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iCounsel.ling

Athenas undefeated!

disrupt.ed by Judy Holland8 Imprint staff

I

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STORMING AHEAD: Waterloo player in pursuit. Turn to page

?-

,halmersfy

centerback 28 of sports

)y Henrietta Veerman imprint staff

A cool million was recently donated to UW’s arts adminisration specialization by Dr. ?loyd ;tnd Mrs. Jean Chalmers. The arts administration spe:ialization alms to educate and rain future managers for cultu*al organizations. Part of the applied studies program, arts subsidizes

steak

the ball with

a Guelph

major arts patrons

Artbadmin

administration

Lisa Page (right) for the results.

the

:o-op student’s salary, which filancially-strapped cultural orsuch as the ganizations Canadian Opera Company and the Royal Winnipeg Ballet canlot afford. “There is a general perception .n Canada that arts organiza:ions are poorly managed. We’re

get& $1 M

John, dean of applied studies. Of the 160 applied studies students accepted last year, fewer than ten were chosen for the arts administration specialization this year. “We look for academic standards, and they must have shown a past commitment to the arts. This is very important,” stressed Dr. John. He is excited, maybe even overwhelmed by the generosity of the donation. “It is a lot of money,” Dr. John said. “It’s the largest cash donation UW has ever received.” The million was given as shares in MacLean-Hunter stock. I Dr. Chalmers, 91, was chairman of MacLean-Hunter for years, and is still wits honorary chairman. The Chalmers family. have given countless millions. toc the

most among all patrons to the arts in Canada. “At the same time of our gift, they gave away $10 million to other arts institutions,” Dr. John said. “The Chalmers family is investing in our specialty, because of our success. They want to help us expand.” Dr. John plans to keep most of the MacLean-Hunter shares as an investment, and use the proceeds to expand the program, selling off shares as needed. “We will expand the specialization

nationally,

improve

cur-

riculum, and press into a bilingual program.” Increased, perhaps doubled enrollment, is also planned. Only two other universities Eave arts administration programs. Arts administration at UW is going into its eighth year, and with * as million bucks, Dr. _. . m1

A 25 per cent cutback of space at Counselling Services has disrupted programs for this term and jeopardized the futures of several other services. The centre in Needles Hall is currently undergoing re-const ruct ion to accommodate two administrative offices, which have been moved from the third floor, One on one counselling has not been affected, but workshop offerings have been substantially reduced this term. Depression management, exam anxiety, gestalt therapy and relaxation therapy have been cancelled all together, while assertion training and career planning having been reduced from two groups to only one. The Dean of Students,. Ernie Lucy and Co-ordinator of Handicapped Students, Florence Thomlinson, will move into the offices which used to be group tIi’empy rooms. They have left .the upper echelons of Needles I&# to make room for the assotiiate, provost, academic affairs, dean of computing and associate provost, general servic,es, revised administration positions. According to Ernie Lucy, the decision to move the offices into the counselling centre was made by the university’s space planner, who discovered that the square footage per person in the counselling centre is beyond the standard of the university. Because both dean of students and the coordinator of handicapped services are positions related to student services, it was considered reasonable to move them in beside the counselling offices, he said. When asked if he thought that

the changes would affect the services offered to students, Lucy said he felt it would bnly be a short term inconvenience. He also stated that the group sessions could be rearranged to fit in the space that is now available, adding that, “whenever a group loses an area they had been using, it is painful to give up that space.‘: Staff at Counselling Services were shocked when the changes were announced late in July. According to Linda Keller, a counsellor at the centre, the loss of counselling rooms constitutes a loss of 20-25 per cent of their total space. During the construction, they have been working in cramped conditions, she said. The changes were not discussed with people at Counselling. Rather, they were delivered as a directorate to the Director, Jack Williams. Explaining the reaction of staff, Linda Keller said, “We were all v&y upset about it, especially thoee who offer group services.” Ap roximately 2100 students use e ounselling Se&ices each year; the past two years has seen a 20 per cent increase in demand for the programs. Compared to other Ontario universities, Waterloo is slightly below average in counseilor to student ratios, Williams said. Linda Keller was uncertain about the long term effect of the space reduction. At the moment, there is one less group room when demand for these programs is increasing. When asked if they could use other rooms on campus. tihe replied that’ the idea predents certain problems. “Group sessions sometimes require equipment

Continued

on page 4


“Pop-a-ShcW tourney every Thursday night.

Great prizes for both sexes! V40!!” Start pradicing...The League begins October 1 st.

Landlord and T enant 0 0 I nformation 0 ffice ’ l%~4I I

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The LTIO is looking for volunteers to staff our office in ccl5OB from September to December. Training is available All applications must arrive,by I September 26. Please call or

Paul Nancy

Tuesday,

888-0128

Environmental Studios - regular Science - regular H.K.L.S. - regular Renisrm College

888-0170 Then YOU have the opportunity to sit on the:

The LTIO is also looking for a Co-ordinator for January to ???. Applicant must have strong organizational skills and knowledge of Landlord/Tenant Information. Please

either call one of the contacts above or

UDENTS

COUNCiL

Nominations for’the above seats are open from September,22 to September 29th, so drop into th6 FED Office in the Campus Centre (CC 235) to


Confused? Troubled? Perplexed?

1

Sue has all t-he sex answers by Daneal Charney leY Imprint staff

and Al Wad-

their mot her’s bra around a chair and practiced removing it. They’ve also prepared a tape of “humping music”, usually beginEnergizing, humorous, candid ning with Tonight’s the Night by and informative - that’s Sue JoRod Stewairt: Those who are hanson. Many of us have seen overzealous could include Push, her in our high schools. RePush in the Bush. member? She’s the one who In case females think they are gives the famous line, “one size experiencing *deja vu on their fits all,” while stretching a con- _ dates, Sue said males have been dom above her head, and then using the same lines and stratepulling it over most of her foregies for years. arm. Sue also talked about how Sue is not only famous for her kales and females are socialized “Sunday Night Sex Show” on differently regarding what is apQ107 and “Talking Sex with propriate .sexual behaviour, Sue” on Rogers Cable T.V., but is Males tend to be given the mesalso the author of Talk Sex, anda sage that it’s okay to have sex as monthly columnist in Chatelaine long as they are responsible. magazine. Unlike guys, girls are not enLast Monday, the Public couraged to fantasize about sex Issues Board and Sexuality Reor plan toward it+ Girls are source Centre, both Federation simply told “Don’t.” Because of organizations, brought Sue to this type of deterrence, many UW, and it is unlikely that any of girls are uncomfortable with the 200 people in the audience fantasizing, masturbating, or left without learning something looking at themselves, she told about sex and sexuality. Sue the audience. drew on her experience as a parSue believes many parents ent, and also as the coordinator provide their kids with miscon(and founder) of the Don Mills ceptions. For example, sqme Birth Control Clinic. mothers believe that their boys After playing with the conare born knowing about sex by doms, Sire pointed out that our intuition. attitudea toward sexuality begin Some parents also give negato,develop at infancy. Interest in tive or incorrect information to sex begfns about ten minutes their kids to discourage aspects after birth, and that is about the of sexuality such as masturbasfline tirne.that parents begin to tion. However, Sue reassured influence our views about sexuthe males who masturbate that ality, sh& said. they will not go blind, grow hair on their palms, or start “shooting orI% o~;Et;~~~~o~~ 2 blanks” later in life. bqrrassing moments that came. Being candid helped Sue eonw$h it. ghe had the males in the vey her information effectively. audiencq laughing with the meFor example, she admitted that mory of itheir experience trying she found it difficult to discuss. to hide an erection in a spandex sex with her own children, and bikini. that she had fallen into the trap “,Femal& were reminded about of raising them with a double how awkward it was trying to standard. insert a “super-sized” tampon at Sue's openness, humour and the onset of menstruation, when empathy during the speech their parents were afraid to discreated an atmosphere in which cuss how to insert tampons members of the audience felt properly. comfortable asking her personal Sue also remarked that males questions. It was clear from the think through, fantasize about rapport that she established and prepare their sexual encounwith the audience why she has ters before they happen. Some become Canada’s foremost’ auteens have told her that they put tho&y on sexuality.

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A@r her condom demonstratibn, she’ examining your own genitals, iqerting’ d, , photo by J&&im, +-i


4 Imprint, Friday, September 22, 1989

NEWS

9

Counselling cramped Continued

I

Renovations move.

in Needles

Hall forcing

Counselliqg Services to photo by Judy Hotbd~ I

l ZlQ~Ave.(at~)............

lank st. w. (m

endangered

from page 1

which would h&e to be moved, and confidentiality also presents a problem. Lecture rooms are not designed for the type of confidentiality required for counselIing.” Barbara Schumacher, Medical Director of Health and Safety, also expressed concern about the absence of many of the group workshops this term. “A number of psychological concerns, stresses and illnesses are dealt with well in a group setting. The workshops, provided by CounseHing Services help a lot of students,” she said. ’ She is particularly concerned about the depression management course which is relatively new and has only recently been requested by students. Schumacher also commented that group counselling is important - with a limited number of staff, it is the’ best way of reaching more students. Many students who were signed up for groups this fall returned to campus to find their programs cancelled. Clara wanted to be in a Gestalt group but was disappuinted. “Part of the frustration is that we didn’t find out until we got h&e. I was anticipating this group and hoping it would happen. A lot of smotional support issues come up when you are away from home and studying -that’s why I signed up for it. ‘This is a cold university. You are just one face among thousands. For them to take away that one small bit of support makes me wonder where the priorities of the administration are,”

This duck was found in the vincinity of Village one near the end of fresh week, able to move only its head. Five other ducks died or had to be put to sleep due to unnatural injuries sustained near the end of Frosh week. The punishment months in prison

for unnecessary cruelty to animals and/or a thousand dollar fine.

is six

photo by Dave Thomson

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Imprint,

NEWS

Friday,

September

22, 1989

5

Students’ Council: eggs a.nd .agendas by Scott Murray Imprint staff Th6 governing body, for the Federation of Students, the Students’ Council, kicked off its first meeting this term on Sunday, September 17 with Fed Hall pancakes and eggs galore. After council members and guests finished brunch, the meeting started with a review of activities that had taken place since the last meeting, held on July 30, with particular attention paid to Orientation. The overall assessment of this year’s activities was good, with the executive stating that the pep rally was the most successful one ever held. While the official Shinerama campaign. in which frosh raise money for Cyftic fibrosis research, is not over until October 31, Shinerama chair Terry Playford estimated that the total raised jointly by Laurier and UW will be $70,000 to $73,000. Their goal for this year was $89,000. The difference could be crucial UW and WLU bet Western that the two Universities combined could raise more money than Western. If YOU seethe Federation president and vice-presidents wandering around campus with purple hair, you will know we lost - the losers have to dye their hair the othe’r schools’ COlours. Vice-President [University Affairs) Fran Wdowczyk, reported that she is continuing to work on the exclusionary bylaw situation in Waterloo. City council has so far refused to strike down the by-law, which prohibits rhore than five unrelated people occupying the same

Fed Hall manager Chuck McMullan, VPOF Fran Wdowczyk, and deep for iou, breaking ground for the Fed Hall coat check. dwelling, even though it contrastudent the Federation is sponvenes provincial law. The Unisoring arrived on September 7. versity of Western Ontario faced She stated that he is fine, althe same problem, but the city of though still adjusting to the cliLondon recently removed it.s exmate. If anyone has extra men’s clusionary by-law. small clothing, it can be dropped Through its two seats on the off for him in the Fed Office city’s Housing Task Force, the [CCZSS]. Federation plans to honQur good Fed President Dave Readman landlords with plaques, and orreported that the ground breakganize the licensing of boarding ing for the coat check at Fed Hall and rooming houses with the inshould happen this week, and is tention of lowering insurance expected to take 16 weeks to rates and hopefully rents. complete. The ground was actuWdowczyk informed councilally broken on September 19. lors that the Ethiopian refugee There have been numerous de-

.

President

Dave

Readman

dig

lays by Plant Operatiogs. Readwhich caused man said, uncertainty over the groundbreaking date. The Fed executive hope the alterations will be completed by January 1st. He said the coat check will not go over its $300,000 budget, in spite of the delays. Readman was recently questioned by a WS reporter about drinking on campus in response to a drinking-related death at the University of Guelph last winter. He found the reporter was only interested in the problems of student drinking, not in pro-

grams that promote responsible drinking practices. Readman reported the university’s commitment to the student life building appears totbe waning. Initially the university said they would provide $6 m:illion, to be supplemented with student What is now contributions. being discussed is $2 million coming from the university and students, and requesting $1 million from the Ontario goverti’ment. He suggested council consider having an architectural design competition similar to the one held for Fed Hall. The Canadian Feder#ion of Students (CFS), of which the Federation of Students is a prospective member, presented an information session on’ our benefit s and responsibilities. As prospective members, iwe gain all the benefits of a full membership, with the exception of both . the StudentSaver, and International Student Card programs. We also must hold a referendum within two years of being granted prospective status. Currently, the referendum is scheduled to coincide with next year’s Federation of Students election. Plans for fpur additional Commerce banking machines, two full service machines and two cash machines, are proceeding, Vice-President (Operations and Finance) Tim Collins’said. Negotiations are still on-going, but Collins expects South Campus Hall will get at least one of the new machines. The next council meeting is scheduled for Sunday, October 22 in the fish bowl-style room of the Davis Centre.

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/ Is democracy !i truly democratic?

i

1 The Temagami wilderness, the SkyDome, the poor - all ! have something in common . I , public opinion. Eachissue that arises in our society is decided in terms of votes, popularity, or money. Public opinion does not necessarily mean that if the public , wants it, the public gets it. Decisions are also made in terms of : how close the election is, or how much money is to be made, both over and under the table. Of course there is patronage: ; “so-and-so did this for me so I will use my democratically elected position to do he/she/it a personal favour”. I What really bothers me about this system called democracy ’ is that 1) it is a myth and 2) we live as if it epitomizes truth, justice and freedom. Yes, democracy is a myth. When was the last time your needs were represented by your elected representatives? How often do our politicians make a decision based on ethical or moral grounds? Where exactly are their priorities? In Toronto, that world class city down the street, the homeless, the economic disadvantaged, and the discouraged youth are behind the new opera house [read “image”), the SkyDome (read “image”), the seduction of the IOC [read “image”], and Expo 2000 (read “image”). Oh yes, in a fit of benevolence the alderpersons state that these projects will create jobs. Then there is the environment+ In a society where science is the accepted religion, the scientists are blasphemed by our leaders when they warn of the fatal dangers of our gluttonous consumerism. Slowly the leaders turn their ears to the warnings, only because they may lose votes if they do not listen. Democracy does not guarantee justice, nor does it ensure that our children have a society worth living in, and it reduces ethics and morality to insipid legislation. Truth, justice and freedom are manacled to public opinion. A protracted and expensive lobby has to try donvince our 4 leaders that the environment is actually deserving of their attention; justice is assumed if you happen to be white, male, physically able, English speaking, economically able, and attractive; freedom is enjoyed if you are white, male I I Democracy is not all it has promised. Yes, this comment piece is a bit one-sided and reactionary, ; but it does raise issues not always addressed. Next time you read the news, examine who makes the decisions for whom ; and then compare that process with your assumptions on j democracy. There are some redeeming qualities in democracy I (I have the freedom tq critize it], but the abuses are too often ; w-aived!.with=.an uncritical shrug of the shoulders and benign 1 acdeptance. ’ : Michael Salovaara l

Imprint staff meetings are held every Friday at 12:30 in our office, cc 140. Everyone welcome!

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Authority

rebel: twisting

The simple motion of sun revolving around the earth is false. It once was true, but the majority no longer believe it. Perhaps, a few apocalyptic seers still assume that one day it will crash and categorically destroy us all. [These individu-als, however, are commonly kept under surveillance and pose no real threat to the consensus view.] Majorities dictate popular culture in every society. Fantasy becomes fact when supported by the tools of the prevalent power structure. The tendrils of the mass media, religious networks, and convoluted education systems are all responsible for distorting our information dnd, behaviour. The fundamental truth is that there is no one truth. Unfortunately, the loudest and most frequently uttered ideas make the biggest impression on the most people. The remainder of the population is forced to reconcile their exclusion from the mass. This reconciliation requires a certain amount of compromise and personal tolerance. Those of us who cannot supply the necessary amounts are referred to as “authority rebels.” Compliance to authority is the golden principle of socialization. Without this basic agreement between the power-brokers and power-pawned, all levels of gokernme& religion, military, &d education would be left in considerable chaos. Basic psychology tells u5 that if we desire a future reward, we must commit ourselves to a present action. We believe we will be rewarded because &e assume that the system to do so will remain intact long enough for us to benefit + The essentisl problem with this system is that the.more you benefit from it, the more you rely on it and seek to preserve it for future gain. I offer an example, a quote from one of my peers: “I’l! .wait until I get in a position of powF,r, then 1’11 raise hell.” Any desire we would have to fight the system while we are under its control is lost once we gain control and can dominate others. The entire social context in modern culture is one of domination and submission. The key to success is to suffer long enough to be’come part of the power structure and then reflect your sufferixig on your inferiors - initiation on a large scale. University is a paradigm of i

the initiation ritual. The power system here offers rewards after we surmount each obstacle, and then a final acceptance upon passing into commencement, How many actions can be rationalized for gain? A simple example what happens in combat? Is the benefit attainable through war enough that we would kill for it? And how does the benefit appear to the general and the action to’the foot soldier? One leads: The other follows. During the 20 ears that many of us spend in ed ucational institutions, we have been taught to manipulate the little ability we have in order to maximize our earning potential upon graduation. What about maximizing learning potential? Is this a good or even necessary thing, if we are already being told what to know? Can there be motivation without reward? The lab rat upon digesting her sugar pill is proof to the contrary. So what must it be? Marks. Grades. Peer recognition. These qualities are desired simply as the scholar’s surrogates for money, ‘physical weaith, and his seat of worldly power. The essetice of the structure that promotes achievement remains fundamentally unaltered.

and turning Are we in love with the authority rebel? The rare one of us who is not motivated by earning or learning, but rather by twisting and turning? Consider the establishment as so many ideological bricks and so much pragmatic mortar built by one authority after another. Then there must be a desire to defy that establishment, deconstruct it for its own sake. This is what people within the establishment fear. The tolerance for and compliance to authority that put them in the power structtire - this is what they do not wish to lose. Therefore, is it just that qvr professors dare to presume that we should challenge their views? Isn’t this the last thing they want? We have been instructed and socialized throughout our primary and secondary education, Bible groups, girl guides, drinking clubs . . . not to question authority, but to seek comfort within it and to follow the collective beast in good faith. Thus, shall we learn. Thus, ‘shall we earn. Military compliance, nuclear alliance. Thus shall we burri. You and I mersly follow the wisdom of our race. Who will follow us? Pfetr Stathis

Contribution

-List

Neil Barnett, Sam Bruce, Virginia Busnarda, Carol Cambre, John Cob, Paul Done, Andrea Glendinning, J. Hagey, Lynn Hoyles, John Hymers, Steve Kannon, Judy McCrae, Allan Mertick, Patrick Moore, Shaun Morris, Scott Murray, Patrick Myer, Peter Myers, Christa Ptatscek, Jason Rochon, J. Michael Ryan,. Michael Salovaara, Joanne Sandrin, Kevin Shoom, Jeff Smith, Mike Sore, John Paul Tedesco, Henri Veerman, Al Wadley, Andrew Waldeck, Justin ’ Wells, Chris Williams, Chris Wodskou, John Zachariah.

lm’print is holding its annual general meeting on Friday, September 29 at 12:30 p.m. The meeting will take place in its office in CC 140. . z


“What are we teaching

our kids about the handicapped?” 4

To the editor, Until I met him, the physically disabled had intruded on my life in a few ways: a ramp rather than stairs here, an oversized washroom cubicle there, the odd superficial conversation in between. His name is Peter Queiser. He attends our university, getting here with the help of travelling from Project Lift; class to cla$s with the aid of his motorized wheelchair.

This summer he sought and obtained employment within the university community as a staff person in the juniqr day camp sponsored by our earth sciences department. This letter describes some of the frustration he experienced throughout the course of his employment. It is intended solely to give a sample of these frustrations, and should not be construed as an indictment of Peter’s fellow staff members or his day camp super-

Environment To the editor, Recently, the Ontario government has made suggestions to drastically alter the process now employed to obtain approval for development. Stating a desire to streamline and uncomplicate the approval process, a government document entitled “Reforming our Larid Use and Development System”, the government proposes to do away with environmental assessments and place the control of development approval entirely in the hands of the ministry of municipal affairs, an agency that tends to disregard environmental protect ion in favour of development. If these actions ire taken, the province would be taking a giant leap backwards in terms of environmental protection. Without

visor. Late in lune, Peter was interviewed for the job by two staff persons who had had previous experience in the day camp, He was successful even though he overheard divergent opinions as to his suitability. The day camp required a nine week commitment through the months of July and August. Each week a new set of roughly twenty-five children from the ages of seven to twelve were to be en-

over devebDment -

assessments and the involvement of Ontario’s environmental agencies, (i.e. ministry of the environment), development would occur that is environmentally unfriendly causing the loss of many environmental areas. Our natural areas are too fragile and few to omit the requirement for an environmental assessment from the development process. Althdugh growth and development are inevitable in Ontario, care must be taken that they occur sensibly with the least possible damage to the environment. If the Ontario government is allowed to create their proposed “Sustained Development Act” by next month as is planned, our natural areas will definitely suffer.

I-

This suggested act is to consolidate all of the province’s existing environmental legislation and much of the planning regulations as well. This cannot be allowed! The Ontario governTent needs to be shown the detrimental affects their proposed course of action will have. We, as citizens of Ontario need to show our support for environmental protect ion. I strongly urge anyone who is at all concerned with the future of our natural environment, to write the premier, the deputypremier and treasurer and their own local MPP to protest this present government proposal before it ius to&late. - -

gaged with a variety of activities including a weekly excursion to the Ontario Science Centre in Toronto. Peter and the two experienced staff members explored the centre prior to the first group visit to ensure its levels were sufficiently accessible for him. Everything looked fine on this score, so for the first two Thursdays of his employment Peter travelled with the children to the science centre. Thire a fellow staff member would carry him off the bus and set him on a folding wheelchair, as his motorized one wouldn’t fit on the bus. A relatively simple procedure but, as one of the experienced staff persons correctly pointed out on the second Thursday, a procedure which was not part of their work. “Don’t do it,” she insisted as one of her fellow staff persons prepared to carry Peter off the bus. “It’s not in our job description.*’ Despite her litigious argument, Peter was carried off and the same staff person volunteered to push him around the science centre. He enjbyed the job and thought he was doing pretty well at it. Later that week, the staff met with the supervisor in an unscheduled meeting - a com-

Science & Society

Ten

years

ago, thecanadian

Student

Pugwash

was established at various Canadian universities. Their objectives are to promote balanced discussion of the social and ethical implications of science and technology. Topics of Student Pugwash conferences and events have included: l environment issues such as recycling, conservation, ecology, acid rain, end Great Lakes

water

quality; how science can help solve global problems such as providing adequate public health facilities, depletion of the ozone layer, and declining ‘genetic diversity; * genetic engineering, birthing technologies; and * the role of women in scierice and engineering. l

The Waterloo Student Pugwash will be sponsoring several events this term. On October 4, Larry Smith, a UW economist, and Vernon Thomas, a zoologist from the University of Guelph, will discuss’“Economics and the Environment .” On November 2, Pugwash and CASI (Canadian Aeronautical Space Institute) will be presenting a debate on the merits of investing in space research and developmenf. Capping the term off will be a diScussion concerning reproductive technologies on November 16, sponsored by Pugwash and the Women’s ISSUPS Board

af the Federation

continued

on page 8

Condoms fell off

Jen. Kovacs 2N, ERS

To the editor,

Have you ever cursed at an inanimate computer, or sung praises to the convenient banking machine? Over the last half century, we have rapidly evolved into a technological-era, where technology impacts almost all aspects of our daily lives, both in marvelous and horrendous ways. Are science and technology the cause of, or the answer to problems such as global warming and poverty? Canadian Student Pugwash is concerned with the social and ethical implications of science and technology. Pugwash was established by Albert Einstein and Bertrand Russell in 1955, when they called upon scientists of the world to discuss the role and responsibilities of scientists in the arms race. In 1957, the first such conference took place in the small town of Pugwash, Nova Scotia, out of which started the International Pugwash movement. Its primary concerns are the survival of the human race, the betterment of the human condition, and the avoidance of war and conflict, especially nuclear war.

pletely impromptu meeting as far ai Pet& was concerned. It soon became apparen) that the supervisor was trying to relieve Peter. Exactly who motivated the action was unclear; but the reasons given were numerous @nd indisputable. Peter could not clean up after the kids: he could neither set up nor demonstrate the experiments, and he needed to be pushed around the science centre, This made more work for the rest of the staff. Peter was not quite satisfied with this curt dismissal nor at the explanation . . . after all, the staff was well aware of his physical limitations from the initial interview, He had been quite explicit regarding his physical limitations, but even without this verbal warning, it is rather difficult to camouflage a wheelchair against a background of bland office decor. He fought for his job, accusing both staff and supervisor of discrimination. A variety of arguments were levelled against his employment. One of the staff said that Peter had been “on probation” from the start and that they were just “seeing how it would work out” [Peter had

of Students-

Do you want to become involved or just want more information about Pugwash and its activities? Please leave your name and number at 74% 1808 or in our maif slot in the Federation or Engineering Society offices. Pugwash encourages anyone who would like to see a certain topic addressed, tir write a bal- ~ anced article to phone us.

I would like to thank Andrew Dalby for his letter regarding the condom article that appeared in the September 1 issue of Imprint. It was a very amusing letter we laughed so hard that the condoms fell right off our noses. Although we agree that virtually all university students know that a condom is placed on the penis, the questions that we at the Sexuality Resource Centre (SRC) are asked indicate that many people do need information about the use of condoms. We frequently get questions about what type of condoms to buy, how to store them, when to put them on, what type of Iubricant to use and, yes, even ques-

tions about how [as opposed to where) to put on a condom. These are the issues that were discuised in the article. With regard to the graphics, we agree with you that males tend to’know what a penis looks like. However, there aye females who want to learn about condoms as well. The consensus among SRC volunteets (males and females) is that adyone who is sexually active [riot just males) should have an interest in the proper use of condoms. Sorry if we took your letter too seriously - we’ll go and finish writing the article on how to ingest the Pill now. Sexuality lunteem

pesource

Centre

vo-

Oral diarrhea To the

editor,

The committee fdr slowness, technomania and free verbiage seems afflicted with oral diarrhea of a most insatiable kind. Their objectionable thought is so repulsive as to force the thickest of engineers to turn their heads in bewilderment. If God.were to dispense social justice, the committee’s wanking rhetoric would light afire and their cultural manure would rot. I call upon the frosh of this campus to educate yourseIves, to understand the meaning of public interest research, to absorb the knowledge of past generations of Waterloo students, to take up the challenge of developing creative thought and then to

act on it. You have a duty to yourselves, your community and to people around the world to eschew obfuscation and question authority, to find creative solutions to complex social, economic and environmental problems, and in so doing search always for truth and virtue. I call upon all students at the University of Waterloo to acknowledge the contribution that WPIRG has made to develop creative solutions to problems within the University and in the Waterloo community. Vivian E. Neal part-t ime studies B.I.S. (Waterloo), B.A.%. (Waterloo),

1982 1886


8

Imprint,

Friday,

September 22, 1989

FORUM

-

Disabled’s right to work important, Peter felt neither welcomed by the staff nor part of their core after it= Perhaps worst heard nothing of such a trial peof all, as far as Peter was conriod], cerned, was that the enmity was In- connection to the science hardly concealed in front of the centre trips, another pdinted out day campers. “What are we that the primary mandate of the teaching our kids about the handtiy camp staff was to work with dicapped?” he asked me rhetorithe children rather than assist cally. fellow staff members. He proDespite all the problems, Peter posed a solution whereby a voenjoyed the children so much lunteer would be enlisted to t that he plans to reapply for the push him around the centre. The same position next year . . . on idea was met with disdain: “He’s the condition that his applicajust trying to make us feel tion be promptly rejected if a reguilty.” play of this fiasco is likely. The supervisor agreed to look Although this letter is rather . into the possibility, but Peter specific, I must reiterate that it is never heard back from him, so not intended as a harsh criticism for the remaining seven weeks of of those involved. I suspect they the day camp, he stayed in K-W reacted much like many of us do: when the children and other initial accept ante with shallow staff went to the science centre. commitment, followed by disAt least he had his job. comfort and disassociation. The weekly excursions to the science centre were not the only ‘Gordon Hamilton casualty of this meeting. Just as C&O

continued

from

page 7

Bleak forest futures for Brazil ,ceand Canada! l

Rainforests are extremely complex ecosystems which house 50 per cent of earth’s animal, insect and plant species. One third of all tropical forests are in Brazil. When these forests are destroyed, massive soil erosion occurs, watersheds are disrupted and species lost forever. Rainforests also play a key role in maintaining the balance of carbon dioxide and oxygen in the atmosphere, thus preventing global warming. In Latin America, 37 per cent of original tropical forests have been wiped out. In 1988, Brazil alone lost 27 million acres of forest to developers. By slash-burning and clear-cutting methods, trees are felled to make way for ranching, export crops, dams and roads. Disappearing at a rate of seven per cent each year, the end of the rainforest is in sight!

We can be assured that, as Sodom and Gomorrah were destroyed,-so too will these centres which currently harbor these licentious, base-minded people, The supporters and sympathizers of so-called “Gay Pride” days should consider the ominous warning in Proverbs: “Pride goeth before a fall . . .*’ [Prov. 1698).

In scenes reminiscent of the hours before the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah (Genesis 19), cities throughout North America are witnessing parades of perverse, immoral men and women demanding that the government and society recognize and accept their deplorable, gay and lesbian behaviour.

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Reduce the amount of paper products y;u use. Write on both sides of a sheet of paper and recycle it when you’re done, Avoid using disposable paper products such as paper coffee filters, paper towels/napkins, kleenex, disposable diapers and so on. Plant trees! By choosing species which are found naturally in Waterloo’s local habitat, we will preserve and maintain the local genetic reservoir. Contact WPlRG for information on appropriate tree species to plant, and check with your landlord first. Write or phone the new minister of natural resources for the province of Ontario, Lynn McLeod, to express concern over the logging in Temagami or over logging policies in Ontario.

In Canada, it is an old colonial myth that there are vast stands of virgin forest. For our newsprint and dresser drawers, thousands of hectares of trees are clear-cut every year.. . yet for every four trees logged, only one is re-planted! Considering that, by the most conservative estimates, all old stands of B.C. forest will be

Peter Ventresca

TERM PAPERS NEWSLEllERS OVERHEADS

At the root of the solution

The rights of Brazil’s indigenous peoples are violated in every way. Thousands of forest dwellers living in harmony with the forests for hundreds of years have been suddenly uprooted, terrorized and killed. In the last century alone, 87 of Brazil’s Indian groups have been wiped out, with the native population falling from one million in 1900 to under 200,006 today. Canadian temperate and coniferous forests are as unique.and valuable as those of Brazil. A few of the last remaining old stands have some of the tallest and oldest tfees in the world. Our forests are very important in maintaining soil fertility, watersheds and safe carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.

The lessons of Sodom To the editor,

wiped out in the next two generations, the end of Canadian forests is also on the horizon. The Teme-Augama Anishnabai of Ontario’s Temagami region also suffer injustices. Their people have inhabited the area for the last 6000 years, and the natives consider the forest to be an integral part of their culture. Temagami is to the Teme-Augama Anishnabai as Mecca is to Muslims, yet the Ontario governmen1 is intent on constructing logging roads through it. In the words of chief Gary Potts, “if our land dies, we die.” (Current estimates by the logging industry in Temagami figure two years of employment can take place in the region before the companies will be forced to cut elsewhere.)

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Friday, September

Imprirrt,

NEWS

22,

1989

9

Breaking tradition

Arts orientation

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by Carol Cambre Imprint staff .

,

“Orientation week for arts this year was a huge success,” says Orient ation Chairperson, Jennif er Hance. The main event was “The Wild Thing”, which involved carting 4 crowds of feverish frosh to a ‘mystery location’ somewhere in the wilderness (Guelph). Once there, the frosh were entertained with food and games such as the clothes-line - as many clothes as possible were stripped off by eager frosh and tied together to make the longest clothes line,

Jennifer Hance says about arts 450 frosh attended this event, making it the most successful arts event of the week, Arts orientation has traditionally not been as big or well-organized as other orientations, despite -the fact that arts is the largest faculty. The four frosh teams collected points based ;on attendance and participation. The winners+ Reds, will receive a big party after midterms. Hance was also pleased with the response to the showing of the Rocky Horror Picture Show; enough rice ended up in the projector to amply

supply a wedding. When asked about the impact of orientation efforts on arts as a whole, Hance responded optimistically: “There seems to be more widespread interest in becoming involved with the Arts Student Union (ASU). There was a big impact on both undergrads and fresh, and there are more people hanging around the office and getting to know each other than ever before.” Arts orientation was successful enough to prompt Fed interest in adopting some events, such as the Pep Rally, for future ,years.

Coloured.paper will no longer be recycled under the new recycling expansion program, sche-s duled to start in the next few weeks. As reporied in the September 1 issue of Imprint, fine white paper will soon be picked up on a campus wide basis. Pick up of coloured paper, which at this moment is still ongoing, will be discontinued at that time. “Coloured paper, according to Purchasing, accounts for only ten per cent of paper picked up,” says Tom Galloway, Plant Operations, who is in charge of setiing up the new recycling program. Kara Symbolic, research coordinator of WPIRG, disagrees. “They should be collecting coloured paper. If it were one or two per cent, okay. But ten per cent is a significant emount. “They (Plarit Operations) are making recycling more visible,” Symbolic said. “In that sense they are expanding it.” Gallotiay estimates one hundred

more

tons

of

white

paper will be recycled under-the new system, pushing the yearly figure from 180 to 280 tons. He proposed that coloured paper be collected by student societies. The Turnkeys, have been running recycling on campus for the past year. They collect newspaper, glass and tin in bins located in the Campus Centre.

These bins were originally installed bv WPIRG, which began a campus-wide recycling program. in February, 1988. Plant Operations, however, ordered WPIRG to stop their recycling program. Laidlaw Waste Systerns holds the contract for

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Imprint,

Friday,

September

22,

1989

NEWS---

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by Virgi,nia

IThey don’t caIl me Barbeque Bob Fanolden for nothing1 The] is celebrating their seventh annua e arth science department 28. The day is named in honour of Si L ogan Day on September William Logan, who founded Geological Survey in Canada. i

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Busaarda aid Andrea Glendinning Proceedings went as usual on Monday night as the Senate met to discuss current administrative issues. First on the agenda was the Executive Committee’s update of the situation regarding Chinese graduate students on campus. Enrolment of students from the People’s Republic of China is up IO per cent this fall compared to last year as a result of the ongoing political situation there. Most Canadian universities witnessed a similar increase in enrolment. Ah discussed was the death of Father Siegfried of St, Jetune’s college. He was one of the three main founders of the university. Another issue brought to the Senate’s attention was the noticeable lack of women professors holding senior administrative positions. The concerned senator was under the impresdion that women were not encouraged to apply for these administrative positions, The response to the allegation was that the issue is a real concern and more positions will be available to women in the future. Of the fifty-four Senate members attending the meeting, four were female. In addition to discussion of these issues, a number of appointments and tenewals of faculty members as well as grants to various areas of study were applauded. One of the cIosing remarks was voiced by Dave Readman, President of the Federation of Students. He expressed his interest-in involving more faculty members in orientation events in order to familiarize students with their future professors. Perhaps next year we will see professors driving to Toronto and -Montreal for scavenger hunts., going on pub crawls, and wearing silly t-shirts.

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#CAIMiPlJSf FLASHBACK .

Compiled by Jeff Smith Imprint staff

Thirty years ago this week: Still no issues from The Cord, wait until October. [Remember, The Cord was UW and Laurier’s joint paper until UW got its own.) Twenty years ago this week: The committee of Ontario university presidents issues a paper on campus order and how to maintain it in response to recent confrontations in American schools. The annual orientation concert is a sellout. Who played? Dionne Warwick! Ten yeara ago this week: Warriors Football team beat McMaster 40-6. (Those were the days . . +) Another orientation concert. This time Burton Cummings wows ‘em at the PAC. Five years a o this week: A referen d urn is announced draw from OFS? Engineering faculty practice applicants based on toughness fire.

Should

15.

we with-

of adjusting grades of high school of the high school comes under

Trivia: Last week I asked what UW campus paper was started after we stopped using The Cord. The answer is not the Chevron. How m,any of you remembered the good 01’ Coryphaeus?

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NEWS

Imprint,

Friday,

September

22,

1989

13

To Your Health Everything Compiled by Mike Imprint stuff

you ever wanted warts but were afraid

Soro York

Alcohol

inquest

“Wicca

witch

into administration’s

of the north

“drinking

College,

problems”?

Toronto

.

no more”

Charles Arnold, a member of a modern-day witch religion, Wicca, has quit his secretarial job at the college over the longstanding controversy about his religion. Arnold took the college to fhe Labour Relations Committee to get two paid Wiccan religious holidays a year, which the college refused him. He told the colleg,e’s paper Coven that he is one of the foremost authorities on Satanism in Canada. York You mean they

have to cheat

University at York?

Two more students were convicted of cheating on examinations. Both students were given a suspended sentence, one year’s probation and ordered to complete 50 hours of community work. The students had hired another student to write exams for them. University Not Picture

about

University

A July 21 picnic hosted by the university’s president, Harry Authors, and vice-president of institutional affairs, Sheldon Levy, may jeopardize the campus’s liquor licence. Witnesses reported that the administration violated liquor licencing laws. If investigated by the LLBO, the university could lose its campuswide licence. Huinber

to know to ask.

of Toronto

Perfect

A man posing as a photographer taking pictures for a Ryerson calendar is harassing women on the St. George campus. U of T police fear he is the same man who harassed women last year, claiming he was a photographer,

SO you say you have a wart. Big deal! But it’s an‘H&S nurse, since keeping the area dry is benefunny how these unsightly blemishes can cause ficial to the healing process. so much distress. After treatment, the area may be left uncoWarts are not caused by dirt, toads, poor diet vered and must be kept clean. After blister remonor from lack of sleep. Warts are not the sign of tral, the wart area is wet, and should be being a witch. bandaged. Remove the bandage every night and 1 Warts are bumps on the skin whichoccur freonly reapply if the wart area is still wet. quently in university students A special virus For huge and/or plantar warts, an acidic solugets into our skin via tiny cracks (exemplified by tion may be prescribed. This is used every night dryness] causing the blemish. These viruses can after soaking the infected area in warti water spread to other areas of our own body or others and rem&ing dead skin. Do not use the acidic where it is possible for the virus to penetrate the solution on blistered, wet, read, tender or inflamed warts, skin layer. ! Warts, like K-mart specials, come in various Warts are treated weekly at Health and Safety. shapes and sizes. The most common wart (the red light special] appears on hands and less freBut before you rush in to tre;it that ugly blemquently on other areas such as knees and elbows. repulsive ’ ish which makes you a disgustingly, Plantar warts (or weekly specials) occur on wart (stupid joke intended] to society, not all the sole of the foot. They are usually flat, but warts must be immediately treated. deep due to the constant pressure of walking. It is VERY important that venereal warts are Veneral warts (or the anniversary sale that always treated by a health care person, occurs every month) appear on genital areas and Other types of warts may disappear without are usually spread through sexual contact. treatment if the immune system is triggeredto There is nothing to stop warts from appearing fight the virus. on other parts of the body, but these are less Warts which are painful, inflamed, growing, common and usually have a slightly different spreading or just plain stubborn should be asappearance. se88ed for treatment. If you are stl! not sure, ask To treat that special buy, usually the wart (‘An ounce of prevention . . .’ my mother used to must be destroyed (after you worked so hard to say)* get it). There is no successful vaccination, but burnFor more information on this or other interesting, freezing and chemical methods have been ing topics, ask the Health and Safety Resource successful. If any virus escapes the destruction Network (HSRN for ‘Coolies’) at 8854211 ext. process, the wart may recur. 6277, or visit the Health and Safety building, If you visit Health and Safety to treat a wart, room 121 or send smoke signals. the most common methodis freezing with liquid Since the HSRN is a student liasion, no quesnitrogen. Blistering will occur within a day or tion is too large, too small, too difficult, or just two. Water and blood blisters should be check by too silly to ask us about.

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12

Imprint,

Friday,

Third

September

22, 1989

NEWS

world

await-s you

by Christa

Are you interested in volunteering-several months to a service project in a developing nation? Think fast, because the deadline for applications to Youth Challenge International (YCI) is this Monday, September YCI is currently recruiting men and women aged 17-25 for projects in developing nations. It is a Canadian organization, created by past participants of the Operation Raleigh Canada Foundation. OperatioQ Raleigh 1984-88 was an around-theworld voyage of discovery, an international program in which over 100 young Canadians participated on three month projects devoted to scientific, conservation and community service projects. In 1990, YCI will involve a group of fifty young people on an international project for a three month period. These 25 Canadians and 25 international youfh will be from all walks of life. Participants will develop leadership skills while undertaking environmental conservation, medical and community service projects under the direct supervision of professional staff. They will be required to volunteer part-time before and after their overseas project to maximize their experience on the YCI program. Youth Challenge International is a unique opportunity for young people to take on responsibility in an increasingly complex world. They make important self-discoveries, gain understanding of international development issues, and learn how to translate their strengths and new energy into positive action in the host country and upon their return home.

Ptatschek

“Sexual harassment is not a cotipliment !” It definitely isn’t, and Bonnie Robichaud is going to tell you how to deal with it. On Thursday, September 28, at 7:30 p.m. in Siegfried Hall, St. Jerome’s College, Robichaud is giving a free lecture. With the help of Ciridy Wilkey, a UW grad now working with Cornish and Associates, a Toronto law firm, Robichaud will discuss sexual harassment in the workplace. Robichaud lost her job as a direct result of her eight year struggle for justice. In 1987, in a landmark decision by the Supreme Court of Canada, she won her case against her former employer and her supervisor. The decision against the department of national defence makes employers responsible for the discritiinatory acts of employees. Life has not been easy for Robichaud, though, and she was back in court this spring, seeking to recover over $200,000 in damages from the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal. A decision is still pending.

25.

_

No compliment

The program is open to all young Canadians aged 17-25 who display resourcefulness and show potential to benefit from their experiences. Applicants should have an interest in global development and For safety reaconservation. sons, they must be able to swim 500 meters and speak English. Education level and athletic pro‘wess are not selection criteria,

However, a willingness to work hard, the ability to work well with others and a desire to help others are important. This weekend only, apEjlic& tions may be picked up from the Turnkey desk in the CampuG Centre. The applications must be completed and returned to the Turnkey desk by Monday, September 25. Enquiries may be directed to John Collis at 746-2716.

terms, the summaries have been available in a black filing cabinet in the Career Resource Centre in Needles Hall. The StuStarting tOdaY* co-oP students dent Advisory Council (SAC] Can refer to work term evahawas the impt?tus behind the evations submitted to Needles Hall _1ua t*Ions, Fuller said. SAC is a by their peers. If a student sees body that deals with issues inan interesting job description in valving uw co-op students. the Want Ads, the work term The summaries are given out summary provides an honest b y co-ordinators to all students opinion - that of another stu- attending return-to-campus inden! who held the job - Of what terviews, except for engineers, it was really like in past work who currently receive them in terms. their classes from a SAC Sometimes the evaluations are member. Students are encoursurprising. They can tell a stu- aged but not forced to fill out dent that a particular job was th ese forms. The rate of return great, or-boring, or not at all like on the engineering faculty evait was described in the Want 1ua t*ions is higher than those gaAds. These evaluations can thered at Needles Hall. serve as rnnqmmendations or In the first week of return-towarnings. campus interviews, over 320 According to Brock Fuller, a summaries were filled out and co-ordinator at Co-operative Ed- returned to Needles Hall, and ucation and Career Services 9 more will filter in during the most students are aware of the term, not including those that work term summaries. Firstthe engineering society collects. year .co-op students are told Hopefully, Fuller said, as more about them at the “triple zero” people learn about and use this information sessions during service, they will respond by fiitheir first term. linr! out summarie; of their work For at least three consecutive terhs.

by Leslie Perrault Imprint staff

UNIVERSITIES’

Centn do Rkaptton

I

I I I I

Robichaud

Rate your workterm

ONTARIO

I

Bonnie

Now a university student, Robichaud has written an academic paper on employer attitudes towards sexual harassment. Her study is being published in condensed form in Canadian Criminology Forum. Space for Robichaud’s talk is limited, so to obtain your free tickets, call the UW women’s studies office at 885-1211, ext. 6886.

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NEWS

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rs-571.

Friday,

September

22,

1989

13

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14

PART

Imprint,

Friday,

September

22,

1989

FEATURE

1

by Lyn McGinnis Imprint staff “For today, the women of this nation still retain the liberty to control their destinies. But the signs are evident and very ominous, a chill wind blows.” b’ No, this isn’t a quote from Margaret Atwood’s distopian The Handmaid’s Tale, but dissenting US. Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun, on the 5-4 ruling on July 3, in the case of Webster versus Reproductive Health Services. j The State of Missouri barred public hospitals from performing abortions. In a series of narrowly split decisions, the Court upheld the constitutionality of this law. On July 7, Jean-Guy Tremblay won an injunction from a Quebec lower court blocking his former fiancee, Chantal Daigle from having an abortion. Trembay was heard to say after the ruling: “I’m proud. It’s my child. It’s my woman!” After wading through a hostile Quebec judicial system, Daigle took matters into her own hands, later saying she was “afraid the Supreme Court would insist I have the baby I did not want.” On August 1, the day the Supreme Court of Canada agreed to hear her appeal, she disguised herself, drove 400 kilometres to Boston, and had the procedure. On August 8, the Court unanimously overturned every element of the injuction, fully aware Chantal Daigle. had the abortion a week earlier. Our pleasant basking in the liberalizing’ humanizing trends of the past three decades has been rudely awakened. Those wishing to turn back the clock have their hands on the dials. Examination of this issue will be in two parts. Part one will look at historical and social factors. Next week, part two will take on a more philosophical stance. For this article, a clarification of terms is in order. Embryo is defined as asfertilized ovum up to the eighth week of development. Fetus is the remaining development until birth. Baby and child are separate, individual beings after birth. For years the United States has seen “trench warfare” on the issue.* Clinics have been picketed, patients seeking treatment were victims of verbal and physical abuse, and clinics have been bomb targets. Our most frightening spectacles have occurred in Vancouver’

Less than a fifth of the women questioned would deny an abortion to a woman who had suffered rape, or if *her health were at risk or her embryo genetically damaged. A majority would allow a teenager, a welfare mother, or a married woman with a large family, to have an abortion. “Pro-Life” &advocates don’t mention that women well into this century had between 15 and 20 pregnancies during their lifetime! Many of the children died young; so on many occasions did the mother. The ovum was discovered in the late 19th century. The development of antiseptic techniques, based on the discoveries of Louis Pasteur in 1867 and the introduction of antibiotics in the 194os, brought us into the modern era. Margaret Sanger, an obstetrical nurse in New York’s povertystricken lower east side during W.W.1, was sickened by the conditions of constantly pregnant women she found, and inspired by Emma Goldman’s speeches about “voluntary parenthood.” On October 1913, she went to France, where contraception information was available. She returned and founded the paper: The Women Rebel - No Gods No Masters. In one issue she wrote: “A woman’s body belongs to herself alone. It is her body. It does not belong to the United States of America or to any other government on the face of the earth. . Enforced motherhood is the most complete denial of a woman’s right to life and liberty.” While “barefoot and pregnant ,” women had been sexual social underlings, ecotoys, nomic conveniences and psychological crutches. Men cherished a freedom based on inequality in the rights of mobility’ employment, and personal integrity; religion sanctioned it (as it had slavery in general); and the state upheld it. In 1934, Iceland, 1938, Sweden, 1939, Denmark, 1956, Hungary and Poland, all legalized abortion. In June of this ear, Belgium removed its pro h ibitions entirely. leaving the Irish Republic as the only country in the 12 member European Community where abortion is still illegal. In other anti-Jloice states, Uruguay for example, government authorities estimate that with a population of over three miliion an excess of 150,000 illegal abortions take place annually. l

at- the Everywoman’s Health Centre Society. The clinic opened on November 4,1988. On January 21,19SS, a B;C. Supreme Court injunction, prohibiting protests at the dlinic, failed to stpp demonstrations. The reason was militant fanaticism, “Operation Rescue”, founded in 1986 by 29 year-old Randall Terry of New York State, has a platform. It includes control of women, homophobia, AIDS as God’s righteous anger, and all out war on abortion. . On July 14, Justice John Bouck of the B.C. Supreme Court imposed five month jail sentences

and $1000 fines on fim time offenders of the January injunction. Justice Block said this defiance of the courts, “only encourages others to do the same thing. When that happens, justice is placed in jeopardy. If their behavior goes unpunished, we may end up having a country not worth living in.” Kitchener-Waterloo has not escaped this hysteria. Planned Parenthood of Waterloo Region, after violent demonstrations outside their offices on August 19, moved their services “to secret locations” in the city. Members of “Teenagers Res-

cuing Unborn Tiny Humans”, or T.R.U;T.H., blocked the entrance and attacked police officers trying to clear the area. Inspector Sam Heuchert said the protesters “tried to bite and tried to kick” police. Less than 200 years ago, the Roman Catholic Church formulated its doctrine of “ensoulment” - meaning life begins the moment the s.perm meets theegg. The Catholic hierarchy present the facade of 100 per cent unanimity against all abortion. What do the laity think? In a 1982 Yankelovich poll of Catholic women, a very different picture emerges,

Continued

on page 15


FEATURE

Continued from page IQ *I I _ In Brazil, population 144,00O,OOO, an esti.mated three million illegal abortions occur every I-w* year!a In_ Latins I America, I * which is dominated by a church both anti-contraception and anti-choice, “botched” abortions are the number one killer of women between the ages of 15 and 39. Throughout the Third World, an estimated 200,000 women die each year of illegal abortions, Nazi Germany made abortion a capital crime. When Mother Teresa spoke at an anti-choice rally in September 1988, saying both the mother and the doctor involved in an abortion should be tried for murder, a shadow of the past was evoked. The Reich Ministry of Justice sentenced women to hard labour for having an abortion and executed the abortionist. Death sentences were given to women caught having a second abortion. How does this fit with Nazi

doctrine on the role of women in societv? Hitler stated: “Children. church and kitchen are the only legitimate concerns of women.” Fascist Germany wasn’t alone in these laws for the “protection of

Imprint,

German blood and honour”; Fascist Italv also Dunished abortion as a “crime against the integrity of the race.” Hitler and Mussolini were, among other things, anti-choice.

Friday,

Alan Borovoy, Canada’s foremost civil libertarian, noted: “In a totalitarian society, the tendency is for the rulers to decide how the citizens shall live. In a democratic society, the objective, as much as phssible, is-for each citizen to decide.” Economics plays an important role in abortion. Along with a great many other things, money opens many doors.

“Enforced motherhood denial of right t6 life and liberty.” Women with money are able to get an abortion anywhere in the world: women without money in an anti-choice state, are reduced to extreme measures. Another area of great concern is unwanted ‘children, Bringing children into situations of neglect, abuse, evpn early and violent death, can hardly be called “Pro-Life”.

.

September

22, 1989

15

“But what about the legions of childless couples, cheated by every abort ion?” The qmerican Office of Population Reqearch at Princeton University lqas some interesting figures. In the United States today, there are an estimated 34,000 children waiting for adopt ion. Eighty-two per cent of these are older, handicapped or have special seeds, 51 per cent are from visible minorities. The overwhelming mqjority of couples waiting to adr$pt only want “healthy, white babies.” 2 There is a far larger roup of children, 450,000 in Bacilities and foster homes - due to neglect and abuee. Such ibmense misery is the result of placing “maternity” and “motherhood” on such a high pedestal, whether the child is wanted or not. On January 22, 1973, the US. Supreme Court handed down its decision in the case of Roe versus Wade. The High Court ruled abort ion is a matter between a woman and her doctor. Though far behind most other Western democracies, the decision remains a monument in further humanizing North America.

Bringing children into situations of abuse is hardly “Pro-Life” On January 28, 1988, our Supreme Court struck down the existing abortion law, ruling that it violated the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. In the decision, zti,“df Justice Brian Dickson : “Forcing a woman by threat of criminal sanction to carry a fetus to term unless she meets certain criteria unrelated to her own priorities and aspirations, is a profound interference with a woman’s body and thus an infringement of security of the person.” In both the U.S. and Canada, since the decriminalization of abortion, the anti-choice movement has attempted to change the traditional definition of a “person” to include a fertilized ovum. With this argument, ye move out of tangible history and into intangible philosophies, ideas and, in particular, emotions. These issues will be explored next week.

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16

Imprint,

Friday,

September

22,

for

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1989

mpridw

Testing

BACK TO SCHOOL

SPECIAL

SEXPERT: I think that I might be pregnant. What kind of pregnancy tests are there and where can I get them?

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ANSWER: There are two.procedur&fQr detecting pregnancy -- urine tests and blood tests. When a female is pregnant, a hormone called Human Chorionic Gonadotrophin (HCE) is secreted by the placenta. Both urine and blood tests are done to detect the presence of this hormone. Urine tests are the most common type and can be obtained by visiting a doctor’s office or clinic. The actual analysis of your sample will be done at a laboratory. The sample should be taken first thing in the morning when the concentration of HCG in the urine is highest. Make sure that the bottle you use is very clean and dry. Otherwise, the results of the test might not be accurate. You will have to wait at least two weeks after your missed period (which would be four weeks after conception] before having a urine test done at a lab. The levels of HCG would not be high enough to detect before this time. Pregnancy tests that can be purchased-at drug stores and done at home are also urine tests. Although these home tests do provide immediate results, you should know that they generally are not as reliable as lab tests and do not always have clear instructions. Blood tests are not common, mostly because they are expensive and require more sophisticated equipment than do urine tests. The advantage of blocid tests is that they can detect I-KG sooner than urine tests do - sometimes even bbfore a period has been missed.

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it takes longer to analyze the results of a blood test so that the total time required to get the results is not that different for the two methods. Once you have decided what type of test to have (urine tests are more widely available), your next decision is where to take’the test. This will involve giving at least some thought, if you haven’t already, to what you will do if you are pregnant (adopt ion, abort ion or raising a child). If you are unsure about what you would do, have the pregnancy test done at a doctor’s office or clinic where someone will provide you with unbiased counselling about all your options (i.e. Health and Safety or Planned Parenthood). A home test would not be advisable if you are undecided because, if the test were positive, there might not be anyone with you at that moment to provide support. There are some local agencies that provide free pregnancy tests but you should find out in advance if they have any biases. For example, Birthright offers free tests but does not recognize abortion as one of your options. If the results of the test are negative, it would be a good idea to repeat the test in several weeks (especially if the test was done at home shortly after the missed period). Depending on your personal circumstances, you might have some difficult decisions to make. The services of Health and Safety, Planned Parenthood and the Sexuality Resource Centre are available to help you make those decisions. This column is prepared by vohmteers of the Sexuality Resource Centre [formerly the Birth Control Centrej. ,Anonyrnous questions for this column can be left it the SRC &X206) or sent through on-campus mail [SRC, c/o FEDS]. You can also visit us or cali us at 8854211, ext. 2306). However,

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Sons of Bore.dom

by Patrick

I by john Hymers Imprint staff Remember me? I was that guy that your girlfriend couldn’t keep her eyes off of the other night. And who could blame her. I probably represented a ray of hope to her: someone who wasn’t blindly accepting the situation that was unfolding on the Bombshelter stage. I was bored. A hearty sorry to all those of you who really enjoyed the Sons Of Freedom concert the Friday past at the Bomber. I really wanted to, but I just couldn’t. I mean, I tried to: I drank a fair amount, I convinced myself that they were a great band, and I thought only pure thoughts. Yet for the third time in a row, the Sons proved unable to excite me; in fact, thev failed tointerest me. The Sons of Boredom have a

photo by Pletr Stathis fatal problem, and it has been chronicled before in these very pages: they have only written one song. And then they spend all night r’ehashing it, version after boring version. Some claim that it is a great song. I prefer to think of it as all right. Basically+ they take a Gang of Four bass line and bury it in a very loud guitar buzz. It is more than palatable for a four-minuteplus pop song, but it - if I may be so bold - sucks after that. Time has come for me to stop this useless fence sitting. It was a lousy concert. On a scale of one to 10, it was a zero, Face it, they are quite boring musically. Sure, perhaps you, gentle reader, may have enjoyed it, and I would never question your right to_enjayit. Howevec.it was a muddled show with horrid vocals and a wall of guitar noise

that didn’t contain the music as a wall should, but hid it from view. And let’s not forget their horrific tendency to make every sbng sound the same, The next time they tour, I’ll be there. There must be something that everyon else likes which I am blind to or that I refuse to see.

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Does the video Punk Rock Girl ring a bell? If it does then you are probably familiar with the Dead Milkmen, a punk group out of Philadelphia. Their last album Beelzabuba gives you a good taste of the weird, crazed lyrical style they are known for. The’ songs range form Stuart, which talks about “what the queers are doing to the earth,“, to Coin’ to Graceland to My Many Smds and of course Punk Rock Girl. On Wednesday I ended up getting a phone call from Jasper of the Dead Milkmen. Unless you come from Philly you probably first hetird about the Dead Milkmen when you saw them on MuchMusic. Your next chance to see them is in the Bombshelter next Thursday, September 28. That was a good a place as any to start asking questions from, so I jumped right in and asked if they had plans for another video. lasper answered that “we did ha<e clans for doine one but [chuc&s) we were idvised it would not be worth it”. They had also put out a video to support their 12” single Smoking I&NI~Q Peels, which “was shown on MuchMusic. It hasn’t really been shown much, it wasn’t as popplar as Punk Rock Girl, but we did do it.” The album and the video don’t Seem to have fared too well, since Jasper made a comment about Beelzebubba ending up “in the cutup bin”. The topic of their old albums

seems to have dried up pretty much, so I decided to move on ta more fruitful pastures and ask how a band that is trying to make it tours. The first impression I got was that it was noi excessively fun.

“We haven’t.gotten to the stage et where we have a bus yet, We ii ave a van, even though a bus would be more comfortable.” The main problem with the van seems to be that “there are four of us and we have a sound guy and road manager. We have to wake up around seven or eight but then you have to stay up late anyway.”

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At this point I d’ecided to ask if he liked touring, to which he replied “I love touring.” I’m sure I missed something in there, but I’m not sure where. To wrap up the interview I ask Jasper if he bad a message for any impressionable youths who might ‘be reading this article. After a moment’s hesitation he gave me a couple pieces of advice. “I would like to tell everyone not to put their fingers in electrical sockets and to pick up rubber bands. Recycle waste products.” At this point the interview ended, with what seemed to be a sigh of relief on Jasper’s part.

Someday, I’ll find it. And my little world will be a happier place. But until then, I’ll remain frustrated, on the outside looking in at the contented Sons of Freedom fans. They like the spectacle that the Sons provide. As commodities go, theirs is better than our .~on~umeri~~, mgmg!y-handed -..w - - .s.>-. . ~9: ciety’s - at least the Sons reprehent an escape.

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18

Imprint,

Friday,’

September

22, 1989

ARTS

i

Phi-es to rule the world by Chris Wodskou Imprint staff

Imprint: I recently read an article which said that Pixies play like they love rock ‘n’ roll, but got bored with it so they decided to reinvent it. How would you evaluate that statement? Kim Deal: That’s all right. That’s okay. Sure. Maybe. I don’t know, what do you think? All I can tell you is we definitely didn’t sit around the living room and decide, ‘oh, we’re bored with rock so let’s change it’. , How did you fit into the 4AD scheme of things? What made them so eager to release Come On Pilgrim in its demo form when they didn’t have anything else that sounded like it at the time? I don’t know. People have asked me that before, and I’ve never asked 4AD what they were thinking. I don’t know, at the time I wouldn’t have even thought of asking them because we weren’t familiar at all with 4AD. We weren’t familiar with their bands - actually that’s not true, we knew the Cocteau Twins and some other odd bands, but we

In the scant two years since 4AD released their demo tape, as the mini-album Cbme On Pilgrim, Boston’s Pixies have ascended the throne of alternative rock. Every release immediately vaults into the top spot on campus radio charts; Monkey Gone To Heuven and Here Comes Your MQ~ have become modest club hits. And earlier this spring their latest album, Doolittle, held the Number One roost in the U.K. Independent Top 30 while both Surfer Rosa and Come On Pilgrim nestled in the middle reaches of the chart. It all seems pretty unlikely for A’ a band that revels in skewering song structures and flogging their listenership with an abrasive sonic assault and scatalogical Weltanschauung to capture the popular imagination thus. So we went straight to the horse’s mouth, namely Pixies bassist Kim Dell (the former “Mrs. Iohn Murphy’ of album credits), for all the pertinent answers.

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really good friends. Since the songs on Come on Pilgrim were just a demo, they sounded pretty raw and formless. Would you have liked to den vslop them 8 little more, or were you happy with them? I’m very happy with the way they turned out because I think out of all our songs, the ones on that album were more developed, if only because we had been playing them for a year before we actually recorded them, whereas we only played the songs on Surfer Rosa for a couple of months before we recorded them.

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But that’s weird, maybe it’s just because the production is not great - I mean, we did 16 songs in three days, so the parts are all there, but the production is pretty rough. Why the change in producers from Steve Albiai (of Big Black, who produced Surfer Rosa) to someone like Gil Norton (the producerof Doolittle, perhaps best known for hie work with Echo And The Bunnymen)? I don’t know, we had more money, we wanted to do something different, it seemed like a good idea at the time, and I think it was, But the album doesn’t sound much different from the earlier stuff, although you’d think they’d be very different producers. Yeah, and they are very different, but it is still hard. The only difference is now you can hear the vocals, too. Since Doolittle has become so popular, have you heard complaints from any older fans saying you’ve maybe softened up a bit? Yeah, sure, like “Here Comes Your Man is so commercial, but that’s about the first Pixies song I ever heard.” Here Comes Y&r MQ~ sounds ahnoet like Roy Orbieoa to me. Well, that’s good, that’s good. It seems that a lot of the Bongs on Doolittle were written ‘more as songs and a little more developed musically. Maybe Charles (otherwise known as Pixiea singer/lyricist Black Francis) was just becoming a better songwriter by that time - I can see that now in relation to Come On Pilgrim. But as for the parts, that’s how we wrote for a year before we even recorded Coma On Pilgrim so we weren’t rushed into that or anything. -...-~

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Imprint,

ARTS

Friday,

September

22, 1989

-19

Justin cosies up to has-beeris by Justin Wells Imprint staff The Apocalypse Club has to be one of the best places to see any band. Second only to the Concert Hall - with one very important difference: the Apocalpyse is licensed. Anyway, it seems this place is perfect for almost any kind of show: Chris & Cosey and Band of Susans couldn’t be two more wildly different bands. Band of Susans are part of the recent swell of bad-is-good New York guitar bands, other examples being Sonic Youth and Dinosaur Jr. Band of Susans simply put on an impressive show. The powerful sound of three guitars blending together so as to be indistinguishable, combined with excellent bass and drum support creates an almost physical presence in the room. Although the resulting beehive-like drone has sometimes been described as mesmerizing and riveting, vocalist Susan Stenger best described it as “ecstatic minimalism”, while fellow band member Robert Poss described it as “voluptuous fish and chips minimalism.” Unlike numerous other New York noise bands, Band of Susaris really do know how to play. Susan Stenger finds her history with the experimental/new age crowd of musicians: minimalist music. She’s also a flautist. And each and every one of the band members play or have played in Rhys Chatham’s guitar orchestra. Impressive indeed. Robert claims he has been influenced by the likes of Johnny Walker, Jack Daniels and Gilby of Gilby’s Gin.

“There are those who believe that life here began out there...” Beyond this Band of Susans can’t be done. You’ll just have to have something else going for go and see for yourself how good them: they’re cool and they’re they are the next time they play tough. I don’t know so much this area. . about the tough part, but I can personally vouch for the coolAs for headlining act Chris & ness of the band. Cosey, they put on a fairly good When I managed to catch show although I wouldn’t pay “slutty Susan” Stenger and Romoney to see them again. Chris & bert Poss backstage before the Cosey are the sort of band every show for an all too brief chat, I right minded person should see at least once, basically for the was pleasantly surprised to find same reason every right minded they’re not your average New person should see New Order at York snot-band members. Hey, least once. Not because they’re any band which thanks me for anything worth seeing these interviewing them is cool in my days, but because once upon a books. time they were a part of a much Look for the Band of Susans more influential band. interview% the next edition of The show was interesting, to Imprint, As for a description of say the least. Cosey Fanni Tutti the show put on by these musical [on vocals and what C&C call fanatics - that’s something that

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“Dercussion’? Dresents herself fiirly well 0; siage, while Chris Carter (on everything else) seems to have the worst stage presence of anyone anywhere. In fact, if I hadn’t interviewed them over dinner earlier, I would.have assumed that Chris was merely a stage-hand lurking around the stage rather than actually being in the band. Uxifortunately Chris & Cosey created the performance almost completely from the past three albums, and all subliminal messages were stripped out of the songs for live performance. None of their brilliant early work (‘76 to ‘84) managed to find its way into the show. Unfortunately this went over just fine with the vast majority

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of the turnouts, who undoubtedly had no idea they were witnessing live in person two of the people who literally invented-industrial music - oh, how time passes. I really have absolutely no respect for the vast majority of fools who showed up there believing Exotika to be Chris & Cosey’s debut album. In any case, my feelings about the show were somewhat counterbalanced by the selection of slides Chris % Cosey selected as a backdrop. The material, ranging from soft to hardcore pornography, somehow managed to come off in good taste -and provided something to look at toward the end of the show, which became quite boring after the first fifteen minutes.

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ARTS

the gallery forced it to move to ECK The-move should prove to be a treat for the university community. The artists, OCA graduates Alexandra Pennycook and Michael Hales, provide two very different interpretations of the world around them. Pennycook’s world is without people, full of and colourful. architecture, There is a sense of other-worldliness, as if you were looking at a Star Trek set, or the morning after a neutron bombing. The vibrant greens, blues and pinks are mostly responsible for turning the familiar into something almost foreign.

“Beijing”

by Michael

Hales.

photo8 <

by Swml

Art has nothing to do with pretty pictures - if you want pretty pictures, look at the fashion rag mags. Art is a revelation, a statement, a teacher of truth. It makes statements without using words through art that provokes, inspires, or infuriates the viewer into responding to the revealed truth.

ments the desecration of the earth, of women and motherhood. Each exhibit is intended to be observed as part of one large exhibit. The show‘ is on display until October 15. The second shuw is at the gallery at East Campus Hall (look at your campus map, you’ll find it). Featuring two yoting Canadian artists, it was originally slated to appear at the before a fire at stART qallery,

think. The first, at Theatre oflthe Arts in the Modern Languages building, features Generation/&generation: Mrs. John E. Brubacher et al 3989 - 1827 by Susan Shantz and Jane Byers (a UW faculty member in fine arts). This piece, a tribute to the first resident of the farm on which UW now sits, speaks of the frustrations of being a mother, a woman, and a farmer. One of the pieces. entitled Bitter Milk, is an apt subtitle to this show. The woman experiences the joys being a nurturer, only to suffer when the nurtured leaves to establish an independent identity. The most visible piece of the show is outside, on top of the hill between South Campus Hall and Hagey Hall, where Brubacher la-

“Mrs. John E ‘Brtibacher by SuBan want2

by Michael Salvaara Imprint staff

Michael Hales’s work clashes violently with Pennycook’s in both style and subject matter. He focuses on people in their trauma, and in their triumph. There is the heart wrenching Beiiing, which is his Guernica, the dark Sweeney Todd and the Celebratory San hm?nzo Market Area. All his paintings seem to move, forcing the audience to react. This must-see show is on display until October 5. Both of these artists also have works on display at the Carmichael Gallery in Waterloo.

Imprint,

Friday,

September

.

Top Ten Playlist For Sept. 8 - 14

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22

hnprint,

by 1. Michael Imprint rtaff

Friday,

Ryan

September

22,

The fourth full-length player in the Pogues canon finds our intrepid heroes mining the same mu&al vein they did on their last outing. Which is to say that these ::uys are all over the map, style-wise.

Unfocused!

1989

stands out - there isn’t that couple of classics that usually raise a Pogues record from the mediocre to the sublime. Maybe the fault lies with main man Shane MacGowan, composer of the most memorable and affecting of their material. Shane takes a back seat on this project, preferring to let his all too willing but unfortunately less talented cronies take much of the song writing reins, word from the Pogues camp has it that Shane is losing interest in the band, what with a preoccupation with Acid House and its attendant chemical performance enhancing agents. Just what the world needs: Celtic

.

ARTS

acid casualties. Yeah, I’m afraid the Pogues are stuck in much the same me&as me - directionless and purposeless, killing time wondering which way to turn. It’s not a fun position to be in, I can tell you.

by David

Imprint But where the potpourri of If I Should Fall From Grace From God was an adventurous fusion of folk, pop, rock, jazz etc Peace and Love comes across as merely unfocused. It’s as if they realized that after the variety and breadth of the last album they couldn’t go back to just being a great pub-folk band, they had to “mature artistically” or something. Fine if they have the material with which to do-o. Unfortunately, our lovable cast of reprobates just don’t come up with the goods. That’s not to say that anything . on Peace and Love really blows, it’s just that nothing really

I

“I got the .hots for you...”

Thomson staff

Crummy, crummy, and crummy. These are the three words that came to my mind after listening to this new Motown release. The only compliment I have for it is from my roommate, who said it had a nice cover. It is some kind of mutant hybrid between pop and rap that is totally devoid of intelligent vocals or musical composition. This isn’t even the kind of mindless pop that has infested .thousands of radio stations and night clubs around the country. Candi has more talent than these folks. To sum up: don’t buy it,

by Peter Dedes Imprint staff Mother Nature’s Kitchen does not scatter Scottish soil on a musical garden. Rather, it reveals American poisoning of other people’s cultural environment, Or, perhaps, a collective subconscious continues to hammer at musicians to de-urbanize their music. The Poguss and Weddings, Parties, Anything are reproachless as they convey the

sound and smell and feeling of their homelands. Kevin McDermott, however, feels he must translate through a particularly American medium. It’? really quite strange to see how willing Scats are to lap up America. Kevin McDermott Orchestra transcend these name tags to present a kilted version of guitar-pop, although it is not confection. I get the feeling this album is more ephemeral than anything. It’s about the fear of the sun’s remorseless traverse across some serious sky and about nobody in particular. ..a universal melancholy. David Bowie gets a production assist credit and he - along with McDermott and Kenny MacDonald’capture polite guitar and fiddle. Mot&r Nature’s Kitchen, then, becomes an intense look at Scottish psyche and a soft land’s pursuit of a cowboy identity.

F-HE DOCTOR. IS IN j


Imprint,

F

I

G

U

R

E

0

Friday,

U

You were always told not to talk with your mouth full. But what the hec, rules are made to be broken.Translate this sentence from sign language into English.

September

22,

1989

T â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

23


21.

The

Imprint,

first

Friday,

law

September

22,

1989

RECORD REV’lEW&

of noise

by John Hymsrrr qnprint staff The Chills, Stra-ightjacket Fits, Look Blue Go Purple, Jean Paul Experience, The Bats, Sneaky Feelings, The Verlaines, Bailter Space, Headless Chickens, Able Tasmans, The Skeptics, Snapper, and Tall Dwarfs all have a song on this

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project; a project so deep, so subtle, so blunt, and so diverse. A project so good, In Love With These Times is a collection of New Zealand label Flying Nun bands, and sure enough, the above litany all hail from said country, And it goes far beyond what is expected from a compilation album: it is a consistent album. The sublime brilliance of In Love With These Times is hidden in the rough-hewn edges of an imperfect sculpture; a sculpture which does more than challenge you to understand it. It is ti sculpture that defies you to understand it. And though all art/culture is intended to sell you a lifestyle+ this is one lifestyle I don’t mind buying. The sonic experiments on In Love With These Times hint at an informed culture class; a group of people unafraid of noise. As Thales believed that the earth was based on water, and. Afraxemenies air, there seems to be a groupin of artists who see noise as t.a e primal building block. Thus, the noise on this album transcends the merely aural sensation of the brain and hits you right where the rest of culture/music wants to steal: your soul. I guess that’s what makes In Love With Theee Times so good, so important, so right - it aids the soul. How, you might ask? Well, without pretending to be a substitute for religion, In Love With These Times manages to hit you intact, with full integrity. These songs will never be beer commercials, nor .does it appear that they will ever be involved in prepackaged rebellion. Take this music for what it is. And I guess that this is the aforementioned lifestyle that you buy into when listening to this disk. From the subtle stylings of the Chills to the brutal noise control of Bailter S-pace, In Love With These Times manages to entertain and to enlighten. Great albums shun pigeonholing, and this camp is no exception. A thoroughly earnest effort has resulted in an amazing, eclectic, and beautiful collection of sound experiences. Miss it not.

“Why

I love

Yuie”

I : [I I I I

1 I

by Derek Weiler Imprint st eff Welcome to a whole new concept in record reviewing: the DoIt-Yourself Review. It worke like this: Go dig through your ,back issues of NME or Sounds or Imprint and search out all those rave reviews of Dinosaur Jr, albums like Bug and You’re Living All Over Me. Choose the portions of these reviews which describe the band’s performance or songwriting (however\ be sure to avoid any and all references to proper names of band members or songs). Then proceed to paste these clippings into the space provided. ,

1’ \I

:

Iclippings’! i iI here] II

nsert

i I I I

clippings: I I I

here]

i

I I

B I

For all intents and purposes, you now have a completely valid and accurate review of Buffalo Tom’s new self-titled debut LP. I suppose it’s a measure’of Dinosaur Jr.‘s influence that after only a few years of existence, they’ve already spawned a clone band. It’s not that large a stretch of the imagination to picture Buffalo Tom a few months ago, playing the Boston equivalent of the Highlands under the name “Freak Scene - tribute to Dinosaur Jr.” After all, this is a new SST LP from a Boston band produced by Dinosaur’s J Mascis at Fort Apache Studios. Say no more. It’s no surprise, then, that Buffalo

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Buffalo Jr.?

Tom has derived almost every aspect of their sound from J and the boys. Actually, there’s one other surprise: Buffalo Tom is actually a very great album. Like Dinosaur Jr., Buffalo Tom display unprecedented song writing skill and musicianship, and they’ve managed to produce a consist. ently durable, exciting LP. These guys have the formula down pat. You’ve heard it all before, so I’ll be brief: the guitars are sludgy and powerful, the bass is.fluid and melodic, and the drums are steady and pounding. As a matter of fact, they’ve got it down so .well that they even sound. . + well, better than Dinosaur Jr. It’s no mere hyperbole to say

that

they

really

‘have

pro-

duced the best Dinosaur Jr. record ever made. I suppose I really should be condemning Buffalo Tom’s lack of originality and giving them a measly one or two stars. But it’s just such a damn fine record, you can’t help loving it. And if you’re a Dinosaur fan, it’s quite simply a must-hear, Don’t miss it.

r


Imprint,

RECORD REVIEWS

Hip hap

by Paul Done Imprint etaff To quote better men than I (Ratt, that is), “what goes around comes around,” and in these nostalgia-crazed eighties, the cycle getsfaster and faster. It seemed like only yesterday that everyone was getting the big chill and was listening to Mo-

T.O. favorites National V&et are at our very own Bombshelter tonight for the second or third time. Still riding on the strength of their great year-old debut LP, the band has just released a colowful video for 68 Hrs. Maria Del Mar is considered gorgeous by some, hideous by others, but there’s no question she’s got talent. Go see them. At T.O.‘s Rivoli tonight, we have a hardcore triple-header: Guilt Parade, Die Screaming and Black Betty. Ugh. Your chances are a little better over at Lee’s Palace with the Touchstones. Also tonight, Fine Young Cannibals will be playing the Kingswood on (I think) their first live tour ever. Louise Azzarello Dance Projects presents An Evening of Dance tonight and tomorrow night at 8:OOp.m. at the Theatre of the Arts. Azzarello, a UW student, put together this evening of innovative and exciting dance which Judy says will’ be great. Things heat up tomorrow night with iconoclasts Pop Will Eat Itself at Toronto’s Siboney. They began life as a rockin’ guitar group [i.e. the Wonderstuff done right) and have since incorporated dub and hip-hop into their sound. It’ll be interesting to see how tunes like Can U Dig It? and DefCon One translate into alive show. More has-beens out-for bucks: Crosby, Stills and Nash are at Massey Hall Sunday, night. Here in town on Sunday, Kingston band The Tragically Hip are at Stages, supported by The Phan-

September

22,

1989

“Goldfinger

- he’s

a coldfinger

Reasons 1. 2. 3. 4a 5.

,to Kill

Men

They’re smelly, (by St=ey) They’re messy. They read “Road & Track”. They. think menstruation is a joke. They orgasm too quickly.

IF

is a sevpolis dan-

At other times Soul II Soul are so strident in the recidivist proclivities that they descend to the Ievel of unintentional parody like Steve Sfeven’s Spinal Tapesque Atomic Playboys. The most obvious example of this is African Dance, whose fluttering flute is enough to induce snickers from even the most steeled fan of rare groove. Le Chateau is selling Gauchos, so polish u those platforms, press those Plares, get ready for the return of the early seventies. As you strut down the street, afro’ bobbing to the disco beat remember I told you 80.

You CAN APPRECIATE

AND LIKE SEEING A

FRIENDLY SMILE’

r

25

town, then just as quickly it was the S(c)ummer of Love all over again, Real Deadheads are despicable enough without the added annoyance of high-school morons walking around in tie-dyes and topsiders* And now, in the blink of an eye, it’s the early ’70s all over again, and we’re back in the early Flareozoic era Ian Astbury and the Cult are strutting around like Black Sabbath reborn which brings us to Soul II Soul, who are busy rehashing the smooth soul groove of the early arid, surprisingly enough,. producing some pretty snappy dance music in the process. The debut LP from this British coIlective: Keep on Movin’ is the product of a colle’ction of Blackbyrds LPs, a sampler and a keen ear for the happening sounds pf the Rare Groove scene - which along with Acid House has been the dominant trend in London’s club scene. At its best, Keep on Movin’ bracing mixture of smooth enties groove and eighties ish. The title track, especially, six sublime minutes of ce/pop magic.

toms.

The Men They Couldn’t Hang are a British Celtic-punk band firmly in the Pogues tradition. They gigged around this area a lot last summer, and I guess they liked it so much they’re back for more. They’re at the Diamond in Toronto Tuesday, September 26, and at Guelph’s Trasheteria on Wednesday. However, the real thing is .at Massey Hall on September 27 and 28. Yes, it’s the Pogues, back once again. To be honest, the new LP is something of a letdown, and the Pogues [especially Shane) have become increasingly noncommitt al in concert in recent years. But take it from one who’s been there: hearing them do Yeah Yeah Yeoh live is worth the price of admission. Back for their zillionth appearance is The Shuffle Demon8 at Taps on September 26. Here at the Bombshelter on Thursday, September 28, we’ve got the pride of Philadelphia, The Dead Milkmen. Still supporting their last LP Beelzebubba, the Milkmen can be counted on for loads of laughs. ’ Your best bet at the Princess Cinema is Beirut: The Last Home Movie., the story of an aristocratic Lebanon family that’s refusing, to abandon its home. It’s playing on Monday, September 25 at 9:20, and Tuesday and Wednesday at 7:O0.

Friday,

DON’T

COME TO

AVOID 15 KING STREET NORTH WATERLOO

s’


26

Imprint,

Friday,

September

22, 1989

.ARTS

ve

e

Al Pacino

in a sensitive,

convincing

A consummate

actor.

performance. I

what cliched format. Pacino stars as Detective Al Pacino is back in a big way. Frank Keller, a 20-year veteran And just in time it seems: his laof the New York City police test movie, Sea of Love, would be force. Despite all he has seen, running at half-speed without Frank is a “good cop”, compasPacino’s high-octane perforsionate and smart. mance. The film itself is a dark, Frank is assigned to a case that gritty thriller with just a few has seen three men murdered, new twists to, break its somewith more on the horizon. All 1 -II--L-IL-I---1 three victims had placed rhymIof a New I ing ads in the personals All three men I York newspaper. had also been found lying face I down and naked in their own beds. This leads Frank and his I partner, played by John Goodman of television’s Roseanne, to I place their own ad, which in turn 950 King Street W leads them to Helen Cruger. (across from K-W Hospital) I Ellen Barkin plays Cruger, the Kitchcner I erotic shoe store manager who answers Frank’s ad. Barkin is . Noon - 9 PM Man-Fri I absolutely convincing as Helen, Noon - 5 PM Sat I and she seems to simultaneously I draw and emit sexuality. She 749-1121 FAX:749-1152 I plays her part beautifully, conhinting through her I tinuously actions that she could indeed be (At Mail Order Prices!) I the killer. Goodman gives a superb peras Keller’s partner I formance Modems Goodman comI from Queens, mandsscreen time and his fresh, Top Quality, Fully I clean version of a New York city HayesTM Compatible cop is a marvel. modems (D.O.C. O.K.‘ecl) I Sea of Love moves along at a I regular pace for the first hour Internal 2400 baud I until Pacino and Barkin do their ’ I first mattress dance - a power$159 ful scene radiating with sexual f energy. External 2400 baud From here the movie kicks into I high gear, with $179 falling I deeper and deeper Keller for a woman Scanners is ,looking increasingly I who Barkin and Patino keep I guilty. 400 DPI Logitech tension at a peak, I the sexual even in the brief sequences when Scanman $279 they aren’t fondling each other. I 300 DPI Full Page I only have a few complaints about this movie, one of them Scanner, includes PC I I being the film’s lack of subPaintbrush+ $729 st ante. Without Pacino, this I I movie would be headed for the PC-OCR $199 I toilet. If you are like me, howI ever, you would pay to watch Software I Pacino read parking tickets. Also, the camera seems to PC Paintbrush IV (New!) i have an intense fascination with I Ellen Barkin’s legs. Admittedly, $79 4 they are nice legs, but this movie overdoes it: almost every scene AutoSketch Version 2 f has a glimpse [a close-up I glimpse, ,.$149 mind you) of thigh or I calf. I Reserve NOW: SW of Love should be seen I simply for its star power. John I Goodman alone is worth the adAutodesk Animator mission price (admittedly a i $299 highly inflated admission price]. The on-screen romance between 1 Matrix Layout $199 Pacino and Barkin is a riveting I joy to watch. If you could packI Superbase 2 $299 age this movies heat: Hydro would soon be out of business,I Special Discount I If you like Al Pacino or you are I the sort that liked Fcltal Attrac15 96 off diskettes and I tion, you will enjoy Sea of Love. holders with valid I 1 u of w or Wf u Lb.

by Patrick Moore

Cash and Carry


VV~terjoo

13 pqint

comeback

win

Rugby squa-d sinks ‘Stangs by Peter Brown Imprint staff

Waterloo celebrated its return to rugby’s OUAA Division One with a stirring 13-8 victory over the Western Mustangs last Saturday. Down 8-O at half-time in a steady drizzle, the new-look ‘Red Sox’ Warriors rallied for three penalty kicks and a clinching try. Waterloo was led by the inspired tackling of Mark Hogg and Michael Fischer, and the accurate leg of Darren Wilt on. The team was also aided by the excellent play of its rookie forward& The game’s first 20 minutes gave Waterloo fans queasy flashbacks to two years ago, as the home side lost the majority of its strums, and forgot how ;fo tackle. At the same time, Western’s forwards had good running, but their backs were unable to finish the play and convert their chances into points. Though tense, the Warriors played with their usual defensive ferocity to keep Western from the try-line. Michael Fischer was instrumental on more -than one o&asion in the early going. Referring to the Warriors’ April tour of the West coast, Fischer commented afterward that he “learned to tackle in B.C.” He wasn’t kidding. Western maintained their pressure, however, and scored the first points of the game at about the 25th minute to take a 4-O lead. Mark “Hoggmeis t er” Hogg’s defensive intensity got a bit too exuberant at one point, when he high-tackled the Western ball-carrier, leading to a pe-

nalt y kick. The kick sailed wide, but Western added another unconverted try before the half, giving a 8-O Western advantage. Waterloo team members report that Coach Brian Quistberg had simple but effective advice for his team after forty minutes: “Relax. You’re too tense. You can win this game.“ The Warriors must have believed him, because the excellent tackling by the few in the first half spread to the many in the second. After 15.minutes of the second half, Waterloo seemed to be more comfortable at dictating the pace and direction of play. Now, all they needed was points. Those came gradually, along with a definite shift of momentum. Over the next ten minutes, the referee awarded three penalty kicks to Waterloo, and kicker Darren Wilton took full advantage. He made each of the threepoint kicks, the last one staying inside the left crossbar by no more than a foot. Waterloo had climbed the mountain, and now led by a tenuous Q-8 score, with at least 15 minutes remaining. Western was by no means overcome, however, and it took still more solid defensive play by the whole Waterloo side to deny the Mustangs more points. Just as Western began to regain their offensive rhythm, Warriors such as Fischer, Hsgg, and Jimmy Closs proved to be the spoilers. The Mustangs were threatening, and an excellent Waterloo kick set them back to midfield, where they were forced to set up another run. But alertness on the part of Fischer, and providence

Warriors \

in the form of a Door Western pass, combined to brovide a Waterloo interception,, The winger jumped into the path of the ball, caught it, and was off down the sidelines, outrunning three surprised ‘St angs for a corner try. Wilton missed. an almost impossible convert, leaving the score 13-8. Western could still win with a converted try. At this point, Waterloo switched to defence, causing some nervous moments as Western consolidated their running and came .close to scoring in the last few minutes. Two tense strums on Waterloo’s five-metre line gave the hpme side spect ators a bit more suspense than they would have liked. The final whistle brought yells of relief, as this confidencebuilding victory was secured. The win gives Waterloo a share of the lead in the OUAA Division One along with defending champs Queen’s, The Junior Varsity Warriors didn’t fare as well,. unfortunately, as thtiy^feH ‘tti the Junior ‘Stangs by a lopsided 17-4 score. However, the JV’s still represent a valuable pool of talent for an ever-improving Waterloo side. The Warriors qan feel especially optimistic about their chances this season, because of the return to the lineup of Paul Toon, injured in the last exhibition game against Guelph. He is expected to travel with the team to York University,tomorrow to take on the Yeomen. The Warriors’ play again next Wednesday,. September 27 at 4:00 p.m. at Columbia Fields, where they host the Guelph Gryphons.

Junior Vanity the

cl&sic

Warrior tacker

rugby

Sian Jennings demonstrates

face...unfortunately

the

Junior

team

lost

17-4. photo by Ndl Brmett

first, then. _Ispluttkr *

strike

by Rich Nichol Imprint staff

old bad habits

Normally when the Waterloo Warriors lose a football game, it is usually because of a lack of offence or poor pass defence. But last Friday, September 15, at Varsity Stadium in Tdronto, the weakness in the Waterloo roster, surprisingly enough, was on the defensive line. Too many times there were gaping holes created that the Varsity Blues eagerly trotted through. As a result, U of T thumped the Warriora

24-7,

extending

in the second.

Def-

ensively, we played disastrously slow in the first half, but corrected some of the problems in the second. What we need is concentration and effort in all four quarters of the game.” Waterloo surprised everyone. including Toronto, with an impressive touchdown drive in the

_. an impressive touchdown

drive

middle of the first quarter to open the scoring. After thebfirst seven plays of the game and a punt return, the Warriors had first down on their own 14 yard line. I s From there, UW starting pivot Brian Lenart orchestrated a 96 yard touchdown drive, which included six first downs. Large yardage gains were

on passes

to wide

re-

ceiver Jodie Schnarr, flanker Joe Jeffries, and halfback Dave Ropret, and on hand+offs .to halfback Tom Chartier* and Orville Beckford. In the final play of the drive near the two minute mark, Lenart started a fake running pattern to the right, then handed the ball off to Beck.ford who ran a sweep pattern the opposite way to the open side for the first major of the game. Waterloo kicker Peter Tchir added the single point to make the

Water-

loo’s losing streak to 32 games. The loss put Waterloo in the basement of the OIJAA West, sharing 0-2 records’ with. the hapless York Yeomen. I “We didn’t play ES well as we did in last week’s game against Western,” commented head coach Tuffy Knight. “The guys had an outstanding first quarter on offence, but then got into our

achieved

acare

7-O

for

the

Warriora.

The bench and the 200 plus Waterloo fans were ecstatic. But it was wasted energy. York then stormed back *to virtually take over the ball game in the final three quarters. U of T notched their first major of the game at 9:21 of the Continued

on page

28


28

Imprint,

Friday,

September

22,

Hollifield

1989

SPORTS ,

is a sniper

by Lynn Hoyles Imprint staff You can always tell when it’s varsity soccer season in Waterloo - weat her that is sunny and warm during training camp suddenly turns rainy and cold. On Thursday evening, the Athena soccer team travelled to Varsity stadium for an exhibition game against the University of Toronto. It was raining, of course, but B.C. native Catherine Hollifield .must be used to the rain, as she scored both goals in the 2-O victory. Saturday, September 16 was the season opener against. our down-the-street rivals, WLU. It was a hard-fought game, with Laurier missing a penalty kick early in the first half. The Hawks scored later on to lead the game l-6 at halftime. Waterloo came back with a goal by striker Laurie Whyte in the atcond, half, XaThe Laurier goalkeeper failed to gain ccmtrolo of the ball, and Whyte tipped the ball into the net with a great second effort as she was flattened

Ir .Foatball. blues -

by WLU’s fullback. The game ended in a 1-I tie. Sunday was clear and warm as Guelph came to Waterloo for our home-opener. Guelph’s centre half scored early on a high, hard shot that UW goalkeeper Tammi Winchester couldn‘t pull down. In the se&nd half, the momentum switched to the Waterloo team, as Sarah Boswell put a long ball up the left wing to Anita Toogobd. She cracked a high shot that the Guelph keeper knocked down, but right winger Hollifield pounced on the loose ball, knocking it home. The score remained l-l% and the Athenas came .away with two ties to extend their undefeated string to four games. Waterloo native Lisa Bater had two excellent games as sweeper, using her speed and tackling skills to provide coverage on defence. The team is on the road this weekend, travelling to Windsor on Saturday and then to UWO in London for a Sunday afternoon match.

continued

from

page

27

second quarter, when running back Lorne King ran in uncontested. Place kicker Andrew Astrom converted the extra point, his first of two on the day, to tie the score/at seven apiece. The Warrior defence then began to falter. With just over two minutes left in the half, Waterloo allowed two touchdowns and a field goal. Luckily, one touchdowg was denied on a Toronto penalty. But the field goal by Astrom and the touchdown catch by 5’ 6” wide receiver Bob Anderson both counted. In the ensuing kickoff, the U of T kicker didn’t get much height or distance on. the ball, and the Warriors had first down possession at their own 38 yard line. In 50 seconds, Lenart began a quick offensive drive that brought UW to the Toronto 44 yard line with three seconds left on the clock. Tchir attempted a virtually impossible field goal kick but, A

*

Varsity men’sI soccer game, which was won in the second half with goals scored by Nazir Saccoor, Pro Stergiou, and Scatty. It was then off to Toronto to face Ryerson on Saturday, and to Hamilton to face McMaster. Early leads in both games, thanks to Waterloo’s ever-popular striker Wilfrid Grassau, were foiltid by late opposition goals to take both weekend games to 1-1 draws. * Special mention must go to all.star goalie Dan Sicoli who played exceptionally well, sav-

by Pro Stergiou Imprint staff The-varsity men’s soccer team started their season on a good note, attaining four out of a possible six points in their first three games. Brock was the first to feel the wrath of the playoff bound Warrior team, as they .went back to St. Kitts bearing a 3-1 loss. Finishing touches and good conditioning were the keys in this

ing a penalty shot in the McMaster game. The returning players and the four rookies are showing great potential this year. The future looks, very psomising for this mature team. The Warriors are at home on Saturday and Sunday playing Windsor and Western respectively at Columbia Field at 1:OO p.m. both days. Fan support support would be greatly appreciated. Let’s get ‘em guys! P.S. Good job keeping your cool on Sunday, Kevin!!!

although it was headed straight for the uprights, the ball fell out of the air about 10 yards short. At the half, the score was Toronto 17, Waterloo 7. In the entire second half,‘the Waterloo offence obtained only one first down, and that was at 13:39 of the third quarter. UW tried the draw play too many times but couldn’t get much yardage on a very strong Blues defensive Jine. Neither team put anything on the score sheet in the third quarter, although Toronto did have some excellent chances to capitalize on. Luckily, the Warrior defence learned their lesson from the previous quarter and stood their ground. Among the highlights of a’n otherwise dreary third quarter occurred w.hen Dave Shaw jumped up and swatted away a pass attempt, and the ball nearly landed in the hands of another Warrior. Two plays later, U of T tried a 32. yard field goal but the ball sailed wide left, Richard Chen returned the ball by running wide right and somehow squeezed out of the end zone and down the sideline to the Waterloo 25 yard line, In an impressive effort moments later, Waterloo defensive back Steve Futyer nullified a Toronto scoring chance by grabbing the ball carrier’s leg with his outstretched arm while being tackled himself, ‘Only 37 seconds into the fourth quarter, the Blues pulled within field goal range, and Astrom chalked up another three points for the Blues to widen the lead 20-7, The first turnover of the game occurred with ten minutes left in the game, when Lenart tried to carry and was stripped of the ball at the Waterloo 22 yard line. Three plays later, Astrom failed once again to get a field goal, but this time Chen could not get out of the UW end zone and submitted the single point. The score: Toronto 21, Waterloo 7. Waterloo backup pivot Dave Sharp entered the game with three minutes remaining, but couldn’t improve the mediocre offence, Waterloo punted on third down, but the ball bounced off a wall of outstretched Toronto blockers. Within field goal range again,

the Blues put the last three nails in the .Warrior coffin to capture the victory 24-7. Toronto nearly doubled Waterloo in ,almost every offensive statistic, but did not show very impressive numbers compared to the rest of the leagule. Blues quarterback Eugene Buccigrossi, a Pittsburgh natike, skippered 315 yards of offense, on 222 yards rushing, 118 yards p&sing, and a loss of 25 yards. Toronto’s best rusher on the day was King who ran for 126 yards. Lenart used Beckford for most of Waterloo’s dormant running game, gaining 66 yards on 11 carries. In total, Waterloo collected 160 yards of offence, llg on the ground ;lnd 52 in the air, with a total yardage loss of only ten. Lenart completea seven, or 14 pass attempts, One area of weakness on the Waterloo squad is a lack of yardage on punts. Lenart is temporarily filling in the position as punter, but the team needs someone who is a regular to the spot. Jim Harding ran out his eligibility last year and no one showed up at training camp to replace him. The inexperienced Lenart averaged 26 yards per punt against U of T. I think that Tchir should take the job for now. Things don’t get any easier for the Warriors in their next game. The highly touted Guelph Gryphons will be coming to town on Saturday, September 23 with a 200 p.m. kickoff time at Seagram Stadium. “The name of the game is consistency,” said Knight, adding, “if we can stay consistent we can do better than expected against Guelp h.” The biggest threat to Waterloo will be Guelph’s fifth year quarterback, Mike Shoemaker. The statistics for Shoemaker after the first two games include 584 passing yards and 47 completions on 63 passes, an average gain of 12 yards, Waterloo better improve the pass defence or expect a blowout in the game, Maybe a doxology before the game would help the team win, WARRIOR NOTES: Last week, the Warrior’s touchdown against Western was incorrectly published as scored by Orville Beckford. The TD was actually scored by Gene Chartiei.

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s.The bOJ/S of It’s that time of year again. The signs of it are all around* Baseball is about to enter the playoffs, the CFL is in its second half, and the NFL is well underway. Piece it all tbgether and you realize that the hockey season is fast approaching. The Waterloo ice hockey team began training camp on Monday, September 18, with many prospective rookies vying for a spot

mrany prospective rookies at training camp on the team+ That’s a good sign, because the team has lost many of its key forwards+ The Warriors begin exhibition pla in- the first week of October wit x games against Laurier, Guelph, and Ryerson. Don McKee, the head coach of the hockey Warriors, has announced the draw for the Oktoberfest Hockey Tournament which wil1 be staged by the University of Waterloo on October 7 and 8. The six-team tournament will be .divided into two pools. Pool “A” will consist of Laurier, Western, and Toroqto. Pool ‘93” will contain York, Guelph, and Waterloo. Each of the pools will play a round-robin tournament, with the teams playing a cross-over game against their ranked counterpart from the other pool on the second day of the tournament. The opening round will see Pool “A” play all of their games

in the Waterloo Arena. The games are: Saturday, October 7 10:oO a.m. Laurier vs. Western 2:3o p.m. Western vs. Toronto 7~10 pm Laurier vs. Toronto The opening round games in Pool “B” at the Columbia Icefield are: Saturday, October 7 10:00 a.m. Waterloo vs. York 2:30 pm. York vs. Guelph TOO p.m. Guelph vs, Waterloo The cross-over games are as follows: Sunday, October 8 12:o0 p.m. Srd-place Pool “A” vs 3rd-place Pool “B” ~00 p.m. 2nd-place Pool “A” vs 2nd-place Pool “B”, 6:00 p.m. Ist-place Pool “A” vs 1st -place Pool “B” There will be no advance ticket sales for the Oktoberfest Tournament. McKee not only spent the summer recruiting rookies, but also went searching for new coaching staff as well. McKee, who is entering his fifth season as the head coach of the Warriors, had to come up with relacements for Bob Cassidy and R evin Fitzpatrick. Cassidy found it necessary to commit more time to his position with the Waterloo Regional Board of Education+ while Fitzpatrick has taken over the head coaching responsibilities with the Kitchener Ranger Junior “B’S” L Joining McKee this qeason will be Geoff Ward, Dave Fennel, and Rob Whistle. This will be Ward’s first year as an assistant coach at #he uni-

versity level. Ward is a graduate from the University of Western Ontario in honours physical education. He has coaching experience with a triple “A” midget hockey team in New Liskeard, Ward also has his Level III credentials in the National Hockey Coaching Certification Program and is currently studying for his master’s degree in coaching. He is a teacher with the Waterloo County Board of Education. Fennel has five years experience as a me mber oft he hockey

Imprint,

.

Friday,

September

22,

1989

29

winter .

Warriors. While playing for the. Warriors, he acted as an assistant captain and as full captain of the squad. As an undergraduate student at Waterloo, Fennel completed the environmental and resource studies program with a minor in biology. He is currently enrolled in graduate studies in the department of recreation and leisure studies. Whistle has had Plavinrr exnerience in the NHL &ith t6e Nkw York Rangers, St. Louis Blues

and the Washington Capitals. Whistle is a graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University. While playing for Laurier in 1983-84, Whistle was awarded the Senator Joseph A. Sullivan Trophy. .The award goes to the MVP in Canadian University Hockey. In about a week, the final cuts will be made at training camp and the Warrior hockey team will be formed. A summary of the plavers and the team’s Drabable o&come will be discissed in a later issue of Imprint.

Whha Labatt’s road scholarship student in a new Ford Probe sends pylons flying . A lecture and video will be shown on Thursday, Sept. 28, at 7:CXI p.m. in Drivers will be designated at the presentation on AL11 6 to start theorogram. Thurs ,day for the weekend driving test. photo couHe8y of Laatt’r

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30 Imprint, Friday, September 22, 1989

” SPORTS

closes on .at Guelph

Waterloo Western by Kevin Shwm Imprint staff With their sights set squarely on the CIAU championships, the University of Waterloo opened its 1989 cross country season at the Guelph Open last Saturday, September 16. The Warriors finished third and the Athenas took fourth at the meet, which was, as usual, poorly organized. Neither team was at full strength. With Ontario sending’ two teams to the CIAUs, Waterloo is gearing up to outrun its main rivals, Queen’s, Toronto, and especially Western. It was a day of debuts for Waterloo. Of the 14 men wearing black and gold, only five had previously raced for UW. Steve Symon, more noted for his varsity nordic skiing, was the top Warrior in 19th place, while two ‘true’ rookies, Robin Beynon and Brian Hagemeier, ran intelligent races to score 27th and 38th re-

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and the results were impressive. Jill Francis powered to 12th place over the 5.1 kilometre course. Rookies Lauren McLaren and Nancy Calder, in 3rd and 30th respectively, ran Elxcellent races, indicating growing depth on the Athenas squad. iVeteran Marielle Rowan took Seth, while another skier, Fiona Griffith, was 54th. Linda Hachey returned to campus with 63rd place and Claudia Hancock was in 72nd spot, The Athenas were at half strength at best, but still missed third place by only one point. Having had only one yorkout before the meet, unlil+e most other schools, the Atheaas have nowhere to go but up a&he season progresses. Tomorrow (Saturda k ] provide’s the next test for Waterloo as the UW harriers takd part in the prestigious Western Invitational, Besides almost all the competitive Ontario teams, representatives from Michigan and Syracuse will be taking part.

The Athenas entered seven runners, including newcomers,

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Among the participants in last week’s Terry Fox run was Rick Clinch, who biked the 10 km course for the seventh year collecting $85 in pledges. Despite tipping over near V2, Rick completed the course in 1 hour and 43 minutes and would like to thank those kind people that helped him back on -his wheels. 2

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spectively. Peter Brooks in 28th, and Pat MacDonnell in 47th added a little veteran seasoning to the team. The team score of 159 wa* deceptively high. Paul Ernst was fourth, despite cramping up, and Peter Self took 26th. Both are Waterloo students, but ran for their clubs last Saturday. In addition, Mark Rab another nordic skier taking his first shot at cross country running - finished 32nd, but forgot to hand in his finishing tag. The rest of the Warrior contingent was led by rookie Joachim Seebar in 50th. Dave Mossie outkicked Kevin Shoom for Seth, and newcomer Scott McDonald placed 80th. Ken Griffin in 73rd and Roy Strum in 76th ran well, and Richard Bradley in 79th and Dave ‘Sven’ Richardson in 87th rounded out the team.

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Last Saturday, the new version of the Athena field hockey team took to the field against a strong Alumni team. Coach McCrae describes the alumni team as “very strong, very skilled, and with perhaps greater hockey smarts than the varsity team at this time.” In the first of two games, the Athenas drew 4-4 with the Alumni. Goal scorers were Janet MacPhearson, Maureen Owens, and freshman Tara Rosenberger who scored twice. In the second outing, the Athenas lost, as two costly mistakes put the score at O-2.

“I was pleased with our performance. We were playing without two key players,” commented an enthusiastic McCrae,

CATHERINE

Athena

HOLLIFIELD

-

Soacer:

The University of Waterloo and McGinnis-Molson’s Female Athlete of the, Week is Catherine Hollifield. Catherine is a first year kinesiology student from yancouvtir, B.C. ? Hollifield plays right wing for ?%e soccer Athenas. She scored once in an exhibition game versus Guelph on September IO, whi& -:W&erloo won 4-1, and

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“I was anxious to see ourrookies handle a game getting. They did well! I was particularly pleased with the work of Tara Rosenberger, Angela McNeill, and Lisa Armstrong. They played we!l, as did many of our returnees.” The Athenas return to action this weekend as they host four OWIAA East division teams on Saturday and Sunday, September 23 and 24, The schedu!e is as follows:

Sbccer:

Dan Sicoli, a native of Sault Ste. Marie, is in his second year ’ of kinesiology and plays goalkeeper for the sbccer Warriors. As the OUAA West Division allstar goaltender last year, he is having a strong start on the 1989 season in an attempt to repeat his reign. In games versus Brock 3-1, Ryerson l-1, and McMaster l-1, he provided the outstanding leadership and stability required for the- team to be a contender this year. Versus McMaster, he blanked a penalty shot which retained the-tie for the Warrior@. ”

Hollifield was also one of only 11 athletes selected from 18 toD teams in her #home province df British Columbia for the provincial high school a!l-star team. She also Dlavs for the Kerrisdale club teim, “the, B.C. under 18 championship team, which is on the wav to the Nationals in October. ‘” ._

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32 Imprint,

Friday,

September

22, 1989

SPORTS

Varsity scoreboard and schedule OUAA

Football Waat

Division G-w L T F A I’ 2 2 0 0102 16 4

Western Guelph 2 2 0 0 53 22 2+ Toronto 211035232 Laurier 211041332 Windsor 211019262 McMaster 2 1 1 .O 37 70 2 Waterloo 2 0 2 0 17 64 0 York 2 0 2 0 2169 0 l Two points taken away for using an ineligible player East Division GWLT Queen’s Ottawa McGill Concordia Bishop’s Carl&ion

-

Wed. Waterloo Sat. Waterloo Sun. Waterloo

soccer

OUAA

Sept. 13 result 3, Brock I Sept. 16 mylt 1, Ryerson 1 Sept. 17 result 1 F&Master 1

Future UW gamea Sat. Sept. 23 Windsor at Waterloo, I:OO p.m. Sun. Sept. 24 Western at Waterloo, I:00 p.m. Both games at Columbia Field

F AP

2 2 C 0 41 16 4 2 11032242 21105234 2 2 1 1 .O 36 38 2 2 110 22 37 2 2 0 2 0 18 52 0

Fri. Sept. 15 rmsult Toronto 24, Waterloo 7 Sat. Sspt. 16 results Western 62, McMaster 6 Laurier 33, York 2 Guelph 17, Windsor 3 Queen’s 28, Bishop’s 7 Concordia 27,McGiil23 Sun. Sept. 17 mnlt Ottawa 23, Carleton 11 Futurs UW game Sat. Sept. 23 Guelph at Waterloo, 2:00 pm Seagram Stadium OUAA

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Sept. 16 result8 Guelph Invitational Team placing: fourth Waterloo finishers: Iill Francis - 12th Lauren McLaren - 23rd Nancy Calder - 30th Marielle Rowan - 38th Fiona Griffith - 54th Linda Hackey - 63rd Claudia Hancock - 72nd

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Sept. 16 resulte Guelph Invitational Team placing: third Waterloo finishers: * Paul Ernst - 4th Steve Symon - 19th * Peter Self - 26th Robin Beynon - 27th Peter Brooks - 28th Brian Hagemeier - 38th Pat MacDonnell - 47th Joachim Seeber --‘56th Dave Mossie - 56th Kevin Shoom - 67th Scott McDonald - 60th Ken Griffith - 73rd Roy Strum - 76th Richard Bradley - 79th Dave Richardson - 87th * Ran for club instead of U

-Student Special $9 9 l

Cross

IMPACT MID

. . SALE *34!!‘!L3 ?131IIIIIIC~UPONII)-IIIIII~ 88 FREE SQUASH BALL : 8 8

stairm~m?

+ Trodmills l Tubbibs l DowMill ski Mwbin8 *Liferower

with the purchase of any. t8CCWt 8 @NE COUPON PER PURCHASE PER CUSTOMER EXPIRES OCTOBER l/89 8 8

ERNIE MEISSNER’S

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744-7700

or 71HEALTH

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MONDAY - FRIDAY: 9 - 9; SATURDAY: 9 - 6.

160 lJNIVERSlT’Y AVE, W., WATERLOO (Seside McGinnis Landing) -

. --..


, SPORTS

Imprint,

1 Oktoberfest bike race by Rich Nichol Imprint ‘staff Coming up on Sunday, October 8, there will be an event during Oktoberfest that doesn’t involve drinking huge volumes of celebratory malt-based beverages. Surprising, but it’s true>

RACE #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 kc8

Ziggy’s Cycle and Sport, in cooperation with Oktoberfest, will be holding a bicycle race on Strasburg Road in the Huron-Industrial Park area of Kitchener. “We are sure it will attract severa1 hundred riders from across Ontario, depending on the weat her,” said a Ziggy’s cycle spokesman.

CATEGORY’

REGISTR.

NOVICE 18-t NOVICE 17 VET & MASTER CADET SENIOR Itl JUNh3R MEN SENIOR I,11 & PRO WOMEN (JR & SEN)

9: 00 9100 9: 30

OUT

OUR

10:00 1O:Ol lo:35 lo:36 11:30 11:31 1230 12: 31

STUDENT

22,

1989

33

8$ Catch Athletics -all the action!

I DISTANCE

LAPS

20 KM 12 KM 32 KM 28 KM’ 40 KM 34 KM 40 KM 32 KM

10 6 16 14 20 17 20 16

AM AM AM AM AM AM AM AM

Jeff Maclnnis

lI!WKW&d MEMBERSHIP $AlE MC2065 ’ onTuesday Sept. 26

MAP TO RACE

CHECK

September

There will be eight separate races, divided according to age, skill, and sex categories. All races will be run separately between the times of 1O:OO a.m. and I:00 p.m., with distances ranging from 12 km to 40 km in length. The details of the categorized Iraces I and a map of the race are below.

START

AM AM AM 9: 30 AM IO:30 AM lo:30 AM 11:OO AM 1l:OO AM

Friday,

comet0

RATES

A SIbtALL PRICE To PAY FOR A GREAT BODY. WITH KINESIOLOGY/PHYS. ED h GUARRANTEED RESULTS Call today for a complimentary workout

EXPIRES OCT. 6/89

ONLY CLUB INSTRUCTION

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,I

The

hot dog half price hsi cone bn ond cfde~ 0 doghalf PI ce Choose from 0 hot dog or one chall or cheese hall-prce Thts I5 good 01 your porll3gatng Dary Queen Store row

hot regula with All dfer

I . -e : Y Brmer

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1 1

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34 Imprint, Friday, September 22, 1989

, SPORTS

Campus ret by Allan

Gvmnastic --

I

Be one of the first to compete in the First Annual Men’s Competitive American Hardball Tournament on October IQ and IS at Waterloo Park. Enter a minimum of 15 players per team by Friday, September 29 at 1:OO p.m. at the PAC receptionist desk. A minimum of eight teams will be competing, so get your team in quickly! The cost is $25 per team. If you want to play, but cannot find a team, come to the captain’s meeting on Wednesday, October 11, room 1001, PAC, at 4:45 p.m. to be put on a team. All UW students and CR members are eligible to play. Make UW history by playing in our First Annual Hardball Tournament, or if you don’t often get to a Blue Jays game, come root for your next favourite team at this wild and woolly event. For more information, contact Joe Taibi at 888-6368, or the CR office at ext. 3532.

Coaches

---

Gymnastics background with excellent communications skills and the- ability to relate to children of all ages is required. Day, evening and weekend classes on a * part-time basis.

CONTACT:

During office hours: Monday to Friday: 9 am. to 5 p.m. Call:

743-4970

or743-7861

by Jane Arnem

Despite a rainy Men’s Slo-Pitch

* HoNywood

Era

l

Generra

l

Barrage

l

ended successfully. The September 16 and 17 tournament showcased the great playing skills of the teams and as a result, there were several close games. In the end, the Dream Webers came out on top in the “A” flight by defeating the Dawgs, In the “B” flight Sire Bob’s Lob Slobs were victorious over SJC Slammers. The Chinchillas narrowly defeated the Beer Pitchers to take the “C” championship. In another close game, Third Floor Dave’s World edged out the Decanters to capturf! the “D” championship. I would like to thank all the plavers who stuck it out in the r&n on Saturday to end the tournament without one default, As well, thanks to Peter for the donuts and Holly for her typing! P.S. A glove was found on diamond 5A on Saturday. If you are the own’er, please contact Jane Arnem at 888-0083. - the only Campus Recreation program cancelled this fall is Women’s Flag Foot ball. - watch for the Campus Recreation booth at the Volunteer Fair in the Campus Centre on September 26 and 271

Mertick

Deluxe

l

Esprit

l

Mexx

beginning, the Tournament

C-R CALENDAR

SEPT.

22-29

See the C-R brochurefor times and locations. Sept. 22 Final Entry Dote -men’s competitive ball hockey, men’s and women’s competitive volleyball, men’s competitive floor hockey Hockey Ref on Ice Sept. 23 Mixed Ho-pitch Tournament Fitness Instructors Course Sept. 24 Mixed Slo-pitch Tournament Fitness Instructors Course Basketball Ref on Court Sept. 25 Women’s and Men’s Gompeijtive Volleyball Meeting Volleyball Ref Clinic Men’s Competitive Ball Hockey Meeting Ball Hockey fief Clinic St. John ,First Aid Heart Saver, CPR Sept. 26 Safety Chic Bali Hockey Ref on Court Ski CIub Meeting Volleyball Ref on Court Fitnesb Instructors Course Tennis Instructors Squash Classes Begin

l

jalapeno

peppers

pickled ginger tofu wieners cous cous tarragon vinegar apricot tea imported chocolates kasha brie cheese meusli whole wheat spaghetti Spanish saffron vanilla beans corn tortillas black-eyed peas organically-grown carrots garam masala

Fine Quality Samples, Seconds and End of Lines

See Coupon on Imprint’s Coupon Page.

a*

II & 8,479 fabulous .&

l

Kaos

l

Gitano

l

Part Two L

FOR SALE

l

Boston Trader

l

Merona

as is, $1,400

certi-

fied. 746-7180.

Tandy Computer

See Our Coupon on Imprint’s

l

FOR SALE

FOR SAb

dent cart 81,200 Good r#@d furniture, household articles and clothes. tow prices. St. Vincent De Paul Thrift store, 97 Victoria Street North., Kitchener. Ah-fare Toronto-Vancouver o/w female, Oct. 3, 2:45 pm. $215. o.b.o. messages: 746-6572. 1980 Chevette, Blue, only 105,ooO km, excellent condition! Perfect stu-

l

.

II

:.

346ki@stau kitushener

from RPM)

Scotland Yard

II

II fddrdefoods

34 King Street North - Waterloo, Ont. 888-3590 (across

other foods

(1000) 38’4K - easily expandable to 640K 2-5 l/4 disk drives, monochrome monitor, joystick includes software, Lotus l-2-3, DOS 3.2, Deskmate, Flightsimulator, Kings Quest etc. Also approx 30 disks & case. Asking $850 call Bruce after 500 pm. 653-6647.

U af W leather jacket - like new, navy, size 42 mens. $19000 call 884’6465.

Cheap

books from ENG 105A. PSCI 101 Qualter, PHIL 145, FRENCH 155, ACC 13l& 132 to CS 100. Call Daneal 746-63 19.

;t986 BMW K75T motorcycle. Mint’ condition 12,000 km many factory op-

Coupon Page.

FOR SALE tions. 893-0393 after 5. bargain prker, brand names only. Disketts, hard drives, computer hardware & software, service, paper and accessories. Call Tristar Computer 888-7099. K0-k bulk 5 l/4” diskettes $8.9” per box of 10. Volume discount availablecall Tristar Computer 888-7099.

Gary-r Moving - man w/small cube van and appliance cart available weeknights, weekends - $30/hr. in Kitchener-Waterloo; out-of-town extra Gary 746-7 160. The Clerlcal Advantage 742-0657 word processing - resumed, application letters, essays, manuscripts, reports. Printing - flyers, signs, banners, cards.


Imprint,

1 CALENDAR

September

Hub WAwT8n

SURVICUS &a& 13 student in need of a T.A. tb tutor Biology. Call Susan after 3 pm. 884-8987.

HaLP

Friday,

WANTED

Weekend Counaallorr for devetopmentally delayed individuals, B”/hr. Every second weekend. Leave messacle for Don Mader after 2:OO pm. 8&I-601 2, 886-5201. Earn $7 per hour cleaning windows. Must be able to work two 9 hour shifts t;ying Sunday). Call Frank 746. a Inatructon: Certified instructors to teach all levels. Experience Dreferred - 747- 1044. Ra!8@ uh+ position available - part time weekdays with occasional Saturdays. Retail .experisnce an asset. Ail students welcome reply in person to Karen-Quinn Strttionary 50 Webstmount Rd. N. Westmount Place, Wa. tsrioo Ontario N2L 2R5.

Waled - sprkrg Break sales .r8pre#ntativs. Average 83,500 commiSsions working part-time, flexible hours, plus free vacations to Cancun, Bahamas, 8ermuda, Rio, etc. Cal t Vacation Planners l -800-47-PARTY. cOn@arnad a&& the impacts of science and technology on society? Consider writing an article for “Pugwash”. Call Andrea 747-l 808. Nude models for Fine Arts Department Studio classes. No experience necessary. 81ooO per hour. Please

apply to ECH 1206.

person - part time, flexible hours in small friendly office, must have experience on MSWORD. An ideal position fdr a person who enjoys variety and an opportunity to learn new skills. Please send resume or telephone to: Richardson Consulting Limited, m Weber St. N., Suite 5 Waterloo N2V 1K4, or phone 747Voluntiiorthe.tandlordandTenant Information Off ice (lTIO),(previously known as the Legal Resource Office (MO)) located in CC 150B, and get involved. Trsining~ssions given. Call Paul at 888-0128.

AVAILABU

If you commut8 from Brantford or P&s daily and -Id like to share ridsa, plsm call. Adrienne at 7562169.

Wvrd8 -money $fofessionat ment processing: Telephone .4315 after &oO pm. for information.

docu742-

more

sp@z8d page t’H type resumes, essays, reports, ~!etters, theses. Fast efficient service. Westmount-Erb area. Phone 886-7153. 35 yeara experienc&. .95 d.s.p. typewriter/$l 25d.s.p. &processor; Erb & Westmount &a. Cati 743-3342.

For

m

35

PLRSOWALS

Word Pm

RID8

22, 1989

duuM8

Word P~OCUS!~

Essays, Theses, resumes, etc. L8#8r qua tity printer, spetkheck. Have medical terminology. On campus &&very and pickup. Call Sharon 656-3387.

l

Fast, professIonal

word processing by University Grad (English). Grammar, spelling, corrections availabk3. Laser printer. Suzanne, 886-3857. Fast, accurate typing and letter quality word processing. Resumes, essays, theses, business reports. FRee pickup and delivery. Cal! Diane, 5761284. ,Typing rsnlce - letter qdity, spellcheck, fast service. CalI about Fall Resume-special. 669-2491 for info and prices. e

Two wr8 housemates wan-d: Sept 1989 througti June 1990. Intervieti prior to acceptance. Large furnished house locatad within 1 mile of University. Waa&?r/&yar parking - I R8nt 8300 per month aach. AM utiliti8s included. Call 888-0$8X UnlveiMy and Glenri&e. four bedroom house on cuj-de-sac, bordering park. Two and one haff baths, finished basement with firapiace, ingrwnd pool (care incl) centrat air, drapes, five appliances. 1 ZOO/m0 plus utitities. Tel: 884-2732 or 885-4670. Accomod8tlon rvllkble for f8mate non-smoker, share kitchen and bath with one Other. Parking availabie, Waterloo CalI 744-2864 t8W8 m8StBQ8.

RunmIng krddy needed. 5-mile runs, approximately 8 l/2 min/mi. Pace, prefer 630 - 830 am. Daily. Call Debbie: 885-0377.

PhH080phy mjon %re invited to a beginning-of-term gathering, HH 378, Friday, SeDt 23, 3:30 Dm. ACCKWA, AIDS Committee of Cambridge, Kitchener/Waterloo and Area is a volunteer organization dedicated to providing education and support for individuals and the community about the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). We provide an information, referral and counselling hotline: 7418300, Monday to Friday, 1Q:OO am. 500 pm., 7:00 pm. - 11 :OO pm. If you would like more information - call ua, or drop in to our House, at $86 Queens Blvd., Kitchener. Get the facts about AIDSI At the Sexuality Resource Centre, we don’t know 8v8rythiryl...no one does! Howuvar we have the resources ?o find the answers. You have the right to km! Whether in person or in writing...ask us! SK x2306 CC 206. N WU & hgs. We have everythiw from fart spray to rubber chickens. What’s What gifts and WDities, 41 King N. Uptown W%twtm er 15Q King W. downtown Kitchef!#r, 745-7976. Chau nuta chess partner(s) wanted. Phone 742-0380 ask for Jan. Gay urk, V8W $UC&8SSfUi but k@&y, wishes to mat?t Qav or bi-ma!8 for social outings, ski& shows and cornpsnionshio. Serious calls oniv &ease Taiaoare: 24 hours a day, 7 days a w88k. We’re an anonymous, cc&identist telephone d&tress line. Loneb? Worried? Troubled? Call us .658-&35 (local call). Day or Night1 Letoraomething different? How about &do as 8 recr&tion or competi-

tive sport with Asahi Judo Club. CaH 743-4998. Club Nemmb, Sept 23, at the ‘Loo, 900 pm. HI th8r8I Exchange student from U.S. with 12 year old son would like to meet other single parent for socializing, childcare exchange, friendship, etc. Matthew - 888-o359.

Pro-Choke

over rS0 choicel_“Citizens for Choice” is committed to the right of every woman to make raiionel decisions about her own body and for every child to be a wanted child. For more information write to: Citizens for Choice. P.O. 80x 372, Station C, Kitchener N2G 3Y9.

Contwt Lsru Research: Centre for Contact Lens Research requires subjects. Receive fr88 tenses or 8898. Contact Kelly x 4742, 207.

Opt.

LOST 1 be!

my umbrella @tack with a hand18) on the first f ti d the Engineering L8ctur8 Halt (lou*) on September 14. If you found it call rn8 at 725-0823 (James)or turn in at the Turnkey Desk.

Wooden

it

PWWD

Shirt h Bombshelter, on Wednw September 6, derscribe it and its y&a. 746-5814.

sept

Mmey clip found on 11 outside ML. Name the country it was bought in . and its yours - Andrew/Cynthia 744+ 7720.

L

HtDAY,

SLPTCMBLR

22

-DAY,

im’t th8 foundation Of %I1religions th8 same? For informal discussion on th8 above topic, s8e you toniaht at 8100 pm. CC rm. 110 - Baha’i Club. .

tNDSA lnvltes you to attend our “Back in Black” party, tonight, PAS 3005 (Psychology Bldg) at 9:OO pm. -

SRPbfM8ER

Pa

WU-AY

begin today, 1:30- 3:30pm. and 6:308:30 pm. Check cuI8ndar for tomorrow and Thursdw+‘fw tier times. Cinamr Gti presents: “Hell Untimited”, follow&d w “Educating Rita”, showtime is 9:30 pm. in the Campus Centre Grest !-@Il, admission is free. Please come ew to help move the furniture and emre a flood sea??

Polltlc~rl

SATURDAY,

SLPTEMBLR

22

Elora Antlque

show & sale {in Kitchener Memorial Auditoriumnew addition). Today and tomorrow see the finest antiques, sample wine, cheese and specialty coffees. For more information catl 888-6723 or 885-4038.

“Original

Blur&g - my studies with Matthew Fox” A talk given by Hala Piekarski, student of the “silenced” dominican priest who’s “Creation Spirituality” was deemed too unorthodox by the Vatican. Come hear about his ideas on creativity, personal empowerment and heating for citizens of “overdeveloped” First World countries, like ours, at 1l:OO am. Waterloo County Unitarian Fellowship, 136 Allen Street East, Waterloo, all are welcome.

Sclm Students: attend this workshop designed primarily for you. Learn how to make effective use of the Library, a@‘discover reference mate&Is that or@ most useful for Political Science ress%rch. Meet at the Dana ,Porter Library Information Desk at 1:30 Dm. Chemkal

Writing a term paper or doing r-arch in chemistry or biochemistry? Learn how to locate current journal articles or books on a topic using the print&Chemical Abstracts. Meet at the tnformation Desk, Davis Centre Library, II:30 am.

WEDNESDAY,

In: Assertion Training, Career Planning, Reading and Studying Skills, interview Training, Time enagement, etc. are being offered

by Counselting Services. If you are interested, please come to Counselling Services, NH 2080 (directly opposite Renistrar’s office) to sian UD.

improve

study ski Ils in areas such as:

notetaking, effective listening, study techniques and effective management skills. Each workshop lasts for 4 weeks. Interested students can register at the reception desk in CounselIing Services, Needles Hall, room 2080 or call extension 2655. Classes

SEPTEMBER

27

improve study skills. Today classes begin 9:30 - 1130 am. amd 1:30 3:30 pm. For more information see Calendar for Tuesday, September 26. Amn88Q InternrtlOnal, presents Joyce Dipale speaking on “South Africa: A Human Rights Crisis” Joyce of inter-church Coalition on Africa (and originally from Soweto) discusses recent events in her homeland. CC. 135 at 8:00 pm. Everyone welcome. Economk

Workshop&

Abatircb:

Studmta:

Attend this Library workshop designed primarily for you. Learn how to make effective use of the Library, and discover reference materials that are most useful for Economics research. Meet at the Dana Porter Library Information Desk at 3:30 pm.

ClaadcUl

Lute concert for free today

at 123Opm. in the Conrad GrebetCollege Chapel 1Terry McKenna, resident lutenist with the Stratford Shakespearean Festival and instructor at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto, launches the 1989-90 noon hour concert series. For more information ca II 8850220.

“Keeping warm 8s an Artform, Quilting Past and Present” is the title of Doon Heritage Crossroads Fall lecture series. Tonight, between 7:30 and 900 pm., learn all about the quilts in Doon’s historic collection with a slide show and presentation by Professor Nancy Lou Patterson. For more information, call 748-l 914.

CASI

(C&ndl~r Aaronautics 8nd Space Institute) general m8mbership meeting, new. members ‘w8lcome. l&ay in the Davis Centre Rm. 1307 11 m-1 2:30.

Wednesday

information.

‘idormauon

Improve

FenMet

Poetq

Calf 884-GLOW

VdCOm8.

WaterAit are for mm

*iUs. Class begins today 930 - 11:30 am. For more information see Calendar for Tuesday, September 26.

Dkusrkn Group. Meets every Wetiaday from 7m to B:& pm at Global Community Centra. Topic and group varyweeklyso that d?I

BumfIt film for “Global Community Centre” at the Princess Cinema showing tonight at 700 pm. “House full of Smoke” a documentary with interviews of death squad members from Guatamata, Hondoras, and El Salvador, and interviews with Nicaraguan Contra teaders juxtaposed with testimonies of their- victims. ,Cost is 8d/S6.

women 8re welcome anytime. more information 579-3941.

Accounting

rtudy

in room 110 nf .fh~ Cam-

pug Ce-rrke at the UnjksSw& 104 ffam SO0 to ft:OO pd

Students:

Attend this Library workshop designed primarily for you. Learn how to make effective use of the Library, and discover reference materials that are most useful for Accounting research. Meet at the Dana Porter Library Information Desk at 2:30 pm.

Scrabble

phyer’wlub meeting at 7:30 pm. in the MC 3012. Bring boards & dictionaries. Phone 579-3695 for details. Visitors, beginners, other languages wekome. English, French, Russian, & Hebrew boards available,. for play. Sexual Harassment in the Workplace. Free public lecture by Bonnie dobinchaud, winner of 1987 Supreme Court decision against Dept. of National Defense. 7:30 pm. Siegfried Hall, St. Jerome’s Coltege. Tickets available fro& Women’s Studies 885121 1 ext. 6886.

“Amblyopir”-

dlmneaa of sight with no apparent cause, is the subject of tonights free lecture by Dr. K.J. Ciuffreda, professor of vision sciences, State University of New York, in room 347, the third floor lecture amphitheatre. Ootometry.

Everyone welcome! Caribbean Stu dents Association (CSA) meetings every Tuesday at 5:30 pm. in the CC. room 135.

GLOW [Gays and Lesbians of Waterloo) operates a coffee house every

for

Laymen’8

Evangelical fellowship Bible Study. CC 11 Oat 7:30 pm. All are W&xNn8. Cdl 884-5712 for more inform&on. Play Goof Beginners are invited to Go B.C. -Matthews Hall, room 1040. Free admission, regular playing. time 7:30 pm. Ca II 8804424.

are we. Skateboard enthudto vieit the program a@ find out what aii the excitement id ‘&out. For -8

WmYn’S GfOup - meets in CC 135 (usually) %t 8:30 pm. Come out and enjoy movie nights, educational evenings, dances, road trips and casual discussions. For weekly events call 884-GLOW or listen to 94.5 FM, Thursdays from 6-8 pm. FASS writer’s meetings every Thurs- , day ami Sunday at 890 in MC 5045. Help US write our annual musicatcomedy extravaganza, and join in the fun. Everyone is welcome,

88&f

XX).

The American Po8tfv Association is ho1ding.a contbst offering a grand prize of $1000 and a first prize of $500. Poets may enter t’he contest by sending ‘up to SIX poems, each no more,t han 20 lines, name and address on each puge, to American Poetry Association, Uept CT-70, 250A Potrero Street,. P-0. Box 1803, Santa Crur, CA 95061-t 803. Poems must be postmarked by December 31.

d8SSeS,

THURSDAY

till

contest!

AWWOUNC8YPWTS Nomhatlons

are requested for the following seat on the University Senate, to be filled by a by-election. At least ten (10) nominations are required. One (1) full-time undergraduate Science member (term form May 1, 1989 to April 30, 1990). Nomination forms and further information are available from the Secretariat at extension 6125. Nominations should be sent to the Chief Returning Officer, Secretariat, Needles Hall. room 3060, no later than 3:DO brn. Friday, September 29, 1989. An election will follow if necessary,

SUNDAY

Laymen’s Evangelical Fellowship ening service. 163 UniversityAve. Apt 321 (MSA) at 700 pm. All welcome. Call 884-5712 for more formation.

evW., are in-

2-DAY PREP SEMINAR The exam for ~01)s with Canada’s drplomalx servce. IS October 21. Find out about the only semtnar to prepare lor thts competition. taught by former forergn Service Officer Barry Yeates q 5 years in operation wtth encellent success rate cOvers all aspects of the applsallon. exam and IntervIew process prowcles sample questlons. lest-taking bps and mlervlew adnce Includes up-lo-date study krt ~1 trade, aid, rmmlgratlon, geopolrlics and economic rssues l

OHGOING

UVLNTS

l

El Salvador Information Off ice, where you c8n get information about the current social, political and economic situtation in our country. You can visit us at Forest Hill .United Church, 121 Westmount Road East, Kitchener N2M 4Y6, Monday, Wednesday and Friday 7:00 pm. to 9:W pm. and Saturday 500 pm. to 900 pm. Or calI usat 743-54811 K-W Accera-Abil ity needs volunteers for their bi-weekly regularly scheduled programmes for the physically challenged, also for bi-monthly fundraising bingos. For more information please call Chris at 885-6640 between 900 am. and 5:00 pm. area’s first “Attitudes” this skateboard facility located at Albert

l

l

2-day Seminars Across Canada !hpCom~r 2I -6chb*r 39 Halrfax. Montreal, Ottawa. Krngston, Toronto. Waterrloo. Saskatoon. Edmonton, Calgary, Vancouver and Vtctoria Seminar Fee (tax deductrble): Sponsored student - $120 Other student - $135. Non-studenl

-

$150

Study Kit only: $45 (+ $8 postage) payable by advance money order Into:

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1989-90_v12,n10_Imprint