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BOOK REVIEW JIMMY CORRIGAN: THE SMARTEST KID ON EARTH CHRIS WARE PANTHEON BOOKS 4.5/5 This graphic novel is what I deem to be the perfect push for any fence-sitting comics-appreciator who wants to commit to a hearty, existential, and divinely-detailed book. The genesis of Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth sprouted as a 1993 weekly comic strip in a Chicago newspaper. Published in 2003, it re-emerges as a semi-autobiographical story that explores the author’s distant relationship with his estranged father. The title is an instant poke at the 30-year-old protagonist, Jimmy Corrigan, who upon first impression isn’t an inviting or appealing character to be reading about. The man is awkward, timid and mildly pathetic. Throughout the story the reader is witness to moments of Jimmy’s daydreams bleeding into his reality; appearing as surreal visions that desperately speak of his desires and fears. This is a unique quality held by the graphic novel, where it seamlessly weaves The book’s momentum picks up when timeline crossovers become more intricate. Such timelines involve several generations of Corrigan men that can be likened to alternate versions of Jimmy – from arrogant failed father figures, to child-like, anxious Jimmy’s that

A well-sustained, emotional journey over 300 pages, Jimmy Corrigan is comparable to a feature-length movie. As a colour graphic novel, the mood-inducing subtle pastel palette gravitates the story closer to a world we recognise, despite its cartoon depictions. For any artists interested in dabbling a bit in comics too, I can confidently recommend this book as an absolute favourite of many. With its avant-garde comic’s techniques and compelling story, it is bound to inspire. Best snack pairing: Any leftovers microwave-heated to a temperature still containing a small percentage of negligible coldness.

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distant episodes of the psyche and past into the current timeline.

The visual style of the book is precise, clean, and elaborately constructed, panel by panel. Ware’s inventive and architectural compositions are commendable, and encourage multi-perspective reading. While at first it isn’t easy to decipher the comic’s minute details, like any art becomes rewarding to gradually develop a deeper awareness and appreciation for the subtle things.

Gabby Loo read most of this book on the train and says it belongs in the ‘good kush’ of art.

are burdened by abandonment issues.

PERTH FACT TIM WINTON ACTUALLY LIVES IN LANCELIN, I STAYED AT HIS HOUSE ONE TIME WHEN WE HIT A KANGAROO ON THE WAY DOWN TO PERTH

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Profile for UWA Student Guild

Pelican 2016 Edition 7  

Pelican 2016 Edition 7  

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