court. “I am conditioning and keeping my legs and non-shooting hand strong,” he said. “As a veteran, I also try to help the younger players on the bench see what’s happening on the floor.” With a record of 6-7, the Express will take on first-place London in back-toback games, first at London Thursday and at home Friday. Sports video gamers revealed Through an online survey of 1,718 participants, researchers from Concordia University and MIT have finally quantified what most of us have long suspected— the average sports video gamer is male and in their mid-20s. Survey results show that 98.4 per cent of sports gamers are male, 80 per cent are white, with an average age of 27. In comparison with other representative game player demographics, the field is less diverse and the average player is younger. Based on data about the larger game-playing population, sports gamers are drawn from a more traditional demographic of game players, at least when it comes to console and certain personal computer-based video games. Communications professor Mia Consalvo of Concordia University hopes to discover more insights into why there is little diversity in the player demographics and why female players are in a minority.

“We still lack knowledge on how these players relate their passion for video games to their sports fandom in general,“ she said.

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL OUA Ottawa York Queen’s Ryerson Western Toronto McMaster Brock Guelph Lakehead RMC Waterloo Windsor

GP W 10 9 8 8 9 7 9 7 10 6 9 5 10 5 10 3 10 3 11 3 9 2 9 2 10 2

L 1 0 2 2 4 4 5 7 7 8 7 7 8

SW SL PTS 29 5 18 24 3 16 23 12 14 22 11 14 21 18 12 18 16 10 19 20 10 14 26 6 12 24 6 15 26 6 9 22 4 12 23 4 12 24 4

1/11/2013

at Western

6 p.m.

1/19/2013

RMC

1 p.m.

1/25/2013

at York

6 p.m.

1/26/2013

at McMaster

6 p.m.

2/1/2013

Toronto

6 p.m.

MEN’S VOLLEYBALL McMaster Waterloo Western Queen’s Ryerson York Guelph Toronto Windsor RMC

GP W L 9 9 0 9 8 1 9 7 2 9 6 3 9 5 4 9 4 5 9 2 7 9 2 7 9 2 7 9 0 9

PF 27 25 24 20 15 16 11 12 13 1

PA PTS 3 18 10 16 9 14 15 12 17 10 17 8 23 4 21 4 22 4 27 0

TRACK & FIELD 1/18/2013

Mike Lints Open Allendale, Mich

1/25-26/2013

Findlay Invitational Findlay, Ohio

2/1-2/2013

Bison Classic, Winnipeg

2/1-2/2013

Meyo Classic South Bend, Ind.

2/2/2013

York Team Challenge North York

2/8-9/2013

Team Challenge St. Denis Centre

2/16/2013

Silverston Classic Ann Arbor, Mich

2/21-22/2013

OUA Championships St. Denis Centre

3/7-9/2013

CIS Championship Edmonton / U of A

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL OUA EAST Carleton Ottawa Queen’s Toronto Laurentian Ryerson York OUA WEST Brock Windsor Guelph Western Lakehead Laurier McMaster Waterloo

GP W 8 6 8 5 8 4 8 4 8 3 8 2 8 1 GP W 7 7 7 7 7 4 7 4 7 3 7 3 7 3 7 0

L 2 3 4 4 5 6 7 L 0 0 3 3 4 4 4 7

PF 517 562 550 451 481 491 432 PF 440 525 446 444 447 433 449 367

PA PTS 443 12 473 10 517 8 499 8 552 6 540 4 527 2 PA PTS 351 14 372 14 425 8 451 8 460 6 440 6 472 6 513 0

1/11/2013

at Western

8 p.m.

1/19/2013

RMC

3 p.m.

1/20/2013

Queen’s

3 p.m.

1/25/2013

at York

8 p.m.

CIS RANKINGS 1. Windsor (1) 2. Fraser Valley (2) 3. Regina (3) 4. Saint Mary’s (4) 5. Carleton (5) 6. Acadia (6) 7. Calgary (8) 8. Saskatchewan (9) 9. UBC (NR) 10. Brock (NR)

1/26/2013

at McMaster

8 p.m.

1/3/2013

Laurier

6 p.m.

1/5/2013

Guelph

6 p.m.

1/9/2013

at Laurier

6 p.m.

1/13/2013

Waterloo

1 p.m.

1/16/2013

at McMaster

6 p.m.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY OUA Laurier Queen’s Guelph Western Windsor Toronto UOIT Waterloo York Brock Ryerson

GP W L OTL PTS 17 14 1 2 30 17 14 2 1 29 18 13 3 2 28 16 12 3 1 25 17 9 6 2 20 17 9 7 1 19 16 7 7 2 16 17 5 10 2 12 16 4 10 2 10 17 3 13 1 7 16 2 14 0 4

1/12/2013

at Brock

3:15 p.m.

1/13/2013

at Guelph

2 p.m.

1/18/2013

Laurier

7:10 p.m.

1/20/2013

at Waterloo

2 p.m.

1/26/2013

Toronto

4:10 p.m.

MEN’S HOCKEY OUA EAST UQTR Carleton Toronto McGill Ottawa Nipissing Queen’s Ryerson Concordia RMC OUA WEST Western Windsor Guelph Lakehead Waterloo York Brock UOIT Laurier

GP W L OTL PTS 16 12 3 1 25 16 10 4 2 22 16 9 4 3 21 15 10 5 0 20 16 8 4 4 20 17 7 8 2 16 15 6 6 3 15 16 5 11 0 10 16 4 10 2 10 17 2 13 2 6 GP W L OTL PTS 16 13 3 0 26 16 12 4 0 24 18 11 6 1 23 16 9 5 2 20 16 9 5 2 20 16 9 7 0 18 16 6 7 3 15 16 6 9 1 13 16 5 9 2 12

1/4/2013

at UOIT

7:30 p.m.

1/5/2013

at York

7 p.m.

1/11/2013

Brock

7:30 p.m.

1/12/2013

Laurier

7:30 p.m.

MEN’S BASKETBALL OUA EAST Ryerson Carleton Ottawa Queen’s Laurentian York Toronto OUA WEST Windsor Lakehead Brock Guelph Laurier McMaster Western Waterloo

GP W L PF 8 8 0 646 8 7 1 713 8 7 1 652 8 6 2 693 8 5 3 627 8 4 4 608 8 2 6 589 GP W L PF 7 5 2 558 7 3 4 548 7 2 5 471 7 2 5 500 7 2 5 545 7 2 5 519 7 1 6 451 7 0 7 418 CIS RANKINGS 1. Carleton (1) 2. Acadia (2) 3. UBC (4) 4. Cape Breton (5) 5. McGill (3) 6. Fraser Valley (6) 7. Alberta (7) 8. Windsor (8) 9. Ryerson (10) 10. Ottawa (NR)

PA PTS 493 16 477 14 557 14 631 12 590 10 626 8 636 4 PA PTS 507 10 543 6 564 4 602 4 622 4 558 4 584 2 548 0

12/28/2012

at Mt. Vernon Nazarene

7 p.m.

1/3/2013

Laurier

8 p.m.

1/5/2013

Guelph

8 p.m.

1/9/2013

at Laurier

8 p.m.

1/13/2013

Waterloo

3 p.m.

1/16/2013

at McMaster

8 p.m.

1/19/2013

at Guelph

4 p.m.

1/23/2013

McMaster

8 p.m.

1/26/2013

at Waterloo

4 p.m.



Issue 25, Volume 85 - The Lance