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Rekindling the Caribbean Development Revolution His impatience with those who thought and acted as if poverty in developing countries could not be uprooted was also well known. In his role as Vice-Chancellor he spoke and acted strategically upon the value perspective that demanded a steadfast determination to imagine and implement development agendas. In so doing he committed The UWI, in all its facets and manifestations, to a regional economic growth and development agenda to which it has remained attached. Like all fine universities, The UWI was not established nor sustained to serve itself, but to serve the Caribbean nation in its fullness as a spatially unified and beautifully diversified civilisation. It was this perspective that drove Sir Arthur to advocate for and implement the tri-campus university, thus exposing the wider region to the full reach of its role in promoting economic growth and social development. As an economic theorist he understood that development required sustained

Published financial and fiscal indicators, from both internal and external sources, are suggesting that the Caribbean economy will remain beneath the watermark of global growth in the short to medium term. 8 – THE PELICAN/ISSUE 14

economic growth, yet his focus was always on the broader, practical processes that confronted poverty as an economic condition and social culture. Published financial and fiscal indicators, from both internal and external sources, are suggesting that the Caribbean economy will remain beneath the watermark of global growth in the short to medium term. The concept of a “negative outlook” so commonly used by assessing agencies in reference to the region’s prospects has taken on special connotations in the Caribbean context. They speak to a world in which our youth are expected to mature as primary stakeholders of societal poverty. This youth generation is expected to inherit and inhabit economies that are in decline, and are willing to declare doom and desperation. They are also expected to absorb the notion that the region’s development agenda has stalled. The mandate of The UWI in such a circumstance is to use its resources and reasoning in order to reconnect the impatience of Lewis to the imperative of the “now”, which is to rekindle the Caribbean development revolution. That is, to combine the passions pouring out from the historical perspective with the urgency of economic engagement to create a new sense of popular purpose as an inter-generational agenda. This is indeed a fine time for The UWI to step in and step up. The regional economy needs to be democratised. Traditional elites in each island

UWI Pelican Issue 14  
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