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Impr int The university of Waterloo’s official student newspaper

Friday, October 9, 2009

Vol 32, No

imprint . uwaterloo . ca

12

making an

Impact

Dinh Nguyen

Edna’s Archive was one of many artistic performances of the KW Region’s IMPACT ’09 Festival. Above left is Rachel Barna, a UW drama student.

T

his fall one multicultural theatre festival is really making an impact in the Kitchener-Waterloo region. The 10-day-long IMPACT Festival brought physical theatre from four continents, recent Canadian intercultural theatre, and opportunities to engage with over 100 performing artists from around the world. The festival included more than 20 programs and 70 public presentations, from workshops to symposia, that were aimed at facilitating exchange within the artistic community, said Andy Houston, a UW professor and an artist researcher with one of the festival’s shows.

range from achieving global harmony to exploring the international stigma of the SARS outbreak. Through the IMPACT Festival, Houston said, “our region has not only been given a chance to show our own work that addresses important questions concerning cultural representation, but has also been able to welcome artists from China, Hungary, Palestine, and elsewhere to address issues of identity with local audiences.” The IMPACT Festival also addressed the changing landscape of the arts in our technological world. “I work in a profession that is struggling to be socially relevant in a world that is changing at a staggering rate thanks mostly to technology,” Houston said. “Technology is bringing diverse cultures together faster and in a

Theatre is a good medium for a community forum and I think it is important for students to recognize this

“Students in this area, both at high school and at the colleges and universities, should care about the IMPACT Festival because this festival is addressing important questions and concerns about Canadian identity,” Houston said. Those questions and concerns

Coverage

Addressing these questions is one of the defining purposes of the IMPACT Festival. “Theatre is a good medium for this kind of community forum and I think it is important for students to recognize this,” said Houston. He added that he hopes the IMPACT Festival will continue to be presented in the future as currently planned. This year’s inaugural festival was organized by The MT Space, a Waterloo region multicultural theatre company, and its artistic director Majdi Bou Matar. araw@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

3

way unimagined even 10 years ago; within this accelerated world, it is important to find a medium through which people and communities can address important questions about who they are and how best to live together.”

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News

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009 news@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Student services complex explored Tejas Koshy staff reporter

R

ecently the Federation of Students proposed a new Student Services Complex. The proposed complex is to be located on parking lot H, which is across Ring Road from the South Campus Hall. At a total estimated project budget of $47.2 million the proposed expansion will calculate to a $49.50 fee per term per student. According to the website (http:// www.studentspace.uwaterloo.ca), the building will be governed by three principles: 1. Bring together several student services that will complement each other and will be more accessible to the majority of students. 2. No need to generate revenue just to cover costs. The university will be covering the maintenance and day-to-costs. 3. Building will be designed and constructed in a collaborative manner. 4. Will focus on academic support services for students. Overall financial costs of the complex

At a total budget of $47.2 million, the undergraduate students, graduate students, UW Food and Retail Services and the university, will cover the proposed expansion. The university will cover 11 per cent of the project budget, which calculates to $5.1 million. Additionally the university will cover the annual operating costs of the complex, which has been calculated to approximately to $1 million. According to the website, this portion of the funding would go towards elements such as a visitors centre, a new large lecture hall and a graduate studies office. UW Food and Retail Services will cover nine per cent of the project budget, which would calculate to $4.2

million. This portion of the funding would cover the Food Services and Retail Services outlets. Undergraduate students will cover a majority of the funding for the project, which would be 65 per cent of the project. This has been calculated to be approximately $30.5 million. The undergraduate’s funding would cover services such as a 24hour study space, movie theatre and the Feds meeting and office space. This would include the undergraduate’s portion of Student Shared Costs The graduate students will cover 15 per cent of the project that has been calculated to be $7.4 million. This portion of the funding will go toward service, which will be used exclusively by the graduates. These would include a graduate pub, lounge, meeting and office space. This would include the graduate’s portion of the Student Shared Costs. The cost to students

According to the website the cost to full-time undergraduate and graduate students will be $49.50 per term, per student. Similar to the proposed Health Services expansion this fee will be added to the current Student Co-ordinated Plan fee. According to the website the $49.50 fee for both graduates has been indexed at 2 per cent per year. It has been planned that students will start paying the fee after the complex has been “substantially completed,” which would be between 2012 and 2013. It has been tentatively calculated that the fee will continue for 20 years, until the capital costs have been paid for. Similar to the Health Services expansion, this would mark the first time that graduate students are paying into the Student Co-ordinated Plan. Student shared costs?

According to the website, the definition of the Student Shared Costs seems to be primarily the upkeep and operating of students services and venues

such as the: • Interior Courtyard Gathering Space (Great Hall) • Counseling Services • Office for Persons with Disabilities (and Exam Centre) • Student Life Office • Writing Clinic • Student Resource Office (formerly Ombudsperson) • Multi-faith Prayer Room • Multi Purpose Room • Additional Bookable Meeting Space Primarily the undergraduates and the graduates will cover the Student Shared costs. Unfortunately at time of print, there was no information pertaining the amount of the Student’s Shared Costs. Nor were there the undergraduates and the graduate’s would share any information with regards to how much of the Student’s Shared Costs respectively. Why the new location?

The proposed location for the new complex will be on the parking lot H. This means that the new complex will be located across the Tatham Centre and South Campus Hall along Ring Road. According to the website, the location was deemed for several reasons, including the following: 1. Allows the university to demonstrate that students are the highest priority at UW. 2. Allows for the preservation of the current green space. 3. Has easy road access for the delivery of food and retail supplies. 4. Is a central location between multiple faculties and near many existing campus life functions. 5. Near several major bus route and student parking lots. 6. Near the probable location of the rail station for the Region of Waterloo’s rapid-transit line. See BUILDING, page 7

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News

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009



Dispute over stolen artifacts causes rift between Egypt and Louvre

Sinead Mulhern intern

Medical aid teams reach out to Indonesian survivors

Foreign medical aid teams have made further progress into Indonesia’s disaster zone, treating victims of the September 30 quake and those suffering from other medical conditions; the West Sumatra province currently has no healthcare system. According to Indonesia’s Disaster Management Agency, the death toll is about 704 and about 180,000 buildings were severely damaged. Various villages were wiped out by landslides, leaving them nearly inaccessible. These barriers prevented aid workers from reaching the survivors sooner and many complained about the delay. At least 20 countries are reaching out to West Sumatra, including the largest humanitarian offering of the U.S. military since the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami which killed about 130,000 in the Aceh province. The focus has switched from the search for survivors to providing medical aid for homeless. Over 400 have been treated in the past few days, but due to the lack of health care, many more await treatment. The earthquake was the worst natural disaster in the world’s most populated Muslim nation since the 2006 earthquake in the main Javanese city of Yogyakarta, killing 6000. CBC reported “two U.S. navy ships were expected to arrive Wednesday or Thursday, along with a USAID flight with 45 tonnes of emergency relief.” On Tuesday 69 U.S. troops, including 11 doctors, set up a 300 bed field hospital in Padang. — with files from CBC and CBS Egypt refuses co-operation with the Louvre

A dispute over the rightful ownership of ancient Egyptian Pharoanic steles from a tomb in the Valley of Kings near Luxor has Egypt severing ties with the Louvre Museum in Paris. The decorative artwork was stolen from Egypt in the 1980s and sold on the black market. Egypt’s head of antiquities Zahi Hawass told the Agence France Press Agency that the Louvre had bought the pieces knowing that they were stolen. Hawass

states that the purchase of stolen artifacts shows that other museums are prepared to support destruction and theft of other Egyptian antiquities. With the absence of Egyptian co-operation with the Louvre, the museum will be affected in upcoming conferences, and an archeological dig on the necropolis of Saqqura south of Cairo will be stunted. While requests for the return of Egyptian antiquities have been ignored by the Louvre several times, claims from the museum are now being made that the process of returning the four steles is in effect. In order for the steles to be returned, the Louvre needs the approval of the National Scientific Commission for Museum Collections of France. Various Egyptian artworks and relics are on display in some of the world’s top museums today. Currently Egypt is enforcing demands to have them returned. — with files from BBC and CBC Obama: Faced with decisions regarding new strategies in Afghanistan

US President Obama has met with top national security advisors in speculation of changing strategies in Afghanistan. The meetings with national security advisors have come eight years after operations in Afghanistan began. Obama is considering new tactics for the increasingly unpopular war. Last week General Stanley McChrystal, a commander appointed by Obama, called for a troop increase — perhaps up to 40,000. Obama has reportedly ruled out cutting the number of troops, but remains unsure whether he will add more. The group is expected to reassemble on October 9 and has one other planned meeting. Obama, however, is not setting a deadline on his decision regarding the war. The issues involving new plans in Afghanistan are not singularly based on troop levels. A key concern is whether U.S. troops should continue to fight the Taliban while securing the Afghani people or whether their focus should be shifted to targeting al-Qaeda militants believed to be hiding in Pakistan using unmanned spy planes and concealed operations. White House spokesman Robert Gibbs told the Canadian Press Monday

that “Obama has stated that leaving Afghanistan is not an option.” The top three U.S. military commanders are in agreement with staying to fight the Taliban, which is where the extra 40,000 troops would be needed. BBC reports McChrystal recently made claims to a London think-tank that previous operations have been under-resourced, underperformed, and in certain cases: under co-coordinated. The strategy regarding the war on Afghanistan must be agreed upon before a decision on troop numbers is to be made. With the current plans of deployment, by the end of 2009 there will be 68 000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan. Canadian troops are due to be pulled out of combat roles in Afghanistan in 2011. — with files from BBC and The Canadian Press Unnecessarily high maternal mortality rate in India

Unnecessary and preventable maternal complications are responsible for the tens of thousands of deaths amongst Indian women. According to Human Rights Watch, the current

mortality rate in India is 16 times higher than in Russia and 10 times higher than in China. This would mean that 1 out of every 70 Indian women of reproductive age will die due to complications with pregnancy, child birth, or unsafe abortions. Aruna Kashyap, lead researcher of Humans Rights Watch, told CBC “75 per cent of maternal deaths [in India] are preventable.” In 2005, approximately 117,000 Indian women died from pregnancy related factors. The medical system in India is easily to blame for the high maternal mortality rates with its poor planning, caste discrimination, lack of accountability, and limited access to emergency care. Heavily populated states Haryanna and Punjab have had a rise in maternal mortality. Inequalities concerning caste, income, and place of residence continue to be issues in every state including those declaring adequate offers of care to pregnant women and mothers. In Uttar Pradesh, large portions of women die from preventable causes. India’s complex caste system proves to be problematic when pregnant women are concerned. The two bottom classes in India’s caste

— with files from BBC and CBC smulhern@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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News

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

Improvements to JobMine? staff reporter

I

f you happen to be one of the 12,000 co-op students applying for jobs this term through the university’s online co-op application program JobMine, you have likely noticed that its recent operation hasn’t been quite up to par. Until recently, the complaints tended to be the same as those heard every year, but on September 29, the problems came to a head when round one postings were set to close. From 6:00 p.m. onwards to midnight (the deadline for applications), students attempting to post resumes and cover letters experienced a multitude of problems. The issues ranged from having trouble uploading job applications, extremely slow operation, and sessions timing out at random, while some students reported not being allowed to log in in the first place. The problems were so severe that a large number of students missed getting all of their applications submitted on time. While many senior co-op students will attest to the fact that JobMine has always been slow, in particular when the system is overwhelmed with activity (for example, the night before postings close), the extent of the problems on September 29 was significantly larger. Many desperate and frustrated students contacted the JobMine Help Desk that evening, furious at not being able to apply to jobs. The Help Desk responded by issuing an apology and extending the window to make postings to 3:00 p.m.

on September 30, and later extended it to 11:59 p.m. once the full extent of the problems became apparent. Reemah Khalid, a faculty of arts senator and vice president internal of the Arts Student Union, was one student affected by the shortcomings of JobMine that evening. She sent an email to both the JobMine Help Desk and Rocco Fondacaro, director of student and faculty relations, Co-operative Education and Career Ser-

And with an ever-expanding co-op program, one does wonder if these problems will continue to get worse. In an attempt to unite students negatively impacted by the shortcomings of the current system, she created a Facebook group entitled “Students for Improving JobMine at Waterloo” as a venue for students to offer constructive suggestions for improving JobMine. Some of the suggestions generated by

It’s frustrating... high volumes [of users] should be expexted and accomodated for as deadlines approach. — Reemah Khalid

Erin Harrison

for the most part, other functions in the system seemed to be operating as usual that evening. However, he pointed out, at some point “users may have thought [JobMine] had stalled or failed, and so started to create new sessions or connections. This resulted in an unprecedented number of sessions on the web servers, which eventually slowed response in the whole application suite.” While there is still an ongoing investigation as to why the resume-related processes were so slow, since the greatest demand on JobMine is the first round of job postings, Naese doesn’t believe that there will be a similar problem again this term. That being said, its operations will be monitored closely, and that CECS and IST will be meeting soon to sort out a way to avoid a repeat of the situation in the coming terms. Joberloo?

vices (CECS), alerting them to the issues she was experiencing. JobMine responded by saying the high volume of students applying for jobs near the midnight deadline caused JobMine to be exceptionally slow and offered to accept her applications after the 11:59 p.m. deadline. While Khalid acknowledges and appreciates the steps taken by the JobMine Help Desk to rectify the problem this time, her real concern is what will happen if these problems occur again, in particular if the problem was as simple as a high volume of users. “It’s frustrating... high volumes [of users] should be expected and accommodated for as deadlines approach.”

the group include a notification system for when a job you have applied for is screened or if you have been selected for an interview, and the option to upload PDF or word documents as resumes or cover letters instead of the current system which requires applicants to use HTML. When contacted about the situation, CECS was quite forthcoming. In a response from Olaf Naese of the Communications and Public Relations department, the service outage was due to heavy load on the servers “due to the upload and resume attachment functions.” He pointed out that JobMine did not actually fail, and

For the past several years, the university has been working on building a new information system that will support the co-op hiring process as a replacement for JobMine. The project, code named Joberloo, aims to simplify the system for users and improve job matching and information exchange while also accommodating high levels of traffic as was seen on September 29. To its credit, both IST and CECS have tried to involve both employers and students in the development of the new tool, but as of yet, a launch date hasn’t been announced, although it is projected to be in Winter 2010. eharrison@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

proposed

student services complex

location: H lot tentative completion date:

** Building will not be exactly as shown

Addressing students’ needs for increased... Emotional Support t Spiritual Space t Student LIfe t

Office and Meeting Space t Entertainment t Academia t

Services and Resources t Social Space t Study Space t

For more information on the proposed Student Services Complex, and to provide us with your feedback visit 90793

www.studentspace.uwaterloo.ca


News

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009



BUILDING: questions and opinions

Decisions about construction

According to the website, there will be student consultation during the months of September and October. This consultation is intended to provide guidance for the design of the proposal and to ensure that student’s feedback is considered. Depending on the results of the feedback received, some changes to the proposal may result.  The Federation of Students’ Council will vote on the initiation of a referendum for undergraduates on October 18.  Similarly, the Graduate Student Association Board of Directors will vote on the initiation of a referendum for graduate students at its October meeting.  If the votes pass, the tentative date for the online referendum would be in mid-November 2009. Feds councilor Sam Andrey added, “Should the referendum pass, a committee with a student majority will be tasked with finalizing all aspects of the building and will consult with students again regarding more specific plans” Not expanding the SLC

Alan Babor, the president of the Federation of Students, he highlighted the fact that the Student Life Centre has seen two phases of expansion over the last 17 years. He also noted that all abilities to expand the SLC out and up have been exhausted, and any possible expansion (i.e. over the parking lot) would simply not accommodate the need the 135,000 square foot Student Services Complex will provide. Connecting the new complex

Babor noted the fact that currently an architect has not been hired to investigate the design of the new building. This phase will follow a successful referendum. There may be possibilities to expand to one of the underground tunnels connecting TC and SCH, however nothing is confirmed at this time. Interestingly, Babor noted that the west side of parking lot H is reserved for a new faculty facility, so there may be opportunities to incorporate the two buildings together in the future. Retailers and the new building

According to Babor, the new building will not need to generate revenue to cover operating costs given the university’s undertaking to provide the maintenance and upkeep Babor noted that this means that external retailers to the university will not have space in the new Student Services Complex. Food Services,

Babor highlighted the fact that the new proposed location for the Student Services building would allow for the preservation of current green space, and could be constructed with little disruption to current campus functions. What about the potential for the student places (SLC and the proposed Student Services building), to be split up along faculty lines? Babor said that no concerns about this have been brought up. What he did say that Feds realized that there might be natural demographics that flow to each building for various reasons. According to Babor, proximity and service will be main factors in which facilities students choose to use in a given day. Babor was of the opinion that students will simply be given another choice as to what building or facility they could use.

Areas of student activity

According to Babor, the SLC will remain as the “campus living room.” The Davis Centre and Dana Porter Libraries will remain a focal point for silent and group study and academic resources. The SLC multi-faith prayer rooms will still be a central point for many students to practise their religion. Essentially, the Student Services Complex will add yet another option for students to explore and utilize to fulfill these needs, alleviating the congestion and limitations the current facilities face. However Babor did note that one noticeable change would be the centralization of some of “core services” into a key location. These services, with the new building, will have the space needed to expand to support students and provide additional resources and opportunities for students. According to the FAQ, the Student Services Complex will “provide space for support services for student success and to enhance space available to students for informal learning and gathering.”

In general, most people seem to think it’s a very good idea. But at the same time, they feel that the information that’s been passed along is not concrete enough, and there’s not enough detail involved with what has been passed along. Among first years, many of them don’t know about the building as a whole or even that the referendum is coming. Basically, the last major point that being made is that some people are finding it misleading with the fact that the health services complex and the student services complex are combined, but most people seem to not understand the fact that they’re two different votes. — Brad Moggach Arts Student Union President

An academic focus?

Babor noted that the current plan is that, in comparison to the Student Life Centre, the Student Services Complex will have increased resources dedicated to the academic experience.

Standards and parking

Babor highlighted the fact that there will be efforts made to incorporate green initiatives in and around the Student Services Complex. It will be built to a LEAD Silver standard. Babor mentioned that there is no intention of including a subterranean parking lot into the plan. The current plan is that the current parking lot (H), allocated to visitor parking, will be shifted elsewhere as identified in the UW Campus Master Plan. The current plan has created a transportation demand management system that will focus its efforts on reducing the reliance on cars, and will be focusing on pedestrian passages and public transit. Andrey added, “I want to stress that no student lots would be lost — Lot H is only a visitor’s parking lot — and that a plan is in the works by the University to build a new parking garage and/or underground parking to increase the supply of spaces on campus.” Purpose of the complex

Babor noted that the main purpose of this building is to enhance the student experience while at the University of Waterloo. It is a reaction to the constant desire of students for enhanced space on campus, addressing our “outside the classroom” needs, while creating new and exciting environments for students to congregate, learn and grow on campus. Babor highlighted that the organic nature by which the campus and services has grown over the past five decades. According to Babor this left the students with fragmented services and limitations on space. The proposed complex is a partnership between the Feds, GSA, and the university to alleviate these constraints in anticipation of growing demands.

There hasn’t been a lot of chatter on this topic around the EngSoc office, but from a quick poll it seems like engineering students are happy to have more space for student services and to have them all in one place. — Cat Hay Engineering Society ‘B’ President

Personally, I am strongly in favour of the two proposals and most reactions that I have heard thus far have been extremely positive and in favour of both buildings. These buildings are desperately needed additions to campus life. One of the goals of our faculty as well as the Environment Student Society is to increase the amount and quality of student spaces for our students. We’ve committed to doing that, especially in our planned new building so it is very exciting to see that FEDS and the rest of campus are all moving in the same direction. — Scott Hindle Environment Students Society President

According to the website, UW students have been consistently indicating a desire for enhanced space on campus. According to a 2008 National Survey of Student Engagement, apparently the top desires were more study space, expanded social services, and a better social environment. As the student population grew, it became apparent that there was a definite need to expand the current space on campus. Therefore representatives from the Federation of Students and the Graduate Student Association approached the university administration in 2008 about collaborating and sharing the financial costs to make this project a reality. Feds and the Graduate Student Association developed the proposal for this complex over the past year

Location

Rational for a new building

I haven’t heard anything about it. — William Sellier MathSoc President

There are already several proposed resources to be included in the complex. These could potentially cover a wide area of resources that included university services and resources, social space, academic resources, and student life. Potential services include a visitor centre and new retail services. It will include new social spaces such as an interior courtyard, a multi-purpose room, and a graduate student lounge. It will include an expanded writing clinic and Office for Persons with Disabilities. Additionally a 24-hour study space, which has been designed to be larger than the one currently offered in the Davis Centre Learning Commons, is part of the proposed complex. For entertainment purposes, the complex will include a movie theatre. While it will include some “entertainment” services, the complex is not intended to replace the SLC as the centre of student social life.

Retail Services, the Federation of Students, and the Graduate Student Association will oversee any retail in the Student Services Complex. No plans have been made to move the existing tenants of the SLC to the SSC with the exception of the Student Resource Office (formerly Ombudsperson).

Proposed resources


Campus Bulletin UPCOMING

UW RECREATION COMMITTEE

Monday, October 12, 2009 TVO is on the hunt for Ontario’s best lecturer with their 2010 Best Lecturer Competition. Lots of nominations are taking place. New categories this year is favourite professor and Facebook fan page. For further info email Sally at Sally.Byun@can.ddbpr.com or www.tvo.org/bigideas. Tuesday, October 13, 2009 Global National with anchor Kevin Newman will be live from Kitchener City Hall at 5:30 p.m. with national, international and local news. Thursday, October 15, 2009 WaTSA presents “Interview Skill Session” from 5 to 7 p.m. in MultiPurpose Room, SLC. The session will aid students with what to expect at an interview and how to approach each question. All are welcome! October 15-17, 2009 Grand opening of Conestoga Mall, Waterloo, 130,000 square foot addition from 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Enjoy the art-inspired festivities. For more info info@conestogamall.com. Friday, October 16, 2009 Art is transforming downtown Kitchener – you are invited to experience “Rust, Oil and Rainbows,” an ArtDowntown Spectacle. Paul Roorda at Critical Media Lab, 195 King Street at 6 p.m. ; Andy McMurry at Critical Media Lab, 195 King Street at 7 p.m. and Ian Birse and Laura Kavanaugh at City Hall, Berlin Tower at 8 p.m. Visit criticalmedia.uwaterloo.ca for other projects. Thursday, October 22, 2009 UW World Vision will be holding an African Water Walk. All proceeds go to help build a well in an African city. For more info and pledge forms, visit www.uwwv.ca or email us at more info@uwworldvision.clubs.feds.ca. October 24 & 25, 2009 Indie Lounge – interested in producing films? The Grand River Film Festival is hosting a series of film workshops and stunt demos. Visit www. GRFF.com for more info. Thursday, November 5, 2009 Femfest 2009 fundraiser – a celebration of women – 6:30 to 10 p.m. at the Schwaben Club, Kitchener. Come for an evening of free pampering and do some shopping in our silent auction. Check out www.sascwr.org for ticket and event details.

UW Recreation Committee events are open to all employees of the University of Waterloo. Register by emailing UWRC@uwaterloo.ca. UW Book Club meetings – October 21 – “Dreams from my Father” by Barack Obama ; November 18 – “So Brave, Young and Handsome” by Leif Engler ; December 16 – “Child 44” by Tom Rob Smith. Details www. uwrc.uwaterloo.ca. Thursday, October 29: “Blogging with Aimee Morrison,” 12 noon, HH 334. Thursday, November 19: “Entertaining Like a Caterer,” 12 noon, HH 334. Monday, November 23: “Humour in the Workplace,” 12 noon, DC 1302. St. Jacob’s Country Playhouse – last call to order discount4ed tickets to the Robin Hood Pantomime. Exchange Board – looking to rent, buy or sell? UWRC.uwaterloo.ca/exchange_board. More info email Margaret at mulbrick@uwaterloo.ca. Lots of discounts available for UW employees – CN Tower, Ontario place, Empire Theatre, Galaxy Theatre, Kitchener Auditorium, Princess Cinema, VIA rail and more ... email Shirley at schatten@uwaterloo.ca.

VOLUNTEERING Student representation wanted! One year appointment available (2010) to be on the Regional Growth Management Strategy/Rapid Transit Public Advisory Committee. Resume deadline is Friday, October 16/09. For more info www.region.waterloo. on.ca/rgms or call 519-575-4757, ext 3097. Shadow needed to be paired with international students. Show them around and make their stay in Waterloo more enjoyable. Make friends and expand your knowledge. Please apply at www.iso.uwaterloo.ca. Volunteer with a child at their school and help improve their self-esteem and confidence. One to three hours a week commitment. Call Canadian Mental Health at 519-744-7645, ext 229. City of Waterloo has volunteer opportunities. For info call 519-8886478 or www.waterloo.ca/volunteer. The Distress Centre needs volunteers to provide confidential, supportive listening on our crisis and distress lines. Complete training provided.

Call 519-744-7645, ext 300. Volunteer Action Centre, 519-7428610 / volunteer@volunteerkw.ca, for all your volunteering needs! Deliver or befriend through Community Support Connections. Deliver meals, drive seniors to appointments or visit one for a few hours each week. Contact Kate Lavender at 519-772-8787 or katel@communitysupportconnections.org. Hey Hot Stuff! Volunteering at Imprint is fun, easy, helps you meet people and boosts resumes and grad school applications. All welcome, regardless of experience. volunteer@ imprint.uwaterloo.ca. Volunteers needed – The English Tutor program is in constant need of volunters to tutor international students. Volunteering is an essential prt of student life at UW. Apply online at www.iso.uwaterloo.ca. Speak Laos? Volunteer visitor required for a woman with Alzheimer’s Disease who speaks Laos. Two hours per week. Training/support provided by Alzheimer Society. Jill jmercier@alzheimerkw. com. Resume builder.

CAREER SERVICES WORKSHOPS Sign up for these workshops at www. careerservices.uwaterloo.ca. All workshops are held in the William M. Tatham Centre for Co-operative Education and Career Services. Thursday, October 28 – Interview Skills: Selling Your Skills – 4:30 to 6:00 p.m., TC 2218. Note: there is a prerequisite for this workshop. Please see Workshop Registration at the end of these listings. Work Stratagies for the International Students – 2:00 to 3:30 p.m., TC 2218. Wednesday, October 28 – 4:30 to 6:00 p.m., TC 2218. Note: First hour of the session covers general work search stratigies; last half hour details visa requirements. There is a prerequisite for this workshop. Please see Workshop Registration at the end of these listings. Thursday, October 13 – Successfully Negotiating Job Offers – 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., TC 1208. Note: This workshop is geared toward graduating students. Are You Thinking About Med School? Perspectives of a Waterloo Grad – 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., TC 2218. Wednesday, October 14 – Law School Applications – 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., TC 2218. Writing CVs and Cover Letters – 12:00 to 1:30 p.m., TC 2218. Note: Go to the CTE website to register for this workshop: cte.uwaterloo.ca/events_registration/CUT_events.html. Thursday, October 15 – Success on the Job – 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., TC 1208. Exploring Your Personality Type (My-

LSAT MCAT GMAT GRE Preparation Seminars • Complete 30-Hour Seminars • Convenient Weekend Schedule • Proven Test-Taking Strategies • Experienced Course Instructors • Comprehensive Study Materials • Simulated Practice Exams • Limited Class Size • Free Repeat Policy • Personal Tutoring Available • Thousands of Satisfied Students

OXFORD SEMINARS 1-800-269-6719 416-924-3240 www.oxfordseminars.ca

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009 ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca ers-Briggs Type Indicator) Part 1 – 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., TC 1112. Part 2 – Thursday, October 22 – 10:30 a.m. to 12:30, TC 1112. Note: There is a materials charge of $10.00 payable at Career Services prior to the first session. Once you have registered and paid, you will be given information on how to complete the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) online. The online test must be completed a few days prior to the workshop date. Monday, October 19 – Career Interest Assessment (Strong Interest Inventory) – 2:30 to 4:00 p.m., TC 1112. Note: There is a materials charge of $10.00 payable at Career Services prior to the first session. Once you have registered and paid, you will be given information on how to complete the Strong Interest Inventory online. The online test must be completed a few days prior to the workshop date. Teaching Philosophy Statement – 10:00 to 11:30 a.m., TC 2218. Note: Go to the CTE website to register for this workshop: cte.uwaterloo.ca/events_registration/CUT_events.html. Wednesday, October 21 –Professional and Post Degree Days – 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., SLC Great Hall – Thursday, October 22 – 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., SLC Great Hall. Monday, October 26 – Working Effectively in Another Culture – 3:00 to 4:30 p.m., TC 2218. Acedemic Interview – 12:00 to 1:30 p.m., TC 2218. Note: Go to the CTE website to register for this workshop: cte.uwaterloo.ca/events_registration/ CUT_events.html. Tuesday, October 27 – Business Etiquette and Professionalism – 2:30 to 3:30 p.m., TC 2218. Profesional School Interviews – 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., TC 1208. Careers in Public Service – 4:30 to 6:00 p.m., TC 2218. Interview Skills: Preparing for Questions – 3:30 to 5:00 p.m., TC 1208. Wednesday, October 28 – 4:30 to 6:00 p.m., TC 1208. Note: There is a prerequisite for this workshop. Please see Workshop Registration at the end of these listings. Workshop Registration Required Modules at cdm.uwaterloo.ca – if you have completed any of these modules in the Career Development eManual or Co-Fundamentals (PD1, COOP 101, Co-op Fundamentals for Engineering or Co-op Fundamentals for Pharmacy) you have satisfied this requirement and may register for the workshop. To register for Interview Skills: Preparing for Questions, complete this module within Marketing Yourself Interview Skills ; To register for Interview Skills: Selling Your Skills, complete this module within Marketing Yourself Interview Skills ; To register for Networking 101, complete this module within Marketing Yourself Work Search ; To register for Work Search Strategies, complete this module within Marketing Yourself Work Search. To access the module, go to cdm.uwaterloo.ca and select the UW student version of the Career Development eManual.

STUDENT AWARD & FINANCIAL AID For all in-person inquiries, including OSAP funding pickup, your SIN card and government issued, valid photo ID are required. Please note that the BIYD card CAN NOW be accepted as photo ID. October 23: OSAP application deadline (full funding) – fall and winter or fall, winter and spring applications. October 27: deadline for OSAP Reviews. OSAP funding pickup will take place from September 8 to 29 in the Tatham Centre by appointment only. Visit safa.uwaterloo.ca for a full listing of scholarships and awards.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

“In The Mind’s Eye 2009: Issues of Substance Use in Film + Forum” – offers a very rare glimpse into the world of drug and/or alcohol use through films, workshops and keynote presentations. In The Mind’s Eye is unique in North America and is held at locations throughout Waterloo region in October and November. For more info visit www.inthemindseye.ca or call the hotline at 519-575-4757, ext 5016. Tune in to Sound 100.3 FM radio to hear DJ Cool, Mondays 4:30 to 6 p.m. and Fridays 7 to 10 a.m., with lots of music, entertainment, helpful info, weather and more. www.soundfm.ca >listen or www.ckmsfm.ca. Bereaved Families of Ontario, Midwestern Region mailing address is P.O.Box 25017, Kitchener, ON, N2A 4A5 ; telephone 519-894-8344 ; www. bfomidwest.org. Location/shipping address is Grand River Hospital, Freeport Health Centre, Pioneer Terrace, Second Floor, 3570 King Street, E., Kitchener, ON, N2A 2W1. Office of the Vice-President, Academic & Provost released an update on H1N1 Influenza related absences on September 21 to all UW faculty, staff and student associations. See the Daily Bulletin, September 22 edition and Imprint, September 18 edition, page 14 for all up-to-date info on H1N1.

ONGOING MONDAYS Gambling can ruin your life. Gamblers Anonymous, 7 p.m. at St Marks, 825 King Street, W, basement.

Classified SERVICES Does your thesis or major paper need a fresh pair of eyes to catch English spelling and grammar errors? Thesis English editing, $50/hour. Five business day turnaround. Neal Moogk-Soulis, ncmoogks@uwaterloo.ca.

HELP WANTED

The Bauer Kitchen is “Coming Soon” and is accepting resumes for experienced servers, bartenders and cooks. We are also accepting applications for hosts, bussers and dishwashers. If you are a positive, dynamic and spirited individual who possesses a passion for food, wine and service, please apply in person on October 14 to 16, between the hours of 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Wildcraft, 425 King Street, N., Waterloo, ON, N2J 2Z5. www.thebauerkitchen. ca. Weekend counsellors and relief staff to work in homes for individuals with developmental challenges. Minimum eight-month commitment. Paid positions. Send resume to Don Mader, KW Habilitation Services, 108 Sydney Street, Kitchener, ON, N2G 3V2. Cora Breakfast/Lunch – now hiring for new location at Waterloo Town Square. To be considered for a position you must attend the interviews held at the Knox Presbyterian Church (50 Erb Street, W) on October 16 from 4 to 9 p.m. or October 17 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Bring two copies of your resume. Grand opening is November 16. Systems Administrator – up to 15 hours/week at $11/hour. Candidates will have Webmail server administration experience, be familiar with medium scale Linux network administration, SAMBA file management, Windows XP workstations, LDAP authentication and Apache admin. Duties include maintaining and strengthening our office’s network system. Applicants must be full-time students and eligible for OSAP. Please send resume to editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca.


Opinion

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009 opinion@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Holidays and Identity

Friday, October 9, 2009 Vol. 32, No. 12 Student Life Centre, Room 1116 University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 P: 519.888.4048 F: 519.884.7800 http://imprint.uwaterloo.ca

editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

T

hanksgiving is lucky. Like New Years and Good Friday and “Family Day,” it has official government backing. But the same is not so with most special days; most don’t have official government backing or recognition, and are either corporate or grassroots movements. For instance, there’s “Talk like a pirate day,” which is every September 19. It was made up by two guys from Oregon, and is awesome. Some guys in my high school were intent on declaring some days “National Skip Day” or “National no-bra day.” Object lesson: people or groups try and start holidays all the time. However, not every new holiday has the same lightheartedness; some are more important. Every year October 11 is “National coming out day.” It’s a day where people, notably queer people, are encouraged to accept their sexual orientation and disclose it to their friends and family. If someone knows they’re gay but has been hiding it from their parents, it is the day to come out of the closet. GLOW, our on-campus queer and questioning

Editor-in-chief, Michael L. Davenport editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Advertising & Production Manager, Laurie Tigert-Dumas ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca General Manager, Catherine Bolger cbolger@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Ad Assistant, Tony Tang Sales Assisstant, vacant Systems Admin., vacant Distribution, Sherif Soliman Distribution, Garrett Saunders Intern, Paige Leslie Volunteer co-ordinator, Angela Gaetano Board of Directors board@imprint.uwaterloo.ca President, Sherif Soliman president@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Vice-president, Anya Lomako vp@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Treasurer, Lu Jiang treasurer@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Secretary, Erin Thompson secretary@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Staff liaison, Caitlin McIntyre liaison@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Production Staff Natasha Gandhi, Angela Gaetano, Jacqueline McKoy Lambert, Adisade Dare, Duncan Ramsay, Deanna Ostafichuk, Paula Trelinska, Sherif Soliman, Felicia Rahaman, Andrew Dodds, Ivan Lui, Chantal Desereville, Mraham Ceaser, David George-Cosh, Paul Collier Graphics Team Ian Cutajar, Xiaobo Liu, Alcina Wong, Kevin Liang Imprint is the official student newspaper of the University of Waterloo. It is an editorially independent newspaper published by Imprint Publications, Waterloo, a corporation without share capital. Imprint is a member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association (OCNA). Editorial submissions may be considered for publication in any edition of Imprint. Imprint may also reproduce the material commercially in any format or medium as part of the newspaper database, Web site or any other product derived from the newspaper. Those submitting editorial content, including articles, letters, photos and graphics, will grant Imprint first publication rights of their submitted material, and as such, agree not to submit the same work to any other publication or group until such time as the material has been distributed in an issue of Imprint, or Imprint declares their intent not to publish the material. The full text of this agreement is available upon request. Imprint does not guarantee to publish articles, photographs, letters or advertising. Material may not be published, at the discretion of Imprint, if that material is deemed to be libelous or in contravention with Imprint’s policies with reference to our code of ethics and journalistic standards. Imprint is published every Friday during fall and winter terms, and every second Friday during the spring term. Imprint reserves the right to screen, edit andrefuseadvertising.Onecopypercustomer.Imprint ISSN 0706-7380. Imprint CDN Pub Mail Product Sales Agreement no. 40065122. Next staff meeting: Tuesday, October 6 12:30 p.m. Next board of directors meeting: TBA

always been able to vote, we’ve always been able to own property, and we’ve always been able to marry. And straight white guys are everywhere. There’s me. There’s the president of the university, David Johnston. There’s the Prime Minister of Canada, Stephen Harper. Reminders that some people are straight white men are not in short supply. But coming out day serves as a reminder itself: not everyone is like I am. Not everyone is a straight white man; furthermore not everyone even considers those distinctions as binary. Besides all of that, there’s a message behind coming out day I find particularly agreeable. It’s about not only thinking about who you are, but being true to that self. To me, that’s the biggest lesson of all: nobody should have to carry on lying to themselves, or lying to their co-workers, or lying to your family. You are who you are, and everyone should be okay with that. As far as government-unrecognized holidays go, “coming out day” is among the most important.

Community Editorials Beware of this new wide-spread disease

While this tragic disease does not get the attention it deserves, its effects are greatest on those who do not suffer from the disease

With all the news about the H1N1 flu, I would like to remind you all about a deadly disease that never gets the public attention it deserves: Backobusphobia. This disease is very common on the GRT bus system during peak hours in the fall semester. Symptoms include

lack of ability to perform basic tasks such as following instructions by the bus driver and the fear of moving up steps. Suggested possible causes of this are frosh who are unaccustomed to public transit and lazy people. While this tragic disease does not get the attention

it deserves, its effects are greatest on those who do not suffer from the disease. These innocent folk are left standing outside waiting for another bus to come pick them up because a bus had passengers suffering from Backobusphobia. So I urge you, as you think about H1N1,

Editorial Staff Assistant Editor, Adrienne Raw Head Reporter, vacant Lead Proofreader, vacant Cover Editor, Katrina Massey News Editor, vacant News Assistant, Clara Shin Opinion Editor, vacant Opinion Assistant, Rosalind Gunn Features Editor, Keriece Harris Features Assistant, Simone Toma Arts & Entertainment, Dinh Nguyen Arts & E. Assistant, Robyn Goodfellow Science & Tech Editor, Bogdan Petrescu Science & Tech Assistant, Shirley Ma Sports & Living Editor, Brent Golem Sports & Living Assistant, Komal R. Lakhani Photo Editor, Peter Kreze Photo Assistant, Sophie Sanniti Graphics Editor, Peter N. Trinh Graphics Assistant, Sonia Lee Web Administrator, Paul Collier Web Assistant, Xiaobo Liu Systems Administrator, vacant System Administrator Assistant, vacant

centre, is having a series of “coming out week” events, from October 13 to October 16. In that spirit, here goes. I’m straight. Even more, I’m a straight, white man. Now, being a straight white man, one could argue that coming out day isn’t really “for” me. And while being straight means I don’t exactly have a lot of “coming out” to do, I still see a lot of value in coming out day. Coming out day gets me to think about identity in general. I’ll have probably worn out the words “straight white man” already, but if you were to get me to identify myself, none of those terms would come to mind. I would think “geek,” or “photographer,” or “scientist.” But I suppose that’s part of the point: by default, I wouldn’t think about being a straight white man because I’m a straight white man. We’ve never been a disadvantaged class in Canada. With some rare exceptions (child custody case discrimination comes to mind) able-bodied straight white men haven’t had to do a whole lot of fighting for equal rights; we’ve

please do your best to prevent the spread of Backobusphobia by doing your part. Luke Bovard 3B Mathematical Physics

UW MANIPULATING PUBLIC OPINION? UW will be co-sponoring a conference in Ottawa on October 25 and 26 called, “Nuclear power in society: Finding the balance.” The University of Waterloo, through the Waterloo Institute for Sustainable Energy, along with the Council for Clean and Reliable Electricity, is co-sponsoring a conference in Ottawa on October 25 and 26 called, “Nuclear power in society: finding the balance.” The stated aim of the Conference is to foster, ‘...a constructive dialogue on the role that nuclear may play in a national and global strategy to help us adapt to the challenge of meeting society’s energy needs while reducing our reliance on fossil fuels.” It is interesting that this

dicussion is supposed to take place with no reference to other sources of power and the word “renewable” is never used in the description of the conference or in the information about the “Conference for clean and reliable elecricity.” Instead, only proponents of nuclear power, such as the CEOs of Atomic Energy of Canada, Bruce Power, and the executive director of the Waterloo Institute for Sustainable Energy, will be speaking. No opponents have been invited to attend even though they have offered to participate. In fact, the mandate of the Council

for Clean and Reliable Electricity is to, “promote the generation, transmission and distribution of clean, affordable and reliable electricity.” The website of the Canadian Nuclear Asssociation claims that nuclear power is, “clean,affordable and reliable.” However,the council also claims, at the same time, to be a, “non-profit organization that was formed to provide a platform for open public dialogue and a solutions-oriented approach to the challenges of the energy sector.” It is obvious that the real objective of the conference is to promote

nuclear power; and the University of Waterloo, by letting the conference use its name, is giving legitimacy to this attempt to hide the real motive of this conference which is to manipulate public opinion. Wolfe Erlichman President Community Coalition Against Mining Uranium (CCAMU)


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Opinion

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

The turkey dump is upon us funny thing is, I truly feel pain in my chest, as if my heart was actually breaking inside of me. Psychologically or not, my entire body seems to shut down if I am shut out from love. I wish I could find the perfect analogy, or the perfect metaphor to describe the darkness one feels when abandoned. The weight of the broken heart is too much to bear for many people. Every time I had a breakup, I have tried to compose myself in the most sane way possible. I would remove everything about my ex from my life. Fill up boxes of stuff, delete pictures, contact information, and even their friends... all purged. I didn’t know any other way to get through it, other than pretending that it never happened. There were a few times I failed miserably, though. I have left bars or socials in tears, avoided certain people, and secretly hated any of my friends who would interact with my exes. I would take extra care to look my best if I knew my ex was going to be around. I would try to do impressive things, and somehow hope that my ex would get word of it. I would try to appear as normal, cool, and happy as possible when I would run into an ex. I even remember befriending my exes friends, in hopes to get a glimpse of the one who got away. There’s just something about heartache that ruins

the better parts of us. We cocoon our life around thoughts that you’ll never find someone that good again, or no one will ever want to be with me, or no one will ever match you or love you the same way again. I remember emailing an ex that took me over a year to get over, and telling him that even though I had a new boyfriend (whom was very short lived), I still loved my ex. If I were dating someone new, and they did that behind my back – I would be devastated. I have never liked the person I became when I was newly single; being newly single is complete social destruction for many of us. I have never been the type to seek meaningless interaction with people from a bar, or just in general – so to fill the void of loneliness I would try to find things I could be proud of. When you don’t want to get out of bed, and you don’t enjoy doing anything, you can certainly guess that nothing you do will make yourself internally proud. Only after you can eat again, only after you can function normally (or at least on the outside), can you get yourself out there and try things to fill the void. The worst breakup thus far of my life landed during the fall season one year. By the time the winter rolled around, I was dying of loneliness, but I still wasn’t ready to date anyone new yet. Out of absolutely nowhere one day, I went

ian cutajar

to the nearest snowboard shop, and bought myself a new partner. My new partner was my snowboard. I had never snowboarded a day in my life until the day I bought that board. I remember spending nights on Chicopee, falling down again and again, bruised, tired, and beaten. I remember falling so hard one time that I knocked the wind out of myself so violently that all I could do was lay with my back to the snow, trying to gasp a breath of air, staring at the night sky. A tear rolled down my

• Go onto YouTube and look up some breakup videos. I suggest Kandee Johnson’s breakup advice - http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=jrEHoKQOIa4. • Learn how to bake the best cookies imaginable. If you mess it up the first time, then you have something else to keep you busy. If you don’t want to eat a whole batch of cookies, it looks like you’re going to have to find some human interaction to hand them off to people. It’s a win-win!

I have never liked the person I became when I was newly single; being newly single is complete social destruction for many of us.

face, and I remember thinking “this is the first tear I have cried that wasn’t about him since he left.” It’s sounds so stupid, and so silly, but that tear was the first sign to let me know that I was doing better. That I was going to be okay. That being alone, cold, and broken is much better than not living at all. You never know exactly when you have moved on from someone, and in some cases, people never move on. Don’t hate yourself for being so hung up on someone for the rest of your life, just take it one day at a time. Each day you make it though without doing something crazy, consider that a win. One day at a time, and before you know it, months and years will pass and you will struggle to find out what exactly it was that left you so broken hearted in the first place. Stay strong and know that in the future you will look back on this time, and you can choose right now if you want to be proud or ashamed of the way you will remember this time. Here are a couple of things that can keep you busy while your mind tries to heal itself. • Make a list of all the things you didn’t like about your ex, and compare it to a list of good qualities • Think about the things you have always wanted to do, that you held back on because of your ex. Now is the time to go do them!

T

he lowest time of my life was when I was suffering from a broken heart. For those of you who have ever had your heart broken, or whether you are going through it right now, please know one thing: You will survive. The Turkey Dump is upon us, which means... it’s breakup season. This is the first time for many first years to return to their hometown on Thanksgiving to finally see their high school sweetheart for the first time since coming here. Many of you will come back feeling like half of you is missing. Many of you will come back with mixed messages and the idea that something bad is about to happen. And the smallest group of you will continue to be in your lovely relationship. Not all of us are so lucky. This article is for the recently single, the recently broken, and the recently ruined. I can be in the happiest moods of life nowadays, but I will never forget the times in my life when I really thought it wasn’t worth living anymore. Loving someone with all your heart and then having to lose them is quite possibly the worst feeling a person can have. A broken heart will find the deepest darkest places within us, strip us from all of our securities, and take over your life. If some of you are like me, you can’t eat, sleep, talk, or go about your everyday life when dealing with heartache. The

• Talk to people who give honest and positive advice. Don’t ask Lizzy Loose Pants who will try to drag you to the bar to hook up with a random. Ask someone who is in a solid relationship or someone you know who has been through this stuff. You’d probably be surprised as to what you parents or siblings might know. All you have to do is ask. • Talk to the opposite sex that you’re interested in. They will give you the best advice, I find. I asked a guy pal for some breakup advice once, and his words still resonate with me today. Thanks Cory and Dave, if you’re reading this, you really did help me. • Watch your favourite movie. Mine is Amelie, and it’s a beautiful love story filled with hope. • Pick up snowboarding like me, or is you hate sports, go buy a guitar. Have no money? Take up poetry or photography. Find something new to stimulate your mind to the point that you don’t have the chance to think about your ex. If the mind is busy, the mind can’t wander. • Reconnect with the people you haven’t seen in a while. If they were absent in your life because of your partner, then now is the best time to rekindle that friendship. Whatever you do, make sure that future you would be proud of the heartbroken mess that you are today.


Opinion

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

11

Letters pro-life insert debate continues Given the large response to the advertising supplement that was in the September 25th issue of Imprint entitled “We Know Better Now” it is clear that there is significant interest in the abortion issue. It is not surprising to see so many people who want to examine this issue. The demographics of our university community indicate that there are likely a significant number of women on campus who grapple with an abortion decision each year. It is important that they hear information from different perspectives if they are going to be empowered to make a truly informed decision. Moreover, open, intellectually honest debate on issues such as abortion is at the heart of a university campus. With Canada’s future decision makers right here at UW, we need to talk about it. UW Students for Life (UWSFL), the club responsible for putting the insert in Imprint, has always invited discussion on these difficult issues. We have hosted debates and other events to provide a venue of discussion for both those who are pro-choice, pro-life and undecided.

We are concerned about the number of women speaking out publicly about their abortion experiences who are saying “I regret my abortion.” This includes groups such as Silent

No More Awareness Campaign and Rachel’s Vineyard. These voices remind us that abortion is not the liberation for women that they were promised and are a signal to all that we should at least revisit our views on abortion. Nevertheless, it is disappointing and surprising to me, the president of UW Students for Life, that there are some students who want to

I think one question has to be asked of anyone who thinks it appropriate to censor the pro-life side of the abortion debate: What are you so afraid of? Waterloo is home to many of the brightest students in Canada. They are capable of reviewing evidence presented and using critical thinking skills, along with their own research to make an informed decision on this

On this note, for those who would like to review the corrected list of references or view the insert for the first time, it is available online at www.ncln.ca .

I am a UW alumnus and I’ve just read the comments about the pro-life insert in Imprint this past week. I wanted to thank you for being courageous enough to stand up for free speech and allow the pro-life group to include this advertisement. It is not a popular message that students

want to hear and I thank you for giving the group a chance to express their views. Whether we agree with their position or not, they deserve to be able to express themselves and advertise their views and services just like any other group on campus. Too often now, campus groups who don’t

correspond with the popular ideology are being censored on campuses throughout Canada. It’s refreshing to hear that Imprint is not giving in to majority bullying and allowing students to continue challenging the status quo.

Auravelia Colomer

Do we really “know better now?” Apparently not! Two weeks ago an anti-abortion advertising supplement was distributed in every copy of Imprint. Several of the members of the UW Women’s Centre, along with many UW students were not only sincerely disappointed, but gravely concerned about the content of said supplement. Published by www.humanlife.org, an American anti-choice organization, this full colour, multi-page insert, has potentially discerning consequences for the general health of UW students and Waterloo citizens alike. There are a number of things wrong with this supplement. For instance, in the section on rape and incest, the authors reject any known facts about how domestic and family abuse functions. Instead they favour clap trap found on poorly researched anti-choice websites. Equally unnerving is the supplement’s comparison of the social acceptance of abortion to slavery: “[w]hat if US citizens had been willing to accept this justification for tolerating slavery?” Regardless of these questionable statements, the concern of the UW Women’s Centre is solely that students are receiving false medical and sexual health information.

The argument is not about whether one agrees or disagrees with abortion, but rather the legality of distributing false medical information to the public. On Page 9 of the insert, there is an article

ridiculous supplement suggests that birth control and emergency contraceptives leads to unwanted abortions , a delightful contradiction in terms that would be funny if it weren’t so infuriating.

relevant resources to strengthen their convictions.” By avoiding the term “health,” they’ve freed themselves from any obligation that they might have had otherwise to produce credible and accurate information. The fact that Imprint blindly distributed this advertising supplement serves to make a larger comment about the social perception of women’s health — that it is not important. If the argument for distributing this supplement is that “Imprint can’t take sides on moral issues,” perhaps we should be asking ourselves why so many people view breast cancer, prenatal depression, and birth control as moral issues. For a paper that’s claimed to be “by the students for the students” it’s done us huge disservice by spreading this advertisement around campus.

This week I returned to the university campus for the first time in over 15 years. I started university in 1986, and graduated in 1990. A lot has changed on campus. I briefly visited Renison College, whereI lived in residence for several years, and barely recognized the place. The new co-op building, and the extension on Hagey Hall were unfamiliar. I also saw, for the first time, the Student Life Centre — I remember paying fees to help in its construction, but I’d never seen the finished building. I was a little disappointed to discover that it seems to be little more than a shopping mall. But the thing that I found most jarring and jaw-dropping on campus was the 12-page colour anti-abortion insert in this week’s Imprint. During my time in university, a number of significant events took place that have contributed to my own feminist consciousness. The R. v. Morgentaler decision was handed down in 1988, in the middle of my university days. Prior to that, Morgentaler’s arrests and trials were frequently discussed in the news and Imprint, itself, was known to opine on the topic of abortion.

(I also remember vividly that day in 1992, when I passed by the remains of the Morgentaler clinic on Harbord St. in Toronto — it had been destroyed by bomb the night before.) And one of my other strong memories of university was that cold day in 1989 when, in the early days of exam period, we students became aware of the Montreal Massacre. These events were very stark signposts on the path toward women’s rights. But at least then, there seemed to be allies. Imprint was an ally, then, I think. Imprint was not always a perfect paper in those days. It was frequently criticized for its obsession with indie band CD reviews and there was a summer when a particular editorial accused a whole faculty of being socially stupid. But I always felt, then, that Imprint, like the university, was a place in which progressive ideas were explored. And after having this brief taste of Imprint 2009, I am left with an impression of a paper that is considerably more retrograde than even mainstream papers. And that’s a very sober thought.

I think one question has to be asked of anyone who thinks it appropriate to censor the pro-life side of the abortion debate: What are you so afraid of? — UW Students for Life

On page 9 of the insert, there is an article entitled “Abortion and Breast Cancer – Is there a Connection?” For the record, the answer is no – a fact that the entire legitimate medical community supports. — UW Women’s Centre staff

entitled “Abortion and Breast Cancer — Is there a Connection?” For the record, the answer is no — a fact that the entire legitimate medical community supports. Nonetheless, humanlife.org holds that a “women’s natural way of resisting breast cancer” is to avoid abortion. Their cited sources for these wild claims are exclusively online anti-choice organizations — neither of which (there are only two) have any apparent publications in peer-reviewed academic journals. Another article in this

Hailey Brown President, UW Students for Life 4th Year Arts

UW Alumna

important issue. Isn’t that the point of going to university? In fact, some students have correctly pointed out to us that a couple of the reference links were broken.

Humanlife.org boasts that it’s “designed to encourage the increasing number of pro-life students entering college and provide them with

UW Women’s Centre staff

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UpTown Waterloo has a number of great restaurants, bistros and bars for you to enjoy. If you’re planning on drinking though, please consider parking your car either in the UpTown Waterloo Parkade located at the corner of Willis Way and Regina Street (entrance located on Willis Way) or in the designated spots in the Station Lot located at 20 Regina Street (the east side next to the Paul Puncher clothing store). Overnight parking is prohibited on all City streets and municipal parking lots (with the exception of the designated spots in the Station Lot).

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For more information about parking and

parking fees in UpTown Waterloo, visit our website, www.waterloo.ca

stifle and censor this discussion. Shutting down one side of a debate is a threat to freedom of speech — something we celebrate as a key value to Canadian society.

The Parkade has 24 hour video surveillance and while you will be paying for your parking in this garage, or in the designated spots in the Station Lot ($5 for overnight), your car will be safe and ticket-free until you can pick it up the next morning.

Please don’t drink and drive.


12

Opinion

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

Letters Re: Sarah Mae Baxter’s Origami letter I hadn’t thought about origami since I was 12 and in art class. Even then I thought that what we were doing was useless. I couldn’t see how our paper creations (which were poorly folded and assembled) could be considered “art.” So, in reading origami enthusiast Sarah Mae Baxter’s article in Imprint last week made me re-think origami—and I’m glad I did. As encouraged by Sarah, I went to Eric Joisel’s website and was blown away by the many facets that Joisel uses to create his “sculptures.” With slightly more research, I discovered that Joisel participated in a film titled “Between the Folds” (www.greenfusefilms.com) which is a documentary about the interdisciplinary nature of origami. Joisel is featured among other masters of origami who speak to their individual disciplines and how they are relevant to the art of origami. Sarah, I hope other people have taken you up on your challenge (visit ericjoisel.com) because it has made me rethink origami and opened my eyes to just how spectacular this art form can be.

On politics needing young canadians

A student responds to Justin Trudeau’s talk given in the SLC last week I would like to begin by applaudingTrudeau on his dedication to the cause of youth political involvement. It’s a shame that those who have the most to gain from government are habitually the most apathetic to its processes. We’re the ones who will live with the consequences of today’s governments – both tomorrow and decades into the future. Trudeau’s remark on the cause of this situation rings true—that politicians do not pay enough attention to youth. And yet, Liberal

leader Michael Ignatieff, in bold defiance of Canada’s opinion, both youth and otherwise, is doing just that. Spinning Canada into the third general election in four years, adding a dash of political turmoil to Canada’s economic recovery, is plainly seen as a power grab by the Ignatieff – swooping in from the Harvard establishment, playing political opportunism to its fullest. Finally, in regards to the young MP’s quip about the lack of Conservative youth, it should be noted that during UW Clubs Days the only

present campus political clubs were the Conservatives and the Greens. We have burgeoning campus associations here and across the country, with ample opportunities to get your voice heard and make a difference. It seems it’s the Liberals who have a problem with youth activism here in the ‘Loo. Just some food for thought. Derek Aiton 2A Arts and business

Laura Robinson 4A English Literature and Rhetoric

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Opinion

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

13

Politics of proposals huge political question has just been posed to the students of UW this week, even if it hasn’t been expressly described as such. By now, everyone has seen the big posters presenting artists’ renditions of two proposed building projects: the Health Services addition, and the a new Student Services Complex. Politics enters the equation here at the word “proposed”— the money for this construction will come from raised student fees from now until, practically speaking, the end of time. So, someone has asked us, the wider student body, for money. Should we give it to them? It’s helpful to consider the two projects separately. Certainly no one can deny the necessity of an expansion to Health Services. The current location is very small, can only see a limited number of patients, and these limitations only become clearer as the university engages in pandemic preparations. Not only does a cramped doctor’s office lengthen wait times, but it also provides an environment in which it is possible for more people to get sick. However, is it our responsibility to pay for this extension? It was not us, after all, who decided to dramatically expand enrolment while not keeping up with infrastructure. It was the university administration who made Waterloo a more attractive place to be a student. And it was they who did not take steps to limit the student population even when students were being cramped into dubious conditions in REV’s infamous triple rooms. If UW is going to continue to bring in more and more people, they need to be prepared to pay to maintain their standard of

living, and this responsibility includes health care. It is not fair to ask the students to pay to clean up the administration’s oversight in this area. They brought in the people; they should pay to look after them. The Student Services Complex, however, poses more difficult questions. We already have a Student Life Centre, and the Bomber continues be in the red. In this case, it is only fair for students to shoulder the majority

the time was meant to be a new hot spot for campus life. Now it stands, while certainly not completely empty, as a hollow shell of its original promise. We, the students, should not be eager to put ourselves on the hook for another money pit. If we are going to be investing in something we need to know that we will get something for it. This new building needs to be able to offer something that we currently can’t access, or to provide

bring the ideas and innovations of students to the fore. In a school so heavily focused on the cutting edge of communications and networking technology, with banners that promote “innovation” and “collaboration” to every passer-by, surely we can think of something different, something unique to fill our space with. Feds is calling for student input, and we need to give it to them. We need to collaborate

Feds is calling for student input, and we need to give it to them. We need to collaborate on new ideas and new approaches...if you have an idea about something that could be made better, something that could be done differently, or something that can contribute to student life, present and future, now is the time to see it put into reality.

of the burden. Recreational space is not a right in the same way as health care. While certainly local companies who hire co-op students would see the utility in improving the quality of life for students (it keeps them from leaving, for one thing!) and could reasonably be canvassed for donations of money or equipment, the majority of the responsibility falls on us. But there are reasons to be cautious. Students in the 1980s bought Fed Hall, which at

opportunities we don’t currently have. If we’re spending money, we need to be adding serious value to campus. It is a certainty that only a small percentage of us will be here when these new buildings are built. However, we are making decisions now that will affect the well-being of generations of future students. It is their money that we are spending as well. We owe it to them, and to ourselves, to talk seriously about these new projects, and to

A

mrowley@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

on new ideas and new approaches. What can’t you do on campus that you wished you could? If the answer is “nothing,” which I doubt, then perhaps the project is a non-starter. But if you have an idea about something that could be made better, something that could be done differently, or something that can contribute to student life, present and future, now is the time to see it put into reality.

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Features

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009 features@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Gear to rock the p90x On the road to a healthier lifestyle me a few years ago, and I really only use it for the fitness tests. You can tell if you are working hard; you might not know if you are exactly in your cardio zone (but close enough).

Steven R. McEvoy staff reporter

W

hat gear do you need to do the workouts for P90X from Beachbody? I am frequently being asked about what equipment it takes to do the fitness program that I have been on now for nearly three months. Between the articles I have written, and friends, family, fellow students, and co-workers asking me questions about my weight loss, I decided to write this article comparing three equipment lists: the recommended equipment, with what I think is the minimum equipment, and the gear that I have been using. I hope that this piece will help answer some of those frequent questions and emails and about my fitness journey. Recommended equipment • • • • • • • •

Chin up bar or exercise bands with mount Dumbbells or exercise bands Heart rate monitor Yoga mat Yoga blocks Body fat tester Powerstands or pushup stands DVD player

This list is pretty self explanatory, and Beachbody does sell versions of all of this equipment. I have only bought one piece of equipment from them and it was excellent, worth every penny. Minimum required equipment

• • • •

Chin up bar or exercise bands with mount Dumbbells or exercise bands Yoga block DVD player

This is the bare bones list. You could get by without the yoga block if you are already pretty flexible or improvise one from something around the house. Every video and every exercise can be done with the exercise bands, so if you don’t have a chin-up bar or dumbbells you can do every exercise with just exercise bands. A while back I was travelling with work and did all my workouts while on the road with my bands and playing the DVD’s on my laptop. I dropped the heart rate monitor because even though they can be purchased for around $40 on a student budget that is a little pricey. I do have one, but only because it was given to

Participants Needed for Research on Dating Relationships

My gear

• • • • • • •

Exercise bands with mount Power block dumbbells Heart rate monitor Yoga mat Yoga block Powerstands DVD player

I use the exercise bands for all the pull-ups and chin-ups. I use my Powerblocks for all weight exercises; the set I have goes from 2.5 lbs to 90 lbs a side. I made a mistake and bought the cheapest yoga mat I could find. I regret it. I am already planning on upgrading to a much better one this fall. After Phase I of P90X, I bought the Powerstands from Beachbody. They are fantastic. My pushups have better form and greater reps. I have done a few of the workouts with just bands while on the road. The B-Line resistance bands sold by Beachbody look great, but I went to a physiotherapist here in town, Kinetex Rehab on Columbia, and paid about a buck a foot. I would recommend seven feet, and tie a loop in then ends for handles. The DVDs are $120 on the Beachbody site, and about the same price here in Canada at Wal-Mart or Zellers, but I know a number of people who bought them and gave up, You can probably find a cheaper set to fit the student budget. I do most of my workouts in my den, and have done all of them there. Normally I do Plyometrics, Yoga X, and Kenpo X in the living room because of the carpet for extra cushion, but I have done a few of them in a small hotel room. You can adapt all of these for even the smallest dorm room. The final tool I use is not equipment, but it is equipping, and that is the forums and message boards on www.teambeachbody. com. There are specific message boards for different start dates, a dedicated Canadian contingent, even groups dedicated to information technology (IT) junkies. I have posted pretty regularly to four specific forms and used some of the advice and support from them to help me get the results I am seeing. Hopefully that will answer many of the questions from students out there about what you need to have to do these workouts and start making lifestyle changes to get healthier and in better shape. In the end it doesn’t really matter what equipment you have if you’re not using it, so if you decided to give P90X a try, remember what Tony Horton the host of the video says “Do you best and forget the rest.� Keep pushing play on the videos and work out every day.

Paige Leslie

smcevoy@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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Features

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

COLLABORATIVE ART

15

Creating artwork as a community, one step at a time

Kenzie Reid reporter

W

hat is an exquisite corpse? While it may sound macabre, it is in fact a project of art, writing, and design, created through collaboration. “Exquisite Corpses: The Charms and Surprises of Collaboration,” took place last Friday as part of the Knowledge Integration Seminar Series. It was a lecture presented by Rob Gorbet and Isabella Stefanescu about collaborations in art. Rob Gorbet is a professor of mechatronics engineering at the University of Waterloo, and a technology artist with pieces exhibited around the world. Isabella Stefanescu is a painter and a founder of Contemporary Art Forum Kitchener and Area (CAFKA), a K-W art festival. They first met through a collaboration on The Notebook Project, an exhibit shown at the Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery in 2006. As Gorbet and Stefanescu related in the seminar, the project focused on a sketchbook of Stefanescu’s, filled with writing, watercolour and ink drawings, and collage. It was exhibited in a large, blank room with a projected image of the notebook filled one wall, and in the middle of the room was a bowl of stones and a scale. When a viewer dropped a stone into the scale, the notebook would turn a page. Gorbet, who created the interface, designed it to be as natural and accessible as possible. Other collaborators on the Notebook Project were composer Nick Storring and videographer Nathan Saliwonchyk. Storring’s music was designed to change and adapt de-

Courtesy Alcina Wong

pending on which pages of the notebook had been seen, while Saliwonchyk animated the smooth turning of the pages. All in all, each collaborator brought expertise and innovation to the project.

After outlining the Notebook Project, Gorbet and Stefanescu spoke of what entails successful collaboration. As said by Stefanescu, “Teamwork can either be commanding, or an exquisite corpse.” The talk centred on the idea

that either a leader that gives out instructions or, more preferably, all its members can invent something together. Wasted effort does not exist, she insisted. Even if the project fails, new and useful ideas or partnerships can come from the collaboration. Gorbet had several essential points to add on matters of invention and teamwork. First, “concepts are more powerful than their applications.” That is, understanding why something works is more useful knowledge than understanding how it works. Second, “design for the hind brain.” Simple and intuitive is best, no matter what the product you’re creating. Lastly, “collaboration is rewarding.” Done right, he says, a team can achieve rich results and create helpful connections between experts who might not otherwise meet. In 2004, Gorbet put this into practice when he created the Technology Art Studio course (FINE 392). The course pairs upper-year engineering students with upper-year fine arts students, in an excellent example of knowledge integration and teamwork. Finally, Gorbet and Stefanescu delivered advice valuable to any student: strive for knowledge, discover accidentally, and fail spectacularly. Above all, they emphasized collaboration. “What is an exquisite corpse?” Stefanescu posed. “A surrealist game with no rules. OK, one rule: you cannot play alone.” “Exquisite Corpses” was presented as part of the Knowledge Integration Seminar Series, held Fridays at 1:30 pm in AL 208. These seminars are open for any UW student wanting to attend.


16

Features

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

Foot-train by Choice jgoodhand@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

I

f there is one thing I’ve talked about doing for years with failed attempt after failed attempt, it is breaking away from my dependence on driving. Saving money, getting more exercise and reducing my carbon emissions were just not reason enough to push me to set my alarm 20 minutes earlier in the morning or to buy practical shoes for walking the city with. So, with that knowledge in mind, and thousands of people without cars as examples I spent one last night with my car under the stars and then said farewell after. A post on Kijiji with an offer that would cover just four months rent and a few interested buyers, she was out of my life for good. I’ve quit a lot of things in my life, smoking, drinking, meat, but none of these pleasures were there in such a constant and reassuring way. A best friend, a perceived safety bubble, and a protective layer from the elements, this car was there through breakups, getaways and celebrations. But the guilt of knowing the vast amount of unnecessary emissions I was creating constantly hung over my head. How could I preach that we needed to take more actions to eliminate carbon emissions while I journeyed on unnecessary missions to corner stores and drive-thrus? In the book Carsick by Lyn Sloman she discusses the rule of 40:40:20, the idea that 40 per cent of car trips could have been made by bike, foot or public transport, the other 40 per cent are trips too far to walk, cycle or don’t have adequate transport. The final 20 per cent accounts for journeys that have to be made by car (for example moving or transporting large objects). Taking a look at my own uses, I realized that aside from moving once a year and the inability to afford the train to St. Jacobs each

Sonia Lee

weekend, 90 per cent of my car trips could have been made with an alternative, such as foot, or public transportation. So here I am, carless for the first time in five years and doing my best to keep up the excitement of riding my grandmothers recently fixed up ’71 Colt Raleigh with basket and bell and getting on buses with surprise destinations. There is no turning back this time. Why would I, when I now have an up close and personal opportunity to interact more directly with the world around me? Not only am I unrestricted by safety belts and road signs, but I can stop, turn around and venture on my own curiosity driven paths without constraint. As life often does, the lessons we learn best are those that put us in positions of helplessness and a challenge to use resources we’ve never considered. My first month of carlessness has just concluded and I wonder what other previously perceived “need a car” challenges I could have resolved in the past without one. A new house, two funerals in another city and a wedding up north were issues I could have

mindlessly approached when I owned a car. Now strapped for time, dependence on the kindness of my friends and an attempted car rental (walking to Muskoka just wasn’t in the cards) I kept my reasons in check and took the month on headstrong. After just a few days in my new house and the wisdom of “location, location, location” could not be more obvious. Just a two-minute walk to every major bus route in the city allows me the freedom (yes, I said it, freedom without a car) to get to every major shopping centre, grocery store and the university all within 30 minutes and with a last-minute opportunity to do last night’s readings. Ability to get to means of survival, check! The challenge of carpooling, something I have only ever known as a driver is now making me feel a dependence of new sorts. Recent memories of being treated extra special because of my wheels and the uncertainty of people’s motivations put me in a place where I hoped I was able to make it clear I would return the favour in the snap of a finger if ever I was asked.

Friendships grown from past loyalty to secure a ride in a tough situation, check! This challenge, unfortunately, wasn’t all streamers and blow horns, since I should have been spending one of these last weekend’s clinking glasses of celebration at a wedding up north. With these two challenges and a canceled credit card because of fraud, a lack of a G-license because the ministry went on strike the day before my test and a canceled insurance policy because of recently selling my car left me about 6 “checks” from renting a car and completing the challenge. Aside from the fear that I may have lost a friend or two in the unsuccessfulness of getting to the wedding I don’t feel a single ounce of doubt that giving up the car was the right move for me. This month I’ve saved on gas, insurance, and parking, have doubled my physical activity and have seen some beautiful natural landscape by taking shortcuts through wooded paths and meadows. I can’t wait to see what is in store for me in the years to come. If you are unable to give up your car because of family or work purposes try parking it for a week to see just how (unnecessarily) dependent you are on it and what alternatives might be out there that are less expensive and more rewarding. If you want to learn further about the impacts of cars on the environment or ways in which you can reduce your own emissions check out: Walkscore.com – shows the nearest services to your location that can be taken by foot Treehugger.com – current information on the impacts of cars and transportation and planet friendly alternatives Peoplescar.org – Grandriver CarShare Program


Features

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

Engineering a dream University marks groundbreaking of Engineering 6

Brendon Simon reporter

A

del S. Sedra, dean of the faculty of engineering, called the groundbreaking of Engineering 6 “An important milestone in engineering at the University of Waterloo.” The five-story Engineering 6 building will house four chemical engineering research groups, about half of the chemical engineering department at the University of Waterloo. The groundbreaking ceremony occurred last Thursday, September 24 attended by staff, students, graduates, alumni, local politicians, and the community. The building will be located in parking lot B behind the already under-construction Engineering 6. The building, scheduled for completion in March 2011, will provide 113,000 square feet for research, service laboratories, teaching and administration. Engineering 6 will provide upgraded and expanded facilities for graduate students in chemical engineering, where enrolment has increased by more than 50 percent since 2005. The project has unique innovations in sustainability including power, lighting and architectural elements. The facility will allow for world class research endeavours in bio chemical, bio processing, tissue engineering and green energy. The new Engineering 6 building is funded through the government of Canada’s Knowledge infrastructure program, where both the provincial and federal government have provided over $1.5 billion in 49 projects at Ontario’s colleges and universities. The University of Waterloo received $50 million of these funds for the new Engineering 6 building and other related projects. “The new building is a means to several exciting outcomes,” said Adel Sedra, dean of the faculty of engineering. “The most immediate benefit will be our ability to expand our ground-breaking chemical engineering research and experiential learning. As well, we will also be positioned to continue to contribute to the University of Waterloo’s reputation as a centre

for world class engineering initiatives.” The new building will allow the Douglas Wright Engineering building to be renovated for the civil/environmental engineering division. The Douglas Wright building, completed in December 1958, was the first academic building constructed at the university. The project, along with Engineering 5 and 6 is part of the faculty’s Vision 2010 campaign. The initiative is to achieve overall international excellence, by making Waterloo Engineering the premier engineering school in Canada, and among the top in the world. Meg Beckel, vice president of external relations at the University of Waterloo, called the new engineering building “a power of partnership between the federal, provincial governments and the university.” Combined with other projects on campus, 1400 new construction jobs will be created. In addition, millions of dollars will be generated into the economy from new innovations from research and graduates in this building. “W hen I think of the University of Waterloo, I think of engineering,” said Honourable John Milloy, Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities. “This project will allow the department to build on world class excellence.” Peter Braid, MP for Kitchener-Waterloo added. “The University of Waterloo earned the distinction of being Canada’s most innovative university, these recent projects will bring the university to the forefront of advancement nationally and internationally.” Graduate students are pleased with the construction of Engineering 6. Ramila Peiris, a chemical graduate student, explained to the audience at the groundbreaking ceremony. It will “allow for more space for office areas, research, and classrooms,” he said. Former alumni also liked the idea of new buildings on campus. Paul Koch, from the class of 1963, one of the first graduates from the University of Waterloo stated that UW is “still looking to lead.” bsimon@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

ian cutajar

17


Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009 arts@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

who is

Edna Bear? Dinh Nguyen arts editor

“O

nce I feel myself observed by the lens everything changes, I am in the process of posing.

“I subconsciously make another body for myself. I transform myself into an image. This transformation is an active choice. “You animate me. I animate you. We create an adventure. “Posing in front of your lens – I determine my existence. I make the choice? Don’t I? “Who holds the power? The gazed Or the gazer? “So many pictures. Who are you [Edna Bear]?” Like echoes from memories released into a hollow room, these words were repeated during the animation and production of Edna’s Archive at The Critical Media Lab — a tiny, restored building on an empty corner of King Street, downtown Kitchener. Constructed from 1,700 artifacts — 13 photo albums, 23 letters, 75 postcards, a leather bound zippered secretary, a three cent US stamp from 1952, a piece of ribbon, a baby book from 1923, and countless slides — found in a dumpster of an apartment complex in Toronto, Edna’s Archive is by far one of the most sentimental and thought-provoking piece of art I’ve ever witnessed, and as an audience member, took part in. Unlike most plays, the living archive directed by Andrew Houston and Lisa O’Connell surpasses many boundaries of stage traditions. In this production the audience are more than simple viewers. From the beginning we were invited to interact with the actors and as well, play an individual role of our own. Edna’s Archive begins with 30 audience members divided into to two groups. Before we were allowed into the archival stage we were each given a MP3 player, a mini map of some streets in Kitchener, and three photos — a wall fire hydrant with a note attached to it, a black and white picture of two men on King Street, and a picture of Edna herself at a table with everyone else cut out— tucked into the map’s sleeve. We were asked to listen to the tracks on the music player, and follow the envisioned voice of a nostalgic Edna Bear as she reminisced and gave walking direction. The play began shortly after 8 p.m. The chilling night wind and dimming fluorescent street lights aided the atmosphere. My fellow audience members and I were instructed to walk up and down an empty King Street, stopping occasionally to ponder thoughts and relive her memories. We were like ghosts revisiting the past — for some, an unfamiliar past, but for many like myself, a history all too close to our childhood. Many times throughout the walk, Edna re-created in us the story of reconstructed buildings. She told us of the lives and the businesses that used be. I can imagine that many people, like me, remember the Capitol movie theatre that is now Elements nightclub, and St. Mary’s high school when it was still downtown. All the memories conjured up seems to help us connect to Edna, yet, we still have no idea who she is. See Edna’s Archive, page 24 Dinh Nguyen


Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

19

Event Calendar

Music

Thursday Oct 15, 2009

Friday Oct 9, 2009

KWS Pops - Paris to Broadway — The Centre in the Square — ($20) — 8 p.m.

Metric, The Stills — Centre in the Square — ($32.50) — 8 p.m.

Behind the Milk with DJ Charless — Starlight — ($5 before 11 p.m.) — 8:10 p.m.

The Bad Bong Water Boys, Nervous Wrecked — The Boathouse — 8 p.m.

Mark Berube and the Patriotic Few, Chinese Food (19+) — Maxwell’s Music House — ($12) — 8 p.m.

Matthew DeZoete Band, Bass Lions, Yukon Blonde — Maxwell’s Music House — ($7 or $5 with student card) — 9 p.m.

Saturday Oct 10, 2009 .

Dan Griffin (of Arkells), Mandippal, & Robyn Dell

KWS Pops - Paris to Broadway — The Centre in the Square — ($20) — 8 p.m. KWS Family Concerts Thanksgiving! — The Centre in the Square — ($10) — 2:30 p.m. Tyler Schwende Band, Chasing Amee, Isle of Thieves (19+) — Maxwell’s Music House — ($7 or $5 with student card) — 9 p.m.

Tuesday Oct 13, 2009 Paddy Townsend, “stars Here” Open Stage — The Boathouse — (free) — 8 p.m. Open Mic Night — Macwell’s Music House — (free)

Wednesday Oct 14, 2009 Hannah Georgas, Said the Whale — Maxwell’s Music House — ($10) — 9 p.m. Moshe Hammer, Robert Kortgaard — The Music Room — ($30) — 8 p.m.

— Maxwell’s Music House

Julie & Julia (PG) — 7 p.m. — Also playing from Oct 10 - 15 (various times) It Might Get Loud (PG) — 9:25 p.m. — Also playing from Oct 10 - 13 (various times)

Princess Twin Bright Star (PG) — 7 p.m. — Also playing from Oct 10 - 15 (various times) Inglourious Basterds (14A) — 7:15 p.m. — Also playing on Oct 10 - 15 (various times)

Saturday Oct 10, 2009

Theatre Friday Oct 9, 2009 The Last 15 Seconds — The Registry Theatre — ($20) — 8 p.m.

Saturday Oct 10, 2009 The Last 15 Seconds — The Registry Theatre — ($20) — 8 p.m.

In The Loop (14A) — Princess Cinema — 4:50 p.m. — Also playing on Oct 11

Tuesday Oct 13, 2009 Bicycle Thieves (PG) — Princess Cinema — 7 p.m. — Also playing on Oct 14

Wednesday Oct 14, 2009

Sunday Oct 11, 2009

Enlighten Up! (PG) — Princess Cinema — 9 p.m. — Also playing on Oct 15

Oktoberfest Idol — The Registry Theatre — ($5) — 11 a.m.

Rod The Stormtrooper — Princess Twin — 9 p.m.

Thursday Oct 15, 2009 A Place To Call Home — The Registry Theatre — ($20) — 8 p.m.

Galaxy Cinemas (Conestoga Mall) Oct 9 - Oct 15, 2009 • Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs (PG) • Couples Retreat (PG) • Fame (PG) • Love Happens (PG) • Surrogates (PG) • The Informant (14A) • The Invention Of Lying(14A) • Trailer Park Boys Countdown To Liquor Day (14A) • Whip It (PG) • Zombieland (14A)

Misc. Friday Oct 9, 2009 Canadian Landscapes — Button Factory — Open until October 30 — 5 p.m. Rhythm of Life — Button Factory — Open until October 31 — 5 p.m. Painters Open Studio — Button Factory — ($2) — 1 p.m.

Saturday Oct 10, 2009 — DJ legal E — Caesar Martini’s

“An effective primer into the world of rock 'n' roll that holds plenty of appeal for hardcore fans and neophytes alike.” - askmen.com

Movies Friday Oct 9, 2009

Princess Cinema

IT MIGHT GET LOUD NOW PLAYING 6 Princess St. W., Waterloo 885-2950 www.princesscinemas.com

Participants Needed For Research In Slot Machine Gambling We are looking for experienced slots players (people who play at least twice a month) for a one hour study on features that make slot machines so exciting. Participants will play a slot machine while non-invasive measurements of heart rate, finger perspiration and pupil dilation are made. In appreciation for your time, you will receive $20, and an additional $10 depending on your end balance. To be eligible you must: (1) not be taking anxiety reducing medications, (2) not have heart problems, (3) not be in treatment for problem gambling, and (4) be between 19 years and 65 years of age. If interested, please email UWgamblingstudy@gmail.com or call Danielle or Michelle at 519-888-4567 ext 37187 This study has been reviewed by, and received ethics clearance through, the Office of Research Ethics, University of Waterloo


20

Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

21

Terror in the last 15 seconds Simone Toma

Dancing in the nude

courtesy MTspace

Katrina Massey staff reporter

I

have to say, I never expected to see a group of sweaty, morethan-half-naked Hungarian men perform acrobatics on stage at KW’s IMPACT ’09 festival. Okay, that’s a lie. The second I heard about Fiúk and the troupe’s members, I jumped on the chance for tickets. But who can blame me? It’s a rare occurrence for someone to undertake the challenge of tastefully combining male nudity with performance art, and even rarer to see a group pull it off so seamlessly. Fiúk, the Hungarian word for “boys”, was presented during the festival on the evenings of October 2 and 3 at the King Street Theatre in Kitchener. The group responsible for the performance, Compagnie Pál Frenák, came from across the Atlantic to stage their short but incredibly charged theatrical endeavour. “The show is an immersion in the unconsciousness of men and boys,” the festival brochure stated. I, however, felt that Fiúk was much more than that. The performance was not only an immersion into the unconsciousness of men, but a jarring attempt to define and criticize components of the male psyche. Switching between scenes of aggression and tenderness, companionship and alienation, Fiúk is gritty, grim, and graphic. Fiúk consistently conveys a claustrophobic tone that is used to illustrate entrapment within the male societal role. This is emphasized through the use of lighting. For much of the performance, only

parts of the stage are illuminated, thus narrowing the perception of space. At other times, only one or two people are lighted, creating an intensely isolating focal point. The interpretive dance-like choreography and use of sound lend further context to the performance. A scene that stood out to me took place as a small group of men performed acrobatics with the aid of several ropes hanging down from the ceiling near the front of the stage. They entangled themselves in and around the ropes while in the back left corner, and with intense illumination, another man is made to dance by an invisible force. He is haphazardly dressed in full ballerina attire, pink tutu included, and rapidly changes between different postures and poses. The jerky, forced movement of his dance makes it appear as though he is being moved by a series of invisible strings from above. The concern seems to be the ability of a man to fit into society’s mold, his questioned desire in doing so, and a probable fear of the effeminate. These concepts seem to have been a major concern for the producer of the show, and therefore resonated within myself as being important. Another scene that I considered as having a large impact was more concerned with sexuality. Three of the male performers, clad only in skin-tight black boxer-brief bottoms, perform a slow, sensual dance to an English song that asks ‘What makes a man?’ The choreography here is sexy and dirty, almost stripper-like, but at the same time carried the forced feeling of the ballerina scene.

This especially resonated during a point in which all three men smile garishly, mouths wide open, at the audience. This gave them the appearance of having been put on display to be judged, another theme that ran throughout the duration of Fiúk. This scene placed an emphasis on the expectations of the general collective versus the desires of the individual. There were countless other scenes that had a strong impact during the performance. Three naked men crawl across the stage under the glare of a single light and mutter unintelligibly amongst themselves, giving them the appearance of having crawled out of a cave like animals. A lone man dances awkwardly in a plain dress while a group of other men laugh and point at him. Another man appears to scream soundlessly while a set of indecipherable end credits scroll over his flesh. The performance says a lot during its 40-minute run time. Fiúk is a performance that makes you think about gender roles in a way that they haven’t been examined before. I had never seen a performance that focused on the male side of the issue: in my opinion, the female half has always been more prominent as a forum for criticism. The play tries to explain what society thinks and expects of males, and then tries to tear the expectations apart. The short length suited the material: if it had been dragged out to become a longer performance, say, an hour and a half in length, it wouldn’t have had nearly the imapct. Fiúk was an intense and highly thought-provoking performance that was a privilege to see.

staff reporter

D

uring the IMPACT09 festival, I had the privilege of attending a play entitled “The Last 15 Seconds.” And, despite the weather not being the greatest lately, I knew that I wasn’t going to let that get in the way of me having a great time. Because, the truth is that I had yet to see a play that was off-campus in the Kitchener-Waterloo region. There was something special about “The Last 15 seconds.” And, if you were to ask me right away what it was, I would not have been able to provide an accurate answer. But, within five or so minutes of the play, I knew of a few things that made it both unique and successful. The most important and most evident part of this play was all of the hard work that every

single individual had dedicated. Without their motivation, the play wouldn’t have been able to exceed its potential. The diversity amongst the cast was something that I truly enjoyed witnessing. People of different races and ethnicities were involved in this play and I was genuinely happy about that. Primarily because it helped to target a wider, more diverse audience, but also because it demonstrated two different cultures coming together: North American and MiddleEasterners. The script ultimately focused on terrorism and how it affects individual lives from both perspectives as victims and killers. During the beginning of the play, the audience is introduced to the death of Mustapha Akkad, a Syrian-American filmmaker, and his daughter Rima who had both witnessed vicious attacks in Amman during 2005. Meanwhile, throughout the rest of the play the audience witnessed the grieving process of lost

lives and the aftermath of terrorism attacks. Another component that the play featured was the inclusion of a variety of different art forms. Both ballet dancing and hysterical crying were just a few of the methods that the cast successfully used to emphasize scenes of intimacy between a romantic couple and the tragic death of a loved one. It was almost as if the audience was taken aback because it was not only difficult to predict what the next scene would involve, but also what emotion would be used to depict that particular scene. What I didn’t particularly enjoy were the infrequent backdrop changes and minimalist outfits. Don’t get me wrong, I do understand how much hard work and effort was put into the detailed backdrop changes and creating outfits for each particular character. But, the backdrop itself did not end up being as effective as it could have been because it was constantly present regardless of

what the scene itself was about. It would have been more effective if there were a few backdrops of fairly decent quality in order to further develop the audience’s imagination with regards to where the story takes place. Meanwhile, the clothing itself did not necessarily gravitate towards the audience. It was nothing flashy at all. In fact, most colours were very neutral. Despite the fact that the backdrops and clothing could use some improvements, there is no reason why these two things should steer you away from watching this play. In fact, I strongly recommend that you take the time to watch the play on October 8, 9 or 10 of 2009 at the Registry Theatre in Kitchener. Call Centre in the Square at 519-578-1570 to find out more information and to order your own tickets. You will not regret it. stoma@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

kmassey@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

courtesy Sarah Al-hage


22

Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

Imprint Publications Presents The Horrors Of Halloween Writing Contest To Enter: • • • •

Write a horror story Keep it less than 200 words Original fiction only Submit it to arts@imprint.uwaterloo.ca by October 25th • Top entries will be published in the Halloween edition of Imprint • Winner will receive a prize

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Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

23

Courtesy Pat the Dog

From left to right, Miroki Tong, Maggie Clark, and Johnny Trinh, respectively, fourth, first, and second place winners, in the Pat the Dog 24-Hours play writing competition.

You know I still love you after 24 hours Robyn Goodfellow arts & entertainment assistant

I

MPACT 09 swept through the Waterloo region last week, sponsoring a number of unique events including Pat the Dog Theatre’s 24-Hour Playwriting Contest. The rules for participation were tough and extremely limiting; only one page of notes and a computer to be used for 24 consecutive hours of intensive playwriting. Top-placing winners would receive a decent monetary prize (useful for any aspiring or recent university graduate) and a staged reading of their play. Maggie Clark (full disclosure: former Imprint editor-in-chief) won the contest with her play You Know I Still Love You. In keep-

ing with the fast-paced theme of the contest, Clark’s participation defined urgency from the beginning. “My interest was very urgent and impulsive: I love any opportunity to write intensely,” she said. Beyond her obvious enjoyment of creative writing, an artistic expression that she has been exposed to nearly since birth, her goal when entering the contest was to become integrated with other serious writers in the Waterloo community. And though she wrote off-site of the contest, an option available to writers, she undoubtedly met a number of other participants and sponsors. Her play traces a woman’s first social date after 16 years of imprisonment in a kidnapper’s basement. Clark describes her award-winning work as a play paralleling “[the woman’s] dif-

Join

ficulties with those of her blind date, a recent divorcé who still has deep feelings — positive and negative — for his ex, and intermingles dark comedy with a deconstruction of the world-building that dominated the victim’s stolen childhood.” While Clark still questions some of her creative decisions, an experience that regular writers face daily, artistic director and judge Lisa O’Connell described Clark’s play as “timely, sweet, funny and poignant.” With this high praise from an authority in the artistic community, one can hardly be surprised by Clark’s recent victory. Her past work with Imprint and continued work with The Boar are testaments to her devotion to the artistic community and her past articles speak to her well-developed

writing style. As for her future horizons, Clark faces the ordeal of pitching completed manuscripts to publishing hourses and a guest appearance on CTV’s debate program, What’s Your Point?, which is set to air on October 24. With respect to the play, Clark adds, “I am incredibly grateful to the artistic director of this playwriting event, Lisa O’Connell, who with Charmian Christie and a team of dedicated volunteers took a risk on this first 24-hour competition, and in doing so introduced me to an absolutely wonderful, open, and supportive creative community here in Waterloo.” rgoodfellow@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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24

Arts & Entertainment Edna’s Archive:

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

“Why did you do it?”

From top to bottom and then right, some places that Edna voice instructed audience to walk and reminiscence her experiences. the corner of old Berlin. In 1862 it was a vil“lage,ThisInwas 1871, a town. In 1912, a city. What is it today? Walk to city hall. Wait for the light. Cross the road. Stop briefly if there’s time and look down the street. This was all Swamp. This was a great road. It was a corduroy road; uneven, and unsure, like memory. You should be in front of the fountain, move to the lip, right up close… Turn right, walk to the end of the fountain. Stop. Turn right… Begin your archive. I wonder do cities dream? Walk down to the next street. Count with me like children. one, two, three, allerry, four five six oh deary, seven eight, nine, so eerie. Walk with me and Edna.

continued from page 18

The question still remains: who is Edna Bear? And, furthermore, why did she take so many pictures? The irony here is that while her memories are being supposedly re-enacted for us, the audience later learns that living Edna is locked up in a mental institution, suffering from Alzheimer’s. Her husband is in the same institution at a different wing. Our only hope is to unravel who she was through the artifacts she left behind. Before the actors narrated a story sewn together from the content provided by the artifacts, the audience was invited to wander — aimlessly if they liked — into two small rooms where the majority of her artifacts were present on walls and ledges. Collections of pictures and letters were posted on walls, as slides were played in an insert of a small box-like hallway that connected the display rooms. After about 20 minutes of examining the artifacts, members of the audience steadily made their way to the seating hall where they sat on both sides of the performance area, creating the illusions of a circular stage with spectators surrounding it.

Five actors in white gowns and red ribbon tied around their necks — three Waterloo students (Rachel Barna, Elysia Cloet, and Amy Wells), a UW lecturer (Heather Hill), and a Laurier alumna (Meghan Bunce) — played Edna. They all appeared on stage at the same time, each representing a different perspective and personality of what could be Edna from her childhood to the year when her artifacts ends. The main actors were supported by UW Alumna Miroki Tong and UW student Chai Lavie who played characters that may have interacted with Edna. Laurier student, Afendi Yusuf, performed background music that brought the audience into the scenes. Throughout the performance it was revealed that Edna lead a childhood full of dance lessons and adventures. She grew up to serve in the W-Debs Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF), a unit that was create to perform play and dance at camps. According to the archive, it is fact that “Edna was an entertainment unit dancer in the W-Debs RCAF show of 1944. Edna was with the show for eight months in 1944 touring RCAF camps and hospitals in England and Scotland. They did over 150 performances. They were to tour Italy but unfortunately for Edna, the war ended.”

— A sample from the Edna voice mp3

After the war, Edna returned to Kitchener and got married. She was divorced within a year. There were no wedding photo among the artifacts, but the archives revealed that she got married twice more. Within the 23 photo albums found, numerous pictures showed Edna with many different men. It is suspected that she had many lovers. The actors presented Edna as someone with a strong personality. She was depicted as someone who knew how to use the media spotlights to her advantage. This was the conclusion the performers arrived at after analyzing Edna’s overwhelming amount of photos. “So many pictures. “Why did you do it Edna?” By the end of the Edna’s Archive the audience was left with a clearer sense of who she was — who she portrayed herself to be, but was also left with even more questions about who she is. Edna Bear is every single picture, slide and news clipping; all 1700 of the artifacts that was found; but no one artifacts alone is her. • Edna’s Archive is also an ongoing art project. To find out more visit www.ednasarchive.ca. dnguyen@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Photos by Dinh Nguyen


Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

Less Than Bloody Brilliant

I

am of the opinion that there is nothing more entertaining than watching a zombie with blood dripping from its mouth attack and bite into an innocent human being, revealing bits of sinew and muscle as the victim screams helplessly. As a zombie fanatic, I like to imagine myself well-versed in the sub genre. I’ve been aching to get my hands on a copy of the recently released book Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. From Night of the Living Dead to Fido to even The Gay Zombie (yes, this is a real movie), as long as it has quasi-human creatures vying after another’s flesh, it’s good. For the sake of this review, however, I will attempt to be a little more critical than that. Zombieland has received some hype from the media since it was released last Friday. I’ve read several reviews that said the movie was the successful rejuvenation of a dying sub genre. I disagree with this statement for two reasons. Firstly, I did not find Zombieland to be all that original, and secondly, zombie movies are not a dying sub genre! I know enough zombie fans to know that the category is still very much alive. Nonetheless, even if Zombieland wasn’t as original as some critics have claimed, it was still very much entertaining. Guys, if your girl wants to go see a movie and you don’t want to get stuck in Love Happens, I recommend offering

Courtesy ScifiCool

this up as a compromise. Sure, there isn’t nearly as much gore as there should have been to make it a really good zombie movie, but your squeamish girl will be able to sit through it without shrieking “ew!” every 30 seconds, and there’s enough humour to make up for the lack of gore that both of you can still enjoy the movie. My biggest objection to this movie was that the main character, Columbus, as played by Jesse Eisenberg, was extremely bland. I’m fairly certain that the role was written for Michael Cera. Columbus was the same character that Cera always plays in every movie he’s ever done — shy, dorky, but a genuinely nice boy who just wants to get the girl. Cera played the character in Juno. He played it in Year One. He played it in Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist, Paper Heart, Superbad, and he’ll play it in Youth Revolt when it comes out. The only thing that’s more irritating than having the same one trick pony shoved in your face in every other movie of the year is having its clone shoved in your face. Eisenberg is in terrible danger of becoming Michael Cera II. It’s the stuff of nightmares, the stuff of real horror movies that has even the bravest of men wringing their hands and crying out “No more!” Eisenberg’s girl of interest in this movie, as played by Emma Stone, was equally disappointing. Her character,

Wichita, was the same girl that Cera’s character always goes for — insecure girl who tries too hard to be quirky and is mostly good but has “bad girl” flair. Stone’s other major roles in the past include such intellectual endeavours as Ghosts of Girlfriends Past, The House Bunny and (surprise!) Superbad alongside Cera himself. Wichita didn’t lend anything to Zombieland past her first appearance in the film. Her main function was to prevent the movie from becoming a sausage fest: the same reason that Megan Fox was in the Transformers series. Even with this shoddy cast list, however, Zombieland still manages to come across as a good film. This is not just because of the appearance of brain-munching zombies, although they certainly do help. This is because out of the four main characters, one character is simply delightful to behold. Woody Harrelson as Tallahassee is so entertaining you can’t help but enjoy the movie. There is nothing in this world that is more fun that watching Harrelson kill zombies in new, creative ways while ‘Solute Your Solution’ by The Raconteurs blares in the background. Bruce Campbell would have been proud. The surprising thing is that there are times when you can connect to this character, which I did not expect. Tallahassee makes up for the blandness of the other characters. If this movie had just been about Harrelson kicking zombie butt, it would have been so much better. As a side note, there was also a surprising cameo in this film (as signaled by the initials B.M.) that was a lot of fun. After seeing the whole movie, however, I’d still have to argue that the opening credits were the best part of Zombieland. This reverts back to the zombie lover in me. I simply cannot help but enjoy watching zombie deaths and attacks on humans in slow motion, complete with slow motion blood splatter. If I had to gage Zombieland against other zombie films, I’d say that it wasn’t as good as Shaun of the Dead, but it was better than Quarantine. Overall, I’d give it three zombie bites out of five, and if you claim to be a horror buff or zombie buff and don’t see this film, then shame on you.

Patrick Carman The Black Circle The 39 Clues - Book 5 Scholastic (2009)

P

atrick Carman does an amazing job on the hinge pin book in this series. This series is ten books by seven different authors. The flow of the story is continuous, and nearly seamless. Patrick’s adventure takes place in Russia. In this segment of the story, the Cahill children Amy and Dan have a secret benefactor who is leaving them clues and guiding them along. The problem is they have a time limit to research clues all over Russia. So the Cahill’s form an alliance with the unlikeliest of team, the Holts. Fortunately they negotiate and go back and forth with the son of the Holt clan, Hamilton. The history lesson in this book focuses around the Romanov’s, Rasputin and general Russian history. Patrick Carman does a great job of

including a lot of information without the fictional book appearing like a history lesson. The story flows and has an amazing pace. Once you pick it up and start reading it you will not be able to put it down. With any book in a series there is always hesitation to pick it up, knowing it will be months before the next one comes out. However once I started this one I could not put it down. This series is amazing, First the concept was intriguing — one continuous story told over ten books by seven different authors. It will introduce fans of some of the authors to other authors. All of the authors have won multiple awards across different areas. Together they are telling an amazing story of an adventure around the world and through history. Following members of the four clans in the Cahill family, these families have been the movers and shapers of history and now they are on a chase for 39 clues that will

Have an artistic event? arts@uwaterloo.ca

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Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

Music Reviews

Franz Ferdinand Tonight Domino Records (2009)

As the title of their third album suggests, these tunes turned out by Scottish rockers Franz Ferdinand are best enjoyed in the twilight hours, or at least while daydreaming

Mika The Boy Who Knew Too Much Casablanca (2009)

Being an admirer of his debut album, Life in Cartoon Motion, I had pretty high expectations for Mika’s second project; unfortunately, I couldn’t help but be slightly crestfallen after having listened to its content. Lacking much variety, The Boy Who Knew Too Much is a collection of happy-golucky songs containing nonsense lyrics. The quirky idiosyncrasies of his previous work give Mika’s first album a unique flare, but his new release relies way too much on this same style, demonstrating his failure to take any risks. Furthermore, the melodies and harmonies of this new composition are nothing impressive either, as they too are very reminiscent of Mika’s first album. Indeed,

about them. Packed with hypnotic rhythms, the album presents an atfirst-glance contradiction of indie rock and electronica. For me, this unruly combination had its highs and lows, but ultimately provided something refreshing and unique. However, for die-hard Franz fans it could prove to be a disappointment, since Franz deviates from the more organic, rock style of their previous hits, such as “Take Me Out.” Overall, Tonight may not be as radio-friendly as previous albums, but it can certainly rival the massively overplayed hip-hop-in-a dorm-room-near-you’s ability to pump-up the party mood. The first single of the album, “Ulysses,” starts off with a slick beat, and then goes into ever-present synths after lead signer, Alex Kapranos, cheekily sings “Come on,

let’s get high”. Although “just say no” immediately comes to my mind, that doesn’t change the appeal of the rebellious spirit and audacity of the song. Kapranos isn’t referring to peer pressure, but rather to losing yourself and loving it. After all, how can you find something without losing it? This song, as well as “Turn It On,” “Can’t Stop Feeling” and “What She Came For,” are sure to plunge you headfirst into a night of fun in style. One of the main drawbacks of the album is that the party never ends, and the album doesn’t explore much beyond the rollicking-past-your-bedtime theme. Not exactly an album to calmly listen to while studying or trying to relax. However, Tonight’s unconventional style and unexpected twists put it in a category all its own.

the album’s similarities to its predecessor are not necessarily a sign of failure, but the album certainly lacks the groundbreaking new ideas I had hoped to find.

first is “By the Time,” which coincidentally composed, and sung with Imogen Heap. It is full of the unique harmonies that are characteristic of Imogen Heap’s work. The second praiseworthy piece is “Pick up off the floor”, which is pleasantly bluesy. Both of these songs have a drowsy feel to them, whereas the rest of the album’s songs are repetitive, sharp and slightly irritating. Because of my love for Life in Cartoon Motion, it is possible that I had unreasonably high expectations for The Boy Who Knew Too Much; however, I still conclude that the album is mediocre at best. Although I remain a fan of Mika’s, I hope that he endeavors to take more risks in his next album.

There are only two songs in this album that I find praiseworthy. The

— Julia Gunst

— Chantal deSereville

Courtesy Wonemer

Venom Metal Black Castle Music/Sanctuary Records (2006)

“I bear the soul of Satan “I wear the seal of death “I hold the keys to destiny “Steal your dying breath...” The opening lines of Venom’s thirteenth album Metal Black get to the point rather quickly. These guys are not in the oh-so-happy story-telling business, but their focus, like many heavy metal bands, is on stories that other bands are not comfortable talking about. “Death & Dying,” “Lucifer Rising,” and “Assassin,” the titles for some of their songs on the album, more than describe what Venom wants to talk about. The lyrics make sense, but what about the feel? Feel is crucial to metal music. Previously, I had not heard an album by Venom, but I had high expectations, as I know they are an old-school band. When I heard the first song on the Metal Black album, “Antechrist”, I was unsure of what stand to take. The combinations of power chords, that are played are definitely “heavy,” heavy implying a more intense concoction of minor notes. The problem was that it seemed to me that the lead guitar was playing second place. The sound was sort of dampened. The surprise however, came from the vocals. Conrad “Cronos” Lant’s vocals are actually clean and you can understand the words being spoken. They are husky, yes, and have a dark feel to them that makes the sound even better. My reservation about the lead guitar being second place turned out to be misplaced because the second song, “Burn in Hell,” came back with a stronger, crispier guitar riff with

some good guitar screaming and a speedy solo. That’s the way I like it. So what I could infer was that the band was experimenting with their sound throughout the album. Experimenting is good. Mike “Mykvs” Hickey’s guitar is raw, scratchy, and quite unaltered, which is a plus. It helps bring out energy throughout the album. But, I would have liked to hear the band have more single notes between the power chords — something that was missing in the album. It’s too much based on power chords with the occasional screaming that can become a bit boring and monotonous. Their contemporaries, like Iron Maiden and Blitzkrieg, although being slightly different in genre use more single noted patterns in their songs. I got a feeling that their contemporaries might be making better music than them. I must point out that Venom’s toning down of their extreme sound and speed is a little disappointing. If “heavy” is what was wanted, more guitar solos would have been welcome. Like Metallica, Venom played a crucial role in the evolution of Black Metal and Thrash. I would have appreciated some ballads and arpeggios from Venom — styles that were missing in the album. But maybe that’s the way they like it. Heavy and hard, no slow business. Their music is simple, which is a good and a bad thing. Simple can leave you wanting more. And that is to some extent how I feel. But I like the album overall; it had lots of energy and good old heavy metal. One thumb up to Venom, but I’m left wanting to give them more.

Meet in the parking lot behind the Uptown Waterloo LCBO at 2 pm.

A Gen X Video event

— Nafis Ahmed Farid


Science & Technology

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009 science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology Shirley Ma assistant science editor

T

here is a reason why WIN is the name for Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology. These letters represent the spirit of leading, and they present “the focus on the future and on improving the quality of life for all”. The Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology (WIN) was approved by the Senate in June 2008. Led by Dr Arthur Carty and another 47 faculty members from 8 departments, WIN has established several sub-departments including the undergraduate nanotechnology engineering program and its facility building-Quantum Nano Centre. Both the intellectual excellent and advanced facility preparation combine to achieve one single purpose: “to establish WIN as a global centre of excellence for nanotechnology and its applications.” Why nanotechnology then? Well, first let’s define what nanotechnology is. The executive director of WIN, Dr. Arthur Carty, has explained the term on WIN’s website: “Nanotechnology is science and technology on the nanoscale (one-billionth of a metre).  It enables the manipulation of matter to design and engineer new materials, structures, devices, and systems with novel propertiesdefined by their nano-size.” After we understand “What is nanotechnology”, you may want to know “why is nanotechnology important”. Dr. Robert Donker, the nanotechnology engineering business development officer gave a class seminar

to address the topic to 1A nanotechnology engineering students on Oct 2. 2009. “Basically, nanotechnology is one special material science. Everytime you study materials on this scale, you are looking at objects in size of 1nm to 100nm. Looking at these kind of tiny things will be comparable to looking at objects that have a size of 1m to 10m on the moon from the earth.” Once objects have been studied at this scale, they will exhibit a variety of amazing characteristics that can’t be observed at a normal scale. For example. one rich American has purchased a nano blood testing chip. On this chip, there are various kinds of circuit intersections, like that in a computer chip. However, what’s different is that circuits on this chip are able to deliver blood cells to tiny analysis centres (also on the chip). These analysis centers have different functions, which allow them to reflect the health condition of different organs. Eventually, analysis from different perspective will be collected to generate a complete health report for the person, within just a few seconds! So, in the future, if this nano testing technology is applied, where do you think the long waiting time for medical examination will go? Obviously it will disappear. Therefore, nanotechnology will mean cheaper, smaller and faster technology. Every country has realized the potential involved in nanomaterials. Here are some facts from the University of Waterloo Nanotechnology Engineering department: “Nanotechnology is maturing rapidly. Between 1997 and 2005, investment in nanotech

research and development by governments around the world soared from $432 million to about $4.1 billion, and corresponding industry investment exceeded that of governments by 2005. By 2015, products incorporating nanotech will contribute approximately $1 trillion to the global economy. About two million workers will be employed in nanotech industries, and three times that many will have supporting jobs.”

Research institutions around the globe have started a race to the top of nanotechnology development. WIN is competing as well. At this point, WIN has put hands on major areas of nano research including nano-materials, nano-instruments, nano-electronics and nano-biosystems. With the support from its associate directors, professors, researchers, students and advanced facilities, we will be very excited to see how WIN will win.

Shirley MA

part 1: from art to the universe Shirley Ma assistant science editor

The technology behind finding the art Leonardo da Vinci’s greatest painting, The Battle of Anghiari, is said to be hiding in Florence’s city hall’s wall, waiting to be discovered. Dr. Maurizio Seracini, an engineering professor at University of California, in San Diego, has led an international team of scientists to search for the painting. There are two major techniques Dr. Seracini and his team are planning to use. The first one

is by using complete mapping, which means every millimeter of the wall and related rooms will be searched using lasers, radar, ultraviolet light, and infrared cameras. The second is using neutron-beam technology where a beam of neutrons will be shot towards the possible area on the wall. Neutrons will then collide with different chemicals elements and be bounced back to a detector. The detector will then analyze the information contributed by the neutron distribution. “The goal is to locate the sulfur in Leonardo’s ground layer, the tin in the white prime layer, and the chemicals in the colour pig-

ments, like the mercury in vermilion and copper in the blue pigments of an azurite.” Nobel Prize in physics 2009 to be shared Nobel Physics Prize has finally been unveiled and will be shared by three outstanding scientists. Half of the prize will be given to Charles Kao, from Shanghai, China, for “his groundbreaking achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication”. Texts, images and videos transmitted over the Internet through simple opti-

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cal fibers have been around since the 1930s. However, there is one common problem that they cannot avoid. When fibers touch each other, they leak light. Through years of hard work and research, Mr. Kao achieved his goal of keeping 99 per cent of the light remaining on the optical fiber. Willard Boyle, from Nova Scotia, and George Smith, from New York, each share one quarter of the prize, for their “invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit. The technology enabled pictures to be saved on electronic device instead of film; opening the door of digital camera development. Without the technology, we would not have seen the images of space taken by the Hubble space telescope. Entropy of the universe Scientists have previously thought they understood how the universe works, based on theoretical calculations. However, a new calculation contributed by two Australian cosmologists have found that the universe is “messier” than previously thought. Chas Egan from Australian National University in Canberra and Charles Lineweaver of the University of New South Wales in Sydney have written an analysis on the collective entropy of all the super black holes in the centre of the universe. It is reported that the collective entropy is 100 times larger than the previous calculation. Black holes have been calculated to be the largest contributor to cosmic entropy. To explain, a black hole is an entropy “trap” because there are unlimited ways for objects to fall into it in a organized manner. One explanation, from Egan, is that, “the entropy of

the universe must be limited within a maximum value, which marks the end of all dissipative processes, including life. This will be the heat death of the universe”. Theorist Ned Wright of the University of California, Los Angeles said, because the extra entropy is locked inside the black holes, the rest of the universe should have lower entropy and be further away from the heat death. New weather discovery Close attention has being paid to space weather. In the past, scientists believed that one of the most active factors that contribute to space weather is the ionosphere, which is 80 to 1000 km above sea level. The cause of turbulence in the ionosphere has always been blamed on the sun. However, researchers have discovered that the sun may not be the only source to affect space weather. Surprisingly, the weather on the earth can be a factor as well. Terrestrial events that occur under the troposphere(15 km above sea level) and the stratosphere (50km above sea level), can leak to the upper sphere levels. Because the lower atmosphere levels hold much more energy than the upper levels, even a tiny change in the lower atmosphere will possibly have a big effect on the weather condition above. There are many historical facts that support such an assumption. In 1950, Chinese researchers reported that the ionosphere behaved as if it was disturbed during the approach of a typhoon. Recently, an American study has shown that the ionosphere seemed to be distorted during the southern El Niño weather pattern.


Science & Technology

28

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

part 2: from snakes to Nobel Prizes Bogdan Petrescu science editor

One legged snake terorrizes elderly lady A one legged snake has been found in China. Dean Qiongxiu, a 66 year old lady found the creature. She said she saw it crawling along the wall of her bedroom, and it scared her so much that she killed the snake with a shoe. She then preserved the body in a bottle of alcohol. The snake is undergoing an autopsy at China’s West Normal University. Its’ body is roughly 16 inches long with a width of a human’s finger. This type of mutation is abnormal. A more common mutation is bycephaly, where snakes are born with two heads. This type of mutation is similar to what Siamese twins go through. Nobel Prize awarded to cell aging researchers The Nobel Prize was awarded to Elizabeth Blackburn, Carol Greider, and Jack Szostak; who had found the enzyme, telomerase, that is important in cell aging and cell health. This finding had inspired new research that will hopefully be able to cure diseases such as blindness cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Telomeres are the ends of the chromosomes. They are parts of the chromosome that act as a cap and ensure that the DNA does not unravel. The enzyme essentially adds more telomeres to the ends of the chromosomes. In this sense both the enzyme and the telomers decide how many times a specific cell can divide which, in turn, determine life span. This research shows that, as we age the telomeres don’t work as well. This makes the cell go through something called senescence. Senescence means that the cell stops dividing and it just remains partially alive. This research originated from the idea that we can prolong life. Now researchers are looking at ways to use telomerase in order to cure some deseases such as blindness and cardiovascular problems Some of the diseases that occur due to problems with telomerase are some forms of cancer. In cancer the cells start reproducing erratically. Almost 90 per cent of the cancers have been found to have a defective telomerase gene. In this case if the gene is deactivated the cancer might stop spreading.

courtesy Sonia lee

The religious side of the brain

Vaccines may be used to treat addictions

Brain scans of people who are religious have shown that religion activates parts of the brain that are also used for social cognition and social intelligence. This may be one way to explain the religion in terms of the human mind’s evolution. This study was run by Jordan Grafman, a National Institute of Health cognitive scientist, who used an fMRI in order to scan 40 people of different religious convictions. People who had religious beliefs also tend to have larger regions of the brain allocated for empathy, symbolic communication, and emotional regulation. Though the study does have a few problems such as a small sample size as well as a focus on Western religion, the results are in line with earlier research that has shown, that religious experience affects other areas of the brain. One of Grafman’s hypotheses is that religious beliefs evolved in order to help explain some of the hardships that family members as well as other animals go through.

A new study has found that vaccines could potentially be an alternative method to treating addiction. One study done by Dr Thomas R. Kosten at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, found that a cocaine vaccine reduced use in 38 per cent of the drug users. Based on this finding, there may also be vaccines used for other drugs such as nicotine. These types of vaccines are not meant to be used like other vaccines. Instead, they are meant to be used in co-operation with behavioural therapy in order to fully stop people’s addictions. The vaccine’s intention is to stimulate the body’s immune system in order to help create antibodies that would then attach to the drug and lower the substance power. This would effectively decrease the high, and in some cases it would stop it completely. This would decrease the need for the drug. However this would only halt the physiological aspect of addiction, it would not stop the behavioural aspect.

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An issue with this type of therapy is that is it expensive. This might block nicotine vaccine from reaching the general public, so the method may not be the most effective. So far, the most effective vaccines are those for cocaine and nicotine, however vaccines that are meant to

stop mephamphetamines, heroin, and phencyclidine are currently being researched as well. — with files from The Telegraph. co.uk The Wall Street Journal, Wired, and the Los Angeles Times

The science section also likes technology articles. If you love technology and/or computers come and write about them!!

Seriously!

Just write about it!!!!!! or we’ll 01010001 you!

science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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Science & Technology

A lesson from the uneducated

A

fter a drought wreaked havoc on his small African village, William Kamkwamba saw something abundant amid all the shortages. Wind. Having been kicked out of school due to a lack of money to pay for school fees, William found a book in the local underfunded library on how to build windmills. He then scoured the junkyards for bicycle parts, car batteries, plastic pipes, and so on, until he had enough to build a windmill. Everyone thought he was crazy — bewitched, even — but he finished his first windmill in 2002. Today, he has five windmills powering his village and pumping water. He now has a book written about him, is attending an elite South African school for young leaders, and travels the world to talk about his success of saving a starving village by himself instead of waiting for government or international aid — all without an education and by using garbage. Back here in Canada, at least 20 Greenpeace activists took over and chained themselves to smokestacks in a Shell Canada upgrader expansion site in Alberta this past weekend. Sixteen of them were arrested. These protests were to highlight the “climate crimes of the tar sands” before the United Nations

Climate Summit in Denmark this December. Greenpeace climate and energy campaigner Mike Hudema called it “another successful action to highlight the climate crimes of the tar sands.” I think the kid without an education just one-upped Greenpeace. While Greenpeace have been doing a great job at raising awareness and gaining publicity (and all publicity is good publicity) for the environmental movement, they have not been very fast in terms of creating actual change. This is largely due to their tactics of holding signs and disrupting operations (although they didn’t disrupt anything this past weekend, as no one was working). This is a great tactic for getting the attention of a news crew, but to a large corporation like Shell, it’s akin to a housefly landing on one hand, only to be shaken away by the other. The power a company like Shell holds allows it to wave away events such as this and make it seem as if the activists are wrong. For example, this past weekend, Shell said in a statement that it wished activists would talk to them “face to face instead of using confrontation and unsafe tactics.” Well, even face to face doesn’t seem to work. While Greenpeace means well, they’re just stoking the fire for Shell. Unfortunately, such

actions will unlikely change any opposing minds. I’m in no way saying Greenpeace or anyone else should give up. I’m saying that their tactics need to be upgraded. While I may not be a huge fan of their current tactics, Greenpeace provides a well known and established forum for the environmental community. Since they have this community, they need to start thinking about taking on other resources people can provide, and actions other than protests and letters to companies and governments. If standing in front of a truck doesn’t stop it from driving over you, it’s time to build a better truck. Take William’s example. Instead of waiting around for help from others or asking for it from the government, he built his own windmills out of garbage. We have an established, developed country where our government and corporations will listen to us if we speak loud enough. Chaining ourselves to trees and smokestacks was loud before, but they’ve drowned us out. If you want to change the lives of more than six billion people, you’re going to need to create something huge. They’ve got global corporate control, massive machines and factories, and a whole lot of money. I dare you to do better.

29

thelferty@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

I dare you to do better

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

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Science & Technology

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Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

One person’s foot is anothers treasure alomako@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

T

he 1,668,870,408 earth inhabitants that have internet access have produced a global digital hub of sexual expression — and deviation — online. Featuring topics varying from bestiality to pedophilia to shokushu goukan (tentacle rape), the moderate anonymity of the internet provides an ideal environment for people to connect, while leaving little to the imagination. But not all sexual deviations have to be extreme, disrespectful or perverse - fetishes, for instance, can be fun and even mainstream. Essentially, something becomes a fetishistic object when a human attaches erotic significance or meaning to something that is typically regarded as asexual. Alfred Binet, a French late1800 psychologist, made an important contribution to the study of sexual fetishism by suggesting a duality of fetish objects. He categorized fetishes into “spiritual love� as those being directed at mental phenomena such as stereotypes, and “plastic love� as arousal resulting from interaction with material objects, like body parts. Behaviorism explains the development of fetishes through many diverse theories, most of which take to classical conditioning to decipher the connection between sexual arousal and the fetish object. Essentially, what these theories have in common is the belief that the experience of sexual stimuli and another object simultaneously is what causes the erotic connection to be made by the brain. These connections do not always remain static — they may generalize or specialize into particular fetishes. A quality of something coupled with a sexual experience can lead it to become a fetish, — for instance, if a sexual memory is coupled with satin bedsheets, the texture or colour of the fabric may become a constantly arousing object, a fetish. The simplest explanation of the development of a fetish is in the example of a commonly developed

fetish, Polyinyl Chloride (PVC). Fitting PVC clothing fetishes are thought to develop when the brain generalizes a sexual experience. This is because sex usually causes the skin to produce sweat, which gives it a shiny, shimmery quality, which the brain then generalizes to all shiny fitted objects, causing the individual to become aroused at the possibility of the pleasurable feelings experienced at the first encounter of sweaty skin, which is now simulated by PVC. The weakness of these theories is that classical conditioning requires many such instances to occur, while many argue that minimal exposure to the sexual stimuli-object combinations is sufficient. Like all other fetishes, foot fetishes (podophilia) have numerous theories about their origin. One theory simply suggests that the brain may classify feet as other taboo areas — such as breasts, buttocks and genitals, which are usually covered up, attributing them to have sexual values as well. Freuds hypothesis is that, as infants develop, they do abundant crawling around the mother’s feet, and if sexual development occurs in the presence of a mother’s feet, it may eventually develop into a fetish; obviously, there is very little support for this theory. Lastly, the research of Wilder Panfield, a Canadian specializing in phantom limbs, which is the phenomenon of experience sensations in an amputated organ, provides the foundation for a completely different theory. Essentially, he mapped out the sensory homunculus to discover which areas of the brain were responsible for sensations in each body part, discovering that when amputees felt orgasms, she or he could feel the orgasm in the body part that was amputated as well. On Penfield’s map, the cortex area processing sensory information from feet is located next to the genital sensory information. Consequently, the arousal by feet may be caused by

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a spillover of information due to the proximity of the informational hubs in the cortex. As far as fetishes go, if you can name it, it’s probably a fetish. Urination, profanity, leather, steel, nail polish, umbrellas, eyebrows, high heels, scars, leashes, stockings, teeth are just some of the objects of fetishism. You probably know what yours is, but are too embarrassed to admit it. Wait, let me guess. Newspapers. Mmm, mmm, just look at the size of that column‌

If you have any questions about the whereabouts or behaviour of your junk, please email me at alomako@ imprint.uwaterloo.ca. Seriously. There are only so many OMGUWs I can submit before I have nothing else to do.

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Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009 sports@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Football downed in guelph

This Week in Sports

courtesy JS Rancourt

Warrior Golf wins medals once again with tournament gold and silver.

See PAGE 32

courtesy steve brooks

Cornerback Hugo Lopez (#22) takes down the Guelph Gryphon receiver after he makes a catch. Lopez had three tackles on the day. courtesy uw athletics

and the early momentum.

Guelph 34 , Waterloo 24 JJ Maxwell reporter

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n Saturday, October 3 the #10 CIS-ranked Guelph Gryphons(3-2) managed to edge out the Waterloo (1-4) Warriors 34 – 24 at Alumni Stadium. The Warriors could not maintain momentum for any length of time; partly due to two lightning delays that halted play for nearly an hour, and fell 10 points short of a comeback win. Guelph was without starting quarterback Justin Dunk who was serving a suspension; the Gryphons’ two backup quarterbacks split the duties. Waterloo was in a similar situation, as

Evan Martin was back in action for the first time since week one, although Luke Balch started the game. 1st Quarter: Warriors 0, Gryphons 7 Guelph – Touchdown by Josh McCreight 9 yd run (Rob Maver convert) @ 13:14 [7-0] The first quarter was filled with back and forth football, with neither team gaining much ground early on. Late in the quarter though, Guelph’s running back Josh McCreight was able to punch the ball in from nine yards out, giving the Gryphons seven points

2nd Quarter: Warriors 14, Gryphons 17 Guelph – TD by Jamie Shaw 10 yd pass from Kurtis Dance (Rob Maver convert) @ 6:31 [14-0] Guelph – FG by Rob Maver 14 yd field goal @ 9:45 [17-0] Waterloo – TD by N. Anapolksy 68 yd pass from E. Martin (D. Sevigny convert) @ 12:39 [17-7] Waterloo – TD by M. Socholotiuk 1 yd run (D. Sevigny convert) @ 14:54 [17-14] As has often been the case this season, one defensive let down led to another as Guelph soon after scored another touchdown which was quickly

followed by a 14-yard field goal. This gave Guelph a commanding 17 – 0 lead, and the game seemed to be slipping yet again quickly out of Warrior hands. Evan Martin replaced Luke Balch at this point and the offence started clicking. Warrior Nick Anapolsky took a screen pass and turned it into a 68yard touchdown, which put Waterloo on the board. Anapolsky led all receivers with 102 yards recieving. This was quickly followed by a strong drive where Martin ran for 25 yards and then followed it up with a 22-yard pass to Andrew Ward. From there rookie RB Matt Socholotiuk was able to punch the ball in from the one-yard line.

Games of the week:

See FOOTBALL, page 36

Men’s Hockey opens at home this Friday. Season preview within.

See PAGE 33

courtesy steve brooks

Women’s Rugby wins once again and is now ranked #9 in Canada.

See PAGE 34

the best games in town

Friday October 9 Men’s Soccer vs Laurier at 3:15pm on North Campus (CIF) Women’s Rugby at Laurier at 4:00pm in Universtity Stadium Men’s Hockey vs Western at 7:30pm at the Columbia barn (CIF) courtesy steve brooks

Sunday October 10 Men’s Football vs Queen’s at 1:00pm at Warrior Field (CIF)

Men’s Soccer was back in action against Western and Windsor.

See PAGE 37


32

Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

Warriors take silver Warrior Wrap-up and gold in action packed week OUA Men’s Tennis Standings

Team

Ryan Scott reporter

T

he Warriors golf team participated in two OUA tournaments this week as they near the end of their regular season circuit. In the two tournaments the Warriors took home both silver and gold team titles, although conditions proved to be difficult this past week. The first event was the two-day Waterloo/ Laurier Invitational held at Whistle Bear and Rebel Creek Golf Courses, co-hosted by both the Warriors and the Laurier Goldenhawks. Conditions made for a wild start to a busy Waterloo golf week as the weather brought rain and wind gusts totaling up to 50 km/h to the Waterloo region this past weekend. This caused the tournament to experience multiple rain delays throughout the weekend. However, the Warrior team followed their motto of “coming prepared to play” and put up a twoday team total of 598. This team score was good enough for second place to the visiting Western Mustangs. However, the fact that the team came within a two-day total of 9 strokes showed that they weren’t far off on a less than ideal weekend for golf. Leading the charge was Simon McInnis, who shot a tournament total of one under par 143, giving him a one stroke advantage over the field and first place individual honours. This was McInnis’s second gold medal finishing performance on the year, coming off his seven under par 65 at Queens Invitational. “It was a long weekend on the course for the team as there were two rain delays on Saturday alone. However, the team plugged on and I was able to get my game back on track firing one under at Whistle Bear after the delay,” McInnis stated. “Sunday, I didn’t play as well but I knew I was in the hunt and would have to score well. Coming down the stretch things remained tight and I was able to drain a birdie on the last hole to win the honours.” McInnis also stated that he was impressed and certainly not surprised with the strong effort and solid play displayed by his fellow teammates. Rounding out the Warrior scores was another routine solid effort by co-captain Garret Rank who shot a two-day total of 2 over par, while Russel Mackay was at 9 over par, Jimmy Latta at 14 over par and Jack Gibson at 16 over par. The team’s silver earning performance proved that despite the conditions the Warrior golf team continues to grind out solid performance after solid performance with no excuses.

The second tournament of the week was the Guelph Invitational hosted at the Cutten Club. For a second straight tournament the conditions proved to be tough as the winds once again were strong and the air cold, giving way to short 20 minute delay to start the day. However, the Warriors posted an impressive team score of 303 to take first place honours, edging off the second place Western Mustangs and giving the Warriors an impressive two gold and two silver team honours in the four events played thus far. Garrett Rank led the effort with a 2 under par round of 68 beating the 40-player field by five shots and bringing home another individual title for the Warriors giving the team an individual gold in rounds at each tournament this season. “I got off to a rocky start with a three-putt bogey on the first hole but managed to make three birdies and the rest pars on the way in.” Garrett stated when commenting on the rounds, “It was nice to win by five strokes but that wasn’t my concern going out there, it was winning this tournament as a team.” Rank contributed his success to the fact that with his fellow teammates playing great around him it makes his job a lot easier. “We knew from the beginning we had a strong team going into this season. We have at least four guys that would be first or second team all-stars if the OUA still had that system is place.” Rank told Imprint. “It shows the great range on our team and the fact that any of those guys can go out there and win the tournament. That’s the truly great thing about the Warriors.” This all-star depth showed as veteran JS Rancourt and co-captain Jimmy Latta fired rounds of 77 to contribute to first place finish, while solid rounds by rookie Jack Gibson and Ryan Stroud were also strong. The Warriors team is looking as strong as ever as they near the regular season ending McMaster Invitational next Tuesday October 13, before the OUA Championships hosted at the well renowned course, Anglus Glen Golf and Country Club. “Our goal is to win the OUA Championship and anything less would definitely be unacceptable. We still have guys competing for the starting five keeping the competitive environment around the team during practices and events, which should definitely help our pursuit for this goal,” Rank added. “Nothing is better than having players pushing one another to be better and with that going on things look good for our team pushing forward.”

GP

W

L

PTS

Waterloo

6

5

1

10

York

5

4

1

8

Montreal

6

3

3

6

Toronto

6

3

0

6

Western

6

3

3

6

Montreal

5

2

3

4

UOIT

6

0

6

0

OUA Field Hockey Standings Team

GP

W

L

T

PTS

Guelph

9

9

0

0

27

Toronto

8

5

1

2

17

Waterloo

9

5

2

2

17

Western

6

4

1

1

13

York

9

3

4

2

11

McGill

6

1

3

2

5

Queen’s

9

1

7

1

4

Carleton

10

0

10

0

0

OUA Women’s Soccer West Division

OUA Women’s Tennis Standings

Team

GP

W

L

PTS

Montreal

6

6

0

12

Western

6

5

1

10

York

6

4

2

8

Toronto

6

3

3

6

Waterloo

6

2

4

4

McMaster

6

1

5

2

UOIT

6

0

6

0

OUA Men’s Football Standings Team

GP

W

L

T

PTS

Queens

5

5

0

0

10

Western

5

4

1

0

8

Guelph

5

3

2

0

6

McMaster

5

3

2

0

6

Laurier

5

3

2

0

6

Ottawa

5

3

2

0

6

Windsor

5

2

3

0

4

Waterloo

5

1

4

0

2

Toronto

5

1

4

0

0

York

5

0

5

0

0

Team

GP

W

L

T

PTS

Laurier

8

6

1

1

19

Team

GP

W

L

PTS

Brock

9

5

2

2

17

Western

17

12

5

24

York

8

5

2

1

16

McMaster

18

12

6

24

Western

9

5

4

0

15

Laurier

18

10

8

20

Windsor

9

2

3

4

10

Brock

17

9

8

18

McMaster

9

2

4

3

9

Toronto

18

9

9

18

Waterloo

8

1

5

2

5

Waterloo

18

6

12

12

Guelph

8

0

5

3

3

Guelph

18

4

14

8

OUA Men’s Baseball Standings

athletes of the week

presents...

THIS WEEK IN

ATHLETICS & RECREATION

TIFFANY TERRIER Golf 4th year, Mechanical Eng. Kingston, Jamaica

MARK SWEENEY Rugby 2nd year, PHD - History Enfield, Nova Scotia

(m) rugby Friday, October 9, 2009

IMPRINT | OCT 9

(m) hockey Friday, October 9, 2009

vs Brock Badgers

vs Western Mustangs

4:00 pm, CIF Field

7:30 pm, CIF Arena

I AM A warrior

home opener Your could win a pizza party for your floor. Plus, great intermission contests.

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Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

33

M e n ’s ho c k e y looking to drop western in the season opener Brent Golem sports and living editor

T

he puck drops on the Men’s hockey team’s season this Friday against the Western Mustangs. Last season the Warriors finished third in the Far West division with 39 points. That total would have put them in first for almost all other divisions. In the playoffs, the Warriors faced an early round exit. Waterloo played in the first round against Lakehead and were swept 2 – 0 in the best of three series. This year it will be different for a variety of reasons. Instead of having four hockey divisions, with the Far West easily the most difficult, the Ontario University Athletics league has restructured to a conference format with nine teams in the East and eight teams in the West. There will be eight teams in the playoffs, so instead of the top teams having a bye, they will play the bottom seed. Waterloo will be gunning for home ice advantage in the playoffs, which they would have had if the league were restructured last year. This means the Warriors will have to place in the top four of their conference. This should be easy for them, even though Guelph had the best recruiting year in OUA and every team from their previous five-team is strong. Luckily this year the Warriors don’t need to worry about making it out of the first round of the playoffs, something they have been unable to do in the past few seasons. Usually the team loses some close one-goal games, which take them out of the playoffs in the first round. They will definitely be making it to the second round of the playoffs this year, as they will be playing a team like Brock or York in the first round. You can expect the Warriors to be more responsible defensively this season, but don’t take that for boring

hockey. This year they will be a “puck pressure� team, and will be pressuring the other team at all times. If this system is bought into completely by the players, then look for this to cause turnovers and some excellent scoring chances. The games will also include some big hits that will raise the excitement in the Waterloo Barn. “[This team] will be very physical and I can guarantee you that!� coach Brian Bourque told Imprint in an interview. “This year we will be more defensively minded, more physical, and hopefully these little changes will help us advance.� Chris Ray and Shane Hart led the team last year with 35 and 32 point respectively. They were also the 12th and 20th leading scorers in the OUA last season, respectively. According to coach Bourque they will be really exciting to see together again. “They played and connected together to lead the team last year,� coach Bourque told Imprint. He’s also excited to see defenseman Kyle Sonnenburg back in action. Sonnenburg, who was named an All-Canadian player last season, is considered by most to be one of the top two defenceman in the country. Although the Warriors will be very competitive in their division, they may be subject to growing pains as the team lost quite a few key players in the off-season. This year they have nine fresh new faces to play alongside their 16 returning players. Even though we don’t know how the players’ chemistry will gel together, it is known that Warrior hockey is a perennial powerhouse, and this year will no different. Make sure you make it out to the Columbia Barn to cheer on the Warriors this Friday when the puck drops at 7:30 p.m.

Left Winger

Centre

Right Winger

Kurt Thorner

Chris Ray

Shane Hart

Kirt Hill

Mark Hartman

Thomas Cardiff

Kyle Pellerin

Cory Fraser

Kyle Schwende

Matthew deJong

Jarrett Schnurr

Mike Veysey

Garrett Rank

Kyle MacDonald

Aaron Lewicki

Defenseman Kyle Sonnenburg

Aaron Dileo

Greg Steffes

Steve Whitely

Kealin Wong

Ben Pasha

Collin Carwardine

Luke Turcotte Goaltender

Keaton Hartigan John Zelenbaba

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Sports & Living

34

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

photos courtesy Chris Gilbert

Warriors rugby win mud bath match in guelph JJ Maxwell reporter

T

he Waterloo men’s rugby team managed to put their first victory under their belt last Friday as they outplayed the Guelph Gryphons in a tumultuous match, winning10 – 0. The games’ rainy weather led to wet and muddy conditions, making for a sloppy affair. Despite the mud, the Warrior had surprisingly few knock-ons and were able to run some quality balls to the outside. About 20 minutes into the game, fullback Rich Lebel dodged around some Guelph defenders and plunged over the try line to make the score 5-0. The rest of the first half was a battle filled with hard hitting, but neither team was able to put any more points on the board. About halfway through the second-half veteran Mark Sweeney made a beautiful grub kick, which Ryan Black was able to touch town for the try. This rounded out the

scoring, giving Waterloo the 10-0 win. This well-timed and confidently executed play is a sign of the promise this Waterloo team hold. Hopefully there will be more like it in the weeks to come. The man of the match was Mark

Sweeney, who did a great job directing traffic on the field and was able to make good passes through the mud and rain. Waterloo is back in action today at 4:00 p.m. against Brock here at home.

OUA Men’s Rugby Standings Team

GP

W

L

PTS

Queens

5

5

0

24

Western

5

4

0

19

Brock

4

3

1

14

Laurier

4

3

1

14

RMC

5

2

1

10

McMaster

4

2

3

9

Waterloo

5

1

3

5

Guelph

4

0

4

1

Toronto

4

0

3

1

55

The Warrior Men’s Rugby team helped the rain turn the Guelph Gryphon field into a mud pit. The Warrior came out with a clean sheet in a 10-0 win.

Women ranked 9th in country after brock badgering thus keeping the ball in Brock’s yardage for most of the time. Although there were exciting moments near the tryline, the warriors could not convert their offensive push. With fifteen minutes remaining, veteran centre Abbey Gingerich scored a game winner off a perfect pass from flyback Julie Prout. After a successful kick thereafter, the game ended 24 – 17 in favour of Waterloo. For two exiting breakaway trys, Erinne Vargas was given Woman of the match honour. The Warriors now stand third in the OUA standings. They play at Laurier’s University Stadium in their last game of the 2009 season. If they win and Western wins against Guelph, the Warriors would end the season atop the OUA rankings (20 points) along with the Gryphons and the Mustangs.

Waterloo 24, Brock 17 Siddant Baride reporter

T

he Warrior women shone this weekend, with pounding wins for the soccer and rugby teams. Surely the female prowess has been highlighted as the ladies are now ranked ninth in Canada. Travelling to Brock, the rugby team had to prove themselves, after their humiliating 48 – 5 defeat against Guelph, two weeks ago. The game started strongly for the Badgers, finding themselves in the Warriors’ endzone within the first ten minutes. As an apt wakeup call, the Badgers scored a quick try on the outside. Fortunately, they failed to convert the kick. The Warriors now had to push through the entire 80-yard field distance, opposed by a determined opposition scrum. The flankers did some excellent offload passing and crashing, thus creating space for veteran Flyback Kristen McAlpine to sneak in and score a try under the post. Captain Melissa McGuire added the twopoint conversion giving Waterloo a 7 – 5 advantage. After a long stalemate in the centre, the Badgers pulled an easy break and scored a try on the outside, again.Warriors immediately replied, with winger Erinne Vargas scoring two breakaway tries in the corner. With a converted kick, the scoreboard stood at 17-17 as the game headed into the second half. The game now saw a new and reinvigorated Warrior side. The scrum provided strong defense,

Women’s Rugby Canadian (CIS) Top Ten 1. Lethbridge 2. StFX 3. Guelph 4. Laval 5. Alberta 6. McMaster 7. Concordia 8. Western 9. Waterloo 10. UBC

OUA Women’s Rugby Standings Shiels Team

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GP

W

L

PTS

Guelph

4

4

0

20

Western

4

3

1

15

Waterloo

4

3

1

15

Brock

4

1

3

5


fp_oct9:Layout 1

10/6/09

12:05 PM

Page 1

(W)(M) soccer Friday, October 9, 2009

vs WLU Golden Hawks (W) 1:00 pm, (M) 3:15 pm CIF Soccer Field

Friday, October 16 - Sunday, october 18

(m) HOckey Home opener

Friday, October 16

Friday, October 9, 2009

1:00 PM 3:00 PM

Women Women

MUN UFV

vs vs

Concordia WATERLOO

6:00 PM 8:00 PM

Men Men

Acadia Manitoba

vs vs

Toronto WATERLOO

7:30 pm, CIF Arena

vs Western Mustnags

Saturday, October 17 1:00 PM 3:00 PM

Women Women

Concordia vs MUN vs

UFV WATERLOO

Football

6:00 PM 8:00 PM

Men Men

Manitoba Acadia

Toronto WATERLOO

Saturday, October 10, 2009

vs vs

Sunday, October 18

vs Queen’s Gaels 1:00 pm, Warrior Field

1:00 PM 3:00 PM

Women Women

UFV vs Concordia vs

MUN WATERLOO

6:00 PM 8:00 PM

Men Men

Acadia Toronto

Manitoba WATERLOO

vs vs

UW Students receive free admission with their Watcards

(m) HOckey

battle of waterloo

Thursday, October 15, 2009

vs WLU Golden Hawks 7:30 pm, CIF Arena

®

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Registered trademarks of Boston Pizza Royalties Limited Partnership, used under license. © Boston Pizza International Inc. 2005


36

Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

FOOTBALL: Close game comeback Continued from page 31

The drive took eight plays and Waterloo traveled 50 yards. This brought the game back within reach, and the teams split for half-time with the score 17-14 in favor of Guelph. 3rd Quarter: Warriors 22, Gryphons 27 Waterloo – Rouge by D. Sevigny @ 1:59 [17-15] Guelph – FG by Rob Maver 43 yd field goal @ 3:33 [20-15] Guelph – TD by Josh McCreight 47 yd run (Rob Maver convert) @ 11:07 [27-15] Waterloo – TD by M. Socholotiuk 1 yd run (D. Sevigny convert) @ 14:50 [27-22]

Courtesy Carl Pawlowski

The Waterloo Women’s Cross Country team ran to a second place finish while the Men’s Cross Country team finished fourth in the Waterloo Hosted Don Mills Meet.

The third quarter started with a Warrior rouge (one point) thanks to kicker Dave Sevigny, who is second in the OUA with 1,845 yards in 47 attempts. Soon afterwards the Gryphons were then able to put up a field goal from 43 yards. Guelph built on this momentum, and with the following possession, Guelph RB Josh

McCreight broke through the Warrior defence and raced 47 yards to the end zone. This gave Guelph a 27-15 lead. While the outlook seemed bleak for the Warriors, the offense would not go down without a fight. Martin threw a 25-yard laser pass to the sideline where Dustin Zender was hauled down on the one yard line. Socholotiuk, who had 66 yards running on 17 carries, then plunged the ball in once again to cut the deficit and bring the game back within reach. 4th Quarter: Warriors 24, Gryphons 34

Guelph – TD by Chris Rossetti 1 yd run (Rob Maver convert) @ 2:32 [35-22] Waterloo – Safety (Guelph conceeded by B. Moallim) @ 11:39 [35-24] Unfortunately, as the weather turned sour in the fourth quarter, so did the Warriors’ play. Guelph quarterback Chris Rossetti was able to engineer a successful drive that ended with a oneyard push by the quarterback. This put the game out of reach of Waterloo — who were only able to score a safety before the final whistle went with the score 34-24.

Game 5 vs Guelph: Players of the Game Offensive Player of the Game:

QB Evan Martin (#13) Martin returned looking like he had something to prove after being injured since week one. He had 19 completions for 33 attempts, with 1 touchdown and one interception and 320 total throwing yards.

Defensive Player of the Game:

DB Mitch Nicholson (#7) Nicholson boasted six solo tackles and six assists. He made himself a noticeable for on the field while coming up with some big stops.

NFL Starter convicted of drunk driving causing death gets less time than michael vick

I

have to say, sometimes, I don’t understand justice. Sometimes, I take a good bite of those laws and amendments that are supposed to hold up our society, and it just leaves a nasty taste in my mouth. As I followed the sporting news this summer I became more and more confused. Say what you will about sports stars, with their larger-thanlife egos and eccentric ways, but they often times bring some serious issues to the forefront. Take our good friend Michael Vick: three years ago, Michael was the toast of the NFL, the kind of player who could hurt defenses in ways people had never seen before. In 2006, he threw for almost 2,500 yards and ran for 1,000 yards, being the first quarterback in the history of the NFL to do so. He was transcendent, a fanfavourite, his jersey sales were through the roof. Then news broke connecting him to a dog-fighting ring that he had apparently been funding. He denied

jtoporowski@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

the allegations for a while, until he was cornered by prosecutors, found guilty, and sent to a state penitentiary where he served 23 months. Then there was Plaxico Burress, a star wide receiver who made the unfortunate decision of bringing an unlicensed gun into a club in New York. Burress, who seemed to have more air in his head than most footballs, accidentally shot himself in the leg (yes, you are reading this correctly) and was recently sentenced to two years in prison for various weapons charges. Both Vick and Burress have been publicly ridiculed. Burress is the butt of more jokes than ‘yo mamma.’ Furthermore, Vick, after paying his debt to society, volunteering at the Humane Society and recently beginning a series of public lectures to children about the dangers of animal cruelty,) is still continually protested at games. Also, his signing, by the Philadelphia Eagles, was met by outrage across the country.

It’s important to have these first two examples, purely for the sake of comparison to the latest bizarre NFL story that emerged this summer — the story of the drunk Donte Stallworth. Stallworth, one of the Cleveland Browns best playmakers, hit 59-year-old Mario Reyes as he was driving home from a bar in Miami Beach at 7:15 in the morning. Stallworth stopped, called the police and admitted, immediately, to hitting Reyes, who was soon pronounced dead. In a crime-filled summer for the NFL, this one was the gem. So how much time did Stallworth get? How many nights would he be rooming with our friends down at the local prison? I mean, Vick got 23 months; Burress got two years—both for offences that didn’t result in the loss of human life. Stallworth got 30 days. Now, it was right here when that big bite of justice started to taste like I’d accidentally chomped down on some

road kill. I mean, 30 days — 30 days… 30 DAYS? His blood-alcohol had been 0.126. He’d killed someone, driving drunk at flippin’ 7:15 in the morning! I was confused, and a little distraught, but I kept repeating one fact to myself — there was no way the public was going to fall for this. Sometimes fancy lawyers pull one over on judges, but surely the public wasn’t going to let him get away with it. Surely, a media firestorm would start up that would make the outrage over Vick’s dog-fighting ring look like a boy scout’s campfire. Well it turned out I was wrong — dead wrong. I was more wrong than Kanye at the VMAs. Sure, there was shock out there and people were just as confused as I; but it seemed, at least to me, that most people out there were defending Stallworth. People were trying to justify the short sentence and in doing so, focusing on all the wrong details. I heard media members discussing how great it was that he had stopped,

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called the police, and that he’d owned up to everything he’d done and had taken full responsibility. Taken full responsibility? This is what Stallworth did so correctly? Isn’t that something you get credit for when you’re six years old and just swiped a cookie before dinner? It’s not even the laws that allowed this to happen (after all, these were United States laws), that burn me up; it’s the public’s reaction. I think Lindsay Lohan’s latest rehab attempt garnered more attention than this story. In the end, it was Roger Goodell, the NFL’s commissioner, who had to step in and give Stallworth what he deserved; he gave Stallworth an indefinite ban from playing in the NFL. Here’s to hoping that the next time Stallworth is returning home at 7:15 in the morning, it’s from the night shift at McDonald’s.

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Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

37

Warriors get blown away by the wind and windsor Waterloo 0, Windsor 2 Komal R. Lakhani sports and living assistant

T

he Warriors went down 2 – 0 to the Windsor Lancers last Saturday afternoon, on the Columbia Ice Fields. Neither luck nor weather were in favour of the Warriors. With the rain pouring and temperatures dropping, it was a tough game. The game also saw a change in goal keepers witj Kyle Cirone and Goran Vlacic both playing

one half each which gave Michel Saccone a break after the challenging games against York and Guelph last week. The first half saw a defensive approach by the Warriors which kept the ball in their area for a long time.The Lancers then opened their account in the 42nd minute off a corner kick. The second half was dominated by Waterloo most of the time, but no concrete result was bought out of it. The ball was not passed around well enough. Taking advantage of a

penalty, Windsor scored their second goal in the 90th minute, bringing the curtains down for the Warriors Head Coach Peter Mackie who we could not catch up with last week said “ At half time we questioned the players a little bit. We did not possess the ball nor passed it properly. The first goal was questionable and so we changed the goalkeepers to stir and sparken the team” On being asked why striker Leon Latty did not have anyone to cover him, Mackie said that

the team played a very conservative lineup of 45-1, and they are now slowly making a smoother transition of sending their midfielders up to help the striker. Even though Waterloo did not win the game, the team did play better than last week. Bobby Colorado, Stanley Adam Craig, Victor Salajon and Chris Lam stood out among a number of Warriors who have played consistently throughout the season. klakhani@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

OUA Men’s Soccer Standings West Division

East Division

GP

W

L

T

PTS

Guelph

6

4

1

1

13

14

Waterloo

6

3

1

2

11

1

13

Windsor

6

3

1

2

11

2

2

11

York

6

2

2

2

8

3

3

2

11

Western

6

2

3

1

7

7

2

3

3

8

McMaster

6

2

4

0

6

Trent

8

2

5

2

7

Laurier

6

1

2

3

6

RMC

5

0

5

1

0

Brock

6

1

4

1

4

Team

GP

W

L

T

PTS

Toronto

7

4

1

2

14

Queens

7

4

1

2

Laurentian

7

4

2

Carleton

7

3

Ryerson

8

Nipissog

Team

Komal r. lakhani

GOAL….. well almost!

Warriors draw close match against Western Komal R. Lakhani sports and living assistant

T

his Sunday’s games were something not to be missed. A day packed with some real soccer action where Warriors stood tall against Western Mustangs. A brilliant goal, by Alexander Woo, centre midfielder at the start of the game, gave the warriors a much needed boost after the previous two losses against Guelph and Windsor. UW started with a very offensive strategy which went into defensive after the first goal. By the end of the first half it was a tie with one goal each, which put the team in a disturbed position. This game was like a battlefield, with our players falling like skittles and bouncing back up like basketballs. The warriors displayed exceptional skills in combating this problem by taking up their game another notch.

The Mustangs played a very rough game causing injuries to our team and a number of yellow cards to theirs in the second half. Goalkeeper Michel Saccone dived in left right and centre not letting the ball pass through the goalpost. Striker Leon Latty’s headers were something to look out for, making the game more challenging for the opposition defenders. After having an offside goal, left midfielder Chris Lam did not waste any time and scored midway during the second half. It was indeed a great goal that bought the crowd jumping to their feet. Victory seemed inevitable this time, but Western managed to score in the 93rd minute. This ended the game in the next minute with a draw. On being asked about these surprising turn of events Head Coach Peter Mackie said “This was a game we thought we would and should have won, The referee lost control of the game during the first half, which saw

some fouls going unnoticed” The Warriors (3-2-3) now stand with 12 points on 4th place in the OUA West division, bringing them down by two spots from last

Waterloo 2, Western 2 week. This week Warriors play against our neighbour Laurier on Friday at 3.15p.m. at Columbia Ice Fields. klakhani@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Komal r. lakhani

Komal r. lakhani

Komal r. lakhani


Comics & Distractions

38

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

By Jordan Campbell

MICHAEL TO (irresponsiblyoptomistic@imprint.uwaterloo.ca)

Sudoku (HEXADECIMAL)

7 0 6

3 A E 5

B 6 3 C 1 F C 5 E 7 D 2 9 0 6

D

F

4 8

0123456789ABCDEF

E

5 A 7

C 9 8 2 0 4 5 2 6 C 3 D 0 E 8 F 1 8 4 A E 3 D 6

4

A B 6 E C F

A 9

8 3

0 6 2 3

1 5

5 9 4 1

A C D 6 B F 8 6 1 2 C 5 9 4 9 4 3 B F

To my Monday double-scoop mango artist, Thy lips, thy tongue, incite me to visualize moments of full body interaction. Please do not be afraid; I am bold, and so are your flavours. See you in line on Monday.

- The Slurper

TO MY EFFING EX GIRLFRIEND, WHENEVER I HEAR EFFINGTON BY BEN FOLDS, I DEDICATE IT TO YOU. YOU’RE A BITCH.

This is to the guy who is ALWAYS in Bowser’s Cafe reading the paper. Like, do you ever go to class? Anyway, you’re hot, so fucking look up once in a while to see me staring.

- Googly Eyes

My sexy loner, Every time I see you sitting in the corner of the classroom by yourself, chills run down my spine. I’ve never seen you sit with anyone. ANYONE. I’d come over and say hello, but seeing you there by yourself just gets me so...

Missed any connections lately? Got any ideas, gripes, or randomly entertaining thoughts? Send them (with utmost affection) to

distractions@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Comics & Distractions

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

Solutions:

39

October 2, 2009

Under what circumstances would you sleep in the SLC? By Michelle Spiers and Michelle Fujita

5 2 8 6 9 4 1 3 7

“Too cold out...missed bus.” Ashley Betschel 2nd Yr. Rec & Leisure

“When there’s an assignment due in two or three hours.” Umair Mahmood 1st Yr. Math CA

“If there was a blizzard.” Raneal 1st Yr. Engineering & Accounting

“During exams.” Terrance Kwok 3rd Yr. Accounting

7 9 4 5 1 3 2 8 6

3 6 1 8 2 7 9 5 4

4 3 2 7 5 6 8 9 1

1 5 7 9 8 2 4 6 3

9 8 6 4 3 1 7 2 5

8 7 5 3 4 9 6 1 2

2 4 3 1 6 8 5 7 9

6 1 9 2 7 5 3 4 8

“If I was paid.” Morgan Genge 1st Yr. Science & Bus.

“Bad weather.” Courtney Ward 1st Yr. Environment

“Studying.” Michelle Fournier 3rd Yr. Biomed

Marissa MacLean 3rd Yr. Biomed

“Bugs in my apartment.” Preet Mangat 1st Yr. Arts & Bus.

“Being lonely.” Narmeen Hasan 1st Yr. Arts & Bus.

“Food.” Fatima Remtullah 1st Yr. Arts & Bus.

Crossword

Look on the PLUS Side By Alex Inayeh 43. Plus side to screwdrivers 45. Bulls 47. Not yet firm 48. Furrow 49. Plus side to medicine 53. Cheap 56. Mirth 57. Bus driver Mann 58. Drop these for listening 59. Coaxial RF connector 60. Woven net 61. Cynical

Down

Across

1. Black sheep noise 4. Looney corporation 8. Halloween mo. 11. Stan and Randy family name 13. Star Trek wrath bringer 14. Chinese minority in Vietnam

15. OJ and Pérignon 16. Plus side to math 18. Manipulate 19. “Get __ of yourself!” 20. Outstanding slang 24. Plus side to church 27. “…or __ say…” (2 wds) 28. Letters to the dead 29. Wade’s opponent

30. Room decoration 31. Poppy seed narcotics 33. Plus side to knives 35. A woman’s cutting tools 37. Big clarinets 40. __ mode 41. National Academy of Engineering 42. Final inning

1. Frat buddy 2. Donkey 3. “Take on me” singer 4. Alias abbreviation 5. Coronary heart disease 6. Comedic magazine 7. First electronic computer 8. Enemy of Columbus state 9. 19th century Asian labourers 10. Two crossed letters 11. Mess up using a plus sign 12. Misspelled protozoas 15. Wet dirt 17. Number of ice cream flavours 21. Death rattles from a Middle Earth monster 22. Cat noises 23. Spicy Indian dish 24. Makes a plus sign 25. Regis’s Kelly 26. Not down golf clubs 32. Extent 34. Exchange 35. 105th element 36. Peyton’s brother’s smaller

DNA 38. Shorter eternity 39. Expresses indifference 43. Many magic dragons 44. If David Bowie’s astronaut were demoted 46. Pigpen 50. Dined 51. Possessive pronoun 52. Homer’s exclamation 53. Stitch 54. La Brea pit 55. Wall plan

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40

Comics & Distractions

Imprint, Friday, October 9, 2009

(postscript@imprint.uwaterloo.ca)

PETER N. TRINH (impression@imprint.uwaterloo.ca)

RAJUL SALEH (differentperspective@imprint.uwaterloo.ca)

By “Treavs” (geese@imprint.uwaterloo.ca)


Imprint_2009-10-09_v32_i12