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MEET THE STAFF TABLE OF CONTENTS Career Services’ Experiential Learning Team Lauren Loeffler

Director of Career Services

Nathan Ford

Associate Director of Career Services

Katie Hudon

P 3: Letter from the Director P 4: Overview P 5-7: A Closer Look, Experiential Learning Theories P 8: Common Threads, Reflection and Onboarding P 9-10: High Impact Educational Practices

Assistant Director of Career Services

P 11-14: Types of Experiential Learning

Mikia Carter

P 15-27: Additional Resources

Experiential Learning Coordinator

CONTACT US PENSACOLA

Web uwf.edu/career Phone 850.474.2254 Email career@uwf.edu Address 11000 University Pkwy., Bldg. 19 Pensacola, FL 32514

FORT WALTON BEACH

Web uwf.edu/career Phone 850.863.6575 Email emolder@uwf.edu Address 1170 MLK Jr. Blvd., Bldg. 2 Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32547


A letter from the Director of Career Services

Lauren Loeffler As the Director of Career Services at the University of West Florida, I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your work in providing a strong academic environment for our students. We encourage our students to work hard both inside and outside the classroom to prepare them for their futures. We look forward to partnering with you to help provide a great experiences for our students. Career Services provides comprehensive career development services to our entire student population and our alumni. We work with students at every stage of their career development process. We are focused on helping students Explore, Discover, Prepare, and Implement to turn their passion into a career. Throughout this process, students are encouraged to participate in experiential learning opportunities. Whether informal through service learning, or, formal through an internship or cooperative education, our students are graduating with relevant experience and skills needed to hit the ground running in their career. We assist our partners in academics in finding ways to incorporate experiential learning components into classes and departments. Our staff are happy to conduct consulting appointments with you to assist in developing the most appropriate experiences for your department and individual student goals. The information and guidelines contained in this toolkit are designed to help with that process and provide information on the variety of options available to compliment the academic work of our institution. We look forward to partnering with you!

Lauren

Lauren Loeffler Director, Career Services

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Overview Toolkit Purpose This toolkit serves as an educational resource for faculty and academic staff to learn more about experiential learning activities, best practices, and methods for incorporating different types of experiential learning into classes and academic programs. Career Services staff members are readily available to provide assistance and additional information for faculty and staff who would like to become better educated or would like assistance incorporating any of these components into their work.

What Can Career Services Do? Faculty and staff may set up consultation appointments to learn more about best practices, resources, and how to potentially incorporate these practices into courses. We work with employers and community agencies daily and may be able to assist in identifying relevant opportunities to compliment course work and areas of study. Career Services can also assist in providing faculty information on service learning hours completed by their students each semester. Career Services staff can provide information and assistance to students to help better prepare them to participate in different forms of experiential learning or life beyond graduation. We can provide one-on-one assistance or can facilitate class presentations and workshops. Preparation for experiential learning is important, a great resource for students to start with is our online Career Development Guide which can be found on uwf.edu/career. We can assist with one-on-one preparation for students or present to your entire class through various workshop topics. Once an experience is completed we can guide students on how to articulate their experience within their resume to maximize their job search.

Request a Presentation! This guide is meant to be a starting point for learning about and incorporating experiential learning into your department or course. If, at any time, you or a colleague would like to talk with our staff, or have us present to your class, you can request either easily. Possible presentation topics include professional documents, interviewing, job search strategies, job shadowing, internships, service learning, Cooperative Education, and more. You can contact our office at 850-474-2254 or career@uwf.edu or you can request either service online by clicking on the request a consult or request presentation links on our website uwf.edu/career

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A Closer Look...

Kolb’s Experiential Learning Cycle, 1984

“Learning is the process whereby knowledge is created through transformation of experience” (1984, p. 38). This theory includes a cyclical model of learning with four stages in which an individual can begin at any stage. The image below outlines this cycle:

Testing in New Situations (4)

Concrete Experience (1)

Kolb’s Experiential Learning Cycle

Forming Abstract Concepts (3)

Observations & Reflections (2)

Information from: http://www.learning-theories. com/experiential-learning-kolb.html

The starting point for this cycle is not fixed, but there is a set order to complete once beginning. • Concrete Experience (Do) • Reflective Observation (Observe) • Abstract Conceptualization (Think) • Active Experimentation (Plan) Kolb’s four-stage learning cycle shows how experience is translated through reflection into concepts, which in turn are used as guides for active experimentation and the choice of new experiences. The first stage, concrete experience (CE), is where the learner actively experiences an activity such as a lab session or field work. The second stage, reflective observation (RO), is when the learner consciously reflects back on that experience. The third stage, abstract conceptualization (AC), is where the learner attempts to conceptualize a theory or model of what is observed. The fourth stage, active experimentation (AE), is where the learner is trying to plan how to test a model or theory or plan for a forthcoming experience. Kolb identified four learning styles which correspond to these stages. The styles highlight conditions under which learners learn better. These styles are: • assimilators, who learn better when presented with sound logical theories to consider • convergers, who learn better when provided with practical applications of concepts and theories • accommodators, who learn better when provided with “hands-on” experiences • divergers, who learn better when allowed to observe and collect a wide range of information

Kolb, David A. 1984. Experiential Learning: Experience as the Source of Learning and Development. Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J.

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A Closer Look...

John Dewey

John Dewey (1859-1952) John Dewey was the most significant educational thinker of his era and, many would argue, of the 20th century. As a philosopher, social reformer and educator, he changed fundamental approaches to teaching and learning. His ideas about education sprang from a philosophy of pragmatism and were central to the Progressive Movement in schooling. Dewey’s concept of education put a premium on meaningful activity in learning and participation in classroom democracy. Unlike earlier models of teaching, which relied on authoritarianism and rote learning, progressive education asserted that students must be invested in what they were learning. Dewey argued that curriculum should be relevant to students’ lives. He saw learning by doing and development of practical life skills as crucial to children’s education (Pinto, M. (n.d.). John Dewey (189-1952). PBS. Retrieved July 3, 2014, from http://www.pbs. org/onlyateacher/john.html ). Below are quotes from his works.

Democracy and Education

(Dewey, J. (1923). Democracy and education. Champaign, Ill.: Project Gutenberg.) When we experience something we act upon it, we do something with it; then we suffer or undergo the consequences. We do something to the thing and then it does something to us in return: such is the peculiar combination. The connection of these two phases of experience measures the fruitfulness or value of the experience (Pg 77). Thought or reflection, as we have already seen virtually if not explicitly, is the discernment of the relation between what we try to do and what happens in consequence. No experience having a meaning is possible without some element of thought...Thinking, in other words, is the intentional endeavor to discover specific connections between something which we do and the consequences which result, so that the two become continuous (Pg 80).

Experience and Education

(Dewey, J. (1938). Experience and education. New York: Macmillan.) It is not enough to insist upon the necessity of experience, nor of even activity in experience. Everything depends upon the quality of the experience which is had. The quality of any experience has two aspects. There is an immediate aspect of agreeableness or disagreeableness, and there is an influence upon later experiences... The effect of an experience is not borne on its face. It sets a problem to the educator. It is his business to arrange for the kind of experiences which, while they do not repel the student, but rather engage his activities are, nevertheless, more than immediately enjoyable since they promote having desirable future experiences (Pg 27).

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A Closer Look...

G. Kuh, High Impact Practices

In the report, High-Impact Education Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter, George Kuh analyzes data from the National Survey of Student Engagement to demonstrate the positive impact of a set of educational practices on student engagement and success, particularly for students historically underserved by higher education. Kuh recommends that institutions should aspire for all students to participate in at least two High Impact Practices (HIPs) over the course of their undergraduate experience—one during the first year and one in the context of their major (NSSE, 2007). In the report, Kuh identifies six common elements across the practices that--when employed—make the practices “high-impact”: 1. They are effortful: high-impact practices “demand that students devote considerable time and effort to purposeful tasks [and] require daily decisions that deepen students’ investment in the activity as well as their commitment to their academic program and the college.” 2. They help the students build substantive relationships: high-impact practices “ demand [that students] interact with faculty and peers about substantive matters…over extended periods of time.” High-impact practices help students to “develop a meaningful relationship with another person…a faculty or staff member, student, coworker, or supervisor” and “put students in the company of mentors and advisers as well as peers who share intellectual interests and are committed to seeing that student succeed.” 3. They help students engage across differences: high-impact practices help students “experience diversity through contact with people who are different from themselves” and “challenge students to develop new ways of thinking about and responding immediately to novel circumstances as they work…in intellectual and practical tasks, inside and outside the classroom, on and off campus.” 4. They provide students with rich feedback: high-impact practices offer students “frequent feedback about their performance…[For example,] having one’s performance evaluated by the internship supervisor are all rich with opportunities for immediate formal and informal feedback. Indeed, because students perform in close proximity to supervisors or peers, feedback is almost continuous.” 5. They help students apply and test what they are learning in new situations: high-impact practices provide “opportunities for students to see how what they are learning works in different settings, on and off campus. These opportunities to integrate, synthesize, and apply knowledge are essential to deep, meaningful learning experiences.” 6. They provide opportunities for students to reflect on the person they are becoming: high-impact practices “deepen learning and bring one’s values and beliefs into awareness; [they] help students develop the ability to take the measure of the events and actions and put them into perspective. As a result, students better understand themselves in relation to others and the larger world, and they acquire the intellectual tools and ethical grounding to act with confidence for the betterment of the human condition.”

High-Impact Practices • • • • • •

Learning community or some other formal program where groups of students take two or more classes together Courses that included a community-based project (service-learning) Work with a faculty member on a research project Internship, co-op, field experience, student teaching, or clinical placement Study abroad Culminating senior experience (capstone course, senior project or thesis, comprehensive exam, portfolio, etc.)

NSSE - National Survey of Student Engagement. (n.d.). NSSE High-Impact Practices. Retrieved July 3, 2014, from http://nsse.iub.edu/html/high_impact_practices.cfm High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter, by George D. Kuh (AAC&U,2008)


Common Threads

Reflection and Onboarding

Reflection, a key component of many classes, is vital to the success of a service-learning course. Reflection is a process of examining and interpreting experience to gain new understanding. Benefits of Reflection • Reflection transforms experience into genuine learning about individual values and goals and about larger social issues. • Reflection challenges students to connect service activities to course objectives and to develop higher-level thinking and problem solving. • Reflection works against the perpetuation of stereotypes by raising students’ awareness of the social structures surrounding service environments. • By fostering a sense of connection to the community and a deeper awareness of community needs, reflection increases the likelihood that students will remain committed to service beyond the term of the course. Facilitating Reflection • Schedule regular opportunities for guided and purposeful reflection. • Communicate in writing students’ responsibilities for reflection and provide well-defined criteria for evaluating their participation. • Seek to engage each student in both group and individual reflection activities. • Challenge each student to assess the knowledge, values, and skills he or she brings to the project. • Establish norms of behavior and a framework for reflection that guides students from objective observations and subjective responses to interpretation, awareness, and action. • Devote some reflection time to orienting students to people and problems they will encounter and allowing students to practice skills that will be required, such as active listening and observing. • Seek closure on emotional issues by the end of each reflective session. • Leave some cognitive and topical issues open for ongoing discussion to encourage reflection between class sessions. Reflection Activities • Journals • Reflective papers • Class discussions • Small-group discussions • Presentations • Responses to course readings • Responses to outside readings, media content, and experiences relevant to the issues surrounding the service activity • Electronic discussions (e.g., chat, e-mail, online forum) Varying activities will accommodate multiple learning styles and will help students understand reflection as part of the learning process, not as an isolated activity.

“Onboarding” is the current term for new-employee orientation. The Society for Human Resource Management defines onboarding as “the process by which new hires get adjusted to the social and performance aspects of their jobs quickly and smoothly, and learn the attitudes, knowledge, skills, and behaviors required to function effectively within an organization.” Research shows that a structured, comprehensive approach to onboarding helps employees acclimate to their new jobs and become productive more quickly. It may also improve loyalty and retention. Following are the main objectives of an effective onboarding program: • Teach new hires the mission and values of the company. • Socialize them to the workplace. Help them feel good about their job and who they work with. • Educate new hires about the company culture. Companies each have their own unspoken rules about acceptable and unacceptable behaviors. For example, is it okay to order a glass of wine at business dinners, tell jokes at the water cooler, bring your lunch to staff meetings? • Educate them about performance standards and expectations. They need to know what is expected of them, what they must do to succeed, and how their performance will be measured. • Teach new hires about how the work is done. Where will they get necessary materials? Who should they go to with a problem? Whose approval is needed before changing plans? Following are some of the essential steps in a top-notch onboarding program: • Create written onboarding plans tailored to each position. • Get input from key parties about what to cover for a given position. • Take care of logistics before the employee starts; for example, have their work station set up, their computer configured, etc. • Make onboarding an interactive process, not an information dump. Take new hires on a tour of the facility. Introduce them to key people. Have them sit in on meetings, as appropriate. • When it is necessary to give them material to read, do it in small chunks, interspersed with other activities. • Spread out the onboarding program for several months, though it will be more intensive in the beginning. People can only absorb so much information at one time. • Consider assigning a mentor to extend the orientation process. • Follow up with the employee at regular intervals to assess their progress and provide any help they need.

Reflection (Writing@CSU. (n.d.). Importance of Student Reflection. Retrieved July 3, 2014, from http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/service_learning/reflect.cfm) Onboarding (Best Practices for Onboarding New Employees. (n.d.). Improve.com. Retrieved July 3, 2014, from http://www.improve.com/Best-Practices-for-OnboardingNew-Employees/4496)

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Types of Experiential Learning

High-Impact Educational Practices First-Year Seminars and Experiences Many schools now build into the curriculum first-year seminars or other programs that bring small groups of students together with faculty or staff on a regular basis. The highest-quality first-year experiences place a strong emphasis on critical inquiry, frequent writing, information literacy, collaborative learning, and other skills that develop students’ intellectual and practical competencies. First-year seminars can also involve students with cutting-edge questions in scholarship and with faculty members’ own research. Common Intellectual Experiences The older idea of a “core” curriculum has evolved into a variety of modern forms, such as a set of required common courses or a vertically organized general education program that includes advanced integrative studies and/or required participation in a learning community (see below). These programs often combine broad themes—e.g., technology and society, global interdependence—with a variety of curricular and cocurricular options for students. Learning Communities The key goals for learning communities are to encourage integration of learning across courses and to involve students with “big questions” that matter beyond the classroom. Students take two or more linked courses as a group and work closely with one another and with their professors. Many learning communities explore a common topic and/ or common readings through the lenses of different disciplines. Some deliberately link “liberal arts” and “professional courses”; others feature service learning. Writing-Intensive Courses These courses emphasize writing at all levels of instruction and across the curriculum, including final-year projects. Students are encouraged to produce and revise various forms of writing for different audiences in different disciplines. The effectiveness of this repeated practice “across the curriculum” has led to parallel efforts in such areas as quantitative reasoning, oral communication, information literacy, and, on some campuses, ethical inquiry. Collaborative Assignments and Projects Collaborative learning combines two key goals: learning to work and solve problems in the company of others, and sharpening one’s own understanding by listening seriously to the insights of others, especially those with different backgrounds and life experiences. Approaches range from study groups within a course, to team-based assignments and writing, to cooperative projects and research.

Undergraduate Research Many colleges and universities are now providing research experiences for students in all disciplines. Undergraduate research, however, has been most prominently used in science disciplines.With strong support from the National Science Foundation and the research community, scientists are reshaping their courses to connect key concepts and questions with students’ early and active involvement in systematic investigation and research.The goal is to involve students with actively contested questions, empirical observation, cutting-edge technologies, and the sense of excitement that comes from working to answer important questions. Diversity/Global Learning Many colleges and universities now emphasize courses and programs that help students explore cultures, life experiences, and worldviews different from their own. These studies—which may address U.S. diversity, world cultures, or both—often explore “difficult differences” such as racial, ethnic, and gender inequality, or continuing struggles around the globe for human rights, freedom, and power. Frequently, intercultural studies are augmented by experiential learning in the community and/or by study abroad. Service Learning, Community-Based Learning In these programs, field-based “experiential learning” with community partners is an instructional strategy—and often a required part of the course. The idea is to give students direct experience with issues they are studying in the curriculum and with ongoing efforts to analyze and solve problems in the community. A key element in these programs is the opportunity students have to both apply what they are learning in real-world settings and reflect in a classroom setting on their service experiences. These programs model the idea that giving something back to the community is an important college outcome, and that working with community partners is good preparation for citizenship, work, and life. Internships Internships are another increasingly common form of experiential learning. The idea is to provide students with direct experience in a work setting—usually related to their career interests—and to give them the benefit of supervision and coaching from professionals in the field. If the internship is taken for course credit, students complete a project or paper that is approved by a faculty member. Capstone Courses and Projects Whether they’re called “senior capstones” or some other name, these culminating experiences require students nearing the end of their college years to create a project of some sort that integrates and applies what they’ve learned. The project might be a research paper, a performance, a portfolio of “best work,” or an exhibit of artwork. Capstones are offered both in departmental programs and, increasingly, in general education as well.

See citation on next page.

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High Impact Practices Benefits Table 1

Relationships between Selected High-Impact Activities, Deep Learning, and Self-Reported Gains Deep Learning

Gains General

Gains Personal

Gains Practical

First-Year Learning Communities

+++

++

++

++

Service Learning

+++

++

+++

++

++

+

++

+++

++

++

++

Service Learning

++

+++

+++

++

Senior Culminating Experience

++

++

+++

++

Senior Study Abroad Student-Faculty Research

+ p < .001, ++ p < .001 & Unstd B > .10, +++ p < .001 & Unstd B > .30

Table 2

Relationships between Selected High-Impact Activities and Clusters of Effective Educational Practices Level of Academic Challenge

Active and Collaborative Learning

StudentFaculty Interaction

Supportive Campus Environment

First-Year Learning Communities

++

+++

+++

++

Service Learning

++

+++

+++

++

++

++

++

+

+++

+++

+++

++

Service Learning

++

+++

+++

++

Senior Culminating Experience

++

++

+++

++

Senior Study Abroad Student-Faculty Research

+ p < .001, ++ p < .001 & Unstd B > .10, +++ p < .001 & Unstd B > .30

Source: High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter by George D. Kuh, (Washington, DC: AAC&U, 2008). For information and more resources and research from LEAP, see www.aacu.org/leap.

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Types of Experiential Learning Internships

Definition:

“Provide students with direct experience in a work setting-usually related to their career interests- and to give them the benefit of supervision and coaching from professionals in their field. If the internship is taken for course credit, students complete a project or paper that is approved by a faculty member” (from Part 1 of High-Impact Educational Practices document). Internships are overseen by each academic department on campus, therefore students need to consult their major advisor for the specific requirements.

Management Tips:

Maintain approved internship agreements • Ensure this has language that addresses expectations of the student, employer, and university and is appropriately signed and tracked. • Consult with UWF General Counsel when creating and authorizing agreements Obtain clear internship job descriptions • Make sure the expectations, scope of work, and potential projects are outlined. Insist on quality training and supervision • Learn about the training program and how interns will learn their position and skills. The experience should include regular supervision and mentoring for the intern throughout their experience. Look for “real” work • Check in with the student to ensure they are doing meaningful work and learning about how their industry actually operates and that they are not simply getting coffee or filing. Also ensure variety in their experiences check on this with assignments and evaluations. Get feedback from the student and employer Feedback can come through a variety of assignments such as journals, discussion questions, site visits, and evaluations.

48.4%

How to help students succeed:

Help students prepare for experiences • Encourage them to participate in other experiences such as job shadowing, service learning, or research. • Share information about the resources provided by Career Services with them. We can assist with writing resumes, practicing interviews, honing job search strategies, and resources. Share opportunities with students and encourage participation • Create and use a faculty account for JasonQuest, the online job database maintained by Career Services. To create an account visit: https://www.myinterfase.com/uwf/faculty/ • Share information about career related events such as career fairs and workshops with students and if possible offer incentives for attendance. Offer credit for experiences • Credit based courses can encourage participation and create opportunities to offer students feedback and allows for growth and development of professional skills.

Conversion rate of interns to full-time employees (2013 NACE Internship & CoOp Survey)

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Types of Experiential Learning Cooperative Education (CoOp)

Definition:

CoOp is a multi-semester (3 semester requirement) experiential learning experience for students that is always paid and for credit. CoOp allows students to gain relevant work experience that compliments their academic studies and is managed through the Career Services office. CoOp is a structured method of combining classroom-based education with practical work experience. A cooperative education experience, commonly known as a “co-op”, provides academic credit for structured job experience. CoOp experiences are either full-time (40 hours per week) alternating periods (semester, quarter) of work and school or part-time (20 hours per week) combining work and school during the same time period. CoOp experiences are paid, supervised by a professional who has followed the same career path of the student and students complete more than one assignment (2 or more) with progressive levels of responsibility (History of Cooperative Education and Internships2013. (n.d.). CEIA. Retrieved July 3, 2014, from http://www.ceiainc.org/history).

History

September 24, 1906, Dean Herman Schneider, University of Cincinnati, CoOp is founded. (History of Cooperative Education and Internships 2013. (n.d.). CEIA. Retrieved July 3, 2014, from http://www.ceiainc. org/history) Originally students were alternating work and school weekly. The first CoOp class had 27 students and 13 companies and first wages in 1906 were 8-10 cents an hour. The Association of Cooperative Colleges was founded in 1926 –the first professional association for cooperative education – First meeting at the University of Cincinnati – Herman Schneider was elected President.

High Conversion Rate

(2013 Internship & Co-op Survey. (n.d.). . Retrieved July 8, 2014, from http://www.naceweb.org/uploadedFiles/ Content/static-assets/downloads/executive-summary/2013-internship-co-op-survey-executive-summary.pdf) • According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers 2013 Internship and CoOp survey “the conversion rate for co-op students was 36.9 percent in 2013.” • “Respondents who hired interns/co-op students from their own programs retained 88.9 percent of these hires after one year.”

Development

• CoOp has a focus on development and growth as a professional before students even begin working. Students must meet with Career Services staff to learn the specifics of participating in CoOp and the process for becoming eligible. Students then seek approval from their department and submit their resume for review by Career Services. Participation in a mock or practice interview is highly encouraged. Once a student has secured a position, they again meet with Career Services to discuss how to prepare, professionalism in the workplace, desired learning and development outcomes, and expectations. • CoOp has a continued focus on development and growth through reflective assignments, research of the field, evaluation of work performance, and professional development topics. Each semester, students attend a meeting at the end of the term with Career Services to discuss additional developmental topics including networking, creating a portfolio, and additional review of their resume. For details on the assignments please see the CoOp syllabus and other documents in the reference section.

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Types of Experiential Learning Service Learning | Field Study

Service Learning

• Service learning combines community service with classroom instruction, focusing on critical, reflective thinking as well as personal civic responsibility. Service learning programs involve students in activities that address local needs while developing their academic skills and commitment to their community (from AACC http://www.aacc.nche. edu/Resources/aaccprograms/horizons/Pages/default.aspx ). • Field-based “experiential learning” with community partners is an instructional strategy, and often a required part of the course. The idea is to give students direct experience with issues they are studying in the curriculum and with ongoing efforts to analyze and solve problems in the community. A key element in these programs is the opportunity students have to both apply what they are learning in real-world settings and to reflect in a classroom setting on their service experiences. These programs model the idea that giving something back to the community is an important college outcome, and that working with community partners is good preparation for citizenship, work and life. (from Part 1 of High-Impact Educational Practices document).

Field Study

• Field study varies from department to department but it is typically a stand alone experience that a student completes in conjunction with their academic department. Assignments might include journals or other reflections and/or a final paper. Requirements for participation are typically defined by the academic department and the position must be approved by the department.

JasonQuest Faculty Portal It’s not just for students.

To assist your students with exploring careers, the JasonQuest Faculty Portal gives you access to view all types of position openings for internship and Cooperative Education opportunities as well as part-time and full-time jobs. Upcoming career events featuring on-campus employer recruiting are also found on the portal. For login assistance, contact career@uwf.edu.

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Types of Experiential Learning Job Shadowing

Students can gain valuable exposure to a career by following a professional in a job shadowing experience. Shadowing can be a great opportunity for students wishing to decide on a major or a good preliminary experience before entering an internship or CoOp. They can spend a half-day, full day, or several days participating in observations and discussions with professionals at work. In a job shadow, students learn what qualifications are needed for the job, the daily responsibilities, and how the position fits into the overall functioning of the organization. This realistic preview of a job allows the student to reflect on the experience and create career goals.

Informational Interviews

• Informational Interviews allow a student to meet with a professional to ask questions and gain more in-depth knowledge about a career from a professional working in that field. This is a great way to ask the very specific things that may matter to a particular individual, but also allows them a chance to get a better overall picture of a position while building a connection in the field.

Entry Point/Exploration

• If a student is unsure of what they would like to do for a career or are struggling to decide between a few different possibilities shadowing can be a great tool for them to make a better informed decision that best matches their values, interests, skills, and personality (VIPS). This can also be a potential entry point and way to make a connection to a later experience in the field.

Networking

• Networking is valuable for individuals to use in connecting with professionals working in the field and can be a great way to connect with possible job opportunities. In fact it is often one of the most valuable ways a person can find potential job opportunities. While shadowing, a student will be able to add more professionals to their network than just the person they are following, they will likely have an opportunity to meet colleagues and other professionals in the industry and may learn of other ways to network within their field such as professional associations.

Career Decision Making

• Choosing a career path can be very intimidating and can be even harder with limited information about a field. Through exploration in job shadowing students have an opportunity to make a better informed decision for themselves and can then have a goal to work towards in the rest of their academic career.

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Resources Agreements (p. 16-20)

“Cooperative Education Employer Participation Agreement”

Academic Resources (p. 21-23) Sample CoOp Syllabus CoOp Employer Evaluation

Reflection for Service (p. 24-26)

“Reflection Exercises for Community Service” “Student Journal & Reflection Guidelines”

Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) (p. 27) Internship Resources

Michael True - http://www.internqube.com/ Starting and Maintaining a Quality Internship Program http://www.internqube.com/uploads/4/8/0/7/4807298/starting_an_internship_program_-_7th_edition.pdf

State Authorizations

http://onlinecampus.uwf.edu/GetStarted/StateAuthorization.cfm

Citations

2013 Internship & Co-op Survey. (n.d.). . Retrieved July 8, 2014, from http://www.naceweb.org/uploadedFiles/Content/static-assets/ downloads/executive-summary/2013-internship-co-op-survey-executive-summary.pdf Dewey, J. (1923). Democracy and education. Champaign, Ill.: Project Gutenberg. Dewey, J. (1938). Experience and education. New York: Macmillan. High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter, by George D. Kuh (AAC&U,2008) History of Cooperative Education and Internships 2013. (n.d.). CEIA. Retrieved July 3, 2014, from http://www.ceiainc.org/history Kolb, David A. 1984. Experiential Learning: Experience as the Source of Learning and Development. Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J. NSSE - National Survey of Student Engagement. (n.d.). NSSE High-Impact Practices. Retrieved July 3, 2014, from http://nsse.iub.edu/html/ high_impact_practices.cfm Onboarding (Best Practices for Onboarding New Employees. (n.d.). Improve.com. Retrieved July 3, 2014, from http://www.improve.com/ Best-Practices-for-Onboarding-New-Employees/4496) Pinto, M. (n.d.). John Dewey (189-1952). PBS. Retrieved July 3, 2014, from http://www.pbs.org/onlyateacher/john.html Reflection (Writing@CSU. (n.d.). Importance of Student Reflection. Retrieved July 3, 2014, from http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/teaching/ service_learning/reflect.cfm)

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Cooperative Education Employer Participation Agreement

This Cooperative Education Employer Participation Agreement (“Agreement”) is made by and between the University of West Florida, for and on behalf of the University of West Florida Board of Trustees (the “University”) and the Employer named below (the “Employer”) shall be effective from the date of the Employer’s execution below until the student’s completion of the Cooperative Education (Co-Op) program described herein. Co-Op Defined and Models

E

Cooperative Education (Co-Op) at the University of West Florida is defined as an academically integrated program that gives students the opportunity to enhance their classroom studies through paid professional work experience before graduation. Co-Ops are multi-semester experiences that are always for course credit and always paid. Students may participate in two types of Co-Ops: parallel or alternating.

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A parallel undergraduate Co-Op student works and goes to school at least 3 semesters in a row, averaging 15-25 hours a week at work and at least 6 academic credits. A parallel graduate Co-Op student works and goes to school at least 3 semesters in a row, averaging 15-25 hours a week at work and at least 3 academic credits. In this model, students must work a minimum of 215 Co-Op hours for one credit hour each semester (approximately 16 weeks). An alternating Co-Op student alternates between work place and school semester by semester, working 40 hours a week during work terms and going to school full time during academic terms.

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Students will not be allowed to participate in more than 5 alternating and 7 parallel Co-Op semesters. For employers, Co-Op is a unique method for collaborating with UWF in improving the overall professional development and workplace readiness of graduates.

The Co-op program does not exist as a mechanism for employers seeking to recruit students directly into training programs, consulting assignments, or to conduct unsupervised job functions at the employer’s client site. Therefore, to be eligible to participate in the Co-Op program the Employer must provide the following: 

Designation of a work site for the student

Designation of an immediate supervisor

A written Co-Op job description with clear learning objectives

A safe work environment

Direct compensation to student (timely paid in accordance with all state and federal laws and at the agreed upon rate)

A work environment conducive to learning

Feedback on student's performance

Allowing an on-site visit by UWF Faculty or Career Services staff

2012-8131- Cooperative Education Employer Participation Agreement 3.22.13

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Additional Contracts/Agreements The Employer agrees that it will not require any Co-Op student to sign any type of contract or agreement that contains any of the following mandatory terms, conditions or obligations: Non-Compete Clause: prohibiting the Co-Op student from subsequently working with an Employer’s competitors, clients, vendors, or any other persons related to the Employer’s business for any length of time. Repayment for Training: requiring the Co-Op student to refund the Employer for the value of any training the student received while working for the Employer.

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Repayment for H-1B Visa Fees: requiring the Co-Op student to pay back sponsorship fees if he/she exit his/her position prior to the agreed upon date. Length of Contracts: requiring the Co-Op student to remain employed beyond the time periods specified in the Co-Op student’s Notice of Cooperative Education Employment attached hereto.

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Relocation Expenses: requiring the Co-Op student to repay the Employer for relocation expenses to an out of area work assignment. In-Kind Compensation: requiring the Co-Op student to accept compensation in a form other than salary. Student Qualification:

Students must meet the following qualifications to pursue Co-Op.

A 2.3 overall GPA for undergraduate, 3.0 GPA for graduate level (Some academic departments have higher academic standards).

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 

Degree-seeking and full-time student in academics, and student conduct “good standing” with the University.

Be recommended by their academic department.

Participate in a Co-Op information appointment/session.

Hiring Process:

The Employer agrees to conduct a fair and non-discriminatory interview process. The Employer is responsible for determining the specific job description outline for each Co-Op student. The job description may be refused by UWF Career Services if it appears to discriminate against applicants on the basis of age, color, disability, gender (including gender identity and sex), marital status, national origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, and veteran status. Once approved by UWF Career Services for a particular student, the job description should be attached to this Agreement. Students may elect to pursue application to all Co-Op positions. Prior to making an offer to a Co-Op student, the Employer must notify the UWF Career Services office of the selected Co-Op student and proposed start date. Once such information is received from the Employer, UWF Career Services will be responsible for generating a Notice of Cooperative Education Employment in the form attached hereto. Termination: 2012-8131- Cooperative Education Employer Participation Agreement 3.22.13

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If the employer finds the Co-Op studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work unsatisfactory, employer will advise UWF in writing. The Co-Op student may be terminated from the Co-Op program and/or Co-Op work site by UWF at any time for the following reasons: resignation of employment, withdrawal from the university, graduation, change in field of study, unsatisfactory job/academic performance, failure to maintain academic standards, violation of professional standards or ethics defined by the academic program or violation of the University Code of Conduct. Any termination of a student from the Co-Op Work Site by the Employer will be preceded by notice to UWF. To the extent possible, terminations due to change in Employer's business needs will be effective not sooner than the end of the applicable semester.

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The Employer understands that if the University believes that the Employer has mistreated, disrespected, misused, overused, unfairly made demands upon or refused to offer necessary resources and help to Co-Op students, the Employer may be excluded from immediate or future participation in the University Co-Op program. The provisions of this Agreement shall be governed by the laws of the State of Florida.

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The following signature confers that the below Employer has read, understands and agrees to the above stated terms and conditions of this Agreement and will participate accordingly. _________________________ Co-Op Program Employer

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_________________________ Employer Representative/Title (Please Print) _________________________ Signature/Date

UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA

UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA

By:______________________ Title:

By:______________________ Title:

___________________________ Signature Date

___________________________ Signature Date

2012-8131- Cooperative Education Employer Participation Agreement 3.22.13

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JOB DESCRIPTION

2012-8131- Cooperative Education Employer Participation Agreement 3.22.13

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NOTICE OF COOPERATIVE EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT You are hereby advised that the following student: __________________________________ ______________________ (Name) (Student ID #) has been assigned to a Cooperative Education Program under a Cooperative Education Employer Participation Agreement between the University of West Florida, acting for and on behalf of the University of West Florida Board of Trustees (“UWF”), and ______________ (“Employer”). The term of the Cooperative Education employment is as follows: __________________________________ _______________________________ (Date of Termination)

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(Date of Commencement)

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ORIGINATING DEPARTMENT By_________________________ Its:

Date:

Notice Received and Acknowledged: EMPLOYER

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_____________________ By:

UWF STUDENT AFFAIRS

By:_____________________ Name: Title: Date:

UWF OFFICE OF THE PROVOST

By: ________________________

Name: Title: Date:

2012-8131- Cooperative Education Employer Participation Agreement 3.22.13

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Cooperative Education Employer Mid-Term Evaluation Studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Name:___________________________________________________ Date:________________________ 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Unsatisfactory (Never demonstrates this ability/does not meet expectations) Uncomplimentary (Seldom demonstrates this ability/rarely meets expectations) Fair (Sometimes demonstrates this ability/meets expectations) Commendable (Usually demonstrates this ability/sometimes exceeds expectations) Exceptional (Always demonstrates this ability/consistently exceeds expectations)

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If any criteria are not applicable or if the student has not had the opportunity to demonstrate this experience; please leave the response blank.

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Communication Skills- The student: 1. Is able to read, comprehend and follow written materials. 2. Is able to communicate ideas and concepts clearly in writing. 3. Listens to others in an active and attentive manner. 4. Effectively participates in meetings or group settings. 5. Demonstrates effective verbal communication skills. 6. Asks pertinent and purposeful questions.

_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

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Please provide the best/most relevant example of how the student demonstrates this skill.

Do you have any recommendations for improvement in this skill?

Vocational/Career Preparation- The student: 7. Is able to break down complex tasks/problems into manageable pieces. 8. Brainstorms/develops options and ideas. 9. Demonstrates ability to problem solve. 10. Exhibits self-motivated approach to work. 11. Demonstrates an ability to set appropriate priorities/goals. 12. Exhibits a professional behavior and attitude. 13. Reports to work as scheduled and arrives on time. 14. The studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dress and appearance are appropriate for this organization. Please provide the best/most relevant example of how the student demonstrates this skill.

Do you have any recommendations for improvement in this skill?

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_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____


Cooperative Education Syllabus/SLOs – SUMMER 2014 Cooperative Education (CoOp) allows students to gain relevant and professional work experiences that complement their academic studies. It is a partnership between employers, students, and the University, focused on professional practice and vocational exploration. Combining paid work experience with their studies, CoOp students have an opportunity to explore their professions and apply principles acquired in the classroom. All assignments must be submitted to eLearning.

No Points will be given for late assignments without prior approval of the UWF Career Services. Please call 850.474.2254 as soon as possible if you have special circumstances.

Students must complete all assignments and have no fewer than 70 points to receive a passing grade for Cooperative Education credit hours.

Semester Work Plan Discussion Question 1

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Assignments

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Points Awarded 10

Deadline Due no later than 11:59PM 05/23/14

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06/4/14

10

06/13/14

Mid-Term Evaluations (Self and Employer Evaluations)

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06/27/14

Discussion Question 2

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07/2/14

Monthly Reflection Research

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07/11/14

Final Report*

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07/25/14

Final Evaluations (Self and Employer Evaluations)

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Reflection Log

07/29/14

End-of-Term Reflection 10 08/6/14** **Schedule an appointment by calling Career Services in Building 19 at 850.474.2254. Reflection meetings should take place between 07/30/14 and 08/6/14. Instructions to prepare for your End-of-Term Reflection will be sent to you by email in advance.

*Failure to submit a Final Report Assignment will result in an unsatisfactory grade for the entire term.

Forms are also located in JasonQuest in the Resource Library. The Student Code of Conduct sets forth the rules, regulations and expected behavior of students enrolled at the University of West Florida. Violations of any rules, regulations, or behavioral expectations may result in a charge of violating the Student Code of Conduct. It is the students’ responsibility to read the Student Code of Conduct and act in accordance to the Code. You may access the current Student Code of Conduct at http://www.uwf.edu/judicialaffairs.

Students with a documented disability who require specific examination or course-related academic accommodations should contact the Student Disability Resource Center (SDRC) by e-mail at sdrc@uwf.edu or by phone at 850.474.2387.

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University of West Florida Cooperative Education Student Learning Outcomes

Communication Skills 1. The student will be able to demonstrate the ability to follow written materials. 2. The student will be able to communicate ideas and concepts clearly in writing. 3. The student will have the ability to listen to others in an active and attentive manner. 4. The student will be able to effectively communicate in meetings or group settings. 5. The student will be able to demonstrate effective verbal communication skills by asking pertinent and purposeful questions.

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Vocational/Career Preparation 1. The student will be able to break down complex tasks/problems into manageable pieces. 2. The student will be able to formulate options and ideas. 3. The student will be able to demonstrate ability to problem solve. 4. The student will be able to demonstrate a self-motivated approach to work. 5. The student will demonstrate an ability to set appropriate priorities/goals. 6. The student will be able to demonstrate professional behavior and attitude. 7. The student will report to work as scheduled and on-time. 8. The student will demonstrate skills for appropriate dress and appearance for a professional organization.

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Leadership 1. The student will be able to manage and resolve conflicts in an effective manner. 2. The student will show the ability to support/contribute to a team atmosphere. 3. The student will be able to demonstrate assertive, but appropriate behavior. 4. The student will exhibit the ability to understand/support the cooperative employer’s organizational mission/goals. 5. The student will demonstrate behavior that fits in with the norms and expectations of the organization. 6. The student will be able to seek out and utilize appropriate resources. 7. The student will be able to work within appropriate authority and decision-making channels. Integrity/Values 1. The student will be able to exhibit a positive and constructive attitude. 2. The student will be able to demonstrate a sense of values and integrity to the job. 3. The student will be capable of learning from previous mistakes. 4. The student will be able to behave in an ethical manner. 5. The student will be able to show respect for the diversity (religious/cultural/ethnic) of co-workers.

Learning outcomes will be measured by cooperative education employer’s evaluation, student report, student reflection and the Experiential Learning Coordinator’s evaluation. Student’s ability to meet these outcomes is expected to improve with the completion of each cooperative education experience semester. Each experience will be different as they are dependent upon the student’s major and the cooperative employment experience.

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reflection exercises for Community Service Reflection helps increase sensitivity to community issues, enabling you to serve more effectively. Use this guide to reflect on and evaluate your community service experience. The reflection exercises center around the Social Change Model of Leadership pictured to the right. As the hub and ultimate goal of the Social Change Model, Change gives meaning and purpose to the other seven Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Change means improving the status quo, creating a better world, and demonstrating a comfort with transition and ambiguity in the process of change.

Society/Community Values Citizenship occurs when one becomes responsibly connected to the community/society in which one resides by actively working toward change to benefit others through care, service, social responsibility and community involvement.

Group Values Common purpose necessitates and contributes to a high level of group trust involving all participants in shared responsibility toward collective aims, values and vision. Collaboration assumes that a group is working towards a Common Purpose, with mutually beneficial goals, and serves to generate creative solutions as a result of group diversity, requiring participants to engage across difference and share authority, responsibility and accountability for its success. Within a diverse group, Controversy with Civility is inevitable that differing viewpoints will exist. In order for a group to work toward positive social change, open, critical and civil discourse can lead to new, creative solutions and is an integral component of the leadership process. Multiple perspectives need to be understood, integrated and bring value to a group.

Individual Values Consciousness of self requires an awareness of personal beliefs, values, attitudes and emotions. Self-awareness, conscious, mindfulness, introspection and continual personal reflection are foundation elements of the leadership process. Congruence requires one to identify personal values, beliefs, attitudes and emotions and act consistently with those values, beliefs, attitudes and emotions. A congruent individual is genuine and honest and â&#x20AC;&#x153;walks the talk.â&#x20AC;? Commitment requires an intrinsic passion, energy and purposeful investment toward action. Follow-through and willing involvement through commitment lead to positive social change. Komives, S.R. (2009). Leadership for a Better World: Understanding the Social Change Model of Leadership Development. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

UWF Career ServiCeS

experiential Learning

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Before the Experience ask the following questions before your community service experience.

1. 2. 3. 4.

What is the agency’s mission and vision? What is the social issue/problem? (e.g., abuse issues, animal rights and environmental issues, diversity issues, elderly citizen issues, health issues, life issues, mentally/physically challenged individual issues, mentoring students, need-based/poverty issues, and tutoring) What is your role and what impact do you think you will make in the community by participating as a volunteer with this agency? What will you accomplish or gain from this community service experience? (e.g., new skills, new knowledge, specific project development) How does it make you feel to be a volunteer with this agency? What will you contribute? What do you hope to see? Who will you interact with while volunteering?

After the Experience Complete one of the following reflection exercises after your community service experience.

Discussion 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

What does the agency do well? What would you like to see done differently? What did you learn about the social issue the agency addresses or the population it serves? Have you learned a skill or clarified an interest? How can you apply it? What have you learned about yourself? In what ways were your stereotypes or assumptions challenged? How has this service experience supported your values? Would you want to serve with this organization again? How responsive is this organization to community needs? What about your experience can you share with your peers or fellow volunteers/activists?

What? So What? Now What?

Have everyone answer three questions in writing, in sharing and in open discussion.

1. 2. 3.

What did we do, see, hear, smell, touch, taste? So what does it all mean? Now what? Where do I/we go from here?

Sentence Stems

Read the sentence stems aloud and have participants write and/or share their thoughts.

1. 2. 3. 4.

Today I learned… What surprised me about today was… The most challenging thing about today was… The best thing about today was…

String Game 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Have participants stand in a circle. Give one person a ball of string. Ask the person with the string to talk about his or her experience, then throw the ball of string to another group member while holding onto the end of the string. Other participants ask the person now holding the ball of string about his or her experience. Have participants continue to toss the ball and share their responses. When everyone has had a turn, process the exercise by pointing out the pattern that has emerged in the string. Emphasize the connections that were made and the role each person had in the finished design. Use this as a metaphor for community and to illustrate the impact each person has on others.

Reflection Exercises Adapted from UC San Diego

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UWF Career ServiCeS

experiential Learning


Service Learning Student Journal & Reflection Guidelines The following provides a framework for the reflection part of your experience. 1. Journal: Use a journal to keep track of your thoughts, perceptions and reactions during your Service Learning experience. Journal topics will be given to you. 2. Reflection Paper: At the end of the Service Learning, write a paper on what you learned from the experience. Discuss how the experience was related to your academic coursework. What should you include in your Reflection Paper? • Agency: Describe and identify its mission, vision, values, and goals. Describe the culture of the organization (level of formality, structure and hierarchy of the organization, values, reward system, etc.). Describe the purpose of the organization. Discuss how your position contributed to the overall mission of the organization. • Learning Objectives/Action Plan: What did you outline as your initial learning objectives and action plan? Did these change throughout the experience? If so, how? Describe the challenges, successes, and setbacks to accomplish your initial objectives. Identify the specific outcomes for each objective, including any changes that were necessary. Describe what you had hoped to gain from this experience and how you planned to accomplish it. Specify new skills and knowledge, specific project development, new responsibilities, as well as the connection the experience had with your academic coursework. What strategies were used to accomplish these goals? • Personal Development: Describe any specific skills acquired or polished during this experience. Describe contributions made to the agency. Identify personal growth. Comment on how this experience relates to future goals. Were your expectations of what should be accomplished met? If not, why? Describe any specific overlap with academic programs, course experiences, etc. In what ways did you learn through this service experience— observation, hands on, research, etc.? Describe what was learned. How did you change from the experience? What did you learn about a specific community or societal issue? What is service? What is community? • Experience Evaluation: Evaluate your Service Learning experience in a summary paragraph. Relate back to your initial expectations and perceptions. Were you able to accomplish what you had hoped to accomplish? Did you learn what you had hoped to learn? Were you able to observe, participate in, or research anything that was valuable to your experience?

UWF CAREER SERVICES

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Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division Fact Sheet #71: Internship Programs Under The Fair Labor Standards Act This fact sheet provides general information to help determine whether interns must be paid the minimum wage and overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act for the services that they provide to “for-profit” private sector employers. Background The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) defines the term “employ” very broadly as including to “suffer or permit to work.” Covered and non-exempt individuals who are “suffered or permitted” to work must be compensated under the law for the services they perform for an employer. Internships in the “for-profit” private sector will most often be viewed as employment, unless the test described below relating to trainees is met. Interns in the “for-profit” private sector who qualify as employees rather than trainees typically must be paid at least the minimum wage and overtime compensation for hours worked over forty in a workweek. The Test For Unpaid Interns There are some circumstances under which individuals who participate in “for-profit” private sector internships or training programs may do so without compensation. The Supreme Court has held that the term “suffer or permit to work” cannot be interpreted so as to make a person whose work serves only his or her own interest an employee of another who provides aid or instruction. This may apply to interns who receive training for their own educational benefit if the training meets certain criteria. The determination of whether an internship or training program meets this exclusion depends upon all of the facts and circumstances of each such program. The following six criteria must be applied when making this determination: 1. The internship, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the employer, is similar to training which would be given in an educational environment; 2. The internship experience is for the benefit of the intern; 3. The intern does not displace regular employees, but works under close supervision of existing staff; 4. The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the intern; and on occasion its operations may actually be impeded; 5. The intern is not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the internship; and 6. The employer and the intern understand that the intern is not entitled to wages for the time spent in the internship.

* Law guidelines and information from the US Department of Labor: Wage and Hour Division (WHD) http://www.wagehour.dol.gov

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For more information about the FLSA visit: http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/whdfs71.htm



UWF Faculty Toolkit