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2008-2009 Community Investment Report

United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley

VISION United Way will be a community builder - doing what no other organization can - bringing the Lehigh Valley together as one community to address the human needs issues we care about most.

MISSION To provide leadership, create the coalitions, and develop the resources to increase the organized capacity of people to care for one another.

UNDERNEATH EVERYTHING WE ARE,

UNDERNEATH EVERYTHING WE DO,

WE ARE ALL PEOPLE.

CONNECTED,INTERDEPENDENT,UNITED. AND WHEN WE REACH OUT A HAND TO ONE,

WE INFLUENCE THE CONDITION OF ALL. THAT’S WHAT IT MEANS TO LIVE UNITED. United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley  2200 Avenue A 3rd Floor  Bethlehem, PA 18017-2189 Phone: 610-758-8010  Fax: 610-867-7255  www.unitedwayglv.org

GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER.

LIVE UNITED

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Thanks to our Printing Sponsor for full color printing: Lehigh Valley Print Center 1251 Airport Road, Allentown, Pa. 610-435-0313


table of contents

GIVE FOUR WAYS TO GIVE TO YOUR UNITED WAY 1. Click on the DONATE button on United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley's website. www.unitedwayglv.org 2. Give through the United Way Workplace Campaign. If your employer does not have a workplace campaign, please contact Dave Jacoby at 610-807-5709 or davej@unitedwayglv.org. 3. Contact United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley offices at 610-758-8010 to receive a pledge form or to make a contribution using any of the following credit cards: Visa, MasterCard, Discover, Amex. 4. Send your donation to: United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley 2200 Avenue A, Third Floor Bethlehem, PA 18017-2189

A Message To Our Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Accountability With Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Community Impact: Four Goals for Positive Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Community Building Partnerships: COMPASS, Youth Success Zone, Success By 6, Lehigh Valley Alliance On Aging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Capacity-Building Program for Lehigh Valley Nonprofits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Making Good Things Happen Takes Partners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Resource Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

ADVOCATE

Volunteer Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

United Way provides support to two local advocacy organizations: Children's Coalition of the Lehigh Valley and the Lehigh Valley Alliance on Aging. Children's Coalition of the Lehigh Valley Become a Member Now! Attend Family Policy Summits, Legislative Breakfasts, and Community Forums Receive updates on issues that impact the lives and education of our children. Carol Obando-Derstine, Executive Director 610-868-2805 website: www.childlv.org Lehigh Valley Alliance on Aging A United Way Community Partnership that addresses issues concerning older adults in the Lehigh Valley. For more information about public policy efforts, go to website: www.lvagingmatters.org.

Awards and Recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Financials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Lehigh Valley of 100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Give, Advocate, Volunteer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 IT’S EASY BEING GREEN Please print this report only if necessary. We have designed the report so that it prints nicely in black & white.

VOLUNTEER The United Way is a community investor in the Volunteer Center of the Lehigh Valley. For volunteer opportunities, visit their website: www.volunteerlv.org 610-807-0336 | Fax 610-807-0361

GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER. 28

LIVE UNITED

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33,100 CHILDREN AND 33,300 ADULTS BENEFIT FROM UNITED WAY-FUNDED PROGRAMS 1


Lehigh Valley of 100 A Message To Our Community Dear Friends of United Way, Thank you to everyone who contributes their time, treasure, and talent to our United Way. On behalf of United Way's Board of Directors, it gives us great pleasure to present this Annual Report in celebration of the past year's exciting accomplishments amidst so many economic challenges. We feel a profound responsibility to the 66,400 people who use the programs that United Way invests in as well as to the thousands of Lehigh Valley residents who contribute so generously to United Way. The economic crisis of the past year, coupled with the Pennsylvania budget impasse, has challenged the stability and security of many families and nonprofit institutions. People who never imagined that they would need to go to a food pantry, or could lose their home or their job, feel a disturbing vulnerability.

51 are female 49 are male 15 are over 65 24 are under 18 80 are Caucasians 12 are Hispanics/Latinos 5 are African-Americans 3 are Asians/Other 5 are foreign born 13 speak a language other than English at home 8 are Veterans. EDUCATION Of the 66 adults over 25 30 have some college education 24 have high school diploma or equivalent ONLY

United Way will be there for people in need. We will also be there for people who dream of a better life. United Way believes everyone deserves good health, a quality education, a stable income, and their basic needs met on a daily basis. We are community focused, with concern for children, youth, adults, families, and neighborhoods.

12 have no high school degree, 8 of whom are functionally illiterate (Cannot read medicine directions or fill out a job application).

Accountability has been the hallmark of the past year. Using the Results-Based Accountability (RBA) system, we have provided training and technical assistance to all of the agencies we invest in to ensure that United Way is synonymous with success and quality.

One in 6 babies is born to a mother without a high school diploma.

President Peyton Helm opened the Muhlenberg College United Way campaign with a letter to the faculty and staff that included the following comment: "The United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley represents the largest and most effective system of providing people-to-people help‌.But United Way doesn't just happen - it depends on each of our personal investment of time and resources." We couldn't have said it better ourselves. United Way Worldwide’s "Live United" message speaks to the capacity we all have to act on behalf of others, for the common good. It is a message of hope that invites each of us to become part of all of us. There is no reason why the Lehigh Valley cannot be a national leader in the education of its children, in the employment opportunities available to its citizens, and in the health and vitality of its people and communities. Sincerely,

Dolores Laputka Esq Chair, Board of Directors

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If we could turn the Lehigh Valley into a small community of 100 people, keeping the same proportions we have today, this is who we are:

Susan Gilmore President

Of the 16 children in public schools, 6 are not reading on grade level in grades 3 through 12.

INCOME In our Valley of 100 46 own their home 27 spend 30%+ on housing costs 17 barely make ends meet 9 are unemployed 8 live in poverty 4 are on public assistance. HEALTH 22 consume fruits and vegetables 5 times today 21 use tobacco 25 lack exercise 18 have a disability of any kind 10 live with asthma 5 live with cancer 9 have heart disease including high cholesterol 25 are obese 12 do not have health coverage 10 depend on food pantries and soup kitchens for meals 5 older adults lack the social & emotional support they need.

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Financials Financials

Accountability With Results

United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley United Way of theStatements Greater Lehigh Valley Position Consolidated of Financial Consolidated As of June Statements 30, 2009 of Financial Position As of June 30, 2009

As the executive of a nonprofit organization that is certified to apply for United Way funding, you know the due diligence that United Way applies to its investment process.

Assets

Assets

Volunteer Involvement Assets Cash and cash equivalents Investments, at fair value Pledges receivable, less allowance for uncollectible Other receivables and prepayments Leasehold improvements and equipment Life insurance cash values Total Assets

The United Way Board of Directors, the Community Impact Council, and Community Investment Teams play an active role in the decision making of the organization.

1,921,453 4,329,811 3,554,968 238,737 94,232 145,107

Organizations Qualify for Funding

10,284,308

Nonprofit agencies must meet a rigorous 22-point Qualifications Criteria confirming the stability, strength, and vitality of the organization to be eligible for United Way investments.

Cash and cash equivalents Investments, at fair value Pledges receivable, less allowance for uncollectible Other receivables and prepayments Leasehold improvements and equipment Life insurance cash values

Liabilities and Net Assets Liabilities and Net Assets

Accounts payable and accrued expenses Custodial funds payable Liability to donors under split-interest trusts Liability to organizations under split-interest trusts Designated campaign support Notes payable Unrestricted Temporarily restricted Permanently restricted

Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued expenses Custodial funds payable Liability to donors under split-interest trusts Liability to organizations under split-interest trusts Designated campaign support Notes payable

602,073 53,628 31,405 21,000 955,041 1,635

Total Liabilities

1,664,782

Net Assets Unrestricted Temporarily restricted Permanently restricted

(570,442) 7,540,788 1,649,180

Total Net Assets

8,619,526

Total Liabilities and Net Assets

10,284,308

The financial statement presented here is condensed from complete financial statements of the United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley and wholly-owned subsidiary United Way Inc.from for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2009. Theits financial statements areServices, condensed complete financial statements Complete financial statements have beenpresented audited byhere independent certified public accountants, whose reports dated of themay United Way of theatGreater Lehigh Valley andWay its wholly-owned United Way November 30, 2009 be examined the offices of the United of the Greater subsidiary Lehigh Valley. Services, Inc. for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2009. Complete financial statements have beenofaudited independent certified public accountants, whose period reportsdue dated A consolidated statement revenueby and expenses has not been provided for this interim to a change November 30, 2009 be examined at the offices of the of the in the organization’s fiscal year. Thismay statement will be provided with the nextUnited annualWay report for Greater the period of July 1, 2009 - June 30, 2010. Lehigh Valley.

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Sandra L. Bodnyk, Treasurer United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley

Sandra Bodnyk, Treasurer United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley

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Jane Stone, Highmark Blue Shield United Way Board Member

U

nited Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley is an organization that you can trust. Accountability requires the courage to follow through on tough decisions. It means creating a culture of accountability that is persistent in its requirement that people benefit in meaningful ways from the work we support.

As a United Way donor, you know that you are making community investments that will change lives and change communities in ways that you can see and United Way can measure.

with the highest levels of need, including five targeted school districts. For 2008-09, 87% of the residents served are low income. Sixty-one percent (53 programs) met overall ResultsBased Accountability performance standards. Many programs used customer satisfaction surveys to learn more about customer needs and preferences, with particularly striking results in safety net programs. Data sharing between United Way and the Allentown and Easton Area School Districts made progress during this period in tracking how well students in afterschool programs were doing.

Annual Updates for Funded Organizations

Organizations meeting the criteria and receiving funding are required to submit on an annual basis a series of documents including a copy of the IRS 501(c)(3) letter of tax exemption, current annual budget, updated board list, most recent 990 tax return, most recent audit by outside auditing firm, and updates to their strategic plan.

Results-Based Accountability

All United Way-funded programs align with United Way's priority of serving low-income residents in seven Lehigh Valley living locations

David Noel, Duel Temp Company United Way Board Member

SPECIAL THANK YOU TO THE PEOPLE WHO WORK IN UNITED WAY’S PARTNER AGENCIES AND PROGRAMS

The people who direct, manage, and work in the nonprofit organizations that United Way supports are seldom celebrated to the degree they deserve in our community. The quality of the care they give to the children and adults who come to them for help everyday humanizes our world in ways that are difficult to measure. United Way deeply appreciates the work these organizations have done to measure the increments of change in people’s lives that add up to success.

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Community Impact FOUR GOALS FOR POSITIVE CHANGE United Way's four community goals for positive change are:  Children Healthy and Ready to Learn  Youth Succeeding in School  Strong Families in Vital Neighborhoods & Basic Needs  Older Adults Aging Successfully With these four goals, United Way addresses the needs of young children and their parents, school age youth, families, and older adults. To keep our work on track and to measure how we are doing, United Way adopted Mark Friedman's framework of Results-Based Accountability for its 2008-2011 Investment Plans. Mark Friedman, the author of Trying Hard is ot Good Enough: How to Produce Measurable Improvements for Customers and Communities, has created a disciplined thinking and planning process that enables organizations to go from talk to action in their work. Investment Plans for each of these goals enable United Way donors to invest in a wide array of programs that give people life-changing skills, resources, support systems, and hope.

COMMUNITY INDICATORS & TREND LINES United Way has selected the following high-quality community indicators to guide us in determining where United Way dollars need to be invested. Every program funded by United Way is working to improve the community condition measured by the indicator. Following the trend lines on these indicators helps us monitor improvements in community conditions. Although no one organization or agency can "turn the curve" or "move the needle" on these indicators, collaborative community action can! 1. Babies born below healthy birth weight. 2. Babies born to a mother without a high school education. 3. 3rd graders not proficient in reading. 4. 8th graders not proficient in math. 5. 8th graders not proficient in reading. 6. High school students not graduating. 7. Older adults (60+) receiving in-home services. 8. Older adults (65+) meeting standards for moderate exercise.

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Awards And Recognition The Express-Times Community Building Award is presented annually to an individual or organization that supports the United Way in its community building efforts; encourages cooperation; contributes talents and resources to further partnerships; and has the ability to create a common ground and to persevere. 2008 John Reynolds PhD Children's Coalition of the Lehigh Valley

2009 Bill Coles Community Volunteer

Diakon Lutheran Social Ministries Jewish Family Service of the Lehigh Valley ShareCare Faith In Action

Wegmans Allentown, Bethlehem and Nazareth/Easton

The President's Award is presented to an individual or organization whose leadership is instrumental in gaining support of the United Way campaign among the organization's employees and peers. This active role fosters education and understanding, resulting in significant growth in giving. 2008 Just Born, Inc.

2009 Lutron Electronics, Inc.

The WLI Philanthropist of the Year Award recognizes a member of the Women's Leadership Initiative who is active in the community, a philanthropic leader in the Lehigh Valley, and demonstrates a personal commitment of time, talent, and treasure to the best of her ability. 2008 Betsy Torrence WLI Founding Member Community Volunteer

2009 Nancy Ehle Community Volunteer

The Morning Call Silver Bowl Award is presented annually to a campaign volunteer who demonstrates outstanding leadership and makes every effort to help the campaign succeed. 2008 Bob Friedman AFLAC

2009 Wendy Body Greg Butz Alvin H. Butz, Inc.

The Campaign Chairman's Award is presented to an organization that has demonstrated continued leadership and innovation in conducting its United Way campaign, and a continued ability to increase awareness throughout the Lehigh Valley. The organization will serve as a model for other workplace campaigns to emulate. 2009 2008 Dual Temp, Inc. Capital BlueCross - Allentown (Harrisburg HQ)

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TeenWorks™ Board Ellen Marx, Co-Chair PSSU/SEIU Local 668, Dept. of Public Welfare Allie Dunmire, Co-Chair Parkland High School Michelle Agolla Lehigh Carbon Community College Steve Banus Teamsters Local 773 Dave Binder IBEW Local 1600, PPL Evan Brown Pen Argyl High School Steve Curto UFCW Retired Bill DeMauriac UAW Local 677, Mack Trucks icole Dionne Liberty High School Darah Donaher Liberty High School Marissa Guarriello Liberty High School Christine Hankee PSEA, Parkland School District Joanna Jaindl Orefield Middle School Brianna Kays Freedom High School Dale Krasley UAW Local 677, Mack Trucks Bob Lalo CWA Local 13500, Verizon

igel Lohman Œazareth High School Jackie Montti Liberty High School Debra Moyer PSEA, Parkland School District Devin Mueller Wilson Area School District Erin Priest CWA Local 14830, Lehigh Valley Digital Print Center Alexandria Quinn Palmerton Jr. High aomy Rosario Liberty High School Jim Roth PACE Retired Jillian Szilagyi Parkland High School Meredith Szilagyi Parkland High School George Treisner Pennsylvania State Education Association/Eastern Region Ellen Weiss AFSCME Local 1435, Gracedale Œursing Home John Weiss PSSU/SEIU Local 668, Pa. Labor & Industry Women’s Leadership Council Patricia Beldon, Chair Community Volunteer Joyce Dougherty PhD, Vice Chair THE PROGRAM for Women and Families

Cassandra Alleyne Merrill Lynch Cheryl Baker Girl Scouts of Eastern PA Anne Baum Capital Blue Cross/Vision Accomplished Barbara Bigelow Pennsylvania Sinfonia Orchestra Carol Carpenter Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Œetwork Maureen Connolley Lehigh University Aubrecia Cooper Just Born, Inc. Barbara Diamant Lehigh University Donna Haggerty Haggerty Services Bonnie Hall Crayola Suzanne Kresge Uniforce Staffing Services Kathryn Leber Community Volunteer Fay Mackey Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Œetwork ancy McCullar Turning Point of Lehigh Valley Meloney Sallie-Dosunmu Just Born, Inc. Terri Slaughter United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley

Champions The following individuals served as United Way Champions for young children, school-age children, strong families, and older adults during 2008-2009. As Champions, they spoke to the United Way Board of Directors about important issues pertinent to their areas of expertise, wrote op-ed pieces, spoke at conferences and forums, and served as advisors to United Way. Their wise counsel and experience helped United Way maintain its commitment to a vision of excellence for everyone we serve. Jarret Patton MD Donna Miller MD Arthur Scott PhD Lehigh Valley Health Œetwork Geriatric Physician Œorthampton Community College Cheri Sterman Francis Salerno MD Alan Jennings Crayola Lehigh Valley Health Œetwork Community Action Committee of the Lehigh Valley

Cheri Sterman Crayola

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Jarret Patton MD Lehigh Valley Health Network

Children Healthy and Ready to Learn United Way believes that the first five years of a child's life are vital to the future success of that child in school and in society. Birth to five years is the optimal time for healthy brain development, positive socialization, and the beginning of a lifetime of curiosity, discovery, and learning. A quality early education program provides children with learning opportunities that have a lifelong impact on their success as elementary, middle, and even high school students. Research shows that investing in quality early education can deliver economic returns on investment of $7 for every $1 invested. Children who have had the benefit of a positive early learning experience are more likely to be successful in school, to graduate on time, to postpone parenthood, to secure satisfying employment, and become contributing members of society. Listed below are the strategies United Way supports in its Children Healthy and Ready to Learn community goal: strategies  Prenatal and postnatal home visitation.  Vision screening.  Family literacy.  High quality early care and education centers serving parents with low-incomes.  Success By 6® [More information on page 13] united way invests in the following programs delivered by community partners YMCA Preschool Child Care Good Sight for School YMCA Child Care Unconditional Child Care Parent Child Home Program Los Ninos Learning Center William Allen High School Teen Parent Program Even Start Family Literacy Seconds to Learn The Learning Center Nurse Family Partnership Parent Advocates in the Home The Children's Center

Allentown YM/YWCA Center for Vision Loss Bethlehem YMCA Child Care Information Services Family Connection Hispanic American Organization Lehigh Valley Children's Center ProJeCt of Easton Spring Garden Children's Center Third Street Alliance VNA of St. Luke's VNA of St. Luke's Volunteers of America

"I just saw one of our Parent-Child Home Program graduates on the first day of the summer kindergarten program. He was beaming from ear to ear….You could see his confidence all over his face." Cathy Ziegenfuss, Parent-Child Home Program Coordinator, Family Connection, Easton

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Youth Succeeding in School The decision to drop out of school is the result of a young person's agonizing experience of losing confidence in him/herself, of losing faith in the system that oversees the education and welfare of its youth, and of losing hope in the future. Some students are challenged to balance high school with work and parenting commitments. Some are moving through the juvenile justice system. Many are overwhelmed by academics, unmet health and mental health needs, and lack of positive adult relationships. According to superintendents and educators, the disengagement of youth that leads to dropping out of high school can begin early. The National Research Council reports that, "Academic success, as defined by high school graduation, can be predicted with reasonable accuracy by knowing someone's reading skill at the end of 3rd grade." At the start of his senior year in high school, Quintin learned that he would not have enough credits to graduate. Juggling a parttime job with schoolwork cost him valuable study time, good grades, and the credits needed to graduate. His family enrolled him in the Easton Area Academy, a United Way-invested program provided by Communities In Schools of the Lehigh Valley. Easton Area Academy helped Quintin catch up in his senior year. Quintin not only completed his high school education on time, he discovered interests that led him to pursue a career in electrical engineering.

Listed below are the strategies United Way supports in its Youth Succeeding in School community goal: strategies  Elementary School: Tutoring, reading recovery and enrichment activities, and community linkages for parents.  Middle School: Expanded learning time with caring adults; intensive social, behavioral, and academic coaches for high-risk students.  High School: Intensive intervention to high-risk students, graduation coaches/mentors, and dropout recovery programs.  COMPASS Community Schools (Community Partners for Student Success) [More information on page 11] united way invests in the following programs delivered by community partners Kidz Lit Fowler Family Center Community Program Urban Scouting Literacy 4 R Youth Make Your M.A.R.K. Family Youth Intervention

Allentown YM/YWCA Bethlehem Partnership for a Healthy Community Big Brothers, Big Sisters Boys Scouts of America Boys & Girls Club of Allentown Boys & Girls Club of Allentown Boys & Girls Club of Allentown

The decision to drop out of high school is not made overnight.

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COMPASS (Community Partners for Student Success) Advisory Council Cindy Glick, Chair 2008-09 Just Born, Inc. Ross Marcus, Chair

orthampton County William Leh CFRE, Vice Chair Farr Healy Consulting Kim Carrell-Smith PhD Lehigh University Michael Cox Priscilla Payne Hurd Foundation Elizabeth Diaz Parent Dean Donaher EdD Bethlehem Area School District Linda Hamilton Crayola Elsbeth Haymon 2008-09 Allentown Art Museum Patricia Hunter Spring Garden Children's Center Deborah Kipp CFRE Muhlenberg College Lynn Kovich Lehigh County Government Center Susan Lozada Allentown School District Belle Marks Allentown Health Bureau Lisa Musselman Vía of the Lehigh Valley Ellie Passman Hock Greater Lehigh Valley Chamber of Commerce John Reinhart Bangor Area School District COMPASS Lead Partners: Deb Fries Jackson Boys & Girls Club of Allentown Jenn Antinoro Communities In Schools of the Lehigh Valley Paul Pierpoint EdD

orthampton Community College Gail Mrowinski

orthampton Community College Debra Geiger Center for Humanistic Change Bridget Pruett Slater Family etwork Foundation

Lehigh Valley Alliance on Aging Steering Committee George Treisner, Chair Pennsylvania State Education Association/Eastern Region Francis Salerno MD, Vice Chair Lehigh Valley Health etwork Henry Acres Community Volunteer Martin Cottrell Community Volunteer Dena Gabel Greater Lehigh Valley Visiting urse Association Carol Halper Representative Charles Dent US House of Representatives James Harper Lehigh University Ronald Heckman Lehigh County Government Center Marisa Leaser Home Instead Senior Care Kenneth McGeary Penn State University John Mehler

orthampton County Area Agency on Aging Donna Miller MD Geriatric Physician Joseph ˆapolitano The Dorothy Rider Pool Health Care Trust Patricia ˆemetch APR Business Services, Inc. Kimberly Rounds Dun & Bradstreet Donna Sabol St. Luke's Hospital & Health etwork Brenda Sanderson Community Volunteer Marcella Schick Phoebe Ministries, Inc. Sally Schoffstall Schoffstall & Focht PC Diane Schrameyer Diakon LSM Jeffrey Tintle Lifestyles over 50 Donna Zimmerman Lehigh County

George Treisner, Pennsylvania State Education Association/Eastern Region

Donna Miller, MD Geriatric Physician

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Community Impact Council

Carol Obando-Derstine Children's Coalition of the Lehigh Valley

Ross Marcus Northampton County

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Judith atale Sabino, Chair Lehigh Valley Health etwork Michael Kier, Vice Chair Wegmans Phyllis Alexander Weed & Seed, Allentown Paul Brunswick Two Rivers Health & Wellness Foundation Martin Cottrell Community Volunteer Michael Cox Priscilla Payne Hurd Foundation Kevin Dolan orthampton County Cindy Glick Just Born, Inc. Patricia Hoffman Community Volunteer Kathy Kapcsos orthampton Community College Vicky Kistler City of Allentown Lynn Kovich Lehigh County Roland Kushner PhD Muhlenberg College Ross Marcus orthampton County Joseph apolitano The Dorothy Rider Pool Health Care Trust Anne oon-Scaggs Lehigh University Elizabeth Ragan Community Volunteer Janet Roth Harry C. Trexler Trust George Treisner PA State Education Association, retired ereida Villanueva Lehigh Valley Heath etwork Success By 6ÂŽ /Leadership Team (2008-09) Vicky Kistler, Chair City of Allentown Lois Mease, Vice Chair Parent Bonnie Coyle MD St. Luke's Hospital & Health etwork

Gisella Gisolo PhD Lehigh University Rebecca Gorton orthampton Community College Drew Lewis, Board Liaison Air Products Reverend Margie Maldonado Casa Guadalupe Center ancy Martin Community Services for Children Kathy Mosley Lehigh Carbon Community College Carol Obando-Derstine Children's Coalition of the Lehigh Valley The Honorable Edward Reibman Lehigh County Courthouse Faith Ring St. Luke's Hospital Allentown Campus Vince Rosati HLS Freight Susan Williams Lehigh Valley Children's Centers Allentown Youth Success Zone The Zone Founders Team Lou Liebhaber, Chair Fundamental Success Consulting Karen Angello PhD Allentown School District William Coles Dun & Bradstreet, retired Wayne Hinman Air Products, retired Tim Holt Air Products Alan Jennings Community Action Committee of the Lehigh Valley Vicky Kistler Allentown Health Bureau Joyce Marin City of Allentown Edward Meehan The Dorothy Rider Pool Health Care Mayor Ed Pawlowski City of Allentown JosĂŠ Molina Kutztown University

united way invests in the following programs delivered by community partners Project Learn Project Learn Gang Prevention Pa'lante Afterschool 20/20 Vision for Children CIS Academies CIS Comprehensive Middle Schools CIS Advance Earn A Bike CADA Youth Programs Saints Clubhouse Afterschool Program Slate Belt Mental Health 21st Century Community Learning Center Aspires Mentoring Afterschool Program Making the Grade

Boys & Girls Club of Bethlehem Boys & Girls Club of Easton Boys & Girls Club of Easton Casa Guadalupe Center Center for Vision Loss (Formerly VIABL) Communities In Schools of the Lehigh Valley Communities In Schools of the Lehigh Valley Communities In Schools of the Lehigh Valley Community Bike Works Council on Alcohol and Drug Abuse Easton Area Community Center Families First Families First Family Connection

Lehigh County Council of Churches Mosser Village Family Center Pinebrook Services for Children & Youth Easton Middle School Success ProJeCt of Easton A.L.P.H.A. THE PROGRAM for Women & Families Truancy Intervention Program Valley Youth House Student Assistance Program Valley Youth House

Getting Fractions! How an Afterschool Program Affects School Performance.

One eleven-year-old girl in the Earn A Bike program worked especially hard to learn fractions. In the Earn A Bike program she had to divide her hours in half between volunteering and earning her bike. The Community Bike Works staff went over the hours she put in and how to divide them. When her class in school studied division, a light bulb went on in her mind. She raised her hand to tell her teacher, "It's like my hours at Community Bike Works!"

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Strong Families in Vital Neighborhoods Helping Lehigh Valley residents meet their basic needs and If every adult contributes become financially self-sufficient is United Way's goal for Strong Families in Vital Neighborhoods. Financial self-sufficiency is positively to society, there defined as the income needed for a family to meet their basic needs, is no limit to what we can without public or private assistance. The Financial SelfSufficiency Standard for Pennsylvania includes housing, child accomplish. care, transportation, health care, taxes, food, clothing, telephone, and miscellaneous household and personal supplies. According to the Financial Self-Sufficiency Standard, 2 adults and 2 children need $44,000-$45,000 to live in the Lehigh Valley. One adult needs at least $20,000. Listed below are the strategies United Way supports in its Strong Families in Vital Neighborhoods community goal: strategies  Intensive 1:1 coaching and family support services to address income, employment, housing, parenting, education/literacy, and safety from abuse or violence.  Financial literacy and individual asset building.  Youth Success Zone [More information on page 12] united way invests in the following programs delivered by community partners Literacy Services Roofover Transitional Shelter Lifespan Counseling Services Ways to Work Family Case Management Transitional Work Development P.L.A.C.E. Program Family Stability - Housing The Day Reporting Program Transitional Residence Parenting Institute Vocational Job Readiness Project EARN Volunteer Management/Project Blueprint

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The Literacy Center Easton Area Neighborhood Centers Family Answers Family Answers Family Connection of Easton Lehigh County Council of Churches Lehigh Valley Center for Independent Living Slater Family Network THE PROGRAM for Women & Families THE PROGRAM for Women & Families Treatment Trends Treatment Trends Victory House of Lehigh Valley Volunteer Center of the Lehigh Valley

Adminstrative Committee

Alexis de Tocqueville Committee

Sandra Bodnyk Joseph Bartenbach, Jr. CBC Howell Benefit Services, Inc. Vaughn Gower Community Volunteer Deborah Keller PPL Corporation Drew Lewis Margaret Plympton Peter Ruggiero Joseph Savage Victaulic Harold Ting PhD CHE

Greg Butz, Co-Chair Wendy Body, Co-Chair Louis Cinquino Robert and Lois Daday Jan Heller Dolores Laputka Esq Jim and Gail Miller Mark Schwab and Katie Loeb-Schwab Elliot Sussman MD Ilene Wood

Audit Committee William Coles Robert Collevechio John Lisicky, Jr. Buckno Lisicky & Co Board Recruitment Committee Drew Lewis Phyllis Alexander City of Allentown Sandra Bodnyk William Coles Bert Daday PPL Corporation Maria Teresa Donate Jane Ervin Community Services for Children Pat Hoffman Community Volunteer Dolores Laputka Esq Grayson Mc…air Community Volunteer

"Some 23 years ago, I dropped out of high school. It is a decision which has haunted me ever since. As a man entering his 40s, my entire life had been one unfulfilling, low-paying job after another, and my future looked no different. One day a few years ago, my employer offered to pay for me to go to college, but I couldn't take advantage of the offer because I didn't have a high school degree. I enrolled in the Adult Literacy Center's GED program. I quickly earned my GED and also passed the placement test for college with high scores. Today I'm enrolled in college, on my way to making a career and better life for myself." José Estevan Gonzalez Mary Beth Golab Air Products

Strategic Planning Committee Harold Ting PhD CHE John Diamant Victaulic Dolores Laputka Esq Ross Marcus Margaret Plympton Michael Scheller JBS, LP Investment Committee Robert Cahill Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Edward O'Dea Lehigh Valley Health etwork Karen Bishoff Wilmington Trust of Pennsylvania Dan Confalone Good Shepherd Rehabilitation etwork V. Daniel Smoker Team Capital Bank Marketing Committee Matthew Petronio, Chair Just Born, Inc. Polly Beste Beste Marketing Services Mary Beth Golab Air Products Susan Hoffman Lehigh Valley Health etwork

Jonathan Lunger ArtsQuest Betsy Storey Bono Concannon, Miller & Company Dan Walsh Viamedia David Yanoshik The Express-Times 2008 Campaign Cabinet Elliot Sussman MD, Chair L. Anderson Daub Brown-Daub Chevy-Volvo, Inc. Dale Kochard Lehigh University Jane Stone Highmark Blue Shield Steven Woods Crayola 2009 Campaign Chairman Summit L. Anderson Daub, Chair Lee Butz Alvin H. Butz, Inc. Robert Daday PPL Corporation Sally Gammon Good Shepherd Rehabilitation etwork Elmer Gates William Hecht PPL Corporation, retired David …oel Mark Schwab Crayola, retired David Shaffer Just Born, Inc. Martin Till The Express-Times Sam Torrence Just Born, Inc., retired Robert Wood Sodexo

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Volunteer Leadership

Basic Needs

Thank you, volunteers! The following pages list the names of individuals who, during 2008 and 2009, committed their time, talent, energy, and passion to our community by serving on United Way's Board of Directors and Committees, Campaign Cabinet, Community Impact Council, Marketing Committee, one or more of the Community Building Partnership groups, or as United Way Champions.

United Way's investments in emergency and safety net services ensure that people will be able to meet all of their basic needs during a crisis. Basic needs are defined as housing, food, clothing, and crisis counseling.

Representing a wide range of Lehigh Valley perspectives - education, health, business, government, media, social service, public policy, arts, economic development, adult education - they come together around community tables with one mission: to make the Lehigh Valley a better place to live, work, and raise children. 2009-2010 Board of Directors

Dolores

Laputka Esq, Chair § Tallman, Hudders & Sorrentino PC Victoria Aitchison

2008-09 § 

Community Volunteer Karen Angello 2008-09  Allentown School District Pat Beldon Community Volunteer Sandra Bodnyk § ational Penn Bank Jeffry Byrne 2008-09 Air Products oshir Chinoy Air Products, retired William Coles §  Dun & Bradstreet, retired Robert Collevechio § Victaulic

L. Anderson Daub, ex-officio Chair, 2009, Community Campaign Brown-Daub Chevy-Volvo, Inc. Maria Teresa Donate § orthampton Community College Todd Donnelly Viamedia Wayne Hinman  Air Products, retired Dennis Hower Teamsters Local 773 Timothy Kennedy § The Morning Call Michael Kier, Jr.  Wegmans Food Markets Charles Lewis § Lehigh Valley Health etwork Drew Lewis §  Air Products *Louis Liebhaber 2008-09  Fundamental Success Consulting Kathleen Loeb-Schwab 2008-09  Community Volunteer Ross Marcus § orthampton County David oel Dual Temp Company, Inc. Matthew Petronio § Just Born, Inc.

Margaret Plympton § Lehigh University Gregg Potter 2008-09 § CWA Local 13500 Peter Ruggiero § Crayola Patricia Simon PBS 39 William Spence PPL Corporation John Stanley Air Products Jane Stone Highmark Blue Shield Elliot Sussman MD, ex-officio Chair, 2008, Community Campaign Lehigh Valley Health etwork Martin Till 2008-09 The Express-Times Harold Ting PhD CHE § Good Shepherd Rehabilitation etwork George Treisner, Jr. 2008-09  Pennsylvania State Education Association/Eastern Region, retired Steven Woods 2008-09 Crayola Susan Gilmore United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley

 Indicates service on Executive Committee and/or Community Impact Council § Indicates service on Administrative, Audit, Board Recruitment, Investment, Marketing & Communication, or Strategic Planning Committees  Indicates service on COMPASS, Success By 6, Lehigh Valley Alliance on Aging, Women’s Leadership Initiative, TeenWorks, or Allentown Youth Success Zone Leadership Teams or Advisory Councils

Close to 200 volunteers are listed on the following pages. In order to make this report as current as possible, the following lists represent those volunteers currently serving on the United Way Board and other United Way committees, along with the names of those individuals who served in 2008-09. Our Board Members’ affiliations are listed on the Board of Directors list. When their names appear on other committees, their affiliations do not appear.

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We have done our utmost to make these lists as accurate as possible, as our way of showing respect and appreciation. If we have made an error or omission, we request that you contact Peggy Campbell at 610-807-5728 or peggyc@unitedwayglv.org immediately, so that we can be sure to correct the error in future publications.

strategy  Quality and responsive "safety net" supports and services. united way invests in the following programs delivered by community partners Housing Case Management Emergency Services Rape Crisis Housing Daybreak Food and Clothing Bank Representative Payee Hospitality Center ASSIST Emergency Assistance Hospitality House Shelter Emergency Shelter Service Lehigh Valley Shelter

AIDS Services Center American Red Cross of the Greater Lehigh Valley Crime Victims Council of the Lehigh Valley Hispanic American Organization Lehigh County Conference of Churches Mosser Village Family Center New Bethany Ministries New Bethany Ministries ProJeCt of Easton The Salvation Army The Salvation Army Third Street Alliance Turning Point of the Lehigh Valley Valley Youth House

VALLEY WIDE HELP In an agreement with the American Red Cross of the Greater Lehigh Valley, United Way invests in Valley Wide Help, a 24-hour information and referral service bringing people and services together. Valley Wide Help provides free, immediate, and confidential services along with direct access to a database of referral resources. One-on-one phone contact is made with customers in crisis. Customers may also contact Valley Wide Help through the Internet and the chapter's Website: http://www.redcrosslv.org. Call 610-691-8711 or 610-866-1089 (Spanish)

On March 3, 2009, an Army Reservist, his wife, and six children ages 3 to 13 lost everything they owned in a house fire three weeks before the father was scheduled to deploy to Iraq. The family was already facing financial challenges. Four of the six children required medication for asthma. The mother needed eyeglasses. The American Red Cross connected the family with an Information Specialist through Valley Wide Help who helped them find a house to rent, furnishings, clothes, and even child care and homework help for their children. The American Red Cross helped the father arrange for an extension of leave from the Armed Forces.

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Older Adults Aging Successfully

Ed Parreiss, age 102 lifting weights

"We are serving 16 clients who are 95 or older. In fact, at least two clients are over 100! I visited Katie on her 100th birthday. She is still living alone in her home in Coplay, where she has lived for the past 80 years. Her birthday was quite busy, with visits from Julie Harhart and other legislators with many proclamations, flowers and cards. Katie is an avid Phillies fan and loves "talking baseball" with the volunteers. She still does her own laundry, in the basement, and has a cat to keep her company. We are thrilled to be a part of her life."

Pennsylvania has the fastest growing over-65 population and second largest number of older adults in the country. The number of adults reaching 65 in the Lehigh Valley is anticipated to increase by 72.6% from 91,464 in 2000 to 158,006 in 2030. In the Lehigh Valley, 31,920 older adults currently live with a disability significant enough to require assistance. Demands for in-home supports are expected to grow an estimated 65% (65,000) by 2030.

During the month of February 2009, Wegmans conducted the "Celebrity Baggers" cash register campaign to support the United Way raising $32,694 which was matched by a generous community donor. Creating community energy around this month-long event was the participation of "Celebrity Baggers"! Media and sports celebrities, government officials, and corporate leaders all joined in the fun and helped raise money for United Way investments. We will be doing this again in February/March 2010.

Listed below are the strategies United Way supports in its Older Adults Aging Successfully community goal:

LEADERSHIP GIVING

Strategies  In-home support services such as delivered meals, home health, and personal care.  Programs that promote good physical and social health.  Lehigh Valley Alliance on Aging [More information on page 14] united way invests in the following programs delivered by community partners OASIS Jesus Ramos Senior Center Aging Well with Vision Loss

Allentown YM/YWCA Casa Guadalupe Center Center for Vision Loss (formerly ABVI) Support Services for the Blind Center for Vision Loss (formerly VIABL) Homemaker Health Aid Family Answers Healthy and Wise Lehigh County Senior Center Meal Delivery Meals on Wheels - Lehigh Meal Delivery Meals on Wheels - Northampton Vamos a Aprender y a Divertimos New Directions Transportation Share Care Sharing the Caring Third Street Alliance Adult Day Services YWCA of Bethlehem

Pam Bechtel, Meals on Wheels of Lehigh County

With the right support, getting older can be a pleasure.

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SPECIAL FUND RAISING EVENTS: THINKING OUTSIDE THE BAG

The Leadership Circle recognizes the generosity and commitment of individuals and businesses that make a contribution of $500 or more to our United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley. PLANNED GIVING

Celebrity Bagger Daryl Dawkins during Wegmans "Celebrity Baggers" cash register campaign to support the United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley raising $32,630.

United Way's Planned Giving program offers individuals the opportunity to become part of a long-term commitment to positive change in our community. Planned Giving can involve naming United Way as the beneficiary of a life insurance policy or in a will, as well as many other outright or deferred gifts. In 2008, United Way received two very generous Planned Giving contributions from the Charitable Remainder Trusts of Horace Miller and Kathryn H. Miers. If you are interested in talking about or making a planned gift, please contact Vickie Nisbet at 610-807-5708 or vickien@unitedwayglv.org. LOYAL CONTRIBUTORS Loyal Contributors are those donors who have a genuine enthusiasm and commitment for United Way's mission. United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley recognizes those who have given for 25 years or more to any United Way. It does not have to be continuous giving. To the 1,034 Loyal Contributors of the Lehigh Valley, we send our sincere appreciation for your trust in us and your support of the community.

John and Barbara Diamant, 2009 Tocqueville Society Co-Chairs

ALEXIS de TOCQUEVILLE SOCIETY The Alexis de Tocqueville Society is a unique group of altruistic and sociallyconscious community leaders interested in joining together for the common good. Inspired by Alexis de Tocqueville's observation that, "equality of conditions" is the "creative element" from which everything else in the society derives, Tocqueville Society members commit their talents and resources to improving the lives of Lehigh Valley residents and providing opportunities to children living in low-income families. Membership in the Tocqueville Society is granted to individuals who contribute at least $10,000 annually to the United Way. Under the leadership of Tocqueville Committee Co-chairs, Wendy Body and Greg Butz, the Society added 20 new members in 2008 and contributed $2,181,060 to the 2009 campaign. The 2009 co-chairs are John Diamant and Michael Molewski.

Mike and Diane Molewski, 2009 Tocqueville Society Co-Chairs

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Resource Development Every year, United Way conducts a comprehensive fund-raising campaign beginning April 1 and ending March 31 and then invests the dollars it raises in the community. Over 600 area businesses partner with United Way in their fund-raising efforts. Thanks to the 2008-2009 Campaign Chair, Dr. Elliot Sussman of Lehigh Valley Health Network for his leadership and extraordinary support. Andy Daub, Partner of the Brown-Daub Auto Dealerships, is the Campaign Chair for 2009 - 2010. Dr. Elliot Sussman Lehigh Valley Hospital 2008 Campaign Chairman

United Way appreciates the strong support of the Lehigh Valley business community. United Way works with organizations to create stimulating workplace campaigns that give employees the opportunity to learn more about the needs of their community. EMPLOYEE CAMPAIGN COORDINATORS Each year, our United Way depends on a dedicated group of over 350 Employee Campaign Coordinators who run fund-raising campaigns and spread the "Live United" message within their own companies. Their visionary employers understand the benefits of supporting regional nonprofit organizations while providing employees with community service opportunities. LOANED EXECUTIVES/LOANED LABOR LEADERS/CAMPAIGN SPECIALISTS

Andy Daub Brown-Daub Dealerships 2009 Campaign Chairman

United Way campaigns benefit from the volunteer time, energy, and talent contributed by Loaned Executives, Loaned Labor Leaders, and Campaign Specialists, all trained to take the “Live United” message and the United Way story to workplaces, schools, and community gatherings. Participants in the campaign effort include Geraldine Coffee of AFSCME Local #2061, Brown and Brown Insurance executives Katie Meeker, Tyler Jones, Jillian Gadomski, Tara DeLuca, and community volunteers Terri Slaughter, Roberta Whitcomb, Christina Hirschman, Ross Reed, Charles Marinello, and Susan Kovacs. All had the chance to see Lehigh Valley United Way-funded programs in action with site visits. Their training included a week of education in community issues and nonprofit organizations, United Way's campaign messages, as well as coaching in presentation skills. CORPORATE GIVING The Lehigh Valley is home to a large number of corporations and businesses led by community-minded CEOs who recognize United Way as the one organization in the Lehigh Valley that is investing in people. As business leaders, they know that no business can be successful without a healthy, educated, and motivated workforce. They embrace United Way's community goals, and encourage their employees to give, advocate, and volunteer for the common good that will benefit us all. Corporate gifts in 2008-2009 represented 21% of all gifts to United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley. The 2009-2010 results will be available after March 31, 2010. CORNERSTONE SOCIETY The Cornerstone Society consists of companies or organizations whose combined corporate and employee support exceeds $100,000 annually.

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COMPASS Community Partners for Student Success

WORKPLACE GIVING

 Air Products  Alvin H. Butz, Inc.  Crayola  Duggan & Marcon, Inc.  The Guardian  Just Born, Inc.  Lehigh Valley Health Network

Community Building Partnerships

 Lutron Electronics, Inc.  Mack Trucks, Inc.  PPL Corp & IBEW Local 1600  Rodale  St. Luke's Hospital & Health Network  Victaulic Company  Wegmans

Public Schools as Community Centers It's 7:00 PM on a cold winter night and your elementary school is open for learning, holding ESL and GED classes for adults, art and theatre classes for students, and a meeting of community partners to review plans for a new community-funded playground. Centered around the philosophy that "schools cannot do it alone," the Community School movement is sweeping the country with its expanded learning time for children and their parents and its success at improving academic achievement by removing all barriers to learning. The COMPASS partnership has attracted local, state, and national attention for its commitment to bring the Community School movement to the Lehigh Valley. United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley launched the ambitious two-county COMPASS Community School collaborative in 2005. In 2008-2009, there were 7,400 students attending COMPASS Community Schools in Lehigh and Northampton counties:  4,460 kindergarten/elementary school children  1,838 middle school children  1,102 high school students

Dr. Gerald Zahorchak, Community School Summit: Catching the Vision June 10, 2009 - Lehigh Valley

In partnership with the Pennsylvania Department of Education and the Center for Schools and Communities, COMPASS hosted a community school summit with Dr. Gerald Zahorchak, Secretary of Education for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and Martin Blank, Director of the Coalition for Community Schools as featured speakers. The 170+ attendees included 9 school districts, 17 community-based organizations, and 5 colleges and universities.

Every COMPASS Community School is linked with a lead partner organization. Every Community School has a site-based leadership team that includes the principal, teachers, parents, community volunteers, Community School Coordinator/Director, Lead Partner, and United Way staff. Listed below are the 11 COMPASS Community Schools and their Lead Partners: School District Allentown School District Central Elementary Roosevelt Elementary South Mountain Middle

Lead Partners Boys & Girls Club of Allentown Boys & Girls Club of Allentown Communities In Schools of the Lehigh Valley Slater Family Network

Bangor Area School District 3 Elementary Schools, 1 Middle School, 1 High School Bethlehem Area School District Calypso Elementary Communities In Schools of the Lehigh Valley Fountain Hill Elementary Northampton Community College Lincoln Elementary Center for Humanistic Change

Benita S. Draper, Principal, Lincoln Elementary School, Bethlehem

“Our Community School Coordinator reaches out to community businesses and has successfully gained sponsors for our student recognition programs and school-wide positive behavior efforts. All of these programs help to keep our attendance rate high and our parents involved."

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DAY OF CARING

Youth Success Zone A Neighborhood Where Children and Families Thrive

The Allentown Youth Success Zone is the Lehigh Valley's "Yes, We Can" response to Geoffrey Canada’s 2007 challenge to the Lehigh Valley cited below. The Zone covers a nine-block area of Center City/Old Allentown. About 700 families with nearly 1200 children under 18 years of age live in this neighborhood, and close to 800 youth are enrolled in the Allentown School District. Financially and academically they are worse off than the rest of the city, the Valley, and the school district with 87% living in poverty, 87% being minority children (67% Hispanic/Latinos and 18% African-American), 17% receiving English as Second Language assistance, and only 53% of the 3rd graders reading at grade level. The Allentown Youth Success Zone is not a program. The Zone will be a coordinated web of effective services to support children from birth to college and/or employment, strengthen the families, and create the healthiest neighborhood possible. With Central Elementary School, a vibrant COMPASS Community School, dozens of small businesses, human social service programs, communities of faith, and city agencies, the Youth Success Zone will be a powerful collaboration of residents and an array of community organizations doing "whatever it takes" to ensure that all kids and families succeed. United Way and The Zone Founders Team hope to expand the Youth Success Zone model to Bethlehem and Easton in the future. In five years (2014), measurable change in key indicators of well being for children, youth, and adults in the Allentown Youth Success Zone is anticipated:  Parents have a high school education and effective parenting skills.  Children are born healthy and have access to quality health services.  Students read at grade level in 3rd grade.  Students earn a high school diploma and are ready to enter college or secure a good job.  Residents are actively involved and have a feeling of community ownership.

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"If you really want to change the lives of inner-city kids, change everything all at once - their schools, families, and neighborhoods. Begin in one small area and grow your success. Why not give every child the tools to succeed?" That was the challenge Geoffrey Canada, founder of the Harlem Children's Zone, offered the Lehigh Valley in May 2007.

PROJECT BLUEPRINT - BRINGING DIVERSITY TO COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP The Volunteer Center of the Lehigh Valley receives funding from United Way to recruit, train, and place professionals from racial and ethnic minority groups to serve on boards and committees of Lehigh Valley nonprofit organizations. Its purpose is to create more culturally relevant boards that are reflective of the communities they serve. Since 1987, Project Blueprint has graduated 350 individuals ready to move into leadership roles in the Lehigh Valley.

The Volunteer Center of the Lehigh Valley kicks off United Way's annual campaign with Day of Caring activities involving over 1,000 volunteers from over 40 local businesses and organizations providing over 45 community agencies with a day of work. Thank you to Highmark Blue Shield and East Penn Bank, the sponsors of Day of Caring 2008 and 2009.

Congratulations 2008 Participants Wael Khansa Lilian Riveros Darlene Oates Keri-Ann Tavares Fabian Moriah

Tracy Gregory Lisa Ligh Gloria Velazquez Valerie Hernandez Sylvia Allen

2009 Participants Steven Patterson William Muniz Ricardo Flores Carol Johnson Keesha Smith Blasina Rodriguez Tanya Bryan Leonie Miller

Celia Williams Claudia Ponton Barbara Isaacs Jeanette Gruber Francis Canales Beverly Saunders Erica Triminio

FAMILYWIZE The Familywize partnership is coordinated by Membership Services Corporation of Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania to reduce the cost of medicine for people throughout the country. Since the introduction of the Familywize cards in January 2008, Lehigh Valley residents have saved $451,472 in prescription costs. Familywize cards can reduce prescription drug costs by an average of 20-35%. The cards are being distributed free of charge by United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley and by other United Ways in all 50 states.

DAY OF CARING PROJECTS

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Making Good Things Happen Takes Partners United Way is excited about the good things that are happening for people in the Lehigh Valley as a result of people working together. We are fortunate to have a robust network of nonprofit social service organizations and other community partners. Changing lives and changing community conditions can be accomplished only by a community-wide effort. TeenWorks™ programs help Lehigh Valley youth do things to create positive changes in their schools, their neighborhoods, and their lives.

LABOR Organized labor and the United Way have benefited from a strong working partnership since 1942. This relationship originally sought cooperation between employers and union representatives in soliciting voluntary employee contributions to United Way. The AFL-CIO Community Services Liaison assists with the annual campaign and works in conjunction with the Department of Labor and Industry to provide guidance and support for laid off workers. They organize fund-raising efforts for various nonprofit agencies and conduct ongoing training sessions with union members on subjects that range from labor history to disaster preparation.

Illick’s Mill Restoration project partially funded by TeenWorks™ Grant

The finest example of this strong partnership between labor and the United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley is the TeenWorks ™ program. The TeenWorks ™ board consists of up to twenty labor representatives and twenty teen participants, who, together with labor donors, provide a source of funding for teens to conduct community service projects. Since 1999, the TeenWorks™ board has granted over $265,000 funding more than 300 projects involving the youth of the Lehigh Valley.

WOMEN'S LEADERSHIP INITIATIVE Women's Leadership Initiative of the United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley (WLI) is a coalition of women who strive to lead through philanthropy and advocacy, donating their own funds and working to raise additional funds for projects to benefit women and children in the Lehigh Valley. WLI seeks the excitement of creating positive change in our community through leadership, giving, special community projects, and mentoring. WLI's initial signature project funds educational scholarships for women working in early childhood education centers, benefiting the scholarship recipients, the centers where they work, and, most important, the children under their care.

Success By 6® Community Engagement That Puts Children First

United Ways around the United States have built a powerful network of Success By 6® coalitions prepared to do whatever it takes to make sure that children from birth to six years of age get what they need to enter school ready to learn. The Success By 6 of the United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley is the Community Engagement Team for Lehigh and Northampton Counties. With funding from Pennsylvania's Office of Child Development and Early Learning (OCDEL), Success By 6 convenes 35 community representatives for monthly meetings overseeing the following work:  Partners with Family Connection of Easton and Community Services for Children to provide two part-time Pre-K to K Transition Coordinators for the Easton Area School District and for Roosevelt Elementary School in Allentown.  Recognizes those Early Care and Education programs participating in the Pennsylvania Keystone STARS program at a breakfast for providers.  Partners with the Children's Coalition of the Lehigh Valley to engage legislators, community leaders, and residents in public forums and Family Policy Summits where the welfare and education of young children are discussed in terms of public policy.

"In 15 years, when today's preschoolers are entering the workforce, job training, or college, up to twice as many adults may be retiring. The vitality of our work and economic environment depends not just on a skilled workforce, but on a new generation of adults who are creative thinkers, disciplined implementers, and thoughtful citizens. Quality early learning opportunities will help us prepare our children for the challenges that await them." Drew Lewis, United Way Board of Directors

WLI's second signature project, in partnership with COMPASS, is a three-year investment of funds for afterschool enrichment and summer programs at Central Elementary School in the Allentown School District.

To become part of the Women’s Leadership Initiative, contact Terri Slaughter at 610-807-5710 or terris@unitedwayglv.org.

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Members in photo: Candi StaurinosHatzinikolaou and Jennifer Mannure Project

In April 2009, Success By 6 hosted "Early Childhood Development Economic Development with a High Public Return" with Rob Grunewald, Associate Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, as the keynote speaker. SB6 also held two Pre-K to K Transition Forums in March and May 2009 where school district administrators, kindergarten teachers, and early childhood educators came together to discuss and make plans for helping parents and children experience a smooth transition into kindergarten.

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Lehigh Valley Alliance On Aging BenefitsCheckUp Saves Millions For Older Adults The Lehigh Valley Alliance on Aging (LVAA)'s BenefitsCheckUp has been recognized nationally as a best practice model for engaging volunteers to help older adults. BenefitsCheckUp Ambassadors, volunteers from the general and faith communities, screen older adults of limited income and resources to increase access to 1,550 federal, state, and local benefits programs utilizing the BenefitsCheckUp screening tool of the National Council on Aging. Since 2004, the LVAA has screened 5436 residents and identified benefits estimated to value $30,358,028. For every dollar invested in the BenefitsCheckUp Initiative in 2008, $68 dollars in benefits were identified. The Lehigh Valley is home to more than 90,000 residents age 65 and older, equaling nearly 15% of the community, well above the United States average of 12%. Thirty-eight percent of this population lives with a disability significant enough to require assistance and 30% live at or below the level of economic selfsufficiency as identified in the Elder Economic Security Initiative for Pennsylvania and Federal Poverty Guidelines. Nearly $31.5 million in available benefits go uncollected annually by older adults. Karen Francis of Arden Courts and the Alzheimer's Association teaches a class of Direct Care Workers about dementia at one of the summer conferences organized by Lehigh Valley Alliance on Aging's Direct Care Workers Association.

Through the Direct Care Workers Association, the LVAA provides education and support for workers in long-term care, home health aide agencies, senior centers, and adult day care. The LVAA also convenes a monthly Public Policy Committee aimed at raising public interest and awareness of issues impacting older adults. Lehigh Valley Direct Care Workers Association Conferences  Alzheimer's

Overview  Strategies for Dealing with the Economic Crunch  Empowerment: Developing Self-Esteem and Respect  Medical Issues on Aging  With speakers from the Alzheimer's Association, Lehigh Valley Health Network, Penn State Cooperative Extension, and Center for Humanistic Change.

Capacity-Building Program For Lehigh Valley Nonprofits HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL Strategic Perspectives in Nonprofit Management Fellowship Recipients 2008 and 2009 Strategic Perspectives in Nonprofit Management is an executive education leadership program of the Harvard Business School's Social Enterprise Initiative. Designed for CEOs and executive directors of nonprofit organizations, the rigorous week-long program gives nonprofit leaders the opportunity to step back from the day-to-day pressures of the workplace to examine their missions and rethink their approaches to carrying them out. Two anonymous donors, one from the Lehigh Valley and one from Harvard University, underwrite the cost of the fellowship. The United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley manages the selection process. A volunteer panel of community leaders evaluate applications for the fellowship. This capacity-building program pays tuition, books, case materials, accommodations, and meals.

Gary Millspaugh Executive Officer, Allentown Rescue Mission

Applicants must meet the following criteria:  Have at least one year experience in their current role as a nonprofit CEO, President, or Executive Director.  Manage between $800,000 and $10,000,000 in annual spending.  Manage a staff of at least five paid full-time employees.  Manage a nonprofit organization with a local office in the Lehigh Valley.

Congratulations to the following fellowship recipients! 2009 John Hughes Executive Director, American Red Cross of the Greater Lehigh Valley Gary Millspaugh Executive Officer, Allentown Rescue Mission 2008 Rev. Margie Maldonado Executive Director, Casa Guadalupe Center

Rev. Margie Maldanado Executive Director, Casa Guadalupe Center

Veronica Elias Chief Executive Officer, Allentown YMCA & YWCA 2007 ancy Teichman President & CEO of Easter Seals Eastern Pennsylvania

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Tom Harrington CEO of the Minsi Trails Council, Boy Scouts of America

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Lehigh Valley Alliance On Aging BenefitsCheckUp Saves Millions For Older Adults The Lehigh Valley Alliance on Aging (LVAA)'s BenefitsCheckUp has been recognized nationally as a best practice model for engaging volunteers to help older adults. BenefitsCheckUp Ambassadors, volunteers from the general and faith communities, screen older adults of limited income and resources to increase access to 1,550 federal, state, and local benefits programs utilizing the BenefitsCheckUp screening tool of the National Council on Aging. Since 2004, the LVAA has screened 5436 residents and identified benefits estimated to value $30,358,028. For every dollar invested in the BenefitsCheckUp Initiative in 2008, $68 dollars in benefits were identified. The Lehigh Valley is home to more than 90,000 residents age 65 and older, equaling nearly 15% of the community, well above the United States average of 12%. Thirty-eight percent of this population lives with a disability significant enough to require assistance and 30% live at or below the level of economic selfsufficiency as identified in the Elder Economic Security Initiative for Pennsylvania and Federal Poverty Guidelines. Nearly $31.5 million in available benefits go uncollected annually by older adults. Karen Francis of Arden Courts and the Alzheimer's Association teaches a class of Direct Care Workers about dementia at one of the summer conferences organized by Lehigh Valley Alliance on Aging's Direct Care Workers Association.

Through the Direct Care Workers Association, the LVAA provides education and support for workers in long-term care, home health aide agencies, senior centers, and adult day care. The LVAA also convenes a monthly Public Policy Committee aimed at raising public interest and awareness of issues impacting older adults. Lehigh Valley Direct Care Workers Association Conferences  Alzheimer's

Overview  Strategies for Dealing with the Economic Crunch  Empowerment: Developing Self-Esteem and Respect  Medical Issues on Aging  With speakers from the Alzheimer's Association, Lehigh Valley Health Network, Penn State Cooperative Extension, and Center for Humanistic Change.

Capacity-Building Program For Lehigh Valley Nonprofits HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL Strategic Perspectives in Nonprofit Management Fellowship Recipients 2008 and 2009 Strategic Perspectives in Nonprofit Management is an executive education leadership program of the Harvard Business School's Social Enterprise Initiative. Designed for CEOs and executive directors of nonprofit organizations, the rigorous week-long program gives nonprofit leaders the opportunity to step back from the day-to-day pressures of the workplace to examine their missions and rethink their approaches to carrying them out. Two anonymous donors, one from the Lehigh Valley and one from Harvard University, underwrite the cost of the fellowship. The United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley manages the selection process. A volunteer panel of community leaders evaluate applications for the fellowship. This capacity-building program pays tuition, books, case materials, accommodations, and meals.

Gary Millspaugh Executive Officer, Allentown Rescue Mission

Applicants must meet the following criteria:  Have at least one year experience in their current role as a nonprofit CEO, President, or Executive Director.  Manage between $800,000 and $10,000,000 in annual spending.  Manage a staff of at least five paid full-time employees.  Manage a nonprofit organization with a local office in the Lehigh Valley.

Congratulations to the following fellowship recipients! 2009 John Hughes Executive Director, American Red Cross of the Greater Lehigh Valley Gary Millspaugh Executive Officer, Allentown Rescue Mission 2008 Rev. Margie Maldonado Executive Director, Casa Guadalupe Center

Rev. Margie Maldanado Executive Director, Casa Guadalupe Center

Veronica Elias Chief Executive Officer, Allentown YMCA & YWCA 2007 ancy Teichman President & CEO of Easter Seals Eastern Pennsylvania

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Tom Harrington CEO of the Minsi Trails Council, Boy Scouts of America

15


Making Good Things Happen Takes Partners United Way is excited about the good things that are happening for people in the Lehigh Valley as a result of people working together. We are fortunate to have a robust network of nonprofit social service organizations and other community partners. Changing lives and changing community conditions can be accomplished only by a community-wide effort. TeenWorks™ programs help Lehigh Valley youth do things to create positive changes in their schools, their neighborhoods, and their lives.

LABOR Organized labor and the United Way have benefited from a strong working partnership since 1942. This relationship originally sought cooperation between employers and union representatives in soliciting voluntary employee contributions to United Way. The AFL-CIO Community Services Liaison assists with the annual campaign and works in conjunction with the Department of Labor and Industry to provide guidance and support for laid off workers. They organize fund-raising efforts for various nonprofit agencies and conduct ongoing training sessions with union members on subjects that range from labor history to disaster preparation.

Illick’s Mill Restoration project partially funded by TeenWorks™ Grant

The finest example of this strong partnership between labor and the United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley is the TeenWorks ™ program. The TeenWorks ™ board consists of up to twenty labor representatives and twenty teen participants, who, together with labor donors, provide a source of funding for teens to conduct community service projects. Since 1999, the TeenWorks™ board has granted over $265,000 funding more than 300 projects involving the youth of the Lehigh Valley.

WOMEN'S LEADERSHIP INITIATIVE Women's Leadership Initiative of the United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley (WLI) is a coalition of women who strive to lead through philanthropy and advocacy, donating their own funds and working to raise additional funds for projects to benefit women and children in the Lehigh Valley. WLI seeks the excitement of creating positive change in our community through leadership, giving, special community projects, and mentoring. WLI's initial signature project funds educational scholarships for women working in early childhood education centers, benefiting the scholarship recipients, the centers where they work, and, most important, the children under their care.

Success By 6® Community Engagement That Puts Children First

United Ways around the United States have built a powerful network of Success By 6® coalitions prepared to do whatever it takes to make sure that children from birth to six years of age get what they need to enter school ready to learn. The Success By 6 of the United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley is the Community Engagement Team for Lehigh and Northampton Counties. With funding from Pennsylvania's Office of Child Development and Early Learning (OCDEL), Success By 6 convenes 35 community representatives for monthly meetings overseeing the following work:  Partners with Family Connection of Easton and Community Services for Children to provide two part-time Pre-K to K Transition Coordinators for the Easton Area School District and for Roosevelt Elementary School in Allentown.  Recognizes those Early Care and Education programs participating in the Pennsylvania Keystone STARS program at a breakfast for providers.  Partners with the Children's Coalition of the Lehigh Valley to engage legislators, community leaders, and residents in public forums and Family Policy Summits where the welfare and education of young children are discussed in terms of public policy.

"In 15 years, when today's preschoolers are entering the workforce, job training, or college, up to twice as many adults may be retiring. The vitality of our work and economic environment depends not just on a skilled workforce, but on a new generation of adults who are creative thinkers, disciplined implementers, and thoughtful citizens. Quality early learning opportunities will help us prepare our children for the challenges that await them." Drew Lewis, United Way Board of Directors

WLI's second signature project, in partnership with COMPASS, is a three-year investment of funds for afterschool enrichment and summer programs at Central Elementary School in the Allentown School District.

To become part of the Women’s Leadership Initiative, contact Terri Slaughter at 610-807-5710 or terris@unitedwayglv.org.

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Members in photo: Candi StaurinosHatzinikolaou and Jennifer Mannure Project

In April 2009, Success By 6 hosted "Early Childhood Development Economic Development with a High Public Return" with Rob Grunewald, Associate Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, as the keynote speaker. SB6 also held two Pre-K to K Transition Forums in March and May 2009 where school district administrators, kindergarten teachers, and early childhood educators came together to discuss and make plans for helping parents and children experience a smooth transition into kindergarten.

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DAY OF CARING

Youth Success Zone A Neighborhood Where Children and Families Thrive

The Allentown Youth Success Zone is the Lehigh Valley's "Yes, We Can" response to Geoffrey Canada’s 2007 challenge to the Lehigh Valley cited below. The Zone covers a nine-block area of Center City/Old Allentown. About 700 families with nearly 1200 children under 18 years of age live in this neighborhood, and close to 800 youth are enrolled in the Allentown School District. Financially and academically they are worse off than the rest of the city, the Valley, and the school district with 87% living in poverty, 87% being minority children (67% Hispanic/Latinos and 18% African-American), 17% receiving English as Second Language assistance, and only 53% of the 3rd graders reading at grade level. The Allentown Youth Success Zone is not a program. The Zone will be a coordinated web of effective services to support children from birth to college and/or employment, strengthen the families, and create the healthiest neighborhood possible. With Central Elementary School, a vibrant COMPASS Community School, dozens of small businesses, human social service programs, communities of faith, and city agencies, the Youth Success Zone will be a powerful collaboration of residents and an array of community organizations doing "whatever it takes" to ensure that all kids and families succeed. United Way and The Zone Founders Team hope to expand the Youth Success Zone model to Bethlehem and Easton in the future. In five years (2014), measurable change in key indicators of well being for children, youth, and adults in the Allentown Youth Success Zone is anticipated:  Parents have a high school education and effective parenting skills.  Children are born healthy and have access to quality health services.  Students read at grade level in 3rd grade.  Students earn a high school diploma and are ready to enter college or secure a good job.  Residents are actively involved and have a feeling of community ownership.

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"If you really want to change the lives of inner-city kids, change everything all at once - their schools, families, and neighborhoods. Begin in one small area and grow your success. Why not give every child the tools to succeed?" That was the challenge Geoffrey Canada, founder of the Harlem Children's Zone, offered the Lehigh Valley in May 2007.

PROJECT BLUEPRINT - BRINGING DIVERSITY TO COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP The Volunteer Center of the Lehigh Valley receives funding from United Way to recruit, train, and place professionals from racial and ethnic minority groups to serve on boards and committees of Lehigh Valley nonprofit organizations. Its purpose is to create more culturally relevant boards that are reflective of the communities they serve. Since 1987, Project Blueprint has graduated 350 individuals ready to move into leadership roles in the Lehigh Valley.

The Volunteer Center of the Lehigh Valley kicks off United Way's annual campaign with Day of Caring activities involving over 1,000 volunteers from over 40 local businesses and organizations providing over 45 community agencies with a day of work. Thank you to Highmark Blue Shield and East Penn Bank, the sponsors of Day of Caring 2008 and 2009.

Congratulations 2008 Participants Wael Khansa Lilian Riveros Darlene Oates Keri-Ann Tavares Fabian Moriah

Tracy Gregory Lisa Ligh Gloria Velazquez Valerie Hernandez Sylvia Allen

2009 Participants Steven Patterson William Muniz Ricardo Flores Carol Johnson Keesha Smith Blasina Rodriguez Tanya Bryan Leonie Miller

Celia Williams Claudia Ponton Barbara Isaacs Jeanette Gruber Francis Canales Beverly Saunders Erica Triminio

FAMILYWIZE The Familywize partnership is coordinated by Membership Services Corporation of Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania to reduce the cost of medicine for people throughout the country. Since the introduction of the Familywize cards in January 2008, Lehigh Valley residents have saved $451,472 in prescription costs. Familywize cards can reduce prescription drug costs by an average of 20-35%. The cards are being distributed free of charge by United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley and by other United Ways in all 50 states.

DAY OF CARING PROJECTS

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Resource Development Every year, United Way conducts a comprehensive fund-raising campaign beginning April 1 and ending March 31 and then invests the dollars it raises in the community. Over 600 area businesses partner with United Way in their fund-raising efforts. Thanks to the 2008-2009 Campaign Chair, Dr. Elliot Sussman of Lehigh Valley Health Network for his leadership and extraordinary support. Andy Daub, Partner of the Brown-Daub Auto Dealerships, is the Campaign Chair for 2009 - 2010. Dr. Elliot Sussman Lehigh Valley Hospital 2008 Campaign Chairman

United Way appreciates the strong support of the Lehigh Valley business community. United Way works with organizations to create stimulating workplace campaigns that give employees the opportunity to learn more about the needs of their community. EMPLOYEE CAMPAIGN COORDINATORS Each year, our United Way depends on a dedicated group of over 350 Employee Campaign Coordinators who run fund-raising campaigns and spread the "Live United" message within their own companies. Their visionary employers understand the benefits of supporting regional nonprofit organizations while providing employees with community service opportunities. LOANED EXECUTIVES/LOANED LABOR LEADERS/CAMPAIGN SPECIALISTS

Andy Daub Brown-Daub Dealerships 2009 Campaign Chairman

United Way campaigns benefit from the volunteer time, energy, and talent contributed by Loaned Executives, Loaned Labor Leaders, and Campaign Specialists, all trained to take the “Live United” message and the United Way story to workplaces, schools, and community gatherings. Participants in the campaign effort include Geraldine Coffee of AFSCME Local #2061, Brown and Brown Insurance executives Katie Meeker, Tyler Jones, Jillian Gadomski, Tara DeLuca, and community volunteers Terri Slaughter, Roberta Whitcomb, Christina Hirschman, Ross Reed, Charles Marinello, and Susan Kovacs. All had the chance to see Lehigh Valley United Way-funded programs in action with site visits. Their training included a week of education in community issues and nonprofit organizations, United Way's campaign messages, as well as coaching in presentation skills. CORPORATE GIVING The Lehigh Valley is home to a large number of corporations and businesses led by community-minded CEOs who recognize United Way as the one organization in the Lehigh Valley that is investing in people. As business leaders, they know that no business can be successful without a healthy, educated, and motivated workforce. They embrace United Way's community goals, and encourage their employees to give, advocate, and volunteer for the common good that will benefit us all. Corporate gifts in 2008-2009 represented 21% of all gifts to United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley. The 2009-2010 results will be available after March 31, 2010. CORNERSTONE SOCIETY The Cornerstone Society consists of companies or organizations whose combined corporate and employee support exceeds $100,000 annually.

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COMPASS Community Partners for Student Success

WORKPLACE GIVING

 Air Products  Alvin H. Butz, Inc.  Crayola  Duggan & Marcon, Inc.  The Guardian  Just Born, Inc.  Lehigh Valley Health Network

Community Building Partnerships

 Lutron Electronics, Inc.  Mack Trucks, Inc.  PPL Corp & IBEW Local 1600  Rodale  St. Luke's Hospital & Health Network  Victaulic Company  Wegmans

Public Schools as Community Centers It's 7:00 PM on a cold winter night and your elementary school is open for learning, holding ESL and GED classes for adults, art and theatre classes for students, and a meeting of community partners to review plans for a new community-funded playground. Centered around the philosophy that "schools cannot do it alone," the Community School movement is sweeping the country with its expanded learning time for children and their parents and its success at improving academic achievement by removing all barriers to learning. The COMPASS partnership has attracted local, state, and national attention for its commitment to bring the Community School movement to the Lehigh Valley. United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley launched the ambitious two-county COMPASS Community School collaborative in 2005. In 2008-2009, there were 7,400 students attending COMPASS Community Schools in Lehigh and Northampton counties:  4,460 kindergarten/elementary school children  1,838 middle school children  1,102 high school students

Dr. Gerald Zahorchak, Community School Summit: Catching the Vision June 10, 2009 - Lehigh Valley

In partnership with the Pennsylvania Department of Education and the Center for Schools and Communities, COMPASS hosted a community school summit with Dr. Gerald Zahorchak, Secretary of Education for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and Martin Blank, Director of the Coalition for Community Schools as featured speakers. The 170+ attendees included 9 school districts, 17 community-based organizations, and 5 colleges and universities.

Every COMPASS Community School is linked with a lead partner organization. Every Community School has a site-based leadership team that includes the principal, teachers, parents, community volunteers, Community School Coordinator/Director, Lead Partner, and United Way staff. Listed below are the 11 COMPASS Community Schools and their Lead Partners: School District Allentown School District Central Elementary Roosevelt Elementary South Mountain Middle

Lead Partners Boys & Girls Club of Allentown Boys & Girls Club of Allentown Communities In Schools of the Lehigh Valley Slater Family Network

Bangor Area School District 3 Elementary Schools, 1 Middle School, 1 High School Bethlehem Area School District Calypso Elementary Communities In Schools of the Lehigh Valley Fountain Hill Elementary Northampton Community College Lincoln Elementary Center for Humanistic Change

Benita S. Draper, Principal, Lincoln Elementary School, Bethlehem

“Our Community School Coordinator reaches out to community businesses and has successfully gained sponsors for our student recognition programs and school-wide positive behavior efforts. All of these programs help to keep our attendance rate high and our parents involved."

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Older Adults Aging Successfully

Ed Parreiss, age 102 lifting weights

"We are serving 16 clients who are 95 or older. In fact, at least two clients are over 100! I visited Katie on her 100th birthday. She is still living alone in her home in Coplay, where she has lived for the past 80 years. Her birthday was quite busy, with visits from Julie Harhart and other legislators with many proclamations, flowers and cards. Katie is an avid Phillies fan and loves "talking baseball" with the volunteers. She still does her own laundry, in the basement, and has a cat to keep her company. We are thrilled to be a part of her life."

Pennsylvania has the fastest growing over-65 population and second largest number of older adults in the country. The number of adults reaching 65 in the Lehigh Valley is anticipated to increase by 72.6% from 91,464 in 2000 to 158,006 in 2030. In the Lehigh Valley, 31,920 older adults currently live with a disability significant enough to require assistance. Demands for in-home supports are expected to grow an estimated 65% (65,000) by 2030.

During the month of February 2009, Wegmans conducted the "Celebrity Baggers" cash register campaign to support the United Way raising $32,694 which was matched by a generous community donor. Creating community energy around this month-long event was the participation of "Celebrity Baggers"! Media and sports celebrities, government officials, and corporate leaders all joined in the fun and helped raise money for United Way investments. We will be doing this again in February/March 2010.

Listed below are the strategies United Way supports in its Older Adults Aging Successfully community goal:

LEADERSHIP GIVING

Strategies  In-home support services such as delivered meals, home health, and personal care.  Programs that promote good physical and social health.  Lehigh Valley Alliance on Aging [More information on page 14] united way invests in the following programs delivered by community partners OASIS Jesus Ramos Senior Center Aging Well with Vision Loss

Allentown YM/YWCA Casa Guadalupe Center Center for Vision Loss (formerly ABVI) Support Services for the Blind Center for Vision Loss (formerly VIABL) Homemaker Health Aid Family Answers Healthy and Wise Lehigh County Senior Center Meal Delivery Meals on Wheels - Lehigh Meal Delivery Meals on Wheels - Northampton Vamos a Aprender y a Divertimos New Directions Transportation Share Care Sharing the Caring Third Street Alliance Adult Day Services YWCA of Bethlehem

Pam Bechtel, Meals on Wheels of Lehigh County

With the right support, getting older can be a pleasure.

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SPECIAL FUND RAISING EVENTS: THINKING OUTSIDE THE BAG

The Leadership Circle recognizes the generosity and commitment of individuals and businesses that make a contribution of $500 or more to our United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley. PLANNED GIVING

Celebrity Bagger Daryl Dawkins during Wegmans "Celebrity Baggers" cash register campaign to support the United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley raising $32,630.

United Way's Planned Giving program offers individuals the opportunity to become part of a long-term commitment to positive change in our community. Planned Giving can involve naming United Way as the beneficiary of a life insurance policy or in a will, as well as many other outright or deferred gifts. In 2008, United Way received two very generous Planned Giving contributions from the Charitable Remainder Trusts of Horace Miller and Kathryn H. Miers. If you are interested in talking about or making a planned gift, please contact Vickie Nisbet at 610-807-5708 or vickien@unitedwayglv.org. LOYAL CONTRIBUTORS Loyal Contributors are those donors who have a genuine enthusiasm and commitment for United Way's mission. United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley recognizes those who have given for 25 years or more to any United Way. It does not have to be continuous giving. To the 1,034 Loyal Contributors of the Lehigh Valley, we send our sincere appreciation for your trust in us and your support of the community.

John and Barbara Diamant, 2009 Tocqueville Society Co-Chairs

ALEXIS de TOCQUEVILLE SOCIETY The Alexis de Tocqueville Society is a unique group of altruistic and sociallyconscious community leaders interested in joining together for the common good. Inspired by Alexis de Tocqueville's observation that, "equality of conditions" is the "creative element" from which everything else in the society derives, Tocqueville Society members commit their talents and resources to improving the lives of Lehigh Valley residents and providing opportunities to children living in low-income families. Membership in the Tocqueville Society is granted to individuals who contribute at least $10,000 annually to the United Way. Under the leadership of Tocqueville Committee Co-chairs, Wendy Body and Greg Butz, the Society added 20 new members in 2008 and contributed $2,181,060 to the 2009 campaign. The 2009 co-chairs are John Diamant and Michael Molewski.

Mike and Diane Molewski, 2009 Tocqueville Society Co-Chairs

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Volunteer Leadership

Basic Needs

Thank you, volunteers! The following pages list the names of individuals who, during 2008 and 2009, committed their time, talent, energy, and passion to our community by serving on United Way's Board of Directors and Committees, Campaign Cabinet, Community Impact Council, Marketing Committee, one or more of the Community Building Partnership groups, or as United Way Champions.

United Way's investments in emergency and safety net services ensure that people will be able to meet all of their basic needs during a crisis. Basic needs are defined as housing, food, clothing, and crisis counseling.

Representing a wide range of Lehigh Valley perspectives - education, health, business, government, media, social service, public policy, arts, economic development, adult education - they come together around community tables with one mission: to make the Lehigh Valley a better place to live, work, and raise children. 2009-2010 Board of Directors

Dolores

Laputka Esq, Chair § Tallman, Hudders & Sorrentino PC Victoria Aitchison

2008-09 § 

Community Volunteer Karen Angello 2008-09  Allentown School District Pat Beldon Community Volunteer Sandra Bodnyk § ational Penn Bank Jeffry Byrne 2008-09 Air Products oshir Chinoy Air Products, retired William Coles §  Dun & Bradstreet, retired Robert Collevechio § Victaulic

L. Anderson Daub, ex-officio Chair, 2009, Community Campaign Brown-Daub Chevy-Volvo, Inc. Maria Teresa Donate § orthampton Community College Todd Donnelly Viamedia Wayne Hinman  Air Products, retired Dennis Hower Teamsters Local 773 Timothy Kennedy § The Morning Call Michael Kier, Jr.  Wegmans Food Markets Charles Lewis § Lehigh Valley Health etwork Drew Lewis §  Air Products *Louis Liebhaber 2008-09  Fundamental Success Consulting Kathleen Loeb-Schwab 2008-09  Community Volunteer Ross Marcus § orthampton County David oel Dual Temp Company, Inc. Matthew Petronio § Just Born, Inc.

Margaret Plympton § Lehigh University Gregg Potter 2008-09 § CWA Local 13500 Peter Ruggiero § Crayola Patricia Simon PBS 39 William Spence PPL Corporation John Stanley Air Products Jane Stone Highmark Blue Shield Elliot Sussman MD, ex-officio Chair, 2008, Community Campaign Lehigh Valley Health etwork Martin Till 2008-09 The Express-Times Harold Ting PhD CHE § Good Shepherd Rehabilitation etwork George Treisner, Jr. 2008-09  Pennsylvania State Education Association/Eastern Region, retired Steven Woods 2008-09 Crayola Susan Gilmore United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley

 Indicates service on Executive Committee and/or Community Impact Council § Indicates service on Administrative, Audit, Board Recruitment, Investment, Marketing & Communication, or Strategic Planning Committees  Indicates service on COMPASS, Success By 6, Lehigh Valley Alliance on Aging, Women’s Leadership Initiative, TeenWorks, or Allentown Youth Success Zone Leadership Teams or Advisory Councils

Close to 200 volunteers are listed on the following pages. In order to make this report as current as possible, the following lists represent those volunteers currently serving on the United Way Board and other United Way committees, along with the names of those individuals who served in 2008-09. Our Board Members’ affiliations are listed on the Board of Directors list. When their names appear on other committees, their affiliations do not appear.

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We have done our utmost to make these lists as accurate as possible, as our way of showing respect and appreciation. If we have made an error or omission, we request that you contact Peggy Campbell at 610-807-5728 or peggyc@unitedwayglv.org immediately, so that we can be sure to correct the error in future publications.

strategy  Quality and responsive "safety net" supports and services. united way invests in the following programs delivered by community partners Housing Case Management Emergency Services Rape Crisis Housing Daybreak Food and Clothing Bank Representative Payee Hospitality Center ASSIST Emergency Assistance Hospitality House Shelter Emergency Shelter Service Lehigh Valley Shelter

AIDS Services Center American Red Cross of the Greater Lehigh Valley Crime Victims Council of the Lehigh Valley Hispanic American Organization Lehigh County Conference of Churches Mosser Village Family Center New Bethany Ministries New Bethany Ministries ProJeCt of Easton The Salvation Army The Salvation Army Third Street Alliance Turning Point of the Lehigh Valley Valley Youth House

VALLEY WIDE HELP In an agreement with the American Red Cross of the Greater Lehigh Valley, United Way invests in Valley Wide Help, a 24-hour information and referral service bringing people and services together. Valley Wide Help provides free, immediate, and confidential services along with direct access to a database of referral resources. One-on-one phone contact is made with customers in crisis. Customers may also contact Valley Wide Help through the Internet and the chapter's Website: http://www.redcrosslv.org. Call 610-691-8711 or 610-866-1089 (Spanish)

On March 3, 2009, an Army Reservist, his wife, and six children ages 3 to 13 lost everything they owned in a house fire three weeks before the father was scheduled to deploy to Iraq. The family was already facing financial challenges. Four of the six children required medication for asthma. The mother needed eyeglasses. The American Red Cross connected the family with an Information Specialist through Valley Wide Help who helped them find a house to rent, furnishings, clothes, and even child care and homework help for their children. The American Red Cross helped the father arrange for an extension of leave from the Armed Forces.

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Strong Families in Vital Neighborhoods Helping Lehigh Valley residents meet their basic needs and If every adult contributes become financially self-sufficient is United Way's goal for Strong Families in Vital Neighborhoods. Financial self-sufficiency is positively to society, there defined as the income needed for a family to meet their basic needs, is no limit to what we can without public or private assistance. The Financial SelfSufficiency Standard for Pennsylvania includes housing, child accomplish. care, transportation, health care, taxes, food, clothing, telephone, and miscellaneous household and personal supplies. According to the Financial Self-Sufficiency Standard, 2 adults and 2 children need $44,000-$45,000 to live in the Lehigh Valley. One adult needs at least $20,000. Listed below are the strategies United Way supports in its Strong Families in Vital Neighborhoods community goal: strategies  Intensive 1:1 coaching and family support services to address income, employment, housing, parenting, education/literacy, and safety from abuse or violence.  Financial literacy and individual asset building.  Youth Success Zone [More information on page 12] united way invests in the following programs delivered by community partners Literacy Services Roofover Transitional Shelter Lifespan Counseling Services Ways to Work Family Case Management Transitional Work Development P.L.A.C.E. Program Family Stability - Housing The Day Reporting Program Transitional Residence Parenting Institute Vocational Job Readiness Project EARN Volunteer Management/Project Blueprint

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The Literacy Center Easton Area Neighborhood Centers Family Answers Family Answers Family Connection of Easton Lehigh County Council of Churches Lehigh Valley Center for Independent Living Slater Family Network THE PROGRAM for Women & Families THE PROGRAM for Women & Families Treatment Trends Treatment Trends Victory House of Lehigh Valley Volunteer Center of the Lehigh Valley

Adminstrative Committee

Alexis de Tocqueville Committee

Sandra Bodnyk Joseph Bartenbach, Jr. CBC Howell Benefit Services, Inc. Vaughn Gower Community Volunteer Deborah Keller PPL Corporation Drew Lewis Margaret Plympton Peter Ruggiero Joseph Savage Victaulic Harold Ting PhD CHE

Greg Butz, Co-Chair Wendy Body, Co-Chair Louis Cinquino Robert and Lois Daday Jan Heller Dolores Laputka Esq Jim and Gail Miller Mark Schwab and Katie Loeb-Schwab Elliot Sussman MD Ilene Wood

Audit Committee William Coles Robert Collevechio John Lisicky, Jr. Buckno Lisicky & Co Board Recruitment Committee Drew Lewis Phyllis Alexander City of Allentown Sandra Bodnyk William Coles Bert Daday PPL Corporation Maria Teresa Donate Jane Ervin Community Services for Children Pat Hoffman Community Volunteer Dolores Laputka Esq Grayson Mc…air Community Volunteer

"Some 23 years ago, I dropped out of high school. It is a decision which has haunted me ever since. As a man entering his 40s, my entire life had been one unfulfilling, low-paying job after another, and my future looked no different. One day a few years ago, my employer offered to pay for me to go to college, but I couldn't take advantage of the offer because I didn't have a high school degree. I enrolled in the Adult Literacy Center's GED program. I quickly earned my GED and also passed the placement test for college with high scores. Today I'm enrolled in college, on my way to making a career and better life for myself." José Estevan Gonzalez Mary Beth Golab Air Products

Strategic Planning Committee Harold Ting PhD CHE John Diamant Victaulic Dolores Laputka Esq Ross Marcus Margaret Plympton Michael Scheller JBS, LP Investment Committee Robert Cahill Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Edward O'Dea Lehigh Valley Health etwork Karen Bishoff Wilmington Trust of Pennsylvania Dan Confalone Good Shepherd Rehabilitation etwork V. Daniel Smoker Team Capital Bank Marketing Committee Matthew Petronio, Chair Just Born, Inc. Polly Beste Beste Marketing Services Mary Beth Golab Air Products Susan Hoffman Lehigh Valley Health etwork

Jonathan Lunger ArtsQuest Betsy Storey Bono Concannon, Miller & Company Dan Walsh Viamedia David Yanoshik The Express-Times 2008 Campaign Cabinet Elliot Sussman MD, Chair L. Anderson Daub Brown-Daub Chevy-Volvo, Inc. Dale Kochard Lehigh University Jane Stone Highmark Blue Shield Steven Woods Crayola 2009 Campaign Chairman Summit L. Anderson Daub, Chair Lee Butz Alvin H. Butz, Inc. Robert Daday PPL Corporation Sally Gammon Good Shepherd Rehabilitation etwork Elmer Gates William Hecht PPL Corporation, retired David …oel Mark Schwab Crayola, retired David Shaffer Just Born, Inc. Martin Till The Express-Times Sam Torrence Just Born, Inc., retired Robert Wood Sodexo

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Community Impact Council

Carol Obando-Derstine Children's Coalition of the Lehigh Valley

Ross Marcus Northampton County

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Judith atale Sabino, Chair Lehigh Valley Health etwork Michael Kier, Vice Chair Wegmans Phyllis Alexander Weed & Seed, Allentown Paul Brunswick Two Rivers Health & Wellness Foundation Martin Cottrell Community Volunteer Michael Cox Priscilla Payne Hurd Foundation Kevin Dolan orthampton County Cindy Glick Just Born, Inc. Patricia Hoffman Community Volunteer Kathy Kapcsos orthampton Community College Vicky Kistler City of Allentown Lynn Kovich Lehigh County Roland Kushner PhD Muhlenberg College Ross Marcus orthampton County Joseph apolitano The Dorothy Rider Pool Health Care Trust Anne oon-Scaggs Lehigh University Elizabeth Ragan Community Volunteer Janet Roth Harry C. Trexler Trust George Treisner PA State Education Association, retired ereida Villanueva Lehigh Valley Heath etwork Success By 6ÂŽ /Leadership Team (2008-09) Vicky Kistler, Chair City of Allentown Lois Mease, Vice Chair Parent Bonnie Coyle MD St. Luke's Hospital & Health etwork

Gisella Gisolo PhD Lehigh University Rebecca Gorton orthampton Community College Drew Lewis, Board Liaison Air Products Reverend Margie Maldonado Casa Guadalupe Center ancy Martin Community Services for Children Kathy Mosley Lehigh Carbon Community College Carol Obando-Derstine Children's Coalition of the Lehigh Valley The Honorable Edward Reibman Lehigh County Courthouse Faith Ring St. Luke's Hospital Allentown Campus Vince Rosati HLS Freight Susan Williams Lehigh Valley Children's Centers Allentown Youth Success Zone The Zone Founders Team Lou Liebhaber, Chair Fundamental Success Consulting Karen Angello PhD Allentown School District William Coles Dun & Bradstreet, retired Wayne Hinman Air Products, retired Tim Holt Air Products Alan Jennings Community Action Committee of the Lehigh Valley Vicky Kistler Allentown Health Bureau Joyce Marin City of Allentown Edward Meehan The Dorothy Rider Pool Health Care Mayor Ed Pawlowski City of Allentown JosĂŠ Molina Kutztown University

united way invests in the following programs delivered by community partners Project Learn Project Learn Gang Prevention Pa'lante Afterschool 20/20 Vision for Children CIS Academies CIS Comprehensive Middle Schools CIS Advance Earn A Bike CADA Youth Programs Saints Clubhouse Afterschool Program Slate Belt Mental Health 21st Century Community Learning Center Aspires Mentoring Afterschool Program Making the Grade

Boys & Girls Club of Bethlehem Boys & Girls Club of Easton Boys & Girls Club of Easton Casa Guadalupe Center Center for Vision Loss (Formerly VIABL) Communities In Schools of the Lehigh Valley Communities In Schools of the Lehigh Valley Communities In Schools of the Lehigh Valley Community Bike Works Council on Alcohol and Drug Abuse Easton Area Community Center Families First Families First Family Connection

Lehigh County Council of Churches Mosser Village Family Center Pinebrook Services for Children & Youth Easton Middle School Success ProJeCt of Easton A.L.P.H.A. THE PROGRAM for Women & Families Truancy Intervention Program Valley Youth House Student Assistance Program Valley Youth House

Getting Fractions! How an Afterschool Program Affects School Performance.

One eleven-year-old girl in the Earn A Bike program worked especially hard to learn fractions. In the Earn A Bike program she had to divide her hours in half between volunteering and earning her bike. The Community Bike Works staff went over the hours she put in and how to divide them. When her class in school studied division, a light bulb went on in her mind. She raised her hand to tell her teacher, "It's like my hours at Community Bike Works!"

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Youth Succeeding in School The decision to drop out of school is the result of a young person's agonizing experience of losing confidence in him/herself, of losing faith in the system that oversees the education and welfare of its youth, and of losing hope in the future. Some students are challenged to balance high school with work and parenting commitments. Some are moving through the juvenile justice system. Many are overwhelmed by academics, unmet health and mental health needs, and lack of positive adult relationships. According to superintendents and educators, the disengagement of youth that leads to dropping out of high school can begin early. The National Research Council reports that, "Academic success, as defined by high school graduation, can be predicted with reasonable accuracy by knowing someone's reading skill at the end of 3rd grade." At the start of his senior year in high school, Quintin learned that he would not have enough credits to graduate. Juggling a parttime job with schoolwork cost him valuable study time, good grades, and the credits needed to graduate. His family enrolled him in the Easton Area Academy, a United Way-invested program provided by Communities In Schools of the Lehigh Valley. Easton Area Academy helped Quintin catch up in his senior year. Quintin not only completed his high school education on time, he discovered interests that led him to pursue a career in electrical engineering.

Listed below are the strategies United Way supports in its Youth Succeeding in School community goal: strategies  Elementary School: Tutoring, reading recovery and enrichment activities, and community linkages for parents.  Middle School: Expanded learning time with caring adults; intensive social, behavioral, and academic coaches for high-risk students.  High School: Intensive intervention to high-risk students, graduation coaches/mentors, and dropout recovery programs.  COMPASS Community Schools (Community Partners for Student Success) [More information on page 11] united way invests in the following programs delivered by community partners Kidz Lit Fowler Family Center Community Program Urban Scouting Literacy 4 R Youth Make Your M.A.R.K. Family Youth Intervention

Allentown YM/YWCA Bethlehem Partnership for a Healthy Community Big Brothers, Big Sisters Boys Scouts of America Boys & Girls Club of Allentown Boys & Girls Club of Allentown Boys & Girls Club of Allentown

The decision to drop out of high school is not made overnight.

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COMPASS (Community Partners for Student Success) Advisory Council Cindy Glick, Chair 2008-09 Just Born, Inc. Ross Marcus, Chair

orthampton County William Leh CFRE, Vice Chair Farr Healy Consulting Kim Carrell-Smith PhD Lehigh University Michael Cox Priscilla Payne Hurd Foundation Elizabeth Diaz Parent Dean Donaher EdD Bethlehem Area School District Linda Hamilton Crayola Elsbeth Haymon 2008-09 Allentown Art Museum Patricia Hunter Spring Garden Children's Center Deborah Kipp CFRE Muhlenberg College Lynn Kovich Lehigh County Government Center Susan Lozada Allentown School District Belle Marks Allentown Health Bureau Lisa Musselman Vía of the Lehigh Valley Ellie Passman Hock Greater Lehigh Valley Chamber of Commerce John Reinhart Bangor Area School District COMPASS Lead Partners: Deb Fries Jackson Boys & Girls Club of Allentown Jenn Antinoro Communities In Schools of the Lehigh Valley Paul Pierpoint EdD

orthampton Community College Gail Mrowinski

orthampton Community College Debra Geiger Center for Humanistic Change Bridget Pruett Slater Family etwork Foundation

Lehigh Valley Alliance on Aging Steering Committee George Treisner, Chair Pennsylvania State Education Association/Eastern Region Francis Salerno MD, Vice Chair Lehigh Valley Health etwork Henry Acres Community Volunteer Martin Cottrell Community Volunteer Dena Gabel Greater Lehigh Valley Visiting urse Association Carol Halper Representative Charles Dent US House of Representatives James Harper Lehigh University Ronald Heckman Lehigh County Government Center Marisa Leaser Home Instead Senior Care Kenneth McGeary Penn State University John Mehler

orthampton County Area Agency on Aging Donna Miller MD Geriatric Physician Joseph ˆapolitano The Dorothy Rider Pool Health Care Trust Patricia ˆemetch APR Business Services, Inc. Kimberly Rounds Dun & Bradstreet Donna Sabol St. Luke's Hospital & Health etwork Brenda Sanderson Community Volunteer Marcella Schick Phoebe Ministries, Inc. Sally Schoffstall Schoffstall & Focht PC Diane Schrameyer Diakon LSM Jeffrey Tintle Lifestyles over 50 Donna Zimmerman Lehigh County

George Treisner, Pennsylvania State Education Association/Eastern Region

Donna Miller, MD Geriatric Physician

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TeenWorks™ Board Ellen Marx, Co-Chair PSSU/SEIU Local 668, Dept. of Public Welfare Allie Dunmire, Co-Chair Parkland High School Michelle Agolla Lehigh Carbon Community College Steve Banus Teamsters Local 773 Dave Binder IBEW Local 1600, PPL Evan Brown Pen Argyl High School Steve Curto UFCW Retired Bill DeMauriac UAW Local 677, Mack Trucks icole Dionne Liberty High School Darah Donaher Liberty High School Marissa Guarriello Liberty High School Christine Hankee PSEA, Parkland School District Joanna Jaindl Orefield Middle School Brianna Kays Freedom High School Dale Krasley UAW Local 677, Mack Trucks Bob Lalo CWA Local 13500, Verizon

igel Lohman Œazareth High School Jackie Montti Liberty High School Debra Moyer PSEA, Parkland School District Devin Mueller Wilson Area School District Erin Priest CWA Local 14830, Lehigh Valley Digital Print Center Alexandria Quinn Palmerton Jr. High aomy Rosario Liberty High School Jim Roth PACE Retired Jillian Szilagyi Parkland High School Meredith Szilagyi Parkland High School George Treisner Pennsylvania State Education Association/Eastern Region Ellen Weiss AFSCME Local 1435, Gracedale Œursing Home John Weiss PSSU/SEIU Local 668, Pa. Labor & Industry Women’s Leadership Council Patricia Beldon, Chair Community Volunteer Joyce Dougherty PhD, Vice Chair THE PROGRAM for Women and Families

Cassandra Alleyne Merrill Lynch Cheryl Baker Girl Scouts of Eastern PA Anne Baum Capital Blue Cross/Vision Accomplished Barbara Bigelow Pennsylvania Sinfonia Orchestra Carol Carpenter Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Œetwork Maureen Connolley Lehigh University Aubrecia Cooper Just Born, Inc. Barbara Diamant Lehigh University Donna Haggerty Haggerty Services Bonnie Hall Crayola Suzanne Kresge Uniforce Staffing Services Kathryn Leber Community Volunteer Fay Mackey Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Œetwork ancy McCullar Turning Point of Lehigh Valley Meloney Sallie-Dosunmu Just Born, Inc. Terri Slaughter United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley

Champions The following individuals served as United Way Champions for young children, school-age children, strong families, and older adults during 2008-2009. As Champions, they spoke to the United Way Board of Directors about important issues pertinent to their areas of expertise, wrote op-ed pieces, spoke at conferences and forums, and served as advisors to United Way. Their wise counsel and experience helped United Way maintain its commitment to a vision of excellence for everyone we serve. Jarret Patton MD Donna Miller MD Arthur Scott PhD Lehigh Valley Health Œetwork Geriatric Physician Œorthampton Community College Cheri Sterman Francis Salerno MD Alan Jennings Crayola Lehigh Valley Health Œetwork Community Action Committee of the Lehigh Valley

Cheri Sterman Crayola

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Jarret Patton MD Lehigh Valley Health Network

Children Healthy and Ready to Learn United Way believes that the first five years of a child's life are vital to the future success of that child in school and in society. Birth to five years is the optimal time for healthy brain development, positive socialization, and the beginning of a lifetime of curiosity, discovery, and learning. A quality early education program provides children with learning opportunities that have a lifelong impact on their success as elementary, middle, and even high school students. Research shows that investing in quality early education can deliver economic returns on investment of $7 for every $1 invested. Children who have had the benefit of a positive early learning experience are more likely to be successful in school, to graduate on time, to postpone parenthood, to secure satisfying employment, and become contributing members of society. Listed below are the strategies United Way supports in its Children Healthy and Ready to Learn community goal: strategies  Prenatal and postnatal home visitation.  Vision screening.  Family literacy.  High quality early care and education centers serving parents with low-incomes.  Success By 6® [More information on page 13] united way invests in the following programs delivered by community partners YMCA Preschool Child Care Good Sight for School YMCA Child Care Unconditional Child Care Parent Child Home Program Los Ninos Learning Center William Allen High School Teen Parent Program Even Start Family Literacy Seconds to Learn The Learning Center Nurse Family Partnership Parent Advocates in the Home The Children's Center

Allentown YM/YWCA Center for Vision Loss Bethlehem YMCA Child Care Information Services Family Connection Hispanic American Organization Lehigh Valley Children's Center ProJeCt of Easton Spring Garden Children's Center Third Street Alliance VNA of St. Luke's VNA of St. Luke's Volunteers of America

"I just saw one of our Parent-Child Home Program graduates on the first day of the summer kindergarten program. He was beaming from ear to ear….You could see his confidence all over his face." Cathy Ziegenfuss, Parent-Child Home Program Coordinator, Family Connection, Easton

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Community Impact FOUR GOALS FOR POSITIVE CHANGE United Way's four community goals for positive change are:  Children Healthy and Ready to Learn  Youth Succeeding in School  Strong Families in Vital Neighborhoods & Basic Needs  Older Adults Aging Successfully With these four goals, United Way addresses the needs of young children and their parents, school age youth, families, and older adults. To keep our work on track and to measure how we are doing, United Way adopted Mark Friedman's framework of Results-Based Accountability for its 2008-2011 Investment Plans. Mark Friedman, the author of Trying Hard is ot Good Enough: How to Produce Measurable Improvements for Customers and Communities, has created a disciplined thinking and planning process that enables organizations to go from talk to action in their work. Investment Plans for each of these goals enable United Way donors to invest in a wide array of programs that give people life-changing skills, resources, support systems, and hope.

COMMUNITY INDICATORS & TREND LINES United Way has selected the following high-quality community indicators to guide us in determining where United Way dollars need to be invested. Every program funded by United Way is working to improve the community condition measured by the indicator. Following the trend lines on these indicators helps us monitor improvements in community conditions. Although no one organization or agency can "turn the curve" or "move the needle" on these indicators, collaborative community action can! 1. Babies born below healthy birth weight. 2. Babies born to a mother without a high school education. 3. 3rd graders not proficient in reading. 4. 8th graders not proficient in math. 5. 8th graders not proficient in reading. 6. High school students not graduating. 7. Older adults (60+) receiving in-home services. 8. Older adults (65+) meeting standards for moderate exercise.

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Awards And Recognition The Express-Times Community Building Award is presented annually to an individual or organization that supports the United Way in its community building efforts; encourages cooperation; contributes talents and resources to further partnerships; and has the ability to create a common ground and to persevere. 2008 John Reynolds PhD Children's Coalition of the Lehigh Valley

2009 Bill Coles Community Volunteer

Diakon Lutheran Social Ministries Jewish Family Service of the Lehigh Valley ShareCare Faith In Action

Wegmans Allentown, Bethlehem and Nazareth/Easton

The President's Award is presented to an individual or organization whose leadership is instrumental in gaining support of the United Way campaign among the organization's employees and peers. This active role fosters education and understanding, resulting in significant growth in giving. 2008 Just Born, Inc.

2009 Lutron Electronics, Inc.

The WLI Philanthropist of the Year Award recognizes a member of the Women's Leadership Initiative who is active in the community, a philanthropic leader in the Lehigh Valley, and demonstrates a personal commitment of time, talent, and treasure to the best of her ability. 2008 Betsy Torrence WLI Founding Member Community Volunteer

2009 Nancy Ehle Community Volunteer

The Morning Call Silver Bowl Award is presented annually to a campaign volunteer who demonstrates outstanding leadership and makes every effort to help the campaign succeed. 2008 Bob Friedman AFLAC

2009 Wendy Body Greg Butz Alvin H. Butz, Inc.

The Campaign Chairman's Award is presented to an organization that has demonstrated continued leadership and innovation in conducting its United Way campaign, and a continued ability to increase awareness throughout the Lehigh Valley. The organization will serve as a model for other workplace campaigns to emulate. 2009 2008 Dual Temp, Inc. Capital BlueCross - Allentown (Harrisburg HQ)

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Financials Financials

Accountability With Results

United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley United Way of theStatements Greater Lehigh Valley Position Consolidated of Financial Consolidated As of June Statements 30, 2009 of Financial Position As of June 30, 2009

As the executive of a nonprofit organization that is certified to apply for United Way funding, you know the due diligence that United Way applies to its investment process.

Assets

Assets

Volunteer Involvement Assets Cash and cash equivalents Investments, at fair value Pledges receivable, less allowance for uncollectible Other receivables and prepayments Leasehold improvements and equipment Life insurance cash values Total Assets

The United Way Board of Directors, the Community Impact Council, and Community Investment Teams play an active role in the decision making of the organization.

1,921,453 4,329,811 3,554,968 238,737 94,232 145,107

Organizations Qualify for Funding

10,284,308

Nonprofit agencies must meet a rigorous 22-point Qualifications Criteria confirming the stability, strength, and vitality of the organization to be eligible for United Way investments.

Cash and cash equivalents Investments, at fair value Pledges receivable, less allowance for uncollectible Other receivables and prepayments Leasehold improvements and equipment Life insurance cash values

Liabilities and Net Assets Liabilities and Net Assets

Accounts payable and accrued expenses Custodial funds payable Liability to donors under split-interest trusts Liability to organizations under split-interest trusts Designated campaign support Notes payable Unrestricted Temporarily restricted Permanently restricted

Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued expenses Custodial funds payable Liability to donors under split-interest trusts Liability to organizations under split-interest trusts Designated campaign support Notes payable

602,073 53,628 31,405 21,000 955,041 1,635

Total Liabilities

1,664,782

Net Assets Unrestricted Temporarily restricted Permanently restricted

(570,442) 7,540,788 1,649,180

Total Net Assets

8,619,526

Total Liabilities and Net Assets

10,284,308

The financial statement presented here is condensed from complete financial statements of the United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley and wholly-owned subsidiary United Way Inc.from for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2009. Theits financial statements areServices, condensed complete financial statements Complete financial statements have beenpresented audited byhere independent certified public accountants, whose reports dated of themay United Way of theatGreater Lehigh Valley andWay its wholly-owned United Way November 30, 2009 be examined the offices of the United of the Greater subsidiary Lehigh Valley. Services, Inc. for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2009. Complete financial statements have beenofaudited independent certified public accountants, whose period reportsdue dated A consolidated statement revenueby and expenses has not been provided for this interim to a change November 30, 2009 be examined at the offices of the of the in the organization’s fiscal year. Thismay statement will be provided with the nextUnited annualWay report for Greater the period of July 1, 2009 - June 30, 2010. Lehigh Valley.

26

Sandra L. Bodnyk, Treasurer United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley

Sandra Bodnyk, Treasurer United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley

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Jane Stone, Highmark Blue Shield United Way Board Member

U

nited Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley is an organization that you can trust. Accountability requires the courage to follow through on tough decisions. It means creating a culture of accountability that is persistent in its requirement that people benefit in meaningful ways from the work we support.

As a United Way donor, you know that you are making community investments that will change lives and change communities in ways that you can see and United Way can measure.

with the highest levels of need, including five targeted school districts. For 2008-09, 87% of the residents served are low income. Sixty-one percent (53 programs) met overall ResultsBased Accountability performance standards. Many programs used customer satisfaction surveys to learn more about customer needs and preferences, with particularly striking results in safety net programs. Data sharing between United Way and the Allentown and Easton Area School Districts made progress during this period in tracking how well students in afterschool programs were doing.

Annual Updates for Funded Organizations

Organizations meeting the criteria and receiving funding are required to submit on an annual basis a series of documents including a copy of the IRS 501(c)(3) letter of tax exemption, current annual budget, updated board list, most recent 990 tax return, most recent audit by outside auditing firm, and updates to their strategic plan.

Results-Based Accountability

All United Way-funded programs align with United Way's priority of serving low-income residents in seven Lehigh Valley living locations

David Noel, Duel Temp Company United Way Board Member

SPECIAL THANK YOU TO THE PEOPLE WHO WORK IN UNITED WAY’S PARTNER AGENCIES AND PROGRAMS

The people who direct, manage, and work in the nonprofit organizations that United Way supports are seldom celebrated to the degree they deserve in our community. The quality of the care they give to the children and adults who come to them for help everyday humanizes our world in ways that are difficult to measure. United Way deeply appreciates the work these organizations have done to measure the increments of change in people’s lives that add up to success.

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Lehigh Valley of 100 A Message To Our Community Dear Friends of United Way, Thank you to everyone who contributes their time, treasure, and talent to our United Way. On behalf of United Way's Board of Directors, it gives us great pleasure to present this Annual Report in celebration of the past year's exciting accomplishments amidst so many economic challenges. We feel a profound responsibility to the 66,400 people who use the programs that United Way invests in as well as to the thousands of Lehigh Valley residents who contribute so generously to United Way. The economic crisis of the past year, coupled with the Pennsylvania budget impasse, has challenged the stability and security of many families and nonprofit institutions. People who never imagined that they would need to go to a food pantry, or could lose their home or their job, feel a disturbing vulnerability.

51 are female 49 are male 15 are over 65 24 are under 18 80 are Caucasians 12 are Hispanics/Latinos 5 are African-Americans 3 are Asians/Other 5 are foreign born 13 speak a language other than English at home 8 are Veterans. EDUCATION Of the 66 adults over 25 30 have some college education 24 have high school diploma or equivalent ONLY

United Way will be there for people in need. We will also be there for people who dream of a better life. United Way believes everyone deserves good health, a quality education, a stable income, and their basic needs met on a daily basis. We are community focused, with concern for children, youth, adults, families, and neighborhoods.

12 have no high school degree, 8 of whom are functionally illiterate (Cannot read medicine directions or fill out a job application).

Accountability has been the hallmark of the past year. Using the Results-Based Accountability (RBA) system, we have provided training and technical assistance to all of the agencies we invest in to ensure that United Way is synonymous with success and quality.

One in 6 babies is born to a mother without a high school diploma.

President Peyton Helm opened the Muhlenberg College United Way campaign with a letter to the faculty and staff that included the following comment: "The United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley represents the largest and most effective system of providing people-to-people help‌.But United Way doesn't just happen - it depends on each of our personal investment of time and resources." We couldn't have said it better ourselves. United Way Worldwide’s "Live United" message speaks to the capacity we all have to act on behalf of others, for the common good. It is a message of hope that invites each of us to become part of all of us. There is no reason why the Lehigh Valley cannot be a national leader in the education of its children, in the employment opportunities available to its citizens, and in the health and vitality of its people and communities. Sincerely,

Dolores Laputka Esq Chair, Board of Directors

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If we could turn the Lehigh Valley into a small community of 100 people, keeping the same proportions we have today, this is who we are:

Susan Gilmore President

Of the 16 children in public schools, 6 are not reading on grade level in grades 3 through 12.

INCOME In our Valley of 100 46 own their home 27 spend 30%+ on housing costs 17 barely make ends meet 9 are unemployed 8 live in poverty 4 are on public assistance. HEALTH 22 consume fruits and vegetables 5 times today 21 use tobacco 25 lack exercise 18 have a disability of any kind 10 live with asthma 5 live with cancer 9 have heart disease including high cholesterol 25 are obese 12 do not have health coverage 10 depend on food pantries and soup kitchens for meals 5 older adults lack the social & emotional support they need.

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table of contents

GIVE FOUR WAYS TO GIVE TO YOUR UNITED WAY 1. Click on the DONATE button on United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley's website. www.unitedwayglv.org 2. Give through the United Way Workplace Campaign. If your employer does not have a workplace campaign, please contact Dave Jacoby at 610-807-5709 or davej@unitedwayglv.org. 3. Contact United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley offices at 610-758-8010 to receive a pledge form or to make a contribution using any of the following credit cards: Visa, MasterCard, Discover, Amex. 4. Send your donation to: United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley 2200 Avenue A, Third Floor Bethlehem, PA 18017-2189

A Message To Our Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Accountability With Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Community Impact: Four Goals for Positive Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Community Building Partnerships: COMPASS, Youth Success Zone, Success By 6, Lehigh Valley Alliance On Aging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Capacity-Building Program for Lehigh Valley Nonprofits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Making Good Things Happen Takes Partners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Resource Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

ADVOCATE

Volunteer Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

United Way provides support to two local advocacy organizations: Children's Coalition of the Lehigh Valley and the Lehigh Valley Alliance on Aging. Children's Coalition of the Lehigh Valley Become a Member Now! Attend Family Policy Summits, Legislative Breakfasts, and Community Forums Receive updates on issues that impact the lives and education of our children. Carol Obando-Derstine, Executive Director 610-868-2805 website: www.childlv.org Lehigh Valley Alliance on Aging A United Way Community Partnership that addresses issues concerning older adults in the Lehigh Valley. For more information about public policy efforts, go to website: www.lvagingmatters.org.

Awards and Recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Financials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Lehigh Valley of 100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Give, Advocate, Volunteer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 IT’S EASY BEING GREEN Please print this report only if necessary. We have designed the report so that it prints nicely in black & white.

VOLUNTEER The United Way is a community investor in the Volunteer Center of the Lehigh Valley. For volunteer opportunities, visit their website: www.volunteerlv.org 610-807-0336 | Fax 610-807-0361

GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER. 28

LIVE UNITED

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33,100 CHILDREN AND 33,300 ADULTS BENEFIT FROM UNITED WAY-FUNDED PROGRAMS 1


2008-2009 Community Investment Report

United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley

VISION United Way will be a community builder - doing what no other organization can - bringing the Lehigh Valley together as one community to address the human needs issues we care about most.

MISSION To provide leadership, create the coalitions, and develop the resources to increase the organized capacity of people to care for one another.

UNDERNEATH EVERYTHING WE ARE,

UNDERNEATH EVERYTHING WE DO,

WE ARE ALL PEOPLE.

CONNECTED,INTERDEPENDENT,UNITED. AND WHEN WE REACH OUT A HAND TO ONE,

WE INFLUENCE THE CONDITION OF ALL. THAT’S WHAT IT MEANS TO LIVE UNITED. United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley  2200 Avenue A 3rd Floor  Bethlehem, PA 18017-2189 Phone: 610-758-8010  Fax: 610-867-7255  www.unitedwayglv.org

GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER.

LIVE UNITED

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Thanks to our Printing Sponsor for full color printing: Lehigh Valley Print Center 1251 Airport Road, Allentown, Pa. 610-435-0313

2008-2009 United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley Annual Report  

Campaign highlights, achievements, and program investments for the 2008-2009 annual campaigns.

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