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A Publication of United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut

Winter |Spring 2011

EMPOWER

GROW

CHANGE

2010 ANNUAL REPORT


Since 1924, United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut has advanced the common good by creating real, lasting change in 40 towns across our region. In 2009, we adopted the following five-year goals: · Double the number of young children who meet key developmental milestones, from 950 to 1,900 · Double the number of youth who improve academically, from 2,300 to 4,600 · Help 1,500 additional families meet the state Self-Sufficiency Standard for income · Provide a safety net of health and human services for everyone in need Together, we can accomplish so much more than any one of us can alone. We invite you to LIVE UNITED by giving, advocating and volunteering.

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Inside the 2010 Annual Report 1 Letter from the Board Chair 2 Education: Diving In to a Successful Future 4 Income: A Win-Win for the Community 6 Health and Safety Net: Building a Caring Community for All of Us 8 2010 United Way Community Campaign, Leadership

and Planned Giving News FOR MORE INFORMATION

To comment, please call (860) 493-6800 or visit our website at unitedwayinc.org. For volunteer opportunities, please visit our website and click on “Volunteer.”

10 Women’s Leadership Initiative: Focus on Financial Stability 11 2010 Community Service Award Recipient: Elsa Núñez, PhD

12 Walking the Red Carpet at the United Way Best Of Awards 14 2010 United Way Community Investment Results 16 Statement of Financial Position and Statement of Activities 19 United Way Volunteers and Staff 21 The Backstory: From Assembly Line to Supervisor, With Help from Workforce Development

United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut is proud to be part of the Capitol Region Partnership – working to strengthen our region’s economy, facilitate inter-town and inter-agency cooperation, and create a recognizable identity for the greater Hartford region.


Letter from the Board Chair

Dear Friends: First, I want to thank you all for saying “yes” – one small

a financial education

word that makes all the difference in the world. 54,000 of

program for families

you said “yes” to helping others in need by contributing

at Alfred E. Burr

more than $25 million through the 2010 United Way

Elementary School.

Community Campaign. A special note of appreciation to

(See page 10.)

those of you who designated your contribution to United Way Community Investment. These dollars support United Way’s commitment to real, sustainable change by focusing on education, income, and health, including a safety net of services for those most in need. Succeeding in today’s reality requires innovative thought and collaborative action – which is why I am so proud of the leadership role our United Way has taken in finding more effective and innovative ways for public institutions, human services agencies and volunteers to work together to improve life in our communities. To note just a few examples: • In Hartford, we helped found and we continue to support a partnership that is developing the city’s Community Schools. These schools offer an array of educational, social, medical and recreational services beyond the traditional school day and year to help children reach their full potential. They are already

• The Working Families Initiative, now entering its fifth year, unites caring volunteers with nonprofit partners and corporate supporters to help lower-income working families make positive changes to make ends meet. (See page 15.) • We continue to play a leading role in the Workforce Solutions Collaborative of Metro Hartford, helping businesses train and grow a competitive workforce. (See page 21.) • Our United Way continues to support the safety net that has helped so many of our neighbors during the economic downturn. We look forward to hearing from and working with you to give, advocate and volunteer during 2011. We are fortunate to live in such a special community of caring people.

achieving positive results: they posted an average 5.6 point increase in the percentage of students scoring at the Proficient level on the 2010 Connecticut Mastery Test; that’s twice the school district average. United Way’s new Women’s Leadership Initiative is participating in the Community Schools effort by spearheading

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E DU C AT ION

DIVING IN TO A SUCCESSFUL FUTURE

op e p y a he w

“ 2

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ge t n a h c to t n n. a e w I m ] d y e t I decid of [urban minori think

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TAUREAN STOVALL’S ART CAREER STARTED WITH AN UNPLANNED DIVE INTO THE CONNECTICUT RIVER. “I was fishing with a friend and I fell in,” he recalls. “I

minority] men,” he says.

was scared of the water after that. So my parents and my

“I want to become the

counselors at ConnectiKids decided I should learn how

best Taurean I can be.”

to swim.” In his case, that meant a With one new skill mastered, Taurean began to explore

commitment to art. “I’ve

other waters through the summer and after-school

always loved to draw, so

programs at ConnectiKids, a United Way Community

Ric [Herrera] and the

Investment partner that serves elementary school students

other staff helped me take

Because of contributions like

in the Asylum Hill and Barry Square neighborhoods of

it to the next level. They

yours to United Way Community

Hartford.

made me the editor of

Investment, Taurean Stovall of

the summer yearbook for

Hartford not only finished high

“One of our goals is to expose the kids to new things,

two years in a row. I got

school – today he is a successful

whether it’s fine and performing arts, swimming, martial

to work with professional

art major at the University of

arts, or cooking. But academics comes first,” notes Ricardo

artists,” he recalls.

Connecticut.

Herrera, ConnectiKids’ former executive director. Taurean has remained involved with the agency ever

3,000

since, participating in its alumni program for middle

young people improved their academic

and high school students and serving as a public speaker and advocate. Meanwhile, his quest for excellence has

skills last year in after-school and summer programs

led him from Hartford Public High School to Capital Community College, then to UConn’s West Hartford

because you gave to United Way Community Investment.

campus and finally to UConn’s Storrs campus, where he currently studies fine arts.

ConnectiKids’ tutoring and mentoring programs work

“I want to keep challenging myself,” he says. “Ric always

hand-in-hand with neighborhood schools to ensure that

told me, ‘You can do it, you can do it.’ And I will.”

out-of-school time is time well-spent. “When they don’t have that push from home, we try to be that push,” says

Your contributions to United Way Community Investment

Herrera.

support an interconnected web of education, income, health and safety net services that help our neighbors build a better

Taurean is fortunate to have a close-knit family –

life for themselves. That includes after-school and summer

with four siblings who also attended ConnectiKids.

programs that help children and youth develop the skills

Still, he says, “I was at a turning point in my life, and

for success in school and in life. To learn more, visit

ConnectiKids gave me so many wonderful role models. I

unitedwayinc.org/education.

decided I want to change the way people think of [urban Impact Winter|Spring 2011

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I N C O ME

A WIN-WIN FOR THE COMMUNITY

“ 4

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he w s e c a ’s f e l p o e p n o ’ e l . i 0 m 0 s 0 , e 6 k$ g th c n i a e b e g s I like r, ‘You’re gettin a e h y e h t

n


OPENING DOORS, ONE TAX RETURN AT A TIME “I do taxes. What do you do?” asked 16-year-old Kayla

In addition to providing

Daley.

a valuable service to the community, the program

A junior at E.C. Goodwin Technical High School, Daley

opens up doors for the

is one of 40 New Britain youth certified to prepare taxes

young tax preparers.

for lower-income working families. Daly was trained and provides these free services through the Volunteer Income

“The youth component

Tax Assistance (VITA) program at Human Resources

of the VITA program is

Agency (HRA) of New Britain, supported by your

rich in benefits not just

Rob Carrier, a 16-year-old New

contributions to United Way Community Investment.

to the customer but also

Britain High School student,

to the youth,” said Marlo

said the Volunteer Income Tax

VITA sites like those managed by HRA of New Britain

Greponne, director of

Assistance program enables

ensure that hard-working families get the credits and

planning and programs

him to help families while gain-

refunds they deserve. They also connect families with

for HRA of New Britain.

ing professional experience.

services to help them maximize their refund to get ahead financially.

“It’s about the opportunity for them to grow and learn about a field that is not ordinarily offered to them,” she

$14.8 million came back to nearly 8,600 tax

continued. “The financial industry is not normally pushed as an option for lower-income youth. To open up this field to them, and to give them an opportunity to help

filers last year through local VITA programs because

families — that’s a win-win.”

you gave to United Way Community Investment.

“I’m pretty sure I’m the only one of my friends that knows how to do this stuff,” adds Rob Carrier, a junior at New Britain High School. “It can help me out personally

The stories can be troubling; some working families are

and professionally.”

taking care of a sick child. Others have hit rock bottom. Your contributions to United Way Community Investment “Some of these families are working two or three jobs,

support a network of education, income, health and safety

and they’re still struggling to put food on the table,”

net services that help our neighbors build a financially

Daley remarked.

stable future. That includes VITA programs in partnership with HRA of New Britain and Co-opportunity. VITA sites

“I like seeing the smile on people’s faces when they hear,

are also supported by the Bank of America Charitable

‘You’re getting back $6,000,’” said E.C. Goodwin junior

Foundation, the Walmart Foundation and Comcast. To

Kevin Nazario.

learn more, visit unitedwayinc.org/income.

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HEALTH AND SAFETY NET 6

BUILDING A CARING COMMUNITY FOR ALL OF US

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t, o l a h ug o r h t n e t. i e b d i e d v ' I I d n a , y a gw n o l a me a c I d n

a


JORDAN ANDREINI IS MATTER-OF-FACT ABOUT HER EXPERIENCES AS A YOUNG ADULT WITH AN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Jordan’s journey began when she was diagnosed with

“She realized that it was

Williams Syndrome at 14 months – and HARC, a United

the right place for her.

Way Community Investment partner, has been there for

She took that step into

her and her family every step of the way.

adulthood and she’s never looked back. Jordan has

“HARC has been my best friend for 26½ years,” says

worked so hard to get

Jordan’s mother, Pamela Sobering. The agency has provided

where she is today.”

socialization for Jordan, support for her family, job placement and coaching, and a group home setting that

Today, Jordan works

has enabled Jordan to live semi-independently since age 19.

three days a week in the cafeteria at CIGNA in

Jordan assists her friend Tina Gasper, HARC's coordinator of vocational operations, in the HARC mailroom.

“HARC turns 60 this year, and United Way has played an

Bloomfield and two days a

integral role helping us emancipate people with intellectual

week in the HARC offices

disability from large, overly restrictive and often inhumane

in Hartford. In her free time, despite difficulties with

institutions,” explains Dr. Stephen Becker, HARC’s

physical balance, she dances the cha-cha and the tango

president and CEO. “Virtually all of HARC’s lifespan

and plays defense on a Special Olympics basketball team.

services – including early intervention, family support,

She’s a keen UConn women’s basketball fan and also

advocacy, employment, recreation and residential living

keeps up with world events on her computer.

– got their start with United Way support.” And every morning, Jordan makes the rounds at HARC,

Hundreds of intellectually disabled individuals

greeting staff and clients by name. “Jordan is our touchstone,” says Sue Noonan, HARC’s

in our region are able to live full and productive lives

director of residential services. “She contributes so much to our community.”

because you give to United Way Community Investment. “I care about all these people,” Jordan replies with a smile. Those services have made a world of difference for Jordan and hundreds of other HARC clients.

Your contributions to United Way Community Investment support a robust network of education, income, health

“After high school, when her brother and her friends

and safety net services – including programs that help our

were getting ready to go to college, Jordan looked at me

intellectually disabled neighbors reach their full potential.

and said, ‘I want to go to the group home,’” says Pamela.

To learn more, visit unitedwayinc.org/health.

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LIVE UNITED. GIVE UNITED.

2010 UNITED WAY COMMUNITY CAMPAIGN

MORE THAN 54,000 INDIVIDUALS AND 700 LOCAL WORKPLACES LIVED UNITED This year, the 2010 United Way Community Campaign raised an outstanding $25,051,513 and was chaired by Andy Bessette, executive vice president and chief administrative officer of The Travelers Companies Inc. The annual campaign raises the resources to provide the building blocks of a good life for everyone: a quality education that leads to a stable job, income that can support a family, and good health, including a safety net of services across the 40 towns of central and northeastern Connecticut. The United Way Community Campaign is a joint effort of United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut and Community Health Charities of New England. The campaign is the largest annual health and human service fund-raising effort in Connecticut and the second largest in New England. Contributions made through the United Way Community Campaign to United Way Community Investment are invested in health and human services programs across a 40-town service area. (See page 14.) Local businesses such as OKAY Industries Inc. went all out to raise dollars with a variety of creative special events.

At left: Andy Bessette (far left), campaign chair, revealed the 2010 campaign results to a crowd of nearly 600 volunteers including union, corporate and community leaders at a celebration luncheon on November 30 at the Pratt & Whitney Hangar in East Hartford. A list of the 2010 Campaign Cabinet and Loaned Executives appears on page 18.

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LEAVING A LEGACY FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS: Henry M. Zachs “You can’t take it with you,” said Henry Zachs. “Everyone

annually give $10,000 or

should leave a legacy.”

more to United Way.

By naming United Way of Central and Northeastern

“I think anyone that’s

Connecticut in his will, Zachs became one of 20

community minded ought

members of the 1924 Society, which honors those

to give to United Way,”

who have made a bequest or planned gift. Through a

said Zachs. Henry M. Zachs

legacy of giving, members of the 1924 Society create extraordinary opportunities for future generations.

Commitment to community and philanthropy in the Zachs family does not stop with him. Zachs teaches his

A generous philanthropist and business owner, Zachs

four grandchildren to be community minded and has

supports more than 100 nonprofit organizations. A

established a charitable fund in each of their names.

longtime supporter of United Way, he is also a member of the prestigious Tocqueville Society, a national,

For a complete list of members of the 1924 Society, visit

philanthropic group that honors individuals who

unitedwayinc.org/1924.

TOCQUEVILLE SOCIETY HONORS INDIVIDUALS WHO ANNUALLY DONATE $10,000 OR MORE

Many ways to GIVE

Below right: Gregory and Barbara Howey attend a reception at The Travelers Companies Inc.

What better way to recognize a birthday, holiday or life event than by making a contribution that helps provide the building blocks for a good life in our community? It’s quick, it’s online and the honoree will instantly be notified of your kind gesture with a beautiful LIVE UNITED e-card.

Below: Andy Bessette, 2010 United Way Community Campaign chair; Ray and Mary Necci, Tocqueville Society chairs; Susan Dunn, United Way president and CEO; Yamilia Garcia and Lisa Goepfert of The Salvation Army; and Rhoda and Lou Obermeier, Tocqueville Society chairs.

Visit unitedwayinc.org/give to learn more!

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A D V O CATE

WOMEN'S LEADERSHIP INITIATIVE

How can I get involved? You can change your community for the better by working with women on projects you care about and by investing dollars into proven strategies. You can GIVE, ADVOCATE or VOLUNTEER. Call Melanie Cecarelli at (860) 493-6878 for more information. 10

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THE POWER OF WOMEN IS UNDENIABLE. A group of passionate, local women launched the United Way Women’s Leadership Initiative (WLI) in October, joining more than 130 United Way women’s efforts across the nation. The Women’s Leadership Initiative will partner with Hartford Community Schools, The Village for Families and Children and Co-opportunity to bring financial education programs to the Alfred E. Burr School, one of Hartford’s Community Schools. Karmela Malone, Founding Member, WLI “Women contribute a great deal of time and resources, and when you bring women to the table, they bring their friends. The Women’s Leadership Initiative harnesses our individual and collective power to make a measurable difference. We saw an opportunity to build an initiative that pulls services together, so families can look at the issues they face with a holistic approach.” Sandra Ward, Director, Hartford Community Schools “Kids exist in the context of families. If you don’t look at the whole family, you can’t help kids succeed. It’s the mission of the Hartford Community Schools to create community hubs and offer services and supports. Families already make use of a wide variety of educational, cultural, health and social services at Burr School. This initiative will add financial education programs.” Charlene Perez, Community School Director, The Village at Alfred E. Burr School "Our student population can be transitional, because there is very little home ownership in the area where our school is located. Being able to provide families with the resources they need to become more financially stable will, in turn, help stabilize our student population." Donna Taglianetti, Executive Director, Co-opportunity “Financial education isn’t really taught in schools. So where do you learn about money? Most people learn about money from their parents, and if you grew up in household where money was an issue, you’re starting off with a deficit. This program will bring an array of financial education programs to Burr School: classes on money management, one-on-one and group financial coaching, and privately funded matched savings accounts. Our hope is to send families on the road to more positive financial behaviors.”


A MORAL RESPONSIBILITY TO HELP: Elsa Núñez, PhD, 2010 Community Service Award Recipient Elsa Núñez, PhD, president of Eastern Connecticut State University (ECSU), received the 2010 Community Service Award – the highest honor given to a United Way volunteer – at United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut’s 86th Annual Meeting on March 31. The award is now given in memory of Dr. Frederick G. Adams, a former United Way board member and community leader who passed away in 1996 from Lou Gehrig’s disease. Dr. Núñez was selected for her commitment to improving education for children, youth and young adults. We recently spoke with her about her achievements and philosophy. What factors influenced you to become so involved with

During your time at ECSU, the school has been nationally

your community?

recognized for a number of things – including academics,

I have always been involved in the communities where I

community service and commitment to green practices.

live and work, and Willimantic has a special significance

How do you view the role of the university in society?

for me. I was born in San Sebastian, Puerto Rico, and

As a public university, ECSU belongs to everyone in our

during the ECSU search process, I discovered that a

state. When you visit our campus, you will see local resi-

number of local residents also come from my hometown!

dents jogging on the track, relaxing in our green spaces

This community has embraced me from the very begin-

and utilizing our library. That’s the way it should be.

ning and I want to reciprocate. I also believe we have a moral responsibility to our urban What led you to become involved with United Way?

centers. In 2009, I started The Hartford Program, which

United Way makes such a deep and substantive contri-

identifies Hartford students with C or D averages who

bution to the community. It does much more than fund

have the capacity to do much better. We bring them to

worthwhile projects: it supports and nurtures nonprofit

Quinebaug Valley Community College and they live in

organizations and helps them evolve and innovate.

ECSU dorms while they do the background work they need to succeed at ECSU. The program has enrolled 80

While at Lesley University, I served on the Board of

kids so far, and we have an 80% retention rate.

Directors of United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley and was involved with their after-school

Our Center for Community Engagement is another proj-

programs. When I came to ECSU, this United Way invited

ect I’m proud of. Through the Center, our students have

me to help shape multiyear targets, strategies and tactics

contributed more than $800,000 worth of volunteer time

for the Community Investment process. I worked on the

to the local community since 2009. They tutor in the high

subcommittee for children’s programs and initiatives.

schools and middle schools, help with park and museum maintenance, and more.

Why the focus on children? Children are our future and it’s up to us to prepare them.

Any words of wisdom for other volunteers?

Connecticut has the largest achievement gap in the nation

No one person can solve our problems, but collectively we

– and we will pay for it if we don’t educate people.

can make a big difference. That’s what Living United is all about. Impact Winter|Spring 2011

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BEST OF AWARDS 12

WALKING THE RED CARPET

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red o n o h rds a w A f tO s ! e 0 1 B 0 y 2 a f W d so e n t g i i n a U p am The c g n i d an t s t u o the


THE RED CARPET WAS BUSTLING WHILE THE CAMERAS FLASHED... And radio and television host Jim Masters interviewed

Best Campaign Kickoff: The Village for Families & Children

campaign celebrities arriving at the first United Way Best

Best Campaign Photo: YWCA Hartford Region and Pepperidge Farm

Of Awards.

Best Fast and Furious Campaign: OKAY Industries Inc. Best Use of Web and New Media: The Phoenix Companies

“What are you hoping to win tonight?”

Best Rise to the Challenge: UTC Power

“Best Video!” “Best In Show!"

Best New Campaign: Timken Aerospace Transmissions LLC Best Partner Agency Campaign: Our Piece of the Pie

From the moment the nominees and guests arrived at the Hartford Club for the Oscar-themed event, anticipation was in the air.

Best Campaign Special Event – Small Company: Vantis Life Insurance Company Best Campaign Special Event – Large Company: ConnectiCare Best Year-Round Partnership: United Technologies Research Center

After the cocktail glasses were emptied, the envelopes

Best Campaign Video: United Technologies Corporation

were opened to reveal the winning campaigns of 2010.

Campaign Coordinator of the Year: Kathy Hersey (employed by

All told, twenty gold statuettes went home with outstanding organizations and individuals who contributed to the success of the 2010 United Way Community Campaign. Cynthia Forbes, 2010 United Way Community Campaign Loaned Executive from Hamilton Sundstrand, presents an award at the Best Of Awards on February 17.

Hartford Hospital) Loyal Coordinator: Ethel Wright (employed by Metropolitan District Commission) Spirit of the Campaign: Hamilton Sundstrand Best In Show – Small Companies: American Nuclear Insurers, and C & S Wholesale Grocers, Suffield Best In Show – Medium Companies: AAA Allied Group, West Hartford, and United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford Best In Show – Large Companies: The Phoenix Companies The United Way Best Of Awards were generously sponsored by All Waste Inc., OKAY Industries Inc., and UTC Power.

Hartford Hospital employees enjoy the United Way Best Of Awards on February 17. Kathy Hersey, who received the Campaign Coordinator of the Year award, proudly displays her statuette.

Don’t forget to enter the Best Of Awards next year! Details will be available in June at Jumpstart campaign coordinator training and at unitedwayinc.org. Impact Winter|Spring 2011

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Y O U R G I F T AT W O R K 14

2 0 1 0 U N I T E D W AY COMMUNITY INVESTMENT RESULTS During 2010, your contributions to the United Way Community Campaign made real change possible. By Living United, our community raised $25.8 million through the 2009 United Way Community Campaign. Those dollars were disbursed during the fiscal year starting July 1, 2010. Special thanks to everyone who gave to United Way Community Investment: your contributions stayed right here in our region, providing the building blocks of a good life for everyone – education, income, health and a safety net of services.

How Your Community Investment Gifts Were Distributed in 2010

How Your Gifts Were Directed in 2010

Of all the dollars you contribute to the

24%

United Way Community Campaign,

6%

Other 501(c)3s

Uncollectible Pledges

only United Way Community Investment dollars are overseen by United Way

4%

volunteers here in our 40 towns.

Other United Ways

4%

They make sure your gift supports education,

33%

Philanthrophy Fund

income, health and safety net strategies

7%

that lead to real, lasting change.

Partner Agencies

12%

Community Health Charities (includes donor designations)

10%

18%

UWCNCT Operational Funding

Income

for fiscal ’10

33%

Education

49%

Health & Safety Net

For a full list of Community Investment partners by interest area and a map of our service area, visit unitedwayinc.org/Partners2010.

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The United Way Community Investment network is at work 365 days a year, helping children, families and everyone in need in our 40 towns. Because you gave to Community Investment, last year…

EDUCATION

INCOME

HEALTH & SAFETY NET

• Almost 1,000 children developed the skills to succeed in kindergarten, such as counting and recognizing the alphabet. • Nearly 2,000 young people improved their academic performance. • Over 1,000 adults improved their parenting skills.

• Nearly 1,880 people improved their career skills. • More than 1,400 adults learned to read and write. • More than 800 people learned budgeting, credit repair and other financial literacy skills.

• Almost 25,000 of our neighbors received a warm meal or a bag of groceries. • More than 4,000 people received free mammograms. • More than 1,200 people got help during disasters such as fires or floods.

WORKING FAMILIES INITIATIVE UPDATE Our United Way launched the Working Families Initiative in 2007 to raise awareness of the issues facing lower-income working families, provide meaningful volunteer opportunities and help families become financially stable. We work with our partners to meet people where they are, providing a range of coordinated services that help them budget wisely, repair and build credit, train for better-paying jobs and save for long-term goals such as owning a home. Here are just a few ways that our Working Families Initiative helped people make ends meet last year. You’ll find more under “Income,” above. Free tax preparation: 300+ volunteers served almost 8,600 clients at Volunteer Income Tax Assistance sites, bringing $14.8 million in tax refunds back to our region – including $5.5 million in Earned Income Tax Credits for lower-income workers. Improving budgeting skills: 105 volunteer Budget Coaches were trained and 73 clients were coached on topics like reducing debt and paying bills on time. 61% of clients graduated and 64 are following a spending plan. Stretching food budgets: 21 volunteers helped screen 840 lower-income clients and submit 400 applications for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, so clients can use their limited income on other bills. Impact Winter|Spring 2011

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Statement of Financial Position – June 30, 2010 Assets Cash and cash equivalents . ............................................................................................................................................. $5,708,198 Money market funds.................................................................................................................................................................. 16,469 Pledges receivable, net of estimated uncollectibles......................................................................................................... 8,480,601 Other receivables...................................................................................................................................................................... 121,046 Investments .............................................................................................................................................................. 12,441,944 Investments held in trust by others................................................................................................................................... 5,426,899 Prepaid expenses and other assets......................................................................................................................................... 161,841 Plant and equipment, net.................................................................................................................................................... 1,994,544 Total assets......................................................................................................................................... $34,351,542

Liabilities and Net Assets Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued expenses....................................................................................................................... $1,688,305 Campaign support due to Community Health Charities.............................................................................................. 1,857,698 Agency program support payable .................................................................................................................................... 8,852,411 Donor designations payable............................................................................................................................................... 3,867,931 Grants payable....................................................................................................................................................................... 1,529,912 Total liabilities..................................................................................................................................... $17,796,257 Net assets Unrestricted ................................................................................................................................................................ $9,370,011 Temporarily restricted..................................................................................................................................................... 516,555 Permanently restricted................................................................................................................................................. 6,668,719 Total net assets................................................................................................................................... $16,555,285 Total liabilities and net assets............................................................................................................. $34,351,542

“I LIVE UNITED by giving one of the things

most precious to me: my time. Seeing how communities benefit from the committed work of volunteers reaffirms my belief that this is time well spent.”

Debi Davis Assistant Program Officer, Local Initiatives Support Corporation, United Way Community Investment volunteer and United Way of North Central Connecticut advisory board member

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“I LIVE UNITED by coordinating rides to kidney dialysis centers for my neighbors. A strong safety net is something we can all count on, whenever we need it!” Pat Swan Avon-Canton United Way advisory board member


Statement of Activities – June 30, 2010 Campaign amounts raised.............................................................................................................................................. $26,322,577

Add:

Contributions from other United Way campaigns, net of donor designations......................................... 409,439 Less:

Uncollectible pledges.......................................................................................................................................... (989,734)

Community Health Charities’ share of campaign proceeds .................................................................. (3,074,335)

Amounts designated by donors.................................................................................................................. (10,690,718)

Net campaign revenue........................................................................................................................... 11,977,229

Other revenue:

Investment income, net of fees of $101,823......................................................................................................... 248,067

Income from trusts held by others........................................................................................................................ 288,826

Community grants, initiatives and service income............................................................................................ 360,338

Administrative fees on amounts raised on behalf of others............................................................................. 338,594

Rental income............................................................................................................................................................ 123,932

Miscellaneous revenues............................................................................................................................................ 685,642

Total other revenue...................................................................................................................................... 2,045,399

Total public support and revenue....................................................................................................... $14,022,628 Community Investment and program services: Community support and gross funds distributed............................................................................................................ 22,415,053 Less:

Community Health Charities’ share of campaign proceeds...................................................................... (3,074,335)

Amounts designated by donors..................................................................................................................... (10,690,718)

Community Investment (program support)............................................................................................ 8,650,000

Grants and initiatives.................................................................................................................................................................. 133,630 Community Investment services........................................................................................................................................... 1,568,096

Total Community Investment and program services................................................................ 10,351,726

Support services:

Resource development.......................................................................................................................................... 2,383,497

Management and general..................................................................................................................................... 1,354,613

Total support services.................................................................................................................................. 3,738,110

Total Community Investment, program and support services............................................................ $14,089,836 Operating surplus/(deficit)...................................................................................................................... ($67,208) Non-operating revenues and expenses:

Realized loss on sale of investments .................................................................................................................. (293,406)

Loss on disposal of assets ...................................................................................................................................... (12,983)

Changes in unrealized gain/(loss) on investments.......................................................................................... 1,864,936

Pension related changes other than net periodic pension cost.......................................................................... 94,705

Change in net assets............................................................................................................................. $1,586,044 Net assets, beginning of year................................................................................................................................................ 14,969,241 Net assets, end of year........................................................................................................................ $16,555,285

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United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut 2010 Volunteers† Board of Directors OFFICERS James Sicilian,* Chair Day Pitney LLP Denise Essenberg,* Vice Chair PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Lori M. Budnick,* Treasurer Blum Shapiro & Company PC BOARD Chester Paul Beach Jr.* United Technologies Corporation Nancy Bernstein Women’s Health Andy F. Bessette* Travelers Jeffrey D. Butler Northeast Utilities Companies Howard L. Carver Retired, Ernst & Young LLP Otto Eichmann Pratt & Whitney Beth D. Ferrari Avon Congregational Church Kevin E. Flaherty* Webster Bank Karen Jarmoc Enfield Orlando C. Kirton, MD Hartford Hospital Gary Kozak Community Health Charities of New England Betty-Lou Kullas Aetna Inc. Peter LaPlaca University of Hartford Angela LaTour Liberty Bank Laurie H. Londergan Deloitte LLP Shawn J. Maynard* Windham Community Memorial Hospital Natalie B. Morris* United Technologies Corporation Raymond P. Necci* Glastonbury Brian A. O’Connell* The Hartford Financial Services Group Reginald R. Paige Sr. Pratt & Whitney

Paul Pita* Pita Group

Ray and Mary Necci Glastonbury

Karen Prendergast Greater Hartford Central Labor Council

Louis and Rhoda Obermeier Weatogue

Wayne S. Rawlins, MD, MBA Aetna Inc. Earl J. Schofield* District 26 IAMAW Pratt & Whitney Chief Charles A. Teale* Retired, Hartford City Fire Department Gregory C. Toczydlowski* Travelers Lindsley Wellman Wellman Consulting Group Christopher Wilkos, ex officio The Phoenix Companies * Executive Committee member

United Way Community Campaign Cabinet Andy F. Bessette, Chair Travelers Dean Andrews Bank of America Michael Bartley Connecticut Department of Labor

David E. Parekh United Technologies Research Center Paul Pita Pita Group Karen Prendergast Greater Hartford Central Labor Council Earl J. Schofield District 26 IAMAW Pratt & Whitney

United Way Community Campaign Loaned Executives

Audit Committee Kevin E. Flaherty, Chair Webster Bank Howard L. Carver Hartford Denise Essenberg PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Betty-Lou Kullas Avon

Avon-Canton United Way Advisory Board Beth D. Ferrari, Chair Avon Congregational Church Liz Brisco Avon Sharon Davies ETA Travel

Angela Ceasar Sponsored by Carrier Corporation

Richard Farina Howard L. Page and Company LLC

Melanie J. Cecarelli Sponsored by UTC Fire & Security and Hartford Hospital

Kathy Hooker Canton

Stephen Chmelowski Sponsored by Day Pitney LLC and United Technologies Research Center

Kay Kellogg Avon Philip Kenyon Travelers Vicki Kuziak The Phoenix Companies

John F. Byrnes R.C. Knox & Company

Tom Fahey Pratt & Whitney Representing IAM Lodge 700

Bill Cholawa Merrill Lynch

Shari Fiveash Sponsored by Pratt & Whitney

Peg Pinton Canton

Brad Drazen NBC Connecticut

Cynthia Forbes Hamilton Sundstrand

Michele Ryan Avon

CJ Hauss Literacy Volunteers of Greater Hartford

Renee Giantonio Sponsored by Aetna

Susan Saidel Canton

Michael Madsen Sponsored by United Technologies Corporation

Duane Starr Avon

Edward Johnson, DDS Saint Francis Hospital & Medical Center Enrique E. Juncadella Guilford Joe Kidder JCPenney Catalog Warehouse

John Phillips-Sandy Sponsored by ING Americas and Otis Elevator Company

Orlando Kirton, MD Hartford Hospital

Jack Rimetz Sponsored by Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Company

Angela LaTour Liberty Bank

Barbara Steadman CIGNA Corporation

A. Ron Lewis III Westinghouse Electric Company

Muriel B. Towhill Sponsored by Webster Bank

Gene Lee Lunman MetLife

18 Impact Winter|Spring 2011 Impact Winter|Spring 2011

Cristi C. Walker Northeast Utilities Companies

Julie A. Mairano Canton

Pat Swan Canton

Benefits and Compensation Committee Natalie B. Morris, Chair United Technologies Corporation Alfred O. Enagbare, PhD Travelers Erin Ridge The Hartford Financial Services Group

† Lists include those who were serving actively as of December 31, 2010.

Roberto Rosario The Hartford Financial Services Group Wayne S. Rawlins Aetna Inc. Robert N. Andrews West Hartford

Changing Community Conditions Committee Laurie H. Londergan, Chair Deloitte LLP Otto Eichmann Pratt & Whitney Enrique E. Juncadella Guilford Nelly Rojas St. Joseph’s College Malia Sieve CT Department of Higher Education Gerri Sullivan Hartford Ann Thomas Independent Consultant James F. Walsh The Hartford Financial Services Group Joyce Willis Bloomfield Ethel Wright Metropolitan District Commission

Community Investment Leadership Council Chester Paul Beach Jr., Chair United Technologies Corporation Laurie Londergan Deloitte LLP Paul N. Kuehn Northeast Utilities Companies

Community Investment Volunteers Ana G. Alfaro Northeast Utilities Companies Lucinda A. Antonacci Farmington Bank Lourdes Ardel Eastern Connecticut State University


Michael Bartley Connecticut Department of Labor Laura A. Brubaker Comcast Corporation Carla Burgess Hartford Hospital Steven J. Casey Northeast Utilities Companies Debi Davis Local Initiatives Support Corporation (L.I.S.C.) Frank L. DeMaio Newington James Devoe The Hartford Financial Services Group

Edward J. Palasek Community Solutions

Marjorie Wilder Marjorie Wilder LLC

Otto Eichmann Pratt & Whitney

Laurie Felice Verizon Business

Brad Palazzo Comcast Corporation

Michael S. Wilder West Hartford

Doe E. Hentschel Leadership Greater Hartford

Garry B. Guertin Pratt & Whitney

Susan Vandorn Pease Central Connecticut State University

Patricia E. Wilson West Hartford

Michael Rion Resources for Ethics and Management

Michael Madsen Springfield, Massachusetts

Lakiesha Reed The Hartford Financial Services Group Jason Rojas Trinity College Stephanie Rubenzahl Literacy Volunteers of Greater Hartford Sarah F. Russell Travelers

Shayna Ellovich YMCA of Greater Hartford

Kenneth B. Safft DST Output

Mary C. Falotico Manchester

Edward A. Santos West Hartford

James V. Gordon The Salvation Army

Sally J. Sinden The Hartford Financial Services Group

LaTasha Hunter Hartford Public Schools Robert Jennette, MD Eastern Connecticut State University

Lloyd O. Smith Bloomfield Terri A. Smolley Bank of America

Britta Johnson Hartford Hospital

Duane Starr Avon

Hans C. Jung Webster Bank

Carolyn H. Stockman YMCA of New Britain-Berlin

John P. Kidwell Glastonbury

Michael Stockman Northside Institutions Neighborhood Alliance

Paul N. Kuehn Northeast Utilities Companies Katherine Levesque Hartford Hospital Srividya Madhusudhan Northeast Utilities Companies Larry W. Michaud Jr. American Eagle Federal Credit Union Harriet Moore West Hartford Stephen Nightingale West Hartford Mickey Orkin Center for Children’s Advocacy Brian Osoba Central Connecticut State University Martha C. Page Hartford Food System

Anne Theriault University of Connecticut Foundation Lauren Turpak Lockton Companies

Adam P. Zinkievich The Salvation Army

Community Service Award Committee Gregory B. Howey, Chair OKAY Industries Inc. Pamela Churchill Churchill and Associates Barbara Fernandez State of Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development Wayne Rawlins, MD, MBA Aetna Inc. Susan J. Sappington West Hartford Earl J. Schofield District 26 IAMAW Pratt & Whitney

Courage Award Judges Carla Burgess Hartford Hospital Ginger S. Crawford Pratt & Whitney William J. Derwin Otis Elevator Company Tammy Doherty J.H. Cohn LLP Peter LaPlaca University of Hartford

Emmy Van Stolk West Hartford

Karen Prendergast Greater Hartford Central Labor Council

Lynn S. Vasquez Northeast Utilities Companies

Esther Pryor West Hartford

Joseph Vaverchak Consolidated School District of New Britain

Michele Sexton Robinson & Cole LLP

James F. Walsh The Hartford Financial Services Group

Dr. Frederick G. Adams Award Committee

Lindsley Wellman Wellman Consulting Group Jennifer L. White The Hartford Financial Services Group

Carmen Britt Bank of America Patricia C. Cobb Hartford Mary Curran Sovereign Bank

Nancy Rion The Vance Foundation E.J. Ososki Travelers

Brian Osoba Central Connecticut State University

Information Technology Committee

Emergency Food and Shelter Program – Local Board

Brian A. O’Connell, Chair The Hartford Financial Services Group

John M. Antao The Conference of Churches

Steve DesRoches United Technologies Corporation

Chris Baker American Red Cross, Connecticut Chapter Pamela J. Brown Enfield Town Departments Anne M. Danaher Jewish Family Services of Greater Hartford Judith Gough Catholic Charities, Inc., Archdiocese of Hartford Gloria J. McAdam Foodshare Deborah V. Rutledge Manchester Area Conference of Churches Ellen Perkins Simpson Friendship Service Center of New Britain Adam P. Zinkievich The Salvation Army

Jennifer Gerasimov Deloitte LLP Frank Giguere The Hartford Financial Services Group Ed Rodham Systems Integration Inc. Maureen See Bank of America Sue Smith United Technologies Corporation

Investment Committee Christopher Wilkos, Chair The Phoenix Companies Lori M. Budnick Blum Shapiro & Company PC Kevin E. Flaherty Webster Bank

Finance Committee

Michael P. Hermsen Babson Capital

Gregory C. Toczydlowski, Chair Travelers

Alan S. Kosan Rogerscasey

Otto Eichmann Pratt & Whitney

Charles Olson Webster Bank

Steve C. Erickson Whittlesey & Hadley

William R. Peelle Jr. Bradley, Foster & Sargent

Lori M. Budnick Blum Shapiro & Company PC

IBM Technology Grant Selection Committee Stacy Defaranos The Hartford Financial Services Group

Nominating and Governance Committee Shawn J. Maynard, Chair Windham Community Memorial Hospital Reginald Babcock Glastonbury Continued » Impact Winter|Spring 2011

19


United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut 2010 Volunteers and Staff† Nominating and Governance Committee continued

Kristen Roy UnitedHealthcare

Nancy Bernstein Women’s Health

United Way of New Britain and Berlin Advisory Board

Reginald R. Paige Sr. Pratt & Whitney Karen Prendergast Greater Hartford Central Labor Council Earl J. Schofield District 26 IAMAW Pratt & Whitney

Lindsley Wellman, Chair Wellman Consulting Group Michael Bartley Connecticut Department of Labor William F. Dowling New Britain Rock Cats

Operations Committee

Michael Gorzoch Gorzoch and Associates

Lourdes Ardel Eastern Connecticut State University

Samuel Irizarry Charter Oak State College

Carla Burgess Hartford Hospital

Ronald Jakubowski Consolidated School District of New Britain

Shirle Moone Childs, PhD Windsor

Enrique E. Juncadella Guilford

Debi Davis Local Initiatives Support Corporation (L.I.S.C.)

Katherine A. McCue McCue Mortgage

Matt Ellis Ameriprise Financial LaTasha Hunter Hartford Public Schools Paul N. Kuehn Northeast Utilities Companies Brian Osoba Central Connecticut State University Martha C. Page Hartford Food System Brad Palazzo Comcast Corporation Jason Rojas Trinity College Jennifer L. White The Hartford Financial Services Group

United Way Day of Caring Committee Paul N. Kuehn, Co-chair Northeast Utilities Companies Beth Stafford, Co-chair Manchester Area Conference of Churches Allison Gormley Community Health Charities of New England Lois Nesci Catholic Charities, Inc., Archdiocese of Hartford 20

Impact Winter|Spring 2011

Srividya Madhusudhan Northeast Utilities Companies Carlos Morales Dunbar Armored Brad Palazzo Comcast Corporation Susan Vandorn Pease Central Connecticut State University William E. Schuch Del Conte, Hyde, Annello & Schuch Carol Zesut New Britain Police Department

United Way of North Central Connecticut Advisory Board Karen Jarmoc, Chair Enfield Maureen Brennan Enfield Foundation for Excellence in Education Steven J. Casey Northeast Utilities Companies Debi Davis Local Initiatives Support Corporation (L.I.S.C.) Robert E. Earley Comcast Corporation

Mary Ellen Kuraska Enfield Faith Scavetta Hallmark Cards Dean Wern Allied Community Services

United Way Staff Susan B. Dunn* President and CEO Paula Gilberto* Senior Vice President Morrisette “Bonnie” Royster Vice President, Relationship Management Thomas Glynn Vice President, Finance and Administration

Christopher Jungers Assistant Director, Donor Relations Individuals Alison Keller Senior Manager, Community Investment Rochelle Kingsley Director, Donor Relations Marisa Lee-Vaught Secretary, Community Investment Kati Liss* Manager, Donor Relations Individuals

Marianne Owens Human Resources Consultant Teresa Thomas Donor Services Assistant

Interns Rachel Epstein University of Connecticut Kayla McAuley Eastern Connecticut State University Angela Marchio Bryant University

Valerie March HR and Payroll Manager

Channon Miller Trinity College

Tomeka Martin* Manager, Pledge Processing and Quality Assurance

*Employed 5 years or more with United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut

Natasha Ansari Finance Associate

Sara Miller* Director, Donor Services

Kimmy Boulier* Receptionist/Secretary

Kate Milton* Assistant Director, Donor Relations

Liz Buczynski Senior Manager, Community Investment

Joanne Kimball Marketing Consultant

Elise Murray* Manager, Business Intelligence

Windham Region United Way Advisory Board Angela LaTour, Chair Liberty Bank

Michael Buller IT Manager

Lindsey Niarhakos* Senior Accountant

Melissa Camacho Manager, Community Investment

Jose Aponte, Vice Chair Quinebaug Valley Community College

Ann T. Péan* Senior Manager, Donor Relations

Patrick Doyle Manager, Community Investment

Lourdes Ardel Eastern Connecticut State University

Brooke Penders Director of Philanthropic Engagement

Paul E. Bushey Social Security Administration

Karyn Durant Assistant, Donor Services

Elaine Pertillar* Administrative Services Senior Associate

Kezia Ferrara Manager of Finance Liz Ferreira Coordinator, Donor Relations Francis Florius Finance Associate Jennifer Gifford* Director, Planning and Assessment Muriel Guerrette Manager, Communications Peter Haentzschel* Administrative Services Assistant

Libby Richardson Manager, Community Engagement

Dawn Ennis Savings Institute Bank Donna M. Evan Nutmeg Broadcasting Company

Jennifer Sprague Manager, Communications

Marisol Feliciano Saint Francis Hospital & Medical Center

Julie Suedmeyer Senior Manager, Community Investment David Taylor Manager, Donor Relations Mechelle Tovar Olórtegui Manager, Donor Relations

Susannah Hogendorn Senior Manager, Communications

Temporary Staff

† Lists include those who were serving actively as of December 31, 2010.

Matt Ellis Ameriprise Financial

Kimberley Russo* Director, Community Investment

Kimberly Hernandez Senior Associate, eBusiness

John Gallacher Enfield Public Schools

Mario Conjura People’s United Bank

Melissa Albert Finance/Donor Services Temp Shelley Benedict* e-Business Consultant, Donor Services

Robert Fernandez Quinebaug Valley Community College Jerry A. James Northeast Utilities Companies Cathleen Paquette University of Connecticut Maribel Sanchez University of Connecticut Tony Santiago Connecticut Department of Labor


If not for her impacted wisdom teeth, who knows where Danielle George would be today. Her part-time jobs did not provide health insurance and Danielle knew she couldn’t pay for surgery out of pocket. So, through a staffing agency, she found an entry level job at Peter Paul Electronics, a manufacturer in New Britain. Fast forward six years, and this former waitress with no previous manufacturing experience is now a supply chain specialist with a staff of four. Danielle has grown within the company and increased her wages by 70 percent, thanks in part to Lean Leadership, a leadership development program supported by the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology’s ADVANCE Training Grant Program through Workforce Solutions Collaborative of Metro Hartford and your gifts to United Way Community Investment through the United Way Community Campaign. Through the Lean Leadership program, Danielle participates in at least six weeks of intense training per year, and she now trains others in lean, efficient practices. Danielle said the training has helped her grow professionally and personally. “I think taking the class got me into the position I am in today,” she said. “It’s helped me advance through the company.” Danielle is also pursuing a bachelor’s degree, something she and Human Resource Manager Judi Spreda said she might not have done if not for the training she has received at Peter Paul. “I have seen a tremendous growth in Danielle,” Spreda said. “We saw something in her she didn’t see in herself. Because of our confidence in her, she has the confidence to go back to school.”

WORKFORCE SOLUTIONS COLLABORATIVE

THE BACKSTORY

FROM ASSEMBLY LINE TO SUPERVISOR, WITH HELP FROM WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

OF METRO HARTFORD

Workforce Solutions Collaborative of Metro Hartford was established and is led by United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut. For more information about the collaborative's work in advanced manufacturing, health care and energy/utilities, and the partners that make it possible, visit workforce-solutions.org.

Impact Winter|Spring 2011

21


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James Sicilian Chair Susan B. Dunn James Sicilian President and CEO Chair Bonnie Royster Susan B. Dunn Vice President, President andManagement CEO Relationship Morrisette “Bonnie” Royster Joanne Kimball Vice President, Marketing Consultant Relationship Management Susannah Hogendorn Joanne Kimball Senior Manager, Marketing Consultant Communications

Impact mag azi ne Susannah Hogendorn Muriel Guerrette Senior Manager, Manager, Communications Communications Jennifer Sprague Muriel Guerrette Manager, Communications Manager, Communications Libby Richardson Jennifer Sprague Manager, Community Manager, Communications Engagement


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