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Feds leave frosh unlubricated by Judy HoIIands Imprint 8taff The Federation of Students’ decision to not include small packages of lubricant gel with the condoms in frosh kits has left the Sexuality Resource Cetitre well lubricated and confused, Early in August, Al Wadley and Lynn Acri, co-ordinators of the Sexuality Resource Centre, along with Peter Myers from the Health and Safety Resource Net work and Dave Empey of the AIDS Awareness Commission, approached the Feds to suggest that a package of lubricant accompany the condoms in the frosh kits. Wadley says using a lubricant with condoms decreases the risk of breakage and increases sensation, which could encourage more students to use condoms. Overall, he says lubricants help to further protect people from pregnancy and STDs. The Feds initially approved the request and agreed to help cover part of the cost. Thirtyfive hundred small packages were ordered, at a cost of seven cents each, for a total of $245. Two weeks later, Wadley was informed by Federation of Students that the lubricant would not be included in the frosh kits after all. “At the time I was disappointed,” Wadley commented, “but I recognize that people have strong views regarding sexuality.” Tim Collins, vice-president (operations and finance) and Dave McDougall, the orientation coordinator, told Wadley that they had received extreme objections about ‘inclusion of the lubricant from over 25 people. He was told some people objected te it as they felt lubricant promotes homosexual behaviour, and others that it d@es not benefit Lesbians. He addressed /

these concerns in a letter to the editor, published in this issue. It was Wadley’s understanding that the Feds changed their minds because of these objections. “It seemed to me their major concern was avoiding a controversial situation.” When asked about the reversal latef, Tim Collins said the condoms in the frosh kits were already lubricated. He said the’ lubricant which was ordered by the Aids Awareness Commission was not spermicidal, and that if it had been they would have included it. Collins said they felt frosh would “abuse” the tubes oflubricant, adding that, “it wasn’t the people complaining that was my biggest concern, it was that students were aware of what they are getting, because if you spend that much money on something, you want to make it a good product .” The frosh kits do contain pampWets explaining how to use both condoms and lubricant. The packages-already ordered will be distributed from the Sexuality Resource Centre, and during a sexual awareness week planned for early fall, when the Feds are trying to get “Sex with Sue”, the QIOT radio show in which Sue gives sexual advice over the phone. The Feds plan to distribute spermicidal gel with condoms in next year’s frosh kits. Collins said he thought, there would be “too much abuse (of the lubricant) in the first year. With long term planning, it will make .it more effective.” , According to Walter Wilson, education director of Aids Committee for Cambridge, Kitchener-Waterloo and Area (ACCKWAj, the Feds should have included lubricant with the condoms in the frosh kits. “Con-

dom failure is caused by improper use’, and improper lubrication is a major problem,” he told Imprint. Proper condom use includes putting some lubricant inside in the tip and also lubricating the outside, Wilson explained that extra lubrication increases sensitivity and pleasure for both partners. He emphasized the need to change negative feelings about using condoms to help promote safe sex practices. Most important is that extra lubrication protects against condom breakage and thus protects people from STDs, particularly AIDS, both Wilson and Wadley stressed. When asked if it was a good idea for Feds to include lubricant. in next year’s frosh kits, Wilson responded: “Yes, next year is fine. But what about this year? ,Are this year’s students not important enough to be educated to prote.ct themselves? This is a big opportunity for the Federation of Students to show that they care.” Concerning spermicidal lubricant, Wilson had some serious reservations. He said this type of lubricant is very difficult to find in Ontario. He would rather see the Feds promoting something more’available to students. Wadley was unable to find spermicidal lubricant in any of the several drugstores he checked. Wilson said spermicidal lubricant is most often bought in large tubes. “Can you imagine a girl going to Fed Hall trying to fit this large tube in her purse? It is not very discreet .” Spermicidal foams, used in combination with a condom for contraceptive purposes, are more effective than lubricant, Wilson stated. Josee Duffhues, co-ordinator of the Waterloo Regional Health

’ A hAmated comiom is not enough, Waker W~ISO~ O~ACCKWA c says. Unit aids program, echoed Wilanyone. Respondingto Federason’s words. “The final word on tion of Student plans to use sperlubricant next fall, using additional spermicide is micidal not in.” In fact, she said some Duffhues commented: “They recent studies have shown that it should double check the literamay be an irritant to many ture befowe they go ahead. 1 wish they had called me first.” women. Irritants can cause small cuts The Ontario Ministry of in the vagina, which may actuHealth Aids Hotline said the ally allow the HIV virus to enter more lubrication you use, the more easily. Duffhues emphasbetter when trying to prevent ized that it is for this reason that condoms from breaking and prothey definately do not recomtecting yourself against the mend using spermicidal lubriAIDS virus. “If it’s a message cant for anal. sex.. (Twenty-five about safe sex that they are tryper cent of females participate in ing to get across, they should inanal sex, according to Duffhues). elude a sample of lubricant with A water ‘based, non-spermicida1 lubricant will not irritate the condom*”

Paper recycling BY Judy Hollands Imprint staff The university has made a minor step forward in its recicling efforts. Starting in September, Plant Operations will extend its fine paper recycling program, while plans for recycling of pop cans, glass, and nedspaper are no further ahead than they were last November. Currently UW separates fine paper (which includes bond, stationary, computer printout paper, photocopier paper, tablet sheets and white envelopes without windows) from other wastes. Rudy Molinary of Plant Operations explained that whereas before they were focusing on high output areas, “we are now zeroing in on individual offices.” The new fine paper recycling effort is run on a voluntary basis. Departments which want to participate request boxes for individuals so they can deposit their recyclable paper in a main white box in their area. The white boxes are collec.ted and taken to Central Stores, where they are taken away by a contractor for processing.

.

expanded

Meanwhile’, . other recyclable waste produced on campus -. over 110 tons a year -continues to be dumped tit local landfill sites, Plant Operations and Laidlaw Waste Systems Ltd., are still trying to work out a campus recycling system. According to Rudy Molinary, the main problem is finding funding for the program. Efforts to implement a recycling system at UW have been underway since February 1988, when the Waterloo Public Interest Research Group (WPIRG) began campus-wide recycling. The WPIRG program ended when plant operations informed them that Laidlaw Waste Systems Ltd., the company holding the waste disposal contract with UW, was interested in recycling. It has been nearly a year since the WPIRG program was stopped, and the university is no closer40 implementing a system to replace it. The university’s tardiness has frustrated many groups and individuals on campus, causing some people to set up their own recycling projects, The Turnkeys are running newspaper, tin and, glass recycling in the Campus Centre, using the same bins WPIRG used

to use. In contrast to other recycling at UW, chemical waste recycling is established and working well. Scott Nicol is departmental manager and senior storage keeper in charge of treating and packaging all chemical waste generated on campus (that does not include radioactivq. waste). Nicol explained, “we take chemicals from originating labs who have no further use for them and if they are reuseable, match them up with other labs which need them.” This effort reduces the amount of waste which must be disposed of, and also reduces the amount of chemicals the university has to buy. They also distill solvents to make them reusable and encourage waste segregation (the separation of non-ch.lorinated chemicals from ones cojntaminated by chlorine). Their efforts reduce the total volume of chemicals which must be incinerated. The chemical waste recycling program was started six years agd, and has improved and expanded ever since. They now classify and safely ship almost all chemical waste produced on campus.

,


TRANSIT PASSES

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for $110.00 for 3 Months.

To get a pass you need: 1) Valid University I.D. 2) $110.00 in cash, money order: or certified cheque made payable to FEDERATION OF STUDENTS 3) A Kitchener Transit Photo which may be obtained on Sept. 6th and 11 th from 1 O-2 in the Campus Cenfres Great Hall and on Sept. 15 from 1 O-2 in CC 138. Past photos from Kitchener Transit may be used. Passes are available as well from the Fed Office in CC235 from September 6-l 5 between 1O:OO and 4:OO

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NEWS

bFint,

Friday,

September

I, 1989,

3~

UW .gallery ho Ids.,massive lotter by Michael Salovaara Imprint staff

works purchased by the university and the Gazette (which purchases works.,from graduating fine arts students], and gifts from various_ embassies and in-, dividuals. Unfortunately, this showing was held during the month of August, when most students are away. However, a casual browsing of the campus will allow the art enthusiast to view most works. The gall&y also holds regular exhibits. This fall’s showings are: - “Generation/Regeneration: Mrs. John E. Brubacher et al 19894827" from September 14 to October 15. This-exhibit, by

Every three years, all the art work owned by the university is gathered for a showing and then redistributed throughout the campus. To ensure that no one department covets the best pieces, UW art gallery administrator Earl Steiler organizes a massive art lottery. A representative of each department draws a number indicating his or her “picking” position - the first person has first pick and the hundredthperson looks through what’s left over. The gallery’s collection are

fine arts professor Jane Buyers and local artist Susan D. Shantz, is a creative tribute to Mrs. Brubacher, the original settler of what is now the UW campus; - “Images of the Canadian Landscape”, a photbgraphy exhibit by four local photographers, which runs from October 19 to November 19; - “Images of Allegory”, an exhibit of paintings by architecture professor Anu Banerji, on display from November 23 to December 17. The UW art gallery, located in Modern Languages, is open from 11:OO a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday to Friday, and 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 wp.m. on Stinday. *

“Untitled”

“Ahgels

watching

over

me (death

of Malcom

X, 1987)”

by Tim

Perlich

by Margaret

Hagey

photo by Suoml

L

Single by Carissa

Imprint

Cameron

ataff

The growing concern on campus for getting students to make informed choices in sexual matters has prompted an imaginative alternative for this year’s orientation week. . Instead of the traditional “sex talk” given by the nurses at Health Services, frosh will be treated to a play comtiissioned especially for them on the subjects of sexual awareness, birth controt, pregnancy, sexual harassment, date rape, sexually transmitted diseases, AIDS, and alcohol abuse. 5 The Twin Cities Theatre Company was commissioned this summer by the Federation of Students, Student Life Committee, Dean of Students and Health and Safety to write Single and Sexy, a play specific to .the students of Waterloo focusing on the issues ,and choices that are characteristic of being a fro&, a *student and sexually active, “It has been a lot of futi,” says Wendy Farrant, the facilitator for the company. “We’ve approached the play from a collective point of view, This has allowed us to draw from our personal experiences in order to create material for the script. “The eight actors in the compariy have developed characters who represent types of people who could be at risk in sexugl situations because of their backgrounds, personalities and experiences. Since these subjects tend to be considered socially we’ve incorpoemt;arrassin& ratdd as much comedy as we can to break the ice - but we cbnstmtly have to . be aware of the

a-nd ‘sery? fine line between being truthful without or -. - being _-overbearing being funny without saying anything.” Farrant adds, “Learning about sex should be entertaining, As a group the collective has made the encounters with these issues positive, optimistic, ,and informative. There are always choices and options in life and it’s the right to know about ’ individual’s them and to exercise them before a crisis evolves. The only thing we don’t give are the answers.

you have to come to them yourself, “Hopefully our most substantial accomplishment will be to encourage communication. One of the strongest directives that Health Services gave us was to show that communication can clear up a lot of misconceptions that can lead to mistakes.*’ Single and Sexy is being shown in the Theatre of the Arts on Thufsdav, September ? at lo:30 a.m. Everyone is welcome. Condoms at the door,

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Masters

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TO BE ANNOUNCED TO BE ANNOUNCED

Other 89190

TO BE ANNOUNCED

Sept.

Engineering

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NOTE

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This is the photo of you that will be used for your yearbook and class composite. Please make every effort to attend.

official graduation portrait faculties this semester:,

20

pwtos

3rd. Floor Lounge

1

in front of ASU Office

!

TO BE ANNOUNCED TO BE ANNOUNCED TO BE ANNOUNCED TO BE ANNOUNCED

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4A

Imprint,

Friday,

September

1989

1,

COMMENT

.

Exploring’ the . politics of sex

’ .

Lubricant seems to have turned out to be too hot to handle for the Federation of Students, Plans to include packages of it in the frosh kits have beep scrapped - after they had given it the go-ahead, and the Sexuality Resouice Centre had ordered 3500 tubes of the slippery stuff. Imprint was unable to establish the exact reason for scrapping it. The Feds started out saying that they had received too many complaints about it. They are now saying that because it was not a spermicidal lubricant, they did not feel it was necessary, as the condoms were already lubricated. However, information from the Sexuality Resource Centre, the Waterloo Regional Health Unit, the Ontario Ministry of Health, and the AIDS Committee of Cambridge, KitchmrWaterloo and Area all confirmed- that: 1) the more lubricant you use with acondom the better,, as it reduqes chance of breakage, and 2) if you want a spermicide, a foam is recommended over a lubricant. Did the Feds research their decision before they made it? It appears not. VPDF Tim ColIins mentioned the lubricant’s cost as a rea- 4 son for canning it, saying that if ‘tyou spent that muchmoney on something, you want to make it a good product.” First off, the lubricant was not expensive. At seven cents a tube for 3500 tubes, that only amounts to $245. Furthermore, health organizations have pointed out that spermicidal lubricant, which the Feds deem a “good product” (Collins said they would have used it if‘they could get it] is not a good-product. It’s hard to find, an irritant to some women, potentially harmful for anal intercourse, and not anywhere near as effective as spermicidal foam in preventing pregnancies. So why the interest in it? Perhaps they needed to find what would appear to be a rational,. concrete reason for dumping something they expected would be controversal. There was a big uproar when condoms were put in the fresh kits four year? ago. Were the Feds reluctant to deal with a potential lubricantuproar? Is the idea of making sex more pleasurable too much for them even though lubricant aIs0 makes it safer? Apparently, the Feds received complaints that including lubricant in the frosh kits would promote homosexual behaviour. It .could only be perceived as promoting homosexuality to those who are uninformed as to its use, These people are probably the ones who should receive the lubricant, along with the pamphlet that explains its benefits to anyone who uses condoms. So frosh, if you want to be sexually active, but are concerned about pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, drop by the Sexuality Resource Centre in the Campus Centre for your sample tube of lubricant. They’ll look out for you even if the Feds won’t. Flew Macqueen

1Contribution

List 1

I

Cameron, J. Hagey, Angela Heeds, Lynn Hoyles, Shirley-Anne Off, Melinda-Ann *Pollard, Andrew Rehage, Josephine Rezo, Marie Sedivy, Jeff Smith, Renate Staedel, Al Wadley, Jennifer Waiti, Derek Weiler, Justin Wells, Chris Wodskou,, John Wynen, John Zachariah. Carissa

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Dlatributilm

it’s

up to YOU *

Students: “But this question Most of you are-probably imwasn’t covered in class! That’s patient to begin the next, and not fair!!+’ possibly most important, phase Professor: “Well, the material of your lives: post secondary education. Congratulations! You . needed to solve that was discussed several times . ; .I’ have chosen to do so-at one of the Students; “But you never did an most reputable and demanding example question like that!!” universities that Canada has to Professor: “Okay. I’ll devalue offer - particularly if you are that question.” enrolled in engineering or mathematics. The professor himself is on& But is the best that Canada has partially responsible for the outto offer necessarily the best? Is it come of this scene. He is being even good? These are questions coerced by the mentality inthat I have been forced to ask stilled in the student body by the myself during the .recent years system as a whole: -everybody that lead to my own degree. I who is competent shall pass the have no doubt that the education course. The more people they can I received (in computer science) push through, the more funding was thorough and substantial. they will get. But in retrospect, most of that University educatioti, as I pereducation came on work terms. ceived it before arriving here, My misgivings are not with was a noble thing. It took the the overall education one rebest young minds in the country ceives here, but with the pttitude and filled them. St retched them of many students, andone that is in new directions and bestowed catered to by many of the faculty upon them the gift of self suffimembers. ciency. Qntario universities have rePerhaps it still does, but the cently come under fire for being testing methods belie that, Testlittle more than degree mills. ,ing is not geared to expose the Most government funding is student to new situations and based on the number of students examine their abilities to apply attending, so it is little won&r in what they have learned. Rather, these days of flagging support most of the testing in technical th&t the universities respond by subjects is little more than a mix trying to inflate the enrollment. of memory testing gnd a game of But what does this do to the one-of-these-things-justquality of education? doesn’t-belong-here. One effect of the resulting low One difference between high budget, high enrollment mentalschool and university education ity can be felt in the testing poliis supposed to be the emphasis cies of this and other that- universities place on the universities. Consider a typical student’s responsibilitv for his post-mid-term classroom conown educatioh. Ideallv,?he moreversation: mature, sophisticated mind of

the university student no longer needs the hand holding and spoon feeding prevalent in the high school system. Qne profe$sor’, instructing a fourth year computer course, assumed that the students would read the relevant chapters in the - text beforehand, and ran the lectures as a discussion group. I loved it. IJnfortunately, he was trashed on the course ‘evaluations because he didn’t teach anything. So, what kind of advicecan I give to the fresh-faced, enthusiastic student lookingforward to the style of education that I once anticipated? Remember that are responsible for your own education, regardless of what the hapless clods around you seem to believe. Treat the professors; like a resource to help you when you’re having trouble. They are l.ike the wise mountaintop gurus: they can point you in the right direction, but you have to do the work yourself. In that light, don’t expect the lecturer to teach you. Be prepared. Read the text before the lecture, If you end up with a jerk as a prof, it’s better to learn the material regardless, rather than join in with the self pitying masses who feel they’re being .short-changed. What advice do I have for those of you who are here as an extension, to high school, interested only in the higher salary a. Bachelor of Something can demand? Drop out. You’re wasting our time. YOU

Jeff Smith

. We’re havlngowflrat &air mE?&tng: I BViday, Septenibe~ 8, at 12:‘OO p.m. - Everyone w&come! Imprint Editxxiail Board Elections wUl be held on ’ Friw, September 15, at 1290 p.m. Both are in the3 Imprint Offbe, Carmpus Centi Room 140.

. . , . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rilch Nicml .

phofagfrphy

_

Fresh.:

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positions on the edUri&l l Assistant Editor l News Editir l Assistant News Editor l Production Assistant l Features Editc~r

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of Imprint Publications 8purts Editor AMslant Sporti Editor

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Won’t be induded

in the frosh kits

Lube rubs students- wro.ng- way ity Resource Centre, Health and Safety Resource Network and I am writing about something AIDS Awareness Commission that was not part of the package that approached the Federation (frosh kit) given to this year’s of Students with a request that incoming students - a small they share in the cost of the lubpadkage of lubricant. The lubriricant. The request was initially cant would have accompanied ~ approved, but approximately two weeks later I was informed the condoms that were part of by Tim Collins (Vice-President, the frosh kit. The reason for giving a conQperations and Finance, Federadom to each new student was tion. of Students) and Dave presumably to promote responMcDougall (Orientation Coordisible behaviour among sexually nator] that there had been exactive students. Using condoms treme objections to the inclusion reduces the likelihood of unof the lubricant from more than planned pregnancies and the 25 people, Because of these obtransmission of sexually transjections, no lubricant was almitted diseases (including lowed in the frosh kits. AIDS). I am not criticizing Tim or Lubricant would have made Dave for the decision they made. the condoms more effective by I have a lot of respect for both of reducing the chance 0.f them them and the jobs they are doing. breaking. It would also have I recognize that the Feds are acmade it- more likelv that concbuntable to the entire student doms would be used& the future body and they want to avoid because the greater pleasure excontroversial situations. perienced when lubricant is used This letter is written mainly to (by males or females) reduces the 25 or so people whose objectheir resistance to condoms. tions kept the lubricant out of In early Augu<t I was one of the frosh kits, and consequently several people from the Sexualincreased the chance of pregnanTo the editor,

ties and STDs among approximately 3,500 first year students. I was told why you objected, but I don’t fully understand the basis of your protest. One objection ~8s that giving students lubricant “promoted homosexual behaviour.” It seems that these people assume that lubricant is only used by homosexuals. Although I don’t know what percentage of lubricant is currently purchased by homosexuals, I do know that lubricant has important potential benefits for heterosexuals. I expect that the majority of new students are heterosexual, and therefore the heterosexual populatiori would have benefitted most from the inclusion of lubricant. Another objection was made by students who identified themselves as lesbians. They stated that putting lube in the frosh kits was sexist -lubricant benefits male homosexuals, but not lesbians. I can’t argue that there was nothing in the frosh kits that specifically benefitted lesbians, but

REM I not sexist! Well,

made it through the first few pages of news and many pe’ople turn to first in Imprint - the Forum pages. These pages’are aptly named; within them, both our readers and writers express their opinions in a forum for discussion. Here are found our heated debates on feminism, politics, religion and leather jacket stealing at Fed Hall, To help you find your way around these pages, we are providing you with this little guide. Editorials are unsigned opinion pieces written by a staff member, often the editor, that are published as the view of the newspaper as a whole. In order for an editorial to be published, members of the editorial board (those people listed in the masthead on page IA] agree that the editorial reflects the paper’s opinion as a whole, _ -. landed

you’ve

To the editor,

in the section

Last year, we published a number of editorials. However, with such a diverse staff, it is difficult to publish editorials that truly reflect the opinion of the paper. We have also found readers prefer signed pieces. Therefore we have recently been publishing comment pieces. Cornmeat pieces are signed editorials. They reflect the opinion of their authors, not that of the whole staff. Columns are pieces that appear in each issue and address a particular topic. Some are opinion piecesi and some are published more for their information value. Currently we publish the columns The Sexual Errquirer, To Your Health, The Voice of Treason, Focus on Feminism, and WPIRG. In order for Imprint to publish a column, we ask that writers bring us five column submissions. We post these in our office for a week, and at the following staff meeting, discuss the column with the writer. Voting staff members (determined by their contributions to the paper) then vote on whether or not to accept the column for publication. The material that appears in the columns is not dictated by us; but “sanctioned” by us, so to speak. The opinions expressed in the column are those of the author, not the newspaper. We occasionally bring columns in for reviews if we feel they are not fulfilling our expectations, or becoming problematic. I am sure you are all familiar with letters to the editor. If something gets you going, write us! However, don’t forget that letters to Imprint cannot exceed400 words without special exception by the editor, Fleur Macqueen. They must be typed, doublespaced, submitted by 6:OO p.m. the Monday prior to publication, and include your name, discipline, and phone number. You can also e-mail us letters (we prefer it!) at Imprint@watmath, bring them in in ASCII format on floppy disks, or type them here in our office, located in room MO of the Campus Centre. If something in the foru,m pages gets you going, don’t blame Imprint as a whole 2 we’re only trying to give people a forum for If something bothers you, write or expression and discussion. come in and see us.

I am beginning with

the outbursts

to get fed up of feministrc

accusations that I have been reading in Imprint lately. I have tolerated Michelle Blais’ writing recently but I feel that the letter entitled “Smut” (July 281, by Ann Race, was not completely necessary. I have seen the video that offended her and, quite frankly, I think it is humorous. The barechested women, [and man, as ‘she omitted), had their breasts blanked out of the video (unless she saw a different version than 1). In my opinion this video is merely mocking censorship. If Miss Race was familiar with the band’s music, she would realize that they are more inclined to this type of attitude than one of sexism. I realize that sexism can be a problem. I ofi;ln wonder though, if these feminists have a severe case of tunnel vision, desperately searching for sexism in everything? All of my female family members and friends are strong, independent women who are unafraid of their femininity or when it shows. They need not search in vain for laccusations against men to justify their . strength or hide their femininity: Il. Roberts 4A engineering (7%&e

are two

versions

of this

video: on uncensored one which shows their bare chests, and Q censored one, in which black bands appear across their chests. -ed.)

I was under the impression that they had a lower risk of getting STDs. If I am underestimating this risk, perhaps we could work together next year to provide a package that would promote safe sex among student of all sexual orientations. I find it unfortunate that the values’, attitudes and opinions of approximately 25 people were

imposed upon 3,500 other students. Maybe some of the Iubricant would have been used by male homosexuals - is that a sufficient reason that heterosexuals can’t be encouraged to have safer sex? Al Wadley Coordinator, Centre

Sexuality

Resource

What is a person? To the editor, “Women shall have equal rights and responsibilities as men” First Unitarian Congregation, Toronto, 1645. As the legal minds of Canada struggle to define and/or-create a new person from a zygote (first stage of a new organism developing from the union of a spermatozoa and an ovum], each of us have a vested interest in the outcome. In law a person is defined as “any human being, corporation or body politic having legal rights and duties.” Canadian women gained this distinction in 1918, federally. Provincially, Saskatchewan and Alberta led the way by granting the vote to women in 1916. Ontario soon followed in 1917, but sadly Quebec was the last of the provincial jurisdic’tions to grant the franchise to women - 1940. (Unhappily the Equal Rights Amendment to the American Constitution is still being struggled for). Lest we take these rights for granted, we can irote that until recently, family law in Ontario defined a wife as a “chattle”. Suggesting many duties and responsibilities but few rights. No matterhow much a woman and her partner look forward to the birth of their child, the fact is that from zygote to well into puberty following birth this human organism is a parasite. Prenatally completely dependent on another person for its health and well-being. Postnatally, a child is completely depend&t upon the- intelligence, vitality and support systems that its parents and society are able and willing to provide. To create a person legally from a prenatal organism would have horrendous implications and consequences.

Imagine

if

you

will this scenario. Anyone involved in procuring or performing an abortion could then be charged with murder or as an accessory to murder. (The way it was!)

Further, a confirmed pregnancy wduld have to be recognized somehow in the nation’s vital statistics. A government agent (a doctor) would have to allocate a number to ensure statistical control. Would a woman having a miscarriage or s$ontaneous abortion have to prove she did not interfere in any way with the health and well-being of this new person? Our various governments having created a new person, dependent on the body politic, could not in conscience, deny an allowance to a pregnant women (zygote rights). Of course in order to ensure the rights of the fetus, bureaucratic regulations could control every waking and sleeping moment of the woman’s and her partner’s existence. hqloreover, a miscarriage would have to be treated as a death, with a funeral service aind formal burial or cremation. Pregnant women would have to be issued dual passports. The bureaucratic nightmares we now have are nothing compared to what could follow. Legalism as being promoted by so-called “Christians” is still based

on a patriarchal-definition

of the nature of deity, i.e. God is male. Union of divine male and mortal’ female to produce superior being.

Few of us want

to see a des-

return to oligarchy and/or potic totalitarianism as norm. We have voluntarily vested too much in the birth democratic and socially just ciety we call Canada.

the inof a so-

Janet May Kitchener

The awful.truth To the editor, In reference “Tunnel vision: (Imprint+

to your story myth or reality?”

July 283, I would

like to

comment. I am “very pleased” that you discovered that the tunnel rumours are false. Thank you for destroying one of the few “legends” this young university has. I suppose that when you found out there was no Santa Claus, you took great pleasure in telling all your friends and spoiling ilt

for them too? Why don’t you spend your time looking for kids with missing teeth, to tell them there’s no tooth fairy, instead of trying to wreck the “sinking library” story or some other”frosh tales”. Sometimes it’s a lot more fun not knowing the truth. Don’t wreck it for the frosh! Greg Gerard Past Chairman V2 Orientation

L


6A

Imprint,

Friday,

September.

FOl$UM:.,

1, 1989

.

Compiled by Jeff Smith Imprint staff Thirty years ago this week: The Cord, our school paper in 1959, did not begin until late October, so there is no news yet!

To the editor, publishing

Twenty years ago this week (as reported in the Chevron): Radio Waterloo (several months short of becoming CKMS) moves from the Campus Centre to the Bauer warehouse at the north end of campus. Chemical engineering leads the way in giving students a voice on the departmental chairman selection committee. T&I years ago this week: UW President Burt Matthews ( so that’s who that building is named for) accepts plans to build a new, $1.7 million environmenta4 studies building. The architecture program is slated to occupy the new digs. The Residential Tenancies Act is scheduled to come into effect in lOctober to patch loophtiles in the Landlord Tenant Act and the Rent Review Act. Student rights are expected to be strengthened. ip six week trial begins on a university bus system that will ferry students between Bauer warehouse (near Sunnydale), UW and Wilfred Laurier. Five years ago this week: A big public speaking coupe is announced: G. Gordon Liddy (of Watergate fame) is booked to speak in the PAC. - Fed President Tom Allison announces that “Federation Hall is a little behind schedule, but we are shooting to be open by the end of October.” (Good guess, Tom. It actually opened in December.)

BetheFIRBT to Write for Imprinf this ferrn!

I am writing to respond to Ann Race’s letter of July 28, entitled, “Smut .” Anti, on behalf of Federation Hall 1 would like to say that we are sorry you are offended by the video you saw on Thursday, July 13. Although I haven’t seen it personally,t aking your description as correct I would say that it is in poor taste. We subscribe to a video distributor that send us video releases every month which they compile, not what we would choose to buy. As manager I do not censor all the music and videos which we purchase, however I will make one observation,, generally the music in terms of lyrics, and videos in terms of pictures, are rampant with pictures that are offensive. Exploitation of women, men and children is not uncommon and the innuendo is quite obvious (i.e. Guns % Roses). However, if we put ours&es in the position of screening all music and videos that are deemed offensive we would have a difficult time filling a week’s worth of programming, Also I do not feel that censoring is part of our mandate in running Fed Hall 1 our job is to provide food, beverage, service and entertainment awording to the wants and desires of our customers. We do not put ourselves in a position to determine what we feel they should be morally exposed to. Here at Fed Hall the D, J.‘s have a sheet that speople use to request a particular song to be played. When there are numerous enough’ requests the D,J,‘s play it. The request list also works in reverse. Chuck McMullan Manager, Fed Hall

.

The Voice of Treason The Frosh Primer See the happy parents cry. Boo hoo hoo. They have brought little Sally and little Johnnie to University. Silly, silly parents, Their babies have grown up. Yes, they have grown up and turned into frosh. Better luck with the next kid, Mr. Jones. See young fresh. See frosh drinkSee frosh get kicked out of the Bombshelter after drinking only two beers. Yes, little ones, the dry days are back. The fear of law suits [not to be confused with birthday suits] has made campus bars afraid to give you alcohol for the purposes of intoxication. As if you liked it for the taste! Silly, silly Feds. But have no fear, .I dan heip. There are many liquor stores (and for those of you who haven’t learned to walk yet, liquor delivery services) who will sell you cheaper booze than the pubs, guaranteed, and they will sell you lots and lots. See frosh with lots and lots. See frosh get drunk. See frosh stay drunk. See frosh miss class. Silly, silly fresh. See frosh go home at Christmas and never come back. (Except for the nephew of the head of Admissions] Oh, well. Plenty more where he came from. See young frosh frolic during frosh week. See cute froshette meet nice fresh, See cute froshette take nice frosh home. Who is this rugged GQtype frosh? Why, he is Derek, Cricket’s friend and loyal companion. He is down visiting from Genawa City U. Silly, silly froshette, Oh well, it

might grow back. And I might be elected the next Pope. See the frosh all get friendly. Touch, touch, touch. See the frosh all get spots in their lower regions, Itch, itch, itch. Golly, what a silly sight. See the condoms at the Sexuality Resource Centre. Whoops, too late for Spots! It looks like it just fell off! At least he didn’t die. Better luck next time at Fed Hall. Well it’s class time and our poor frosh has fallen asleep in the second row. Silly boy. He is within the profs throwing range. That’s okay, though, Health and Safety can help your bruised head. I don’t know who can help your bruised ego. Next time sit in the back row or bring your hockey mask and helmet. Say now, silly frosh, don’t forget to buy your very own underground hall passes. You won’t want to leave home without it. And what about your elevator passes for the libraries? And what about that swamp land, I hear it’s going for a steal! And please! Little boys and little girls, pay attention and avoid the confusion. G+L.IL.O.W. stands for Gay and Lesbian Liberation of Waterloo or some such thing so let’s all be aware and full of knowledge so that we can all live and let live. Well, that’s all for this week, I hope this primer will help you through the next few years or the next couple of days, whichever’comes first. See you soon, kiddies. And remember to stay away from the guy in the clown suit even if his lollipops are free.

t/VPIRG - THE ENVIRONMENTAL/SOCIkL ‘USTICE CONSCIENCE OF CAMPUS

FOCUS The Waterloo Public Interest Research Group (WPIRG) is a student funded and directed research and educational organization. We actively investigate current environmental and social problems and mobilize the resources of the university and the community toward their resolution. The organization strives to act as a bridge between the campus and the surrounding community. WPIRG empowers the public to work for social change by heightening awareness of the problems faced b!f our society, and by increasing knowledge of successful strategies for dealing with such problems. Students play a key role in working with local citizens to improve our community. WPIRG has steadily grown in visibility in the community and throughout the university. Popular education programs organized by WPIRG feature workshops, speakers, film series, conferences, popular theatre, and special forums. Staff and student volunteers frequently address classes, community organizations, labour-councils, government bodies, and university associations. ACTIVITIES On campus WPIRG plays a dual educational role: stimulating student interest in current environmental, technological’and social issues, and helping students turn concern into action. WPIRG seeks to understand the root causes of unnatural environmental imbalances and social inequalities. Through research that is penetrating and easy to understand, discerning analyses of crucial issues are provided for the general public. We’ve researched and produced major publications, including a landmark book on acid rain, a thematic text called The Social Impacts of Computerization, A Citizen’s Guich? to Toxic Waste Disposa/+ and most recently A Citizen’s Guide to Waste Reduction and Packaging. Public Interest Reseafch (our middle name) means getting information into the hands of thle general public. Students take part in research projects aimed directly at helping to overcome a social injustice or environmental problem. Our research projects for this year will focus on food hsues and excess packaging. If you would like to work on a public interest research project, contact Kara at WPIRG. For the past 15 years, WPIRG has been building up its Resource Library with a wealth of books, files, tapes, and magazines on many issues including acid rain, waste management issues, energy, community development, native peoples, forestry issues, and water quality. WPIRG is currently comptiterizing its resource centre and obtaining access to information data bases with other environmental, social justice, peace and labour groups. If you would like to contribute to the development of your resource centre by cataloging, filing, and helping other students access information, contact Cal at WPIRG.

PARTICIPATION WPIRG provides students with the opportunity to get involved. We actively encourage volunteers to take part in all aspects of our 1 programs. Participation in WPIRG can complement your usual work/study load in a comfortable’and meaningful way. You chose the degree of involvement, and at the same time work on issues that promote community interests. WPIRG provides you with the opportunity to organize educa-. tional events for fellow students and the community in our workgroups. Social justice and environmental Workgroup members select topic eventd, speaker&and arrange audio visual equipment. They also prepare press releases, poster& display tables, and handle other logistic details. Talk to Colleen at WPIRG for information on how to get involved., ACT

NOW!

Your

voluntary,

refundable

[during

the

firsIt

three

weeks

of

term) student membership fee of $3.15 per term maintains the office, supports the widely used resource centre!, brings in speakers, film& and entertainer& and pays for a researched, education co-ordinator and resource centre co-ordinator. The elected student Board of Directors is responsible for polilcy, finance, staff, and program guidance. Come to the WPIRG office (room 123 of the General Services Complex, under the smokestack] atid get invoked in the research, education or resource centre maintenance of your organization. .a


\

. Aids Committee

NEWS I

Imprint,

of Cambridge, KW and Area.

munity groups upon r&quest. MacLean and Walter Wilson, director of education and volunteer coordinator, have held information sessions for various church groups, street kids, single women’, and UW’s Sexuality Resource Centre (formerly the Birth Control Centre),

and

How many HIV-infected people do you think there are in Wat erloo region ? Half a dozea, twenty, maybe fifty? Try three hundred! According to Larry MacLean, executive director of the AIDS Committee of. Cambridge, KitchenerWaterloo and Area (ACCKWAI, this figure is a conservative estimate. ACCKWA was founded by an AIDS sufferer in 1985, and was run completely by volunteers until it was awarded a grant by the Dntario Ministry of Health six honths ago. At that time, it opened its office at 886 Queen Boulevard in Kitchener, ‘and hired two fulltime employees. They recently hired a fundraiser using money from the Trillium Fund, a foundation which redistributes unclaimed lottery wins to non-profit organizations. ACCKWA plans to use some of its funds to help build an assisted housing project for HIVinfected people. This type of housing project w-ould be unique in Ontario outside of Toronto. This project will give people with AIDS a place to live, and assistance according to how far the disease has progressed. Another major project in the works is an assessment of educational needs of this are& allowing ACCKWA to tailor its programs to the needs it finds. Currently, ACCKWA has been providing -information to com-

ACCKWA members are also training volunteers to work one on one with AIDS patients in a type of buddy system: running a support group for people with HIV, another for partners, family and friends, and one for the volunteers who work directly with AIDS sufferers.

by Judy Hollands Imprint staff Successful lobbying on behalf of Federation of Students and the Wilfrid Laurier University Students’ Union (WLUSU) has convinced the city of Kitchener and the city of Waterloo to subsidize student bus passes this year. A three month pass will now cost students $110.06 ingtead of the regular $130.00a This is the second year the city of Waterloo has given a $10 subsidy for student buss passes. The city of Kitchener’s subsidy is precedent-setting, as they usually consider UW, Laurief, and Conestoga College (Waterloo campus) students under the domain of the city of Waterloo. This year the Feds and WLUSU had the support of Kitchener’s down-

by Angela Heeds Imprint staff

Now that you’ve moved. ALL your stuff into that TINY room, ou’re probably hungry. The folPowing is a guide to all the edible edibles on campus. Federation Hall serves chicken wings, p’izzd, nachos, salads, soups and chili, among other things. It’s fried, fast and filling. Their kitchen hours are 11:30 a+m. to 11:OO p.m. on weekdays, 11:30 a.m. to WOO p.m. on Fridays and 8:00 p.m. to l2:OO p.m. tin Saturdays. The Bombshelter Pub serves Go Pizza stuff, which ipcludes tacos’, hotdogs and sandwiches. They’re open from -noon until 1:OO a%. Monday to Saturday. The Bomber is in the Campus Centre. The Wild Duck Cafe is also lo~ cated in the CC. They have a full - H grill that cooks up breakfast and town business association‘, lunch items. Disregard the cockwhich was a big help in getting roach rumours about that place - they’re just big ants, Kitchener’s support, according to Fran Wdowczyk. South Campus Hall Food SerWdowczyk, Federation of Stuvices: dents vice-president (university The Festival Room is open affairs) commented, “We are from lo:30 a.m. to 7:00p.m, Monpretty proud o.f ourselves. We day through Thursday and until didn’t think we’d get the $10 3:OO p.m. on Friday. They are a from Kitchener.” She added that cafeteria type idea - the selecpaying $110 instead’ of $130 tion is comparable to the Vilmakes a big difference to stulage’s range of food choices but dents, the food quality is a few grades The passes are available at the higher. Fed Office (Campus Centre room Laurel Dining Room is open 235) from September 6-15 beMonday through Friday 31:45 tween 1O:OO a.m. and 4:00 p,m:, a.m. until 200 p.m, It is more of a =provided you already have-Kittrue “restaurant”, chener Transit photo ID. PicPastry Plus is open 7:30 a.m. tures will be taken September 6 until 5:OO p.m. and they serve and 11 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in pastry plus much more - the the CC’s Great Hall, and Sepcoffee and donuts idea. tember 15 in CC 138, 10 a.m. to 2 Burt Matthews Cafe is in Burt p.m. .. Matthews Hall. It’s- open from ACCKWA is celebrating its official opening with a fundraising T lunch at Waterloo’s Uptown Cafe on September 15. Dr. Richard Schabag, Ontario’s chief medical officef, will be the keynote, speaker, The official opening will then take place at their Queen’s Blvd. office. If. you want to volunteer, ACCKWA needs people to work in the office, answering the public’s enquiries, or be buddies for AIDS,p%tients. They have established a vblunteer training program’, and are organizing a training weekend for September 30 and 31, For more informatiori, call their office at 741-8300.

Bus r>ass baraain

Segaember

1, 1989

tA

[ UW, mumheterias ]

ACCKWA gets grant by Renate Staedel Flew Macqueen Imprint staff

Friday,

davs

9:15 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. Davis Centre Food Services: Cafe Bon Appetit is the Davis Centre’g version of a shopping mall food court. They have a Chinese countef, a deli counter, a burg& stand and an ice cream counter. The food’s pretty good and the hours are really good 1O:OO a.m. to 7:00 pm, Monday to Friday. Pastry Plus has Another shop here - it’s open from 7:30 a.m. until 8:OO p.m. Monday to Friday. Village Food Services: Village Grill, located in VT, is open from 8:OO p.m. until 12:30 a.m. Sunday through Thursday. The food’s good and filling but it takes forever to get it! Village Sub Shop has the same hours as Village Grill, and it’s located in V2. They have subs, burgers’, bagels, and really good milk shakes. Toppings Pizza in Vl is beside the Housing Offices. Great pizza and really cheap! Faculty Coffee Shops: Every faculty has as least a C&D (coffee and donuts]. Some are bett& than others - here’s a few wdth mentioning. Math Chid, found in MC 3001A, serves delicious baked goodies, the regular donut varieties, vending machines and ice cream desserts. They also have real food like subs, kaisers and sandwiches, Environmental, Studies Coffeeshop located in the bowels of ES1 (room $38) serves the BEST bagel sandwiches, If you eat at no other C&D this term, at least visit the ES coffeeshop. This message has been brought to you from the Association to Prevent Gastric Disorders in The Villages.

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8A

Imprint,

Friday, September 1, 1989

s

NEWS

1

Linking students past, present and future .

by Josephine Rezo and MelindaAnn Pollard Student Alumni Aesociation The Student Alumni Associatiun (SAA] is a student ruti, volunteer organization affiliated with the Office of Alumni Affairs. The SAA’s mandate is to “link students past, present and future” and it is committed to obtaining a “higher quality of student life.” ’ The majority of volunteers are students in their first to fourth year of studies. We do call upon alumni to help out at events we participate iti, but these alumni originally became members of the SAA when they were students and have maintained their ties with the organization long after graduation. The SAA was the brainchild of Joy Robertg, director of Alumni Affairs. Roberts hired Blair Davies, a fourth year engineering student, during his fall 1984 workterm to *help “create.” the SAA. Davies set up meetings with an advisor from Alumni Affairs, faculty deand, alumni representatives, and members of the administration and student societies to determine how best the SAA could serve the needs of the campus. By the end of its first term in 1984, about 20 students had joined the organization. Traditionally, the SAA participates in every major event on campus. Many of you have probably seen our mascot, Pounce de Lion. He can be seen frolicking at

Student Alumni Association members at an American Conference. most UW events. -Survival Kits (Fl!$SK)- that are - You can have Pounce at your distributed to first year students events by contacting the SAAofduring exams is an SAA profice (888-4626). We are located gram. I won’t give out the details upstairs in South Campus Hall of this program, since it may (SCH) - just follow the up to the spoil ,the surprise, but if you’re Office of Development and really curious, come and join the Alumni Affairs (right beside SAA and find out more about it. Pastry Plus]. The Alumni Lane campaign The SAA is responsible for the was originated by Elizabeth administration of some unique Dunn’, an SAA alumnus from 1 campus events. The Final Exam i988. The 1988 graduating class was the first to donate a tree to the University of Waterloo. The tree was planted just before spring convocatian in May 1988. All graduating students were asked to give one dollar towards their class tree.

The trees are planted in Alumni Lane, the pathway that leads to Bert Matthews Hall.. If you wander by the main steps to the Math and Computer building, you should see both trees. The tradition will continue next year with the tree of the class of 1990.

The SAA alsb participates in many other campus events. In early June, members are called upon to act as ambassadors for Waterloo Weekend, during which alumni from all faculties are invited back for a weekend of fun and re-acquaintance. The SAA act as tour guides, hosts, and decorators among

Imprint will not be published on Friday, September 8. We will resume publlcatlon Friday, September 15. b Super Select&

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other thin:ss for reunion events. Being an - ambassador allows members to interact with many alumni as well as participating in the weekend’s festivities. On Canada Day, the SAA assists as parade marshals as well as ambassadors for campus events. Thlis year we also sponsored the band Sticky Fingers during the evening program. In the fall, SAA members are involved in the planning and organizing of Homecoming, Traditionally, the SAA runs the information booth -during the weekend ,and hosts the reflections pub held at Federation Hall on the Saturday night. Last year’, an SAA reunion was held in the Davis Centre lounge‘, which over 50 SAA members past and present attended. SAA memb.ers also attend conferenccfs in the’united Stateg, visit other SAA organizations at Canadian universities, host alumni gumest speakers, and hold the best Friday afternoon “tea parties” on campus (in the Bombshell:er). We are an energetic group of ‘students bvho are not only committed to our academic life on campus, but also believe in making our sta.y (as well as other students’) at, Waterloo as fun-filled as possible. .We gain great insight to ca.mpus life through our commitments to UW events, as well as gain valuable alumni contacts through our commitment to alumni events. If you’re interested in finding out spore about US, give our office . a call or drop by (remembef, we’re in South Campus Hall). Our- first meeting of the tern is scheduled for Tuesday, September 12, in Needles Hall room 3001, from 4:30 p.m. - 530 p.m. Drop in for coffee, donuts and the beginning of a fun term.

19 years

During the last weeks of July, there were at least three incidents of indecent exposure on the UW campus, which escalated to sexual assault. In the first incident, a man wearing seethrough pantihose exposed himself to two women. In the two following incidents, the man attempted to grab passing women. The incidents took place near the bush areas of the Minota ’ Hagey graduate student residence, where parking Lot “C” is. The suspect is a white male; between :20-25 years of age; between 5’10” and 62” tatl; with a tanned complexion. His hair colour has been described as blond, brown, and black. The suspect wore women’s clothing during the of fences, such as pantihose, a red skirt and a brassiere under a dark Tshirt. There were three reported incidentd, which means there may have been even more. The last reported incident occurred on July 31. >. UW Police are advising students nalt to enter the Minota Hagey area alone. Anyone with any information is asked to call UW Police at 888-4911. UW Police also want to remind people to report any incidents occurring on campus. Last tern& a man confessed to 15 separate counts of exposing himself on campus. However, as the police only had seven complaints on file, they were only able to charge him for those seven. ,


NEW9

Imprint,

Friday,

September

1, 1989

9A

A

CAMPUS

QUESTION What do you know now that you wish you’d known your first day on campus? How to look for housing. Jovan Stupar 4A Civil Engineering

by Marie Sedivy Imprint staff

That tractor-pulling is a varsity sport. Rich Nichol Sports editor, Imprint

What the different fices offer. Laurie McKay part-time student

That the Davis Centre was t’o house my office. Huy Vu Electrical Engineering grad student

of-

Not to answer campus questions! (And that carnivores always have bad breath.) John Wynkm in lit&o Electrical Engineering

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by The Fedwatim

of Students, The Arts Student Union, and Heahh and Safety. I


.WelcOme to; UW sports The University of Waterloo has been recognized throughout Canada for its academic prestige for many years now. But what many of you first year students may not be aware of is that Waterloo is also known for its many interuniversity athletic achievements. Since the start of varsity competition at UW in the fall of 1958, Waterloo has collected many CIAO, OUAA, and OWIAA titles in both individual and team sports. There are the great memories of Waterloo’s spectacular CIAU hockey win of 1974 and the many trips to the Canadian championships for Warrior basketball. Last season, th% Warrior volleyball team came agonizingly close to a CIAU title, but settled for fourth overall. in the nation. The Athena squash team captured the OWIAA crown in 1988-89 and the Warrior rugby squad took the bridesmaid role in the OUAA championships. So some of the people in your classes are also athletes that you will see on the court, ice, field, snow, river, or in the pool. The Athletic Department at UW encourages the elite student athletes to try out for a spot on one or more of its varsity teams. Training camp and/or tryouts for most of the fall teams starts in early or mid September. Most coaches have done extensive scoutirig searches for freshman athletes. But there are many talented sports enthusiasts that are missed in the search and later make the team roster. These athletes are called “walk-ons” and are not uncommon in Waterloo sports. First-year students are encouraged to try out for their favorite sport. A list of team meetings appears on this page. If you follow sportd but do not want an active role in these competitive sports, come out and support the teams at their home games as one of the UW fans. You can take in all the action by using your Athletic Season Ticket (which is included with your ID card stickers when you pay your fees]. It entitles you to admission to all Waterloo interuniversity home games up until the playoff 5. There is the exciting Warrior Naismith Basketball Classic tournament in November, at which over 6,000 of the Waterloo faithful fill the PAC to see Waterloo’s greatest spectator sport. Also, any game in any sport between Waterloo and Western is an unmatched rivalry in Ontario. Perhaps playing or watching varsity sports is not your ball of wax, but you still want to participate in a sport on a less competi-. tive level. There is an endless list of sports, instructional or recreational programs, and clubs in Waterloo’s cam us recreation. Pick up a campus recreation brochure for detai Ps. Also, we have a slogan:here at Imprint Sports: “Those who don’t play, write.” Why not betiome an Im rfnt s orts writer or photographer? There are many sports to c R oose Prorn, so come down to Campus Centre room 140 and sign up early. Finally, on behalf of everyone here at Imprint Sporte, I would like to welcome all first-year students ts Wate.rloo and encourage you to catch or take part in the action of Waterloo athletics. Rich Nichol sports Editor

Team tryouts IfyouareinteastedintryingcbutfW~Sp0t plan to attend its organizatiorral meeting.

Rowing Cross Country Indoor Track (M), 0 THUl&(W-j Waterpolo Ice HaMy VdIeybaIt (M) VdleybaIl (W) Basketball (w) Swimming (W) Swimming (M) Nordic Skiing (M). (w) Figure Skating sq-h(w) Synchro Swimming Alpine Skiing (M), (W) Curiing (W) Curling (M) Badminton (M), (W) ‘PhysicuI

Activities

Thurs. Aug. 17 Tues. Sept. 5 Tues. sspt. 5 Thumsept.7 MOfI.SOpt.11 MOfI.~~ll MOn.Sept.ll Morr.SCpt. li Mon.9!pt. 11 Thun. Sept. 14 Mon.sept.ll Tues. Nt. 12 Tues. Sept. 52 Tues. Se@. 12 Tues. Sept. 12 Tues. SqS. 12 wed. sap!. 13 wed. Sept. 13 Wd. Sept. 13 Ttlurs. se@. 14 Thurs. S&t. 14 Thurs. Sept. 14 Tues. sepl. 19 Tues. sepl. 19 Tues. Sept 19 Thurs. S&t. 21 Thurs. Se@. 21 Thurs. Sept. 21 Thurs. Sept. 21

10fXJ am 7xnpm 5-m pm 5-m pm 6SDpm 6apm 7fnpfn 6100~ saopnl fdlopm 730 pm 6:30 pm 43 p(” f:OO pm 5dXlpm 6mpm 500 pm6rCN3 pm 7:00 pm 8:oO pm

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Interuniversity

teams,

PAC. Ottiee PAC Rctun 2046 CdlWWtFWH Cohrmb#Fiilr2 PAC Squat141 Courts PACmwmloo11 Waterloo Tennis Club PAC.Ruom 1Uid

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Canes?oga Golf Club PAC ROOM 1UN PAC Rwm 1oCfl PACRoom100~1 PAC Room lOCl1 PAC Pod De& PAC Room loC11 PAC Room 1001 PAC Room loCl1 PAC Room loCl1 PAC Room loC)l PAC Roonl iah1 PAC Room 10111 PAC Roorll iabi PAC R#nl iabi PAC Room lan PAC Room ian PAc Room tan PAC Room lCXb1 PAC Room lall

Carl Tohkl? Oon McLean Jeff Anderson Brent McFtiane Sandy Macowk Jefl !wef Don McKee Scott sham Dena Oeghu LesJie Dal Cin John Oesch John Oeach &ian Farrance f8A Chco Silvestr~ Bonnie Mack Sandra Gillies Bill Tschirhart 8iN Tschirhart TEA

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CO-ordinatars of In&n-university Attktics: women PatDavb PACRctom2051,&3W211,Ext.~146 PAC Room 20538651211, ~ wmDelahey

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SPORTS

When the graduates of the class of ‘89 left this past spring, they left not only with degrees, but the honour of being the last students to see a Warrior football win as undergraduates. The memories may not be vivid, but the Waterloo Warriors beat the Toronto Varsity Blues on a rainy Saturday afternoon at Seagram Stadium on October 13, 1984. Since then, the Warriors have gone through 30 regular season games, some with scores that were agonizingly close, without a win. But the light at the end of the tunnel is getting brighter. Head coach Dave “Tuffy” Knight, along with his assistants Chuck McMann and Ken Hussey, visited 125 high schools in Ontario this past spring to recruit rookies for this season. “It’s the best crop of rookies that we have had in the last two years,” said an enthusiastic McMann. Here is a uick rundown of the 1989 footba 9 1 units: Quarterback: With some experience behind him now, Brian Lenart will be the starting pivot and Mike Wright will be his backup once again. Waterloo also has depth with sophomore Andy Oliver and rookies Mat Radovan and David Sharp. Knight feels that this unit is much stronger than last year and, with a bit of donsistency, should capitalize more on offence. Runnin Backs: Knight has moved R alfback sensation Orville Beckford to the fullback position, joining veterans Gene

Chartier and Owen Earle, This move should strengthen this area to its maximum potential. With Beckford shuffled back and Dave Ropret moved to slotback, one would think that there would be big holes in the tailback spots. Not so. Freshman T.J. Diehl, a Port Credit native, was outstanding at tailback in high school. He will join second-year player 21;s Chartier in the starting Receivers: Knight is worried about how “green” the wide receivers are. Star receiver Kevin Dutcher will not be returning this season. Dutcher had nine receptions for 118 yards in 1988. Apart from veterans Paul Martin and Joe Jeffrey, this unit is almost all new players. Tight end seems to be ;a11 set with veteran Brian Rayner and Geoff Sansom. Size is the only concern here. Second-year slaver Craig McLennan has iho”wn great- improvement in camp over last year. He will join veteran Brian Abele and rookie Mike Sesek at slotback.. Offensive Line: For the first time in two years, this unit is showing some strength and size. Marshall Bingeman returns for a fourth season with Waterloo. Veteran Greg Daughton will also be valuable since he can play either guard or tackle effectively. Other vets vying for spots on the line are Jeff Smith, Ken Wilson, and Marc Lajeunesse. There are also rookies showing potential. Defensive Line: This crew looks stronger and finally has some depth. Mike Lane, Mark Yarmel, Henry Stachurski and Mark MacCormack are all returning.

Im ressive lineman Len Willems wi 1 challenge for a osit ion. Three ‘other rookies aP so look good. Linebackms: This is definitely the most superior group on the entire team. Two time all-Canadian Dave Shaw will anchor the defense ofice again. Solidifying the backfield are veterans Paul Kilby, Bob Casey, and Dave Brush, along with sophomores Jeff Lake, Ross DePalma, and Rob Proctor. Four rookies also look impressive. Smmlary: The secondary unit is a disappointment according to Knight. Two freshman hopefuls did not show up for training camp, leaving a gaping hole in this area. To add to this, Larry Vaughn and Bohdan Woschuk have graduated, and cornerback Paul Meikle broke his leg in the summer and may not e be 100 per cent. Veterans Rich Chen, Mafk Loisel, and Blair Greenly will try to solve the problems, -along with second-year players Paul Moffat, Steve Futyer, Scott Hyde, and Bill Campbell. Impressive rookie Lionel Felix may be the savior in this unit. Kicking: Peter Tchir had a banner year as place kicker last season and will return to the job in 1989. But, as. of yet, the Warriors have no punter and are in dire need of one. If you have any experience in this area or are maybe even a soccer player with a strong kicking foot, please notify coach Knight as soon as possible. For now, T.J Diehl and Mike Rymer will rotate the position. Overall, the team is much stronger than last year,’ especially on offence, due to the

f

TEAM SPORTS &-TROPHIES 84

KING ST. N., WATERLOO

strong recruiting process. The main concerns are in the wide receiver and secondary unita Look for a win or two this season

Intramural

Jerseys

against York and/or U of T. “I feel mo’re confident of the team’s potential this yaai over last year,” commented Knight.

- 1 l:Ob a,m, l

&it.

Sept.

9

Season opener vs. Western - 1:00 pJll. Both games at Seagram stadium

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BACK TO SCHOOL

PAGE

11

ilA

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Sat. Sept. 2 Scrimmage vs.,LauW

. Clascom

Let us do your

l

1, 1989

. Warrior football

Variables

T-shirts . Trophies l Equipment l Class Shirts I l 1Floor Shirts l Rugger Tops l Class Jackets l Custom Cresting

September

He’s back= After two fabulous seasons acheiving All-Canadian status, it was thought that linebacker Dave Shaw (44) would lmprlnt file phdo , leave to join the B.C. Lions.

NEC & Clssc&n introduce Various configurath

ACROSS FROM THE OLD ENGLISH PARLOUR

l

Friday,

:to find. winning.

,Deterrdned by Rich Nichd Imprint staff

Imprint,

30, 1989

of our


12A

Imprint,

Friday,

September

1, 1989

SPORTS

interuniversity

Women’s

Athena Badminton ’ Head coach: TBA The Athenas finished fifth in the West Section in league play last season, .but failed to qualify for the playoffs. Atheua BasketbaIl Head coach: Leslie Dal Cin Plagued by injuries and inex.perience, the powerless Athenas struggled to a 2-12 season record last season, Yet, two rookies, Leah Ann Erickson and Brenda Kraemer performed well in 198889 and should season to leaders hip roles. Athena Cross-Country Head coach: Jeff Anderson * Waterloo moved from a dismal ninth place to finish fifth in the OWIAA last season. The team also got a ninth place ranking in

by Rich Nichol Imprint staff Here at Waterloo there are 16 women’s interuniversity athletic teams, rowing being the new addition. All the teams use the name Athenas, Athena being the Greek goddess of wisdom, prudent warfare and womanly art, extolling the characteristics of learning, good judgment, and the mastery of athletic skills. Wearing

the traditional black play in the Ontario Women’s Interuniversity Athletic Association (OWIAA), a member of the Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union (CIAU).

and gold, the Athenas

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the CIAU standings, a first for Athena cross-country, Athena *Curling I Head coach: Bill Tschirhart After a bad start in their first sectional of league play last season, the Athenas could not rebound for a qualifying spot in the finals. Athena Field Hockey Head coach: Judy McCrae The team finished fifth in the West division last season, maintaining their standing from the% 1987 season. The Athenas have lost veterans Alison Brown and Lori Parent due to graduation. Annette Koehler was selected as an OWIAA all-star in 1988. Athena Figure Skating Head coach: TBA Waterloo placed fifth of nine teams in the OWIAA championships last season. Suzanne Scott led- the team with a second in precision team, a bronze in senior pairs, fifth in open ladies, and sixth in isolated pairs skating. Athena Alpine Skiing Head coach: Sandra GilIies In team competition the Athenas finished fifth, highlighted by a second place finish in meet four. First year skier Martina Rauter captured the OWIAA Individual Title, winning the Giant Slalom and sharing first place honours in the slalom event. Athena Nordic Skiing Head coach: Brian Farrance Waterloo achieved their best ranking in five years, finishing an im ressive fourth in a year of rebui f ding. All seven skiers will be returning this fall. Athena Rowing Head coach: Don McLean This is Waterloo’s neivest team in Athena sports, making its debut this season. Athena Soccer Head coach: Lynn Hoyles In the always tough OWIAA West division, the Athenas

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athletics losses in exhibition play, and 50 wins and five losses in OWIAA league action. Unfortuna’tely, the Athenas will lose team leader Diane Hutchison, who used up all of her five year eligibility. But the rest of the top five seeds should put forth stronger efforts this season. Athena Swimtiing Head coach: John Oesch Waterloo placed fourth in the OWIAA championships and a strong ninth in the CIAU meet. Four swimmers qualified for the CIAUs, and Susan Masson earned OWIAA all-star-status. Athena Synchronized Swimming Head coach: Bonnie Mack At the OWIAA championship last season, Waterloo finished sixth overall. Individually, Dana Cranstone placed second in intermediate, figures and Bonnie Mack placed sixth in the same event at the ranking meet. Athena Tennis Head coach: Chico Silvestri For a third consecutive year, the Athenas picked up the bronze medal at the Ontarios last season, winning 54 of 75 league play matches. Doubles partners Marcela Krajny and Kim Brandford were named to the OWIAA all-star team for their bronze win at the Ontario championships. Athena Track h Field Head coach: Brent McFarlane The Athena runners placed a respectable eighth overall last season. Lisa Laffradi finished a strong fourth in the 1500 meter event. Athena Volleyball Head coach: Dena Deglau Waterloo collected a five witi, nine loss record last season to finish fifth in the OWIAA West, In her final year on the team, five year veteran Corinne Williams finished the regular season as one of the top ten attackers in the West division.

fought to a misleading 4-7-1 record. In her final year, team leader Linda Hartjes was honoured for her excellent skills with an OWIAA all-star selection and recipient of the Waterloo Athletic Female Athlete of the Year. Athena Squash Head coach: Chico Silvestri Last season’s team was the most successful in Athena squash history. Waterloo tion six tournaments, collecting a record of 49 wins and seven

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SPORTS

*

Imprint,

Friday,

September

1, 1989

1U

Warrior marts teams ciearina.. ~13 by Rich Nichol Imprint staff

improvements this past season, nioving up six positions to place third’in the OUAA championships with a 10-5 record. The men’s interuniversity atWarrior Football hletic team$ [known as the WarHead coach: Dave “Tuffy” riors) compete in the Ontario University Athletic Association ’ Knight a CIAU member. Waterloo finished another (OUAA), Wearing black and gold, Wateryear with an O-7 record. The Warriors lost loo has 18 Warrior teams, including the newly-added rowing first team All-Canadian corteam, nerback Larry Vaughn to gra1 duation. But UW has greatly Warrior Badminton improved with an early and exHead coach: TBA tensive rookie scouting binge. Despite their youth and inexLook for Knight’s sideline influperience, the team improved ence for the first time this season their OUAA standing this year to bring home some wins. from fifth to third with a 71-98 record. Waterloo’s strong efforts Warrior Golf were nullified by Ottawa and Head coach: Carl Totzke Western in the OUAA chamLast season’s team moved up piondhips. one notch from last season, finWarrior Basketball ishing ninth of ten teams in the Head coach: Don McCrae OUAA semi-finals. Bakket ball, Waterloo’s greatest spectator sport, has had a Warrior Hockey long history of success in CanHead coach: Don McKee ada, With the loss of star guard The Warrior pucksters reTom Schneider, the Warriors corded the best record in ten may be weakened. But McCrae years, with a 15-B-3 win-loss-tie will probably silence the critics record, placing second behind once again, as was evident in last Western in the OUAA Central division. Waterloo could not season’s strong 1 l-3 performance in league play. shake the playoff jinx again this Warrior Cross-Country year, and were upset by thirdplace York, eventual CIATJ Head coach: Jeff Anderaon Waterloo finished fifth in the champs two games to one in the OUAA this season with the help semi-finals, of a spectacular fourth place finish by Paul Ernst. The team has UW became a victim of the lost outstanding graduating athgraduation bug at season’s end, lete Shamir Jamal, but with losing Steve Linseman, Chris Ernst, the best is yet to come.. Glover, John Goodman, Dan Warrior Curling Tsandelis, John Dietrich, and Head coach: Bill Tschirhart Clint Ellicott. Expect an intense * The stone throwers made vast rebuilding year..

Warrior Rowing * Heed coach: Don McLean Rowing is Waterloo’s latest addition to the Warrior sports list. Look for some interesting results this fall. 7 Warrior Rugby Head coach Brian Quistberg Waterloo has been promoted back up to Division One after a flawless 7-0 season on the pitch. In the semi& Waterloo surprised everyone by bumping off McMaster 7-4, but lost to a strong Queen’s squad 20-3 in the finals. The Warriors lost star flanker Blair Falconer to graduation, but should still be healthy with strong performances by captain Adam Kendall, Hayden Belgrave, Mac Clayton, Jim Closs, and Alan Phillips. , Warrior Alpine Skiing Head coach: Sandra Gillies Highlighted by a first place finish in the fifth race of the series, the Warriors placed fifth overall in the OUAA. Veteran Colin Rogers won two races this season and wound up in fourth place in the individual rankings. Warrior Nordic Skiing Head coach: Brian Farrance Using a talented crop of rookies, Waterloo had its best finish in five years, placing fifth this year in the OUAA championships. Dave Lumb set a new record for Waterloo by finishing fourth individually. With Farrance as their neti ‘coach, this g?oup of seasoning sophomores should do well.

Continued

on page

Setting Waterloo’s

1QA

up

for a -spike: The Warrior volleyball* team is best chance for a national title in 1989-90. Last squad finished fourth in Canada.

season’s

fmprlnt

file photo.

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14A

Imprint,

Friday,

September

/L&n’s

1, 1989

varsity

SPORTS

sports

tea’m eyes ClAUs again 4

Volleyball Continued

from

page

a 2-7-5 win-loss-tie record. Dan Sicoli’s outstanding performance between the Dosts earned him an OUAA We&division allstar selection. With some expe- , rience behind them now, the Warriors are looking for better results this season. Warrior Squash Head co&h: Barney Lawren’ce

13A

Warrior Soccer Head coach: Kevin Curtis I A rather youfig and inexperienced team finished sixth overall in the OUAA last season with

The 1988-89 Warriors placed a notable second in league play and third in the OUAA playoffs. Ron Hurst won a bronze medal in OUAA competition to become the first medal winner in Warrior squash history. He was also named to the OUAA all-star team. Consistency will be the key in 1989-90. Warrior Swimming He&d coach: John Oesch Waterloo finished a comfortable fifth in the OUAAs in 198889, a season in which many rookies joined the team to-build a possible future powerhouse squad. The Warriors have lost team leader Graeme Peppler and Eric Fergin, but this highly spirited group should recover easily.

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Warrior Tennis Head coach: Chico Silvestri The Warriors showed strong determination this year, finishing a remarkable second in the OUAA West division. Even more improvement is expected in 1989-90. Warrior Indoor Track & Field Head coach: Brent McFarlane Waterloo ended up fifth overall in. the OUAA after some exceptional perfor’mances that broke several school track rccords. The 4x200 meter relay team qualified for the CIAU finals, Paul Meikle set records in the 50 and 300 meter events (finishing sixth in the 300 meter event in the CIAUs), the 4x200 meter relay team finished fifth in the CIAU rankings setting another record, and John Denny <

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set a record in the OUAA championships in the 60 meter clash. Maybe even more records will be shattered this1 season. Warrior Volleyball Head coach: Scott Shantz After finishing first’ in the league standings with a flawless 12-0 record, the Warriors went on to eliminate McMaster in the semi-finals and Western in the finals of the OUAA West division. Then, with a third place CIAU ranking, Waterloo was upset by York 3-2 at the OUAA championships. Despite the loss, the Warriors’ -ranking earneld them a wild card spot in the CIAU championship tournament in Calgary. While there, Waterloo beat UBC 3-2, and then lost to eventual gold medal winner Calgary 3-0 in the semi-finals, Finally, in the bronze medal round, Waterloo lost _to York 3-0, to finish fourth in Canada. Tony Martins was given OUAA allstar status. The Warrio& have lost Fred Koops, Jim McKinnon, Dave Plouffe, and Dave Shum, but the starting six are still intact,

Easy Layup: Chris Troyak (above) wifI try to fill the shoes of deDarted All-Canadian Tom Schneider.

f-l COMPACT

Warrior Waterpolo Head coach: Jeff Slater After a disastrous O-11-3 record in 1987-88, Waterloo made a remarkable improvement last season with a 6-9-l record, good enough for fifth place in the nine team league, and marking the %est record in four years. Norbert Molnar led the Warrior scoring with 25, goals in 16 games,,

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Each year, the UW athletic denartment makes available a seaion ticket which provides the holder with admission to the three interuniversity activities for which admission is charged. The three activities are football, Warrior basketball, and Warrior hockey. The season tickets do not provide admission to playoff games, The cost of UW season tickets is: - one adult ticket - $20.00 - two adult tickets - 35.00 - high school ticket - TO.00 The cost of any one of these interuniversity events is $4.00 for adults and $3.00 for other university and high school students. All full-time UW students receive a season ticket when they pay their student fees. Anyone wishing to purchase a UW season ticket is asked to send their payment (payable to the UW athletic department) along with their name and complete address to: Paul Condon Athletic Department PAC Building University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario NZL 3G1

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mountain dangerous

Mountain bikes equipped with cantilever brakes are potentially hazardous, the product safety branch of Consumer and Corporate Affairs Canada warns consumers, Cantilever brakes are a new system of brakes found on most mountain bikes in which each of two cables, one on either side of the tire, activates a brake pad through an arm connected to the fork of the bike. The two cables join into one main cable above the tire. Together the cables form an inverted “Y” above the tire. The rider activates the main cable through a brake lever located on the handlebars. The danger occurs if the two cables operating the front brakes shake loose from the main cable and catch the knobby tires used on these bikes. This could result in the bike stopping suddenly and its rider being hurled over the handlebars, risking serious injury. Racing bikes, on the other

bikes flaw

hand, are equipped with sidepull brakes. The hazard associated with cantilever brakes does not exist with these brakes. A failure of the single vertical cable which activates the sidepull brake pad calipers will not jam the wheel. Some Canadian bicycle manufacturers, in consultation with Consumer and Corporate Affairs Canada, have agreed voluntarily to add a special restraining device to the front of mountain bike frames to prevent the brake cables jamming the wheels. The device could include a reflector at its front end. In the meantime, mountain bike owners are advised to take. their bikes to a bicycle shop where this device can be installed, The cost is only a few dollars and will ensure saferriding for mountain bike riders. For more information, please contact your nearest office of Consumer and Corporate Affairs Canada.

At Ebp@wn,you’ll finedbulk and canned foods, snack and convenience items, organic produce, cheek, drug-free meatsand rmch more. \I Ebytown is entirely member owned and operated. A student membership is only $10.00. Have a say in where your food dollar goes-join Ebytown today! 280 Phillip St., (in the Waterloo Co-op Residence) Building A4 -- Ground Floor. North Side Entrance Tue., Wed., Thurs. 4 pm to 8 pm ‘Sat. ,lO am to 5 pm

Hours:

Phone:

Ask

I

886-8806

about our member discounts

I% K-W’s Jlternative

Grocery

Store I% J

INTRODUCING

PROBL-EMS? l

Stackable Shelving l Closet Shelving l Wall Units l Storage Accessories

TYPEWRITERS

and

ACCESSORIES

INTRODUCTORY PRICES . I

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l l l

Fult Itnc Auromat~~ “I.rnc-Out” \ymLml AulomatIc corfertion. Supcncrlpt htcmdtlc

lit

(111 crxrectlc “Word-Out” cr)rrt!ctlcln relcKc’atlon and

DISCOUNT

OFFER

EXPIRES

SEPTEMBER

Atitomatic “Line-out” system

“Word-Out” ct~rrection

l l

J.(U)

character~mwy.

0

Built Spell” “Find” and words Rold

0

cap\

after SubscrIpt.

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l

in

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lock.

Regular

OF WATERLOO

Phone

Park Mall Street

North

893- 1962

Kitchener

*299%

30189

South Campus Hall Ottawa

i ’ Incatar)

printmp.

BOOKSTORE

Stanley

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SALE@270@*

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- UNIVERSITY

1005

I

8854211

Ext. 2251

I


WA

Imprint,

Friday,

September

1, 1989

SPORTS

Director of athletics

Totzke to-retire. after 33 years UW’s only director of athletics, Carl Totzke, wiI1 retire from his position on October 1, 1989. “I ve enjoyed my time here at Waterloo, but after 33 years I think it’s time to pursue other interests and alternatives that have been growing in importance,” said Totzke, 63, adding, “The athletics department has grown steadily, sometimes spectacularly, during the 60s and 70s when the university was also in a period of rapid expansion.”

A native of the K-W area, Totzke joined the staff at the University of Waterloo in 1957. An outstanding high school athlete, Totzke played football for Waterloo College and later the McGill University Redmen. He also played for the Kitchener Dutchmen for four years.

outstanding

athlete

Totzke served as head coach of the Warrior football team from 1958 to 1976 with a 27-45-l record. He was also director of athletics on a part-time basis

while writing sports for the K-W Record. Currently, Totzke is coach of the Waterloo golf team. During his tenure at UW, Totzke has used his administrative skills in many areas of endeavour. He has occupied administrative positions in the Ontario-Quebec Athletic Association, the Ontario Universities Athletic Association and the Canadian Interuniversity. Athletic Union. He has served as president of the CIAU longer than any other individual (197% 73 and 1984-86). “Overall, I think that we’ve been able to make a very positive contribution to the university and the campus life of the stu-

dent,” commented Totzke. “From the beginning our goals have been to encourage a broad program of activities for all the students from the beginner to the

a positive contribution elite athlete. Currently there are about 38 interuniversity sports and from 70 to 80 activities in the campus recreation program,” he said. UW athletes have brought 74 provincial and national championships home to Waterloo. “We’ve had some excellent coaches ,and some very compe-

tent administrative personnel and I think the department and our programs are in good shape. My moving on will allow for further growth and development within the department.” Adding to his lengthy list of duties, Totzke served as convener for mlany clinics, conferences and competitions both locally and nationally. He participated in numerous international excursions by CIAU athletes including student games in Turin ‘70, Moscow ‘73, Israel ‘77, Lake Placid ‘80, andJapan ‘87 to name a few. Totzke’s repiacement will be named before the end of September.

money& Columbia playing fields will be busy over the next eleven days as Athena soccer team hopefuls take to the fields, with tryouts starting on Saturday, September 2, and continuing through to Monday; September 11. The team will be without some familiar faces due to graduation and workterms, including last season’s co-captains Sarah Brown and Linda Hartjes. The returning, veterans have already attended a weekend training camp on August 26-27 and look in shape and ready to play. “We are expecting the team to be quicker this season and we have several good first-year forwards coming in who should add more scoring punch,” commented head coach Lynn Hoyles. Two exhibition games have been scheduled. The first is on Sunday, September 10 at ll:Ob a.m. against the University of Guelph on Columbia Field 2. The second pre-season game will be played at Varsity Stadium against the University of Toronto on Thursday, September 14 at 8:00 p.m. So come and cheer the Athenas as they start their fifth season of competition in the exciting OWIAA West.

,

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Dr. icorner Tues:

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12 - 5 pm., Wed - Fri: 12 - 8 pm., Sat: 10 am - 4 pm.

884-6400


Imprint,’ aid, CPR, yoga, tai chi, rock ‘n’ roll (jibe), power walking, power skating, speed skating, figure skating, learn to skate, squash, tennis, and badminton. A number of intiatiural sports are also offered. Come out for basketball+ brqomball, innertube water-polo, indoor soccer, volleyball or slo-pitch baseball in recreational leagues. For those wanting a more intense pace, this year’s corn etiti+e league offerings inc P ude softball, flag football, soccer, ball basketball, ice hockey,

by John Wylien Thinking of learning a new sport, meeting new people or getting back in shape? Campus Recreation is here to help you out with a wide variety of sports, clubs and instructional programs. The instructional prog,rams are a great way to pick up a new skill. This year Campus Ret programs include fitness, social dance, swimming, scuba, first

Wordr for money - professional ment drocessing. Telephone 4315 after 6100 pm. for information.

FUR docu742more

procsr8ing

Word

- theses, reports, ter 4 papers, etc. Letter quality, very professional work. 81so d.s.p. Phone 74316996 after 5:OO.

For $5t double spaced page I’ll type letters, resumes, s. Fast efficient service. West35,*ar8 experience. .95 d.s.p. typewriter//81 26d.s.p. word processor; Erb & Wedtmount area. Call 743-3342. Word Procewlng. Essays, Theses, resum8s, etc. Letter quality printer, spellcheck. Have medical terminology.; On campus delivery and pickup. Call iSharon 656-3387, Fast, profe&lonul word processing by University Grad (English). Grammar, spelling, corrections available. Laser orinter. Suzanne. 886-3857.

HOUSINQ

AVAILABLE

Howeforsale, $116,000, neardowntown Waterloo in lovely older neighbourhood. Two berdrooms, originat pine floors, tastefully decorated. Call collect 416-457-2785. Shared

Accomodatlon: Suitable for upper year female ~0-0~. Separate entrance, Share kitchen and bath. Nonsmoker, parking in Waterloo, near bus route, backyard, nice older home, ,$3oooO includes gll utilities, phone and cable. Call 744-2864. Professional Couple offer private room and bath in 8xchange for occasional babysitting(lOyearoldgirl)and light housekeeping. 1,Ominute walk to Univ@rsity of Waterloo. References reauir$d. Phone 746-6947 after 6 tarn.

%ALE

PAC -

1

lamine pedistal bed frame. As new $7500.886-4728 answering machine - leave message. 1980 AMC Eagle 4WD, 60,000 mi, certified 82500 or best. 745 1093 after 5:30 or seen at 2 Clarence PI. Kit. Clean up your ‘act (cloths) & save money. Portable Inglis washer in perfect condition, yours for $18500. Call 746-4046 or Vivian at 888-4048 from 9:oo to wo.

Gary’8 Moving - man w/small cube van and appliance cart available weeknights, weekends - $30/hr. in Kitchener-Waterloo; out-of-town extra Garv 746-7160.

Driver needed:To drive two students to Waterloo from Erin-Ospringe area starting Sept. until Dec. Phone l-8852080.

~

~-..---

needa you and your van to

deliver your student newspaper throughout the campus and a few places off campus. Not only will we pay you - we will make sure you get a coffee and donut. For all the details call Vivian at 888-4048.

Weekend

Counrellors for developmentally delayed individuals, 6m/hr. Every second weekend. Leave message for Don Mader tifter 200 pm. 884-6012, 886-5201.

Practice Dutch - I would like to meet a person to practice speaking Dutch with..Call 7448672 at 5 om. ACCKWA, AIDS Committee of Cambridge, Kitchener/Waterloo and Area is a volunteer organization dedicated to providing education and support for individuals and the community abouz the Human lmmunodeficiency Virus (HIV). We provide an information, referral and counselling hotline: 7418300, Monday to Friday, 1O:OO am. 500 pm., 7:OO pm. - 11 :OO pm. If you would like more information - call us, or drop in toour House, at 886 Queens Blvd., Kitchener. Get the facts about AIDSI New band being formed. We are two local guitarists looking for drummer, bassist, vocalist and keyboard player to perform original blues influenced rock. Original material welcome. Call Jeff (747-9625) for more info.

Textlle/Flbre Works: Group Show, at the Homer Watson House & Gallery 1754 Old Mill Road, Kitchener. Featurind works weaving, pulp paintings, quilted hangings and freestyle machine embroidery. For more information. call 748-4377. SATURDAY,

SEPTEMBER

2

AUdttlve

Sculpture: Shirley Yanover and Peter Dykhuis, at the Library and Galldry in Cambridge (Galt), 20 Grand Averlue North, opens today and runs to Sdptember 23. A workshop complimending the distinctive technique used~will be held (see Sept. 9). Frultr of their labour is the title of Woodside National Historic Park’s demonstration of canning and pre-. serving techiques of the late 19th century. Learn more about this practice today through Monday, 528 Wellington Street North, Kitchener, admission is free. For more information call 742-5273. WEDIiESDAY,

SEPTEMBER

6

Atari usergroup,

KWEST, 8-bit meeting at 700 pm. in MC 2009, 2nd floor of the Math & Computer Building. Phone 579-3695 for details. Visitors welcome. . Unlverslty Choir auditions. Robert Shantz, director. Everyone welcome. Sign up at Room ‘I 51, CGCfor an audition time. Interviews will also be held on Sept 7, f 1. Choir rehearses on Tuesdavs, 7-9 Drn.

SEPTEMBER

UW Chamber Choir auditions. Wilbur Maust, director. Sign up at the Music Office, today, 1 :OO-300 pm, Room 266, CGC for an audition time. Choir re~easees Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:30-500 om.

I am presently incarcerated at the Wise Correctional Unit number 18. I am seeking to get together with anyone who wishes to maintain a correspondence relationship with me. If anyone is interested, please write to: E.Wiliiam Kirschner P.O.-Box 2139 Coeburn, Virginia 24230. Before I life-time of experience, the experienced lifetime! Sigma Chi welcomes the Frosh of ‘89.

Contact:

Pennie

CAMPUS Come

p.m., Mon

Schrader

885-1211

InternatIonaLAll members and prospective members are invited to Kitchener Public Library Eby Room, 85 Queen Street North in Kitchener. Guest speaker Beijing Eyewitness, Bev Nuttall with slide presentation. New members are igvited to come at 7:OO pm., main meeting starts at 7:30 pm. For more information call 8841850 or 893- 1449.

BIBLE ‘STURY

and hear God’s Word

Wednesdays 7:30 p.m. Campus Centre 110 ALL ARE WELCOME Jesus said: (Laymeds

“I am the Way, the Truth and the Life.” Evangdical Fellowship lntertqtional)

PARTITIME

POSITIONS

Available on campus for positive, enthusiastic ’ and outgoing University of Waterloo students. You can join other students in an exciting and innovative Fundraising Initiative calling U of W graduates.

Telecare: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We’re an anonymous, confidential telephone distress line. Lonely? Worried? Troubled? Call us 658-6805 (local call). Day or Night! Blenheim If you’re ever in Toronto give Ridgetown a call. Pro-Choice over no choice! “Citizens for Choice” is committed to the right of every woman to make rational decisions about her own body and for every child to be a wanted child. For more information write to: Citizens for Choice. P.0. Box 372, Station C, Kitchener N2G 3Y9.

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY TWO EVENINGS A WEEK, 6 - 10 p.m. l HOURLY WAGE STARTING AT $5,25 9 EXCELLENT SKILL DEVELOPMENT AND JOB TRAINING l l

in Waterloo until Sept 10, for more information contact The Waterloo Chambei of Commerce at 886-2440. CGC Chapel Choir auditions. George Wiebe, director. Sign up at the Music Office, Room 266, CGCfor an audition time. Auditions also held on Sept 8, 11, 12. Choir rehea.rseS Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:30-500 pm.

Univeralty

A Great Way to get involved in the solution of University Underfunding

Sexual

Choir auditions.

Everyone welcome. Sign up at Room 151, between 6:00-9:OO pm. CGCfor an audition time.

A day

devoted aware

Crimes on Campus Day . ” to making

of sexual

the university community crimes on campus.

Orchestra auditions. William Janzen, director. All sttidents, faculty and staff welcome. Sign up at the Music Office, today and on Sept 13, Room 266, CGC for an audition time.

Dance-a-halls! Come work for Imprint. .

UW

4:30-

Monday, PANEL

D1SCUSION

September ON SEXUAL

CRIMES

25189 ON CAMPUS

6:3O pm.

“Buskers

i ; ’ ’ I

‘89”Uptown Waterloo plays host to an invasion of musicians, jugglers, acrobats and mimes in the first Buskers Festival to be held in Southwestern Ontario. See professional street perfor.mers from around the world on every c”orner today from 12:00-2:OO pm. and again from 7:OO9,:30 pm.! “Buskers ‘89” witI continue

’ 3 ; I :

/

- F& Ext. 3914

Amnesty

Thursdays,

; ;

Part-time Help \IVanted 11130 a.m-. - 4:00

0

Mennonite pm. at the Kitchener Brethren Church, 19 Ottawa St.; N. (between King & Weber). Remember to eat before vou donate.

rehearses

:

Contact: Debbie Ritchie in the Alumni Office SCH or call 885-l 211, ext.2086

Blood donor clinic today 1:30 to 8:OO

Orchestra

17~

For more information, pick up one of the green Campus Ret 1989 fall programs. The program has all the information, schedules and sign-up dates that you will need. YOU can find them in the PAC and at various other IOcations around campus. So remember, get out, parti+ pate and have some fun!

Red North’

CALENDAR I WEDNESDAY,

1, 1989

VARSITY SPORTS SHOP

Futon frame - Queen size black me-

Imprint

September

and diving well, dance studios, and gyms. You can rent a locker at the PAC,for $8.00 for the term: locker registration takes place Thursday, September 14.

I

. CLASSIFIED TYPING

Friday,

hockey, and volleyball. Looking for something new? Why not come out to one of Campus Ret’s many clubs? You could try your hand at archery, badminton, curling, equestrian, fencing, kendo, martial arts, the oufers club, rowing, sailing. and windsurfing, skiing, sky diving, table tennis, weight training, rowing, yoga, or cycling. ’ in addition to being the center for many of these activities, the UW Physical Activities Cornplex (PAC) is also equipped with weight rooms, a swimming pool

Time: 7:30 - 9:30 p.m. Place: Hagey Hall, Room 373 BOOTH For more

DISPLAY information

call

IN CC 10-3 Kim at Ext. 6305

i I /


18A

Imprint,

FRIDAY,

Friday,

September

1, 1989

SIPTEMBLR

8

SUNDAY,

.

“Buaken ‘89” continues on every street corner from 12:00-2:oO pm.

chener.

MONDAY,

CGC Chapal Choir auditions. Sign up at the Music Office, Room 266 1000 am.-12:OO pm. and l:OO-3:OO pm. CGC for an audi$ion time. Auditions also’ held on Sept. 11, 12. Choir re, hdarS8S Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:30-5300 Pm.

TUESDAY,

11

SEPTEMBER

Sign up at the- Music Office, Room 266 between 1:30-3:30 pm. CGCfbran audition time. Choir rehearses Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:30-5:OO pm.

UW Chamber Choir auditions.

Library:

R.R.2, Kit-

resources available se8 Catendar for

Choir first rehearsal. At Conrad Grebel College, Room 153 between 7:QO-900 pm. SEPTEMBER

13

14

WEDMISDAY Fmlnbt

College,

4:30-6:30

ONGOING

Atarl usew group, KWEST, 16-bit (ST) meeting at 700 pm. in MC 2009,2nd ftoor of the Math & Computer Building. Phone 579-3695 for details. Visitors W8iCOm8. UW Orchestra auditions. All stu dents, faculty and staff welcome. Sign up at the Music Office, Room 266 between 6009:OO pm. CGCfor an audition time. Orchestra rehearses Thursdavs. 4:30-6:30 om.

12

Dlakover

to you, for details, S8Dt t 1.

THUR@DAY,

resources available see Calendar for

SEPTEMBER

is the title-of the first exhibition of Me University of Waterloo’s Art-Gallery this term, located in Modern Languages Building, the foyer of The Theatre of the Arts. Featuring works by Jane Buyers and Susan Shantz, the

. FURNITURE FACTORY OUTLET

FRIDAY;

SEPTEMBER

1S

ACCKWA,

Aids Committee of Cambridge, Kitchener/Waterloo and Area is hosting its official opening today and you are invited to celebrate with us1 Opening Ceremonies are at the ACCKWAiHouse, 886 Queen’s Blvd in Kitchener, there will be a number of speakers and refreshments wilt be served. For more information call 741. 8300.

14

“Generatlon/Flegeneratlon: Mrs. John E. Brubacher et al 1989-1827”,

Sign up 266, bean audiMondays om.

Players Club meeting at 7130 pm., in MC 3012,.Mathematics & Computer Building. Bring boards & dictionaries. phone 579-3695 for details. Visitors, beginners, other languages welcome. English, French, Russian, & Hebrew boards available for Dlay.

GLOW (Gays and Lesbiani of Waterloo) operates a coffee house every Wednesday in room 110 of the Campus Centre at the University of Waterloo from 9:OO to 11100 pm. All are welcome. Call 884-GLOW for more . information.

--~

play

.

“u comedy about sex, love and sandwich spmads” by Joel

Greeriberg

Performed in HAGEY HALL, on the Univel’sity of Waterloo Campus l l

dinette sets l pool & patio furniture l odd chairs 9 lounges stacking tables l accessories l CHAIRS STARTING AT $19

-DELIVERY

SERVICE

l l

STUDIO ROOM

AVAILABLE-

,

HA-USER H. 330 WEBER

STREET

NORTH

(beside SChhJ8t8r Chev-(lids) WATERLOO 747-3818 HOURS: wed. & Thur:

12 noon-5 pm; Fri: 12 noon-6 pm; Sat: 9 am.-5 Em. ZE

:&TED

-#I80

at 8 PM

Wed. to Sat., September Wed to Sat., September TICKETS

are $4.00

at the

6-S 13-16

door

.

CWWTS

K-W Access-Ability needs volunt&s for their bi-weekly regularly scheduled programrnes for the physically challenged, aloo for bi-monthly fundraising bingos. For more information please call Chris at 885-6640 between 9:OO am. and 500 pm. “Attltuder”, thisareas first skateboard facility located at Albert McCormick Arena in Waterloo. Skateboard enthusiasts are welcome to visit the program and, find out what all the excitement is about. For more information call “Attitudes” at 885-l 700. Poetry Content! The American Poetry Association is holding a contest offering a grand prizls of $1,000 and a first prize of 8500. Poets may enter kontest by se.nc~mg up zo SJX poems, each no more than 20 lines, name and address on eac:h page, to American Poetry Association, Dept. CT-70,250A Potrero Strctet, P.O. Box 1803, Santa Cruz, CA 95061-1803. Poems must be postmarked by December 31.

a John Ibbitson

,directed

Meets

El Salvador Information Office, where you can get information about the current social, political and economic situtation in our country. You ca visit us at Forest Hill United Church, 121 Westmount Road East, Kitchener N2M 4Y6, Monday, Wednesday and Friday 7:OO pm. to 9:OOpm. and Saturday 5:OO pm. to 900 pm. Or call us at 743-5481.

Room 156 be-

Dm.’

Scrabble

. WATCAT, learn how to use the Library’s online catalogue, efficiently and effectively. Meet at the Informa; tion Desk, Dana Porter Library todayat 2~30 om.

Group.

Wornyn’r aroup -meets in CC 135 (usually) at 8:,30 pm. Come out and enjoy movie nights, educational evenings, dances, road trips and casual discussions. For weekly events call 884~GLOW or listen to 94.5 FM, Thursdays from 6-8 pm.

resources available to you, for more information see Calendar for Sepj. 11. Uv Orche$tm first rehearsal. At Contween

Dlacwlon

every Wednesday from 7:OO to 9:OO pm at Global Community Centre. Topic and group vary weekly so that all &omen are welcome anytime. For more information 579-3941.

Dlscover

rad Grebel WEDNESDAY,

SLP’PLMILR

show examines the life and times of Mrs. Brubacher, original settler of the land on which the University of Waterloo is situated. There is an informal opening reception today at 5:OOpm. in the Gallery, all are welcome and ,refreshments will be served. 4 UW Concert Band first rehearsal. Karen Tomiin, director. At Conrad Grebel College Room 156, 7:00-9:OO pm. everyone welcome. No audition necessarv. Think Pick up some‘ new plants at the Engineering Society’s plant s&3. Da-ily today through’ Saturday inthe CC. All proceeds go to the Unit8d Wav.

Library:

Unlverslty

Library:

CGC Chapel Choir auditions. at the Music Office, Room tween 1 :OO-300 pm. CGCfor tion time. Choir rehearese and Wednesdays, 3:30-5:oO

Dkover

to you, for details, Scot, 11. *

ClUzenr for Choice is holding a general meeting tonight at Victoria Park Pavilion at 8:00 pm. Come out and learn more about this new “Pro-Choice” organization and its efforts to fight the re-criminalization of abortion. For more information see ad in “Personals” section.

10

THURSDAY,

12

Books, and Paul Kowtecky, of Bethel Book Store, discuss what authors and would-be authors need to know about booksellers. For further information contact Georgina Green, 743-0271 ext. 254.

up

Fall Fair and Penny Carnival today from 1000 am. to 4:30 pm. at the Crossroads,

luncheon food. call 748-l 914.

Unlverslty Choir auditions. Everyone welcome. Sign up at Room 151, between 6:00-900 pm. CGC for an interview .time. Choir rehearses Tuesdays, 7:00-9:OO pm. CGC Chapel Chpir auditions. Sign at the Music Office, Room 266 abtewwn 1 :OO-3:OO pm. CGC for an interview time. Auditions also held on Sept 12. Choir rehearses Mondays and Wednesdavs. 3:30-500 om. UW ChamberChoir auditions. Sign up at the Music Office, Room 266 between 3:00-500 pm.

“Bu8kers’89”final day of the Festival, today held in Waterloo Park. 12:OO 5:30 and closing at 5:00-6:OOpm. For details see Calendar for Sept 7.

Doon Heritage

while en--

8LPTEMBER

SEPTLMBLR

“Book~lerr Speak” at the Kitchener Public Library tonight at 7:30 pm. Chuck Erin, owner of Words Worth

Dr. Stranger

Charla-tan”

Band auditions. Michael Wood, director. Evkryone welcome. Sign up at the Music Office, Room 266, CGC for an audition time. Band rehearses Mondays, 7-9 pm.

with Peter Dykhuis at the Libraryand Gallery of Cambridge (Gait) 20 Grand Avenue North today between 1000 am. and 400 pm. This workshop compliments* the exhibition in the Gallery (see Sept 2). Learn more about this ancient greek technique of painting with hot wax! For more information call l-6210460. “Busker ‘89” Festival continues today, 12:00-5130 pm. and 7:00-9:30 pm. in Uptown Waterloo, see Calendar for SeDt 7 for details. Minor Sports Registration for the City of Waterloo Sports Program will be held today and on the 16th from 1O:OO am. to 1 :OO pm. at Westmount Place Waterloo. For further information, please call Roseanne Toronchuk, Sports & Athletic Co-ordinator at 8861550 ext. 214.

SEPTEMBER

TUESDAY,

UW Stige

9

workshop

SUNDAY,

10

Dlwover tlbrary resources available to you. Guided tours of the Davis Centre and Dana Porter libraries at 1030 am. and Z:30 pm. Starting today and continuing everyday until Friday, September 22. Uqiversity Map and Design Library-tours available upon request. Meet at the Information Desk in the library you wish to tour. If you have any questions please call Linda Hastinas at ex. 2659.

Drn.

Encawtlc

See the amating

joying old fashioned For more information

UW Chamlnr Choir auditions. Sign up at the Music Office, Room 266, between 1000 am. and 1200 pm. CGC for an audition time. Choir rehearses Tuesdays arid Thursdays, 3;30-5:00

SEPTEMBER *

SEPTEMBER

and “Madame

and 7:00-9:30 pm. in Uptown Waterloo! For details see Calendar for Sept 7.

SATURbAY,

CALENDAR

,


Immrint lr-

II

FREE

CERLOX BlNDlNG Standard covers & binding. Colours subject to availability. ie binding per coupon/custom er

ANY REGULAR ONE COUPON

Airi

RIORDAN SPORTS

I

450

PHILLIP ST. AlO, WATERLOO

b

EXPIRES SEPTEMBER 15/89 ----D----------s

------

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“1 Ooo OFF THE PURCHASE OF ANY REGULAR PRICED PRODUCT850 OR GREATER fexcclnt

service

PRICED GOODS PER PURCHASE

-1

FIRST

an order of Krazy Bread regular price and get a second order FREE.

Buy

dent- I

MOVIE

at WITH MEMBERSHIP COUPON PER CUSTOMER

ONE

BANDIT0

VIDEO

BEECHWOOD

COUPON

FREE

.

DAY PASS

Naturd Peanut Butter 1 lb. FREE with a minimum 8 10.00 purchase

6000

FOR ALL FACILITIES

Call for tour appointment One per Customer

FULL CIRCLE FOODS

PLATINUM HEALTH

FITNESS

CENTRE

346 KING ST. W., KITCHENER EXPIRES SEPTEMBER 15189

*

EE

----

-

GIANT PIZZA SLICE d; 12 OZ. SOFTDRINK

ncnn

*la* OFF

I BURN plus

iI V / no,, cm InEhlT P JIUULIWI

nlcrnl Ui~~VUI~I

’ ONE

1h1T

GLERACIOUS HORNBLOWER 33 UNlVERSllY AVE. E. EXPIRES SEPTEMBER 15/89

WITH

ANY OVER

Students

PURCHASE $25.00

are No. 1 with

usl

15 KING

220 KING ST. N., WATERLOO 1w IUNIVtHSl I.... a--.-..-- I Y HI

ST. N., WATERLOO

EXPIRES SEPTEMBER ----------II

REGULAR PRICED ITEMS Excludes framing and silk! sreening materials PRINCESS WATERLOO

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ART ATTACKS Prevent them


28

Imprint,

Friday,

Septembr

I,

1989

The Artstore of Waterkm p 91 Cardine St. S.

WELCOME The Artstore welcome graduate

STUDENTS

of Waterloo

to all Frosh, returning students.

extends a warm undergrads and

We have been supplying and advising the arts community for ten years in our present location. The Artstore maintains a comprehensive selection of graphics, drafting and fine art supplies with such names as Letraset, Winsor Newton, Grumbacher, Berol, Koh-I-Noor, Rotring, Hunt, Holbein and Staedtler. We have such items in stock as Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Arches _ watercolour paper, A-L,ine drafting tables, Pantone paper, foamboard, Letraline, vellum, mylar, drafting scales, sable brushes and light tables. For your convenience, we are located behind Wat.erloo Town Square on Caroline Street ( or Labattâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on William Street, depending on your point of view). See our map. Our hours are 9am to 8pm Monday to Thursday, 9am to 9pm Fridag: and 9am.to 5:45pm Saturday. A ten percent discount will be applied on all purchases (except Letraset and sale items) upon presentation of your full-time student ID before purchase. .

SEEOUR SEPTEMBERSALESPECIALS

r I


Imprint,

ARTS

F rida~teptwnber

1, 1989

38

Eat Ydrink and be merry! The Duke of Wellington - Located downgtl-z- all-s L~11 eg the Atrium -- ’ Town across from t’ he Waterloo Square, ,.,, hav

The Atrium - You can find not only the Duke of Wellington;, but little, quaint cafes in this airy, glass-enclosed building in the Erb Street side of the Waterloo Town Square parking lot. Definitely not your standard ma food belchfest, The Atrium’ taurants are smal specialized. Ciao r receives especi; views. Olympic Gyro that you c strip mall, cated in t Plaza, off4 [and Cana

by Chris and Judy Imprint staff Reggis’s Sandwich Shop Another one of the few late night eateries in Kitchener’, Reggie’s gives you the added fun of letting you fill out your own menu and tailor your sandwich to your own specifications. On King Street in downtown Kitchener. Pogo’s - Waterloo’s artsy late night cafe, tucked, ironically enough, behind Taps, is always packed after the bars close on the weekends and is usually brimming after the late Princess show when people stop in for their sublime cheesecake, but we won’t chastise you if you sneer at the would-be sensitive a,rtists who write poetry at their tables.

loan Med

Subshack - Sub shops are usually a dime a dozea, but Subshack, located in the Parkdale Plaza II, delivers as well in case you’re too lazy to leave the

mCtit?- s

Cafe Mozart - Beware! Mozart’s has an outraneous and decaden _-L selection of zaketi, pastries and other dessert temptations. Just

VU11

A AlGAG

&gr*near

A -trendy_

vu

in Kit-

Baker just p [that’s a

best j in town ..,a-. and their, sped . 1 decor is- 19505, --and in fact, you almost expect Beaver Cleaver _ to come waltzing in to buy cracker jacks or Pink elephant Popcorn (they sell both). This is a hapPening Place so go check it Out for yourself. It is on King Street near Bridgeport.

Street

Stanley’s to gef away and other fa

t Only

Dotigilee - If you don’t break your neck climbing the vertiginous staircase, sample some of this K!ing Street , Kitchener eatery/cafe/bar’s affordable specials and amazing cheesecakeA popular place before and after movied, especially with the almost and just-out-of-high-school crowd. Angie% Kitchen - Breakfast at Angie’s is a cosmic experience. They serve it all day long, so no matter what time you crawl out of bed, you can cure your hangover with their bottomless cup of coffee and homemade eats. Angie has two kitchens, One is on Erb Street near King in Waterloo and the other is in St. Agatha. If you have a cat, go to the one in St. Agatha. Veterans of Angie’s swear that the homemade sausages there are ambrosia. If you are ambitious and want to catch the breakfast special, be in St. Agatha by noon and in Waterloo by 10:30.

resting

house.

Subway - Pricier than other sub shops, but the ingredients are fresh and the bread is baked on the premised, and the menu is varied with a full range of saladd, among other things. In University Shops Plaza II.

UllC

A

Saucee LiI at Bearing

Koh-I-Nohr - We’ve heard nothing but good things about this Indian food emporium, so if you’re feeling adventurous or just have a taste for curry, try it out.

AP

King

Cookie Connection - If you happen to be in the King-University area and want to avoid the WLLJ part of the sidewalk, Cookie Connection has an incredible variety of big, gooey cookies and other pastries.

Ice away from Waterloo. mt Rose Cafe 2 On Mill ‘FcStreet in Elor6, . the Rose offers f--rDODI IanIastic L. mexrcan-vegatarlan- . . and drinks. It is verv close to artsie food at affordable Drices. campus (Universit”y Shops They have a great sele&on of Plaza), so if you really want to imported beers and are famous chow down‘, and not spend your for their frozen yogurt made life’s savings, McGinnis is for with fresh fruit and served in you, homemade waffle cones. v

K-W Book Exchange - Forget the used books: this is simply the best array of general and special interest and international magazines in Kitchener. On King Street in downtown Kitchener.

Continued

on page

MUSIC!MUSIC!-MUSIC! JOINUS...EVERYONEWELCOME! s

Auditionsstst Sept.6 Signup early at the MusicOffice/ConradGtebelCchge, Room266

-

CHORALENSEMBLES I

CHAPELCHOIR , GeorgeWiebe,Director

CHAMBERCHOIR 1 Wilbur Maust,Director

Wednesdays, 3:3OANI p.m.,CGC Chapel First Rehears&Sept*l! Sii upfor auditioh:Sept.611 Mondays

&

I

-57

Tuesdays6L‘Thursdays, 3:30-500p.m., CGCRoom 151 FirstReheadsept.12 Signup for audition:SepL612

UNIVERSITYCHOIR RobertShantz,Director

jalapeno peppers pickled ginger tofu wieners cous cous tarragon vinegar apricot tea imported chocolates kasha

I

Tuesdays,7+9p.m. CCC Room156 First Rehear&:Sept.12 Signup for audition:Sept.6,7,11

f

INSTRUMENTAL 'ENSEMBLES5 -.. J ORCHESTRA

sTAGEtiAND Michaelwcd,Ditemr

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First Rehearsal: spt. 14 Signup for audition:Sept.6-14

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Credit is atilable.

Music

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4B


\ 4B F

lmpriqt,

Friday,

September

ARTS

Bars n Pubs

pretty easily

Graduate House - Definitely worth shelling out $15 for a membership if you’re an undergrad - or sucking up to a grad student to sign you in. The cheapest beer on campus {maybe even in town), a cozy atmosphere for discussin’ and philosophizin’, and hordes of acoustic guitar-wielding folkies on the weekends. We Imprinters personally recommend their ample pitchers of sangria.

The Husther Hotel - Hot wing& pizza, homemade beef, almost ten big TV screens, and even peelers during the day, all in one building in Uptown Waterloo next door to the Princess Cinema. Formerly the Kent Hotel, the Huether is a personal favourite hangout and meeting place; check out the Brew Pub Museum and restaurant for a good and affordable menu, the Speakeasy billiards and games rooni, and the main floor for a real salt-ofth’e-earth bar atmosphere. heard too Flipper’s - Haven’t much from this notorious grungehole lately, but in past months and in its former incarnation as The Backdoor, this hole in the wall has played host to countless bands, poetry readings, and sundry other events of an artistic bent. The Highlight Club - Haven’t heard too much from this place lately, eithef, but worth checking into for Kitchener’s answer to The Bamboo if it’s reggae, hiphop, or dance music craving. At 220 King East in Kitchener. Stages - This is K-W’s most overtly high-tech dance/singles club with a more than ample supply of chrome, acid-washed denim, and self-applied chemical& where the hemlines are tight and the morals are loose, but they occasionally have marginally fun theme nights and decent bands - you can count on Blue Rodeo a couple of times a vear. On Kinn Street in downtown Kitchen&

I

i

‘1, 1989

Pop The Gator - Ever wonder just where those bars are that are always on beer commercials where everyone is going wild and whooping it up? Well, one of them is on Queen Street South in Kitchener and bills itself, quite justifiably, as Canada’s Blues Hotspot, featuring the greatest names in soul and blues, including the perennial favourites Buddy Guy and Otis Clay. Hoodoo home Blues moved Hoodoo back bands

Lounge - Formerly the of the Southern Ontario Association before it to Pop The Gator, the Lcunge is apparently in business with rock every weekend.

Hotel Waterloo - More infamously known as The ‘LOO’, the Hotel Waterloo houses a marginally classy restaurant, Chadd’g, and Taps, the watering‘hole favoured by Laurier students, jocks whose chest measurements (in inches] exceeds their IQ& and their attendant women. But the booze is cheap and it’s

iaid back, intimidated.

if you’re

not

Waterloo Jewish Students; > Association

General Meeting (Yep, it’s that time again)

Thursday, Sept. 4th. at 4530 p.m. in MC 4040’ We are going to have a great semester. You should be part of itl

Phil% Grandson’s Place - Sandwiched between Marty’s and Stanley’s Burgers is Waterloo’s stab at an alternative music club; surprisingly enough it works, even if there are a few too many jocks and black-clad wannabee gothics during the school year. Try out their extensive menu, but go for the music on the weekends and watch Imprint’s Hip Happenings section to tiee who:s playing Wednesdag nights - the last year has featured the likes of The Dream Syndicate, The Cruesomed, and Nomeansno. The Grand If you have too much class to set foot in the Doll’s Houst?, yet another local strip-joint, you can go around the building to Huggy’s, an otherwise run-of-the-mill, tawdry singles bar except for the hilarious tribute bands and the soonto-be-resurrected (we hope) Tuesday night Amateur Strip Night where you can say “hi” to our favourite waitress, Pani, and perennial Amateur Strip champ, Jumpin’ Jack Flash. Highlands Anyone who, listens to 4107 has probably heard of “the Highlands in Cambridge.” Formerly “Ballingers”, many big names have played here including Iggy Pop, The Alarm and Northern Pikes, The Olde English Parlour - Emulating a British pub atmosphere, the Parlout, on King Street near Erb in Waterloo, is a place where you can play darts (remember to bring your own) and drink warn& dark beer by the mugful. It is expensive by student standards and attracts an older crowd. The Parlour has live entertainment which usually consists of someone playing a guitar and singing or someone playing the piano. The Bombshelter - University of Waterloo’s warhorse, The Bomber is the preferred alcove for a couple of beers (or pitchers] after (or instead of] class. Rock ‘n’ roll nights pack The Bomber every Wednesday and special events take place year-round, including the infamous, sodden Green Beer Bash every St. Patrick’s Day. Weekends feature some of the best in Canadian music: 13 Engines, Change of Heart, and Cowboy Junkies all put on great shows in the past year. The Albion 2 The glorified broom closet on the second floor of one of Guelph’s most notorious dives is Guelph’s answer to the Cabana Room and the Apocalypse Club rolled into one. Not only the biggest names in Canadian independent music roll through here, but -also, such international alternative kingpins as The Chills and False Prophets.

Time Club - This would seem to be Cambridge’s answer to the Big Bop, a huge danceifunhouse with different levels and dance floors playing different types of music from 60s psychedelia to hip hop, and filled with little rooms out of the blare of the speakers. The Twist - A converted roller rink that has served as an underage cIub for some time, The Twist is apparently in the process of obtaining a license and word has it they will be bringing in some big-name acts in the none-too-distant future.

Lulu’s - The longest bar in Canada lives at Lulu’s. If you want to check it out, be prepared for drunken middle aged swingers and Ronnie Hawkins, Oh yeah, don’t forget to wear your sequined headband. and meat Ruby’s - Danceteria market aptly describes this nightclub. It’s the kind of place where the dudes line up around the dance floor ogling the chicks before they make their big move. If you want to check out the actiofi, it’s on King Street North at the Waterloo Inn.

Fed Hall - One of UW’s claims to fame is being home to Canada’s largest student pub. Club Fed gets some of the hottest acts going, so strap on your bodgie boots and dance your feet off. Remember, if you are a UW student under 19, you can get in but you will not be served any alcohol. .

Arpdm Dugout- - Styled as a sports bar with big-screen sports going all the time, Arpo’s would seem to be an odd venue for hardcore shows, but such bands as Toxic Reasons have laid waste to the stage recently. Ort: Scott Street (near Market Square) in downtown Kitchener. Shooters gles bars Shooters sity and specials

and sin- Roadhouses are nothing new, but has proximity (UniverWeber] and a few great going for it. r

Marty’s - Yet another version of the neighbourhood bar them& this one is usually filled with regulars and nighthawk& as it’s right across from Laurier at King and University.

Books, records Carry-On Comics Uptown Waterloo if Marvel Comic fetish, Men‘, used Dungeon paperbacks, or old Bogey and Superman.

Heaven in you have a or dig Xand Dragon posters of

Now % Then Books - Yet more used books in downtown Kitchener, but the real drawing card here is the vast selection of comics from the standards to Love & Rockets, Frleak Brothers to the more “alternative” comics. On Queen Street in downtown Kitchener. The Record Store-The best prices for new records, cassettes, and CDs in town are, surprise, surprise, in our very own Campus Centre. You can also find a huge variety of hip and/or offensive T-shirt#g, loads of bargains, and even make a personalized special event if you can’t find what you’re looking for. Keep your money on campus and J. J.‘ll love ya, Dr. Disc -’ One of the busiest stops on I<ing Street in Kitchener, especially on Saturday afternoons, Dr. Disc is usually filIed to bursting with speciald, imports, magazines, representing the whole spectrum of music. Watch the Funboard for new arrivals and the trivia question if you know it, you’ll land yourself a ten per cent discount. Wordsworth Books - They have a much better selection than a typical Coles or W. H. Smith. Wordsworth recently expanded to become new and improved, so they are better than ever. It still. isn’t as good a bargain as buying second hand books, but for new books it’s great. It is on King Street across from Water:loo Town Square. Encore Records - Kitchener’s original used record store has moved into a spacioud, airy new location on-Queen Street to enhance their selection of used records, cassettes and CDS, as well quite simply the as rental CDs best around. Princess Cinema - If you buy a membership, this is the best movie deal in town - and the most interesting. The Princess is a repertory cinema offering a great selection of foreign,filmS, cult classics and box office blockbusters. They also host live acts about once a month, including performers such as Andrew Cash, Located behind the Huether on Princess Street in Waterlod, this cinema is a must for dedicated filmgoers.


i r I

Imprint,

ARTS

Kitchener-Waterloo is not exactly a seething cauldron for bands to brew in; K-W can barely support the few venues it has. Local musicians are thus caught in a quandary: is it hard to be in a band here because there are few venues, or because there is little interest outside the university, or does the former cause the latter, or the latter the former? Excepting the blues hot spot Fop the Gator and the yuppyidinosaur graveyard Lulu’s Roadhouse, local bands have the pauper’s choice of basically only the two UW venues, Club Fed and the Bomber, and a few real world joints, such as Phil’s Grandson’s Place, the Huether Hotel, and once in a while the Princess cinema. But, bucking the odds, K-W has spawned a few bands of note. The following list is by no mean? complete. Ken and Bri I only know of this duo from a tape that they sent to Imprint, Contrasts. It is on sale around the region, but they won’t be playing live around here in a while as Bri is studying in Rome and Ken in Stuttgart. Sort of New Age, sort of folk, sort of Pink Floyd, it is interesting in that it takes a direction different from most. If this is your thang, check it out: they do it as well as anybody. Gordie Gordo and the G Men There is something cosmic about these guys. The first time 1 saw them was exactly a fortnight before the summer solstice, and the second was exactly on the date of the lunar eclipse. In fact, they left the stage exactly eleven minutes before the apex of the eclipse. Unrelated? It is up to you to decide. However, the first time you see them, gentle reader, you will become as dependent as I on them. You will need to witness

September

1, 1989

again their aural sacrifices and the Pink Furry Guitar: you will need repeat exposure to the diabolical Sweet Angel Honey Baby. They are Ii ke heroin to me. Describing their music is foolhardy, if not impossible. Mister T Experience comes close, though, to mapping their hard edged power pop. Humourous and nasty, Gordic Gordo and the G Men are chiefly responsible for our continued existence. Gord)~ Ramble Returning students may know this outfit as Garden Bower Gord Bolan (the patronymic] go1 a new drummer and changed tht name, but he and partner Pau: Weiler made sure the trio3

The cosmos and Gordie Gordo

I

sound remained the same. Interestingly enough, the word ramble is a perfect explanation of their sound: mellovv, drifting, and owing a lot to the Velvets and Meat Puppet& though I have no idea if the latter was actually an influence. They have released two albums and a few tapes as Garden Bower. Very good on vinyl, but bring a friend and a deck of cards if you see them live; they rival the Cowboy junkies for stage presence. Music to talk by. Jizmo Jizmo, a synonym for aesthetic terrorism. A lifestyle: mind fuck. Shunning the past and ignoring our doomed future, Jizmo ruthlessly lives the now, forging concensus reality as they step on toes and crush skulls. Not art, not pretty, but necessary. File under: life. The Rhinos The Rhinos take a bit of jazz, a bit a funk. a chunk of humour,

and serve it on a platter of solid pop rock. No categories here; they play everything from their crowd pleasing punk rave up Andy to acoustic renditions of Jacques Brel compositions. Danny Michel sort of fronts the Rhinos, although the band appears seamless and in no need of leaders. But Michel is a hell of a showman and this, combined with the band’s deft song writing and obvious musical talent, raises the Rhinos well above the average bar band with jazz pretensions. I really like this band. Some Cliches Wither This is the brain child of late night CKMS man Frank Fowlie. Some Cliches Wither are a free form jazz band (mind you - my knowledge of jazz and jazz categories is embarrassing] and they gig around the area on occasion. They have at least one tape out and have a cut on the CKMS album, A Giant Leap of Faith. In fact, it was Fowlie working in tandem with CKMS music boss Jacquie Bruner who put together that CKMS product. From this list of bands, both the Rhinos and Gordie Gordo also have

Tree frogs lay down songs on said album.

and die. “I _ am _ the __last- person in the world to call for music that is more approachable; I believe musicians should play how and what they want. But if you want to be different (read: boring), be artistic, or else I am forced to call it what I think it is: uninspired pretense.” Judge for y ourself, but be warned.

Suburban Distortion I haven’t listened to their second tape, Semi-Detached, since I reviewed it last fall, So, why think of new nasty things to say when I have the luxury of quoting myself? “The plodding drum machines combined with little instrumentation and a dirge for a voice are more fit for a perverted requiem than for music they claim has been compared to the Velvet Underground.

-

Continued

on page

613

MR.GROCER

WELCOME BACK STUDENTS WX

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6B

Imprint,

Friday,

September

1, 1989

ARTS

.

Hip- Autu.nym events I

Once again it’s Fall in the Twin Cities and this year the accent’s on FUN. Maybe you are in darkness and black confusion as to where you can go to get your share of “kicks”. Fear not, I will serve as your guide. Like the elder brother 1 never had, I’d like to think of myself as beacon, serving to part the depths of inky blackness and leading you to your deserved reward. Each year, in the second week of September, the Village Green plays host to a big free outdoor concert. So on Tuesday, the 12th Kim Mitchell will do his (ob-

vious joke) rock ‘n’roll duty at 3 p,m. If the weather fails to coopera&. the show goes on’, in Fed Hall at 9. -

“Good for what ails ya!”

--DR.DISC

172 KING

Federation Hall is the biggest student pub in the country (or something like that). For such a big venue, you need some big names. The dniy confirmed act ai Fed Hall so far is The The, on Wednesday, November 1st. The The will be touring to support the Mindbomb album, the lineup now includes ex-Smiths axman Johnny Marr. But rumors are flying, names like Public Image Ltd., with Gene Loves Jezebel(!); and perennial student fave’, Billy Bragg, have been mentioned.

Continued

Another ascendant star in the entertainment firmament, Cowl boy Junkies are pencilled into the Humanities. Theatre sometime this Fall, but nothing’s certain, so don’t quote me on that. Besides Fed Hall, the other main campus venue for live music is the Bombshelter. Nestled in the Campus Centre’, the ‘Shelter has hosted some groovy windigs in the past. The future iooks even brighter! Two weeks from today, Vancouver rock monsters, Sons Of Freedom drop into the ‘Shelter for muscular post-punk noise mongering. Not to be missed. Another guaranteed good time will be had by all when our old friends, National Velvet pummel our eardums with some sinuous guitar grinding on September 22nd. Then’, less than week later’, .on the 28th some big stars will stumble in - yes, the Dead Milkmen! The Court jesters of punk, it seems the Milkmen get bigger with each day.

ST. W.,

from 5B

The Treefrogs This folk rock outfit recently opened for The Men They Couldn’t Hang at Phil’s and by all accountls held their own on stage, winning new fans in the process. Described by their lead singer as “a cross between Box Car Willie and Ratt, with a little bit of the King thrown iti,” their hybrid sound can be heard on their tape, Live at Lloyd%, and on a new forthcoming five song tape. The latter should be avaiIable when this copy of Imprint arrives on your front porch, or in your hedges.

wx

Another renamed band. WX used to be the Weathermen, but then Peter Stathis wrote them a letter asking for their Black album and they replied nicely that he was referring to a British band, the Weathermen. After the red faces subsided, the GueIph Weathermen picked a new name’, one that was mysteriously founld on the back of their debut album cover, though they were still the Weathermen then. You guessed it: they have an album out and it is a good one at that. While the album is dark and brooding, WX come across as a different band live. They have much more of an edge on stage and are quite entertaining.

743-8315

;W Waterloo Jew b

Students Association Presents Our Famous Arirzual k Wine and CheeseParty

Featuring= Good Wine

Kosher Wine F)m Times Stimulating CunversaGon When: Where:

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PRICE:

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Fresh, -Faculty arid Students ate all We&me join the fun! $2.00 members

A VA tLA6LE A T:

UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO BOOKSTORE STATIONERY DEPARTMENT WHILE

QUANTITIES

LAST!

Wednesday, Sept. 20th. Psych Lounge, Pas 3005 I 8~00 p.m.

to


Justin Wells Imprint staff

by Derek Weiler Imprint staff Pe$haps 1989 will go down as the year of the “wacky cover”, what with the Lemonheads’ Luka and Dinosaur Jr.% Just Like Heaven. And now, we have a couple of LPs featuring a whole slew of alternative acts trashing classic tunes by some of rock’s elder statesmen, Believe me when I say, this is the kind of stuff record reviewers live for. To fall in love with The Bridge, one need only look at its track listing. Dinosaur Jr. doing Lotta Love? Pixies doing Winterlong? Nick Cave doing Helpless? College radio programmers actioss the’land have no doubt been spirited to Nirvana. So let’s get it on record: The Bridge is one of the gems of the year. Not surprising&, the most fun cuts are the irreverent ones. Take, for example, Dinosaur Jr.‘s baffling evisceration of Lotto Love, w-hich began life as a charming little love song. Enter six-string serial killer J. Mascis’, splattering guitar blood everywhere. Similarly, The Flaming Lips attack After the Goldrush like a wild animal, biting huge chunks out of it. What is surprising is that a number of the bands on The Bridge play it straight. The Pixies’ Winterlong, Henry Kaiser’s medley of The Needle and the Damage Done and Tonight’s the Night, and Victoria Williams’ Don’t Let It Bring You Down are all delightful, clearly the work of genuine Neil Yo-ung fans,

L Loop’s Cinnamon Girl and Nick Cave’s Helpless straddle the line, somehow retaining all the spirit of the originals’, while still bearing the distinctive stamp of their performers. (And by the way, just hearing Nick Cave utter the line There is a town in north Ontario is something of a recording event in itself.) Add some fine tracks by Soul Asylun-& Nikki Sudden and Sonic Youth, and The Bridge comes up as a revelation from beginning to end. Even if it didn’t contain some spectacular performance& The Bridge would still be invaluable simply because it offers updated renditions of the work of one of rock’s finest songwriters. The Byrds tribute, though, is a bit of a disappointment. If The Bridge offers us the '27 Yankees of alternative rock, there are just too many bush-leaguers on Time Between. Of course, the best stuff is truly remarkable indeed. Dinosaur Jr. (them again!) turn in a surprisingly straightforward version of Feel Q WhoIe Lot Bettef, except they’ve got some mystery geek singing on top of the track (the mystery geek also makes his presence felt on Lotta Love). Thin White Rope’s Everybody Has Been Burned bubbles and roils like a vat of acid

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that’s threatening to explode in your face. Miracle Legion offer a countrifed romp thiough Mr. Spaceman. Also noteworthy are The Chills’ Draft Morning and Nigel and the Croses’ Wild Mountain Thyme. (Nigel and the Crosses are alternative rock’s answer to the Travelling Wilburys, consisting of R,E,M.‘s Peter Buck, The dBs’ Peter Holsapple, and Robyn Hitchcock & the Egyptians.) There’s lots tif other highly listenable stuff on this LP, from bands like Giant Sand, The Primevals and The Moffs. But not much of it really grabs me the way it should. Maybe. it’s the material; the Byrds could never touch Neil Young anyway. ,Oh well. One truly brilliant compilation album a year will do. Give Time Between a listen on CKMS or something, but rush out and buy The Bridge if you have to spend your lash penny.

With this album -the 8-52's have succeeded in maintaining their status as an aberration which means they’re still potentially subversive, Don’t count on finding much subversion on this album though. Cosmic Thing is an incredibly formulated, conservative release for a band which once gained its fame by making waves, Overall the album sounds like it should have been released about five years ago, and the band look pretty much the way they did a decade ago. Don’t buy this album if you’re shopping around for interesting new concepts, new techniques and brilliant ideas. If you’re’ looking for insightful lyrics, or just an all around “good” album

you’re reading the wrong review. Howevef, don’t despair over the demise of the B-52's yet; if you’re looking for something rather silly and somewhat nostalgically refreshing you’re looking in the right place. Considering the recent death of guitarist Ricky, it’s rather surprising that this album is as upbeat and happy as it is.. Conversely, considering it was produced by Nile Rodgers (of Chic) and Don Was (of Was (Not Was)) it’s not too surprising that it ended up being badly overproduced. With Cosmic Thing the B-52’s are still as silly, shallow, cheesy and optimistically naive as ever; and something about that attitude is still refreshing after ten years of being exactly the same. With the recent wave of prop& ganda music it’s kind of nice to find a band who have absolutely nothing to say about anything. Cosmic Thing is a nice upbeat album for a lazy summer day. Nothing on this album will shock you. Nothing on this album will offend you. Nothing on this album will try to change your life. This album is a lemon which will make you think a lot about lemonade, and may even put a smile on your face.

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Imprint, Friday, September

by Derek Weiier Imprint staff It began innocently enough, at a swamp in rural North Carolina. The noxious slimewater was also used as a dumping ground by the neighbouring town of Charlotte. Her& the town’s detritus accumulated: the rotted, stringless bodies of ancient acoustic guitars; cracked shards of vinyl that were once Led Zeppelin record albums: godawful spandex clothing that even the Salvation Army refused to take. Then one dagl, after a paperwork snafu, the local nuclear power plant began channelling its radioactive waste ‘into the swamp. Not long afterwards, on the proverbial dark and stormy

1, 1989

*_

night, a great bolt of lightning struck this wretched bog, and a te-rrible genesis began. As the rain poured down relentlessly, a hu e rock ‘n’ roll beast rose up an fi shambled out of the muck. The monster had a name: I am Fetchin Bones!, it cried, Strangely though, as the beast went out and prowled the earth, no one seemed to notice. Yes, it’s true. Despite their being one of the very best bands in the US:, despite their having been signed to a major label (following the release of the indie gem Cabin Flounder in ‘851, Fetchin Bones remain criminally overlooked. With a little luck, the band’s new LP Monster just might change all that. This is the most accessible, listener-friendly Fetchin Bones album yet (not only is it the first Bones disc to be released on CD, it’s also the first to include a lyric sheet]. Happily, though, they’ve sacrificed none of their integrity or quality. Fetchin Bones’ savage roar of old is captured on tracks like Spot and the ferocious Love Crushing. For the most part, though, there’s a new sense of wistfulness and lighthearted-

RECORD REVIEWS

by Kevin Co&no Imprint staff

ness, exemplified in the almost lilting ballad Deep Blue. The vast majority of the songs are sustained tension’, rather than uncomprotiising rockouts of the past. Quibbles? Well for one’, Ed Stasium’s sparkling-clean production isn’t really suited to this band. The guitar doesn’t snarl, the bass doesn’t prowI, the way they should. Only Hope Nicholls’ caterwauling voice - always the Bones’ most distinctive feature - really survives this

scrubbing and polishing. And the album’s lightweightedness - although it certainly provides a fine introduction to the band’s wtlrk - will inevitably disappoint longtime fans. But enough of this critical evaluation shit. If you’re a fati, you’ll undoubtedly buy this LP no matter what I write. If (to move on to the far more likely scenario) you’re a stranger to the Bones, then it’s time you made a move that’s long overdue. Buy this album! Buy This Album! BUY THIS ALBUM!

This gets my award for the weirdest concept ever sold to a major label this’year. Prince to score the music for Batman??? I could think of about three hundred thousand other choices (like Shadowy Men from a Shadowy Planet, or even Jim ThirlwelI, for Chrissakes), but the stupid thing is that it works incredibly well. God knows it shouldn’t, but then agaiti, life is full of surprises. There’s only eight songs on the album, and one of them really sucks. It’s -called The Arms of Orion, and, aside from being meaningless, is a duet between His Shortness and Sheena (Do I Ever Need a Career Boost) Easton. it is too sappy for words, and it’s not even dirty, which is the only way that I’ll ever listen to a Prince ballad. But the other shit is messed up. This kick-ass funk is the best thing Prince has done since the Sign o’The Times thang. Songs like Trust, .The‘..Electric Chair and Scandalous (slow, but filthy beyond belief and steamier than watching Body Heat five times in a row) really latch themselves into yo’ brain. But the absolute killer track is the lead single’, titled tritely enough Batdance. It is Prince’s finest funk mess-ter-piece ever. The best place to hear the track is in your favourite dance hole, ‘cos it changes time signature no less than four times, which really pisses people off on the dance floor. Snippets of dialogue float in and out; sampled noise and banging permeates the music;

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and right in the middle Prince lays into the most screaming guitar solo sincle Let’s Go Crazy. Unfortunately, you just know that all those little bat-weenieg, frothing at the mouth over the whole Batman explosioti, are going to line up in droves to buy this just ‘cos it’s got the Batman logo on it - slo you might have to kick a few of them in the head to ‘purchase this record. But go ahead. You have my permission. I mean‘, what’s a few fractured skulls in the battle for rock ‘n’ roll, right? /

songwriter, guitarist and sole member of The The has been playing in bands since age 11. His influences include Syd Barrett, Throbbing Gristle, The Velvet Underground, Cabaret Voltaire, Foetus and The Residents. He claims his music is a sport of modernized form of the early blues; that what he’s doing is what the early greats of the blues would be doing if they were just sta.rting out today. Lyrically he prefers -to deal with the darker side of human exqstence. Believing that peopies’ thoughts randomly intermix the personal and the globaI, his lyrics tend to flirt simultaneously with international crises and private disaster.

Mind Bomb is yet another brilliant piece of work by one-man band Matt Johnson. Whereas previous The The albums tended to be albums to stand up and dance to, this one is definitely an album to sit down and listen to. Mind Bomb is somewhat more One - man man relaxed, less musically aggresI sive, and more smoothly produced than was The The’s previous album’, Infected. Make The smooth, deceptively reno mistake about this album laxing tone OF this album quietly though, it’s no less forceful them urges on the hidden aggression any previous Matt Johnson propackaged into the lyrics. And as ject: the lyrics on this one are usual this album demonstrates especially hard hitting. Johnson’s technical excellence. If you have even the slightest ’ Johnny MarT, among others, interest in Matt Johnson’s work, makes a gu#est appearance on this aIbum will bring you particthis album to provide ace guitar ular pleasure, and if you’re lookwork on Gravitate To Me. ing for an introduction to his The album’s well worth a music, this is a good place to listeti, and their appearance at $tart. Fed Hall November 1 should be Matt Johnson: lead singer, well worth seeing.


Imprint,

Friday,

September

1, 1989

9B

by John Hymers Imprint staff The Reality in which we lahour, sweat, and try to grasp for some basic understanding is constantly changing the rules. We are damned by our impotence in trying to affect any sort of meaningful change. We don’t know the game, but we are trapped in it. We want to understand, we want to work with it and mold it, but Reality is a jellyfish with poisonous tentacles. And it is controlled, but not by us. We are doomed and damned, threatened and terrorized. As I write these few impoverished words, forests the size of P.E.I. are being chewed away by human termites with their mechanized teeth. The Greenhouse Effect is thus multiplied, sealing our ghastly fate. But our immediate danger really iS secret societies. Do you know what your neighbour ‘is up to? If I were you, pal, I woulid find out. I know my neighbour ‘may snap under the strain of his pledges any day and poison my bodily fluids. He belongs to the Industry: I am prepared.

agitation’, it is clear where >the frontiers of this battle are drawn. The pop format. There the two armies wage a brutal war of dire consequences. The prize: souls. Cloudland is chock full ‘o damning traits like perfect hooks, great lyrics, and a perfect understanding of the pop format. In fact, it is the latter which limits the disk to simple excellence: truly, Pere Ubu had the audacity to destruct and reconstruct the

STUDENTS START

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The giant machine of the music Industry has pacified us into the pleasure seeking imbitiles we are. Pane et circensis omni. Our only hope is to sift thr’ough the tonnes of placebos sent our way to try to discern the true musicians who have slipped through the Industry’s controlled dam(n). The mere thought of such infiltrators causes the Industry to further their techniques: for every Pere Ubu that bites the finger in the dike and escapes, they send another pop Messiah to visit the new neighbourhood, the Shopping Mall. Discounting the chance that Pere Ubu are agents of the enemy in this war of pacification versus

pop model, but the results sound like they used Japanese language instructions: nothing is where it should be and it looks weird, What a way to flaunt the Industry. The battle is far from over and the danger is just being realized. It is never too late to rebel with a raised fist, to take a stance. But only those who still own their souls may join the fight. Good luck, fellow warriors.

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Imprint,

Friday,

September

“Just think

of me as the mathematical Picassow S.L. Hodgins, F. W. Letniowski mathNEW 84 pages

by Jeff Smith Imprint staff Well, it finally had to happen. As a recent math graduate, I have had several years to enjoy the truth of the infamous Prof Quotes column in mathNEWS. It was only a matter of time before they were collected into a book. Compiled by Stuart Hodgins and Frank Letniowski, ivith illustrations by Peter Ponzd, Picasso is now available from Math-Sot on the third floor of the MC building for the modest price of $4.00.

1, 1989

- BOOKS

The book is a cornDilation of humourous quotes frim professors on campus who had the misfortune to utter them in the presence of a mathNEWS reader. I use the word truth to describe them as that is precisely what they represent: the gut level truth, recognized by ail-who hear it, but which for political reasons, cannot always be labelled as such. Consider some of-these examples: “If my wife’s giving me a hard time, then you’ll all fail,” - J.

them, you should do them.” - R, Went zell “I didn’t check my overheads, so today’s lecture will be in Spanish.” - Anonymous Don’t believe that only mathies will understand the humour, Although there is a small section devoted to math-related humour, most of it is a distillation of the faux pas committed by lecturers of all disciplines, arts, engineering and math alike. Do I recommend the book? Certainly. I can think of no better way, twenty years from now, to recreate the mood of the lecture halls than ’ to casually flip through the 84 pages in this book. Pages filled with comments that show the professors and their professees as people united in the quest for communicatioti, understanding and really cheap draft beer.

Baker

“To build a hardware model of God is non-trivial.” - D. Dyment “Only those of us who had horny ancestors are still with us today.” - H. Lefcourt “If you can do these problems, don’t -bother; if you can’t do

First Year University: A Survival Guide Ontario Institute for Studies Education 59 pages

in

by Jeff Smith Imprint staff Concerned about how to survive the socio-economic miasma of university life? Well, the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education has produced a guide book-to try to help you through the hardest parts. Organized as a collection of anecdotes, written by a group of survivors, the Survival Guide attempts to depict the glories and pitfalls of the higher education experience. While many of the stories are useful, I found an unpleasant number of articles which are little more than pointless griping.

- KNA>PSACK WEEK

One such piece, entitled My Iife with Biff, simply complains about Biffs punk lifestyle and lack of interest in his studies. Biff failed eleven of twelve courses and he smellerd bad. Is this useful information to the Waterloo neophyte? Do we learn any valuable life-lessons from Biff? If you are of the opinion that you can ignore your work and still pass then you are already too far gone to be saved by this flimsy warning. While the Survival Guide addresses many of the highs and lows of the lifestyle that you are embarking upoti, .its two most salient points, if followed, can save you the $8.95 cover price. 11 Remember you are not alone. By making friends with the other fro&, you can band together to overcome many of the hurdles. There is strength in numbers. 2) Many schools organize some kind of big brotherlsister system to give you access to an upper year student who can guide you through the real-life pitfalls that none of the Administration literature will admit to.

Take advantage qf this opportunity. Learn from the mistakes of those who have gone before you. Beyond these two points, the book becomes a collection of reassuring anecdotes, Unfortunately, there are no stories from people who didn’t make it through the system. The drop outs could probably provide much more useful advice than the graduates. In summation’, I would most strongly recommend the Guide for people who are seething with pent-up anxieties about the impending year, I’m not certain that it will. soothe any of those fears, but it: will put them in relatively realistic perspective. But since you are already on campus, you can just follow points one and two above and skip the book. You already have access to far more expertise than the Guide offers. First Year University: A Survival Guide is available from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, at 252 BIoor -Street West, Toronto, (426) 926-4723.

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1, 1989

MB

End of term record roundup Robyn Hitchcock & the Egyptians - Queen Elvis - “a notbad album but Robyn Hjtchcock isn’t not-bad, he’s great, It’s frustrating to see a brilliant artist refuse to challenge himself.” (3) Keith LeBlanc - Stranger Than Fiction - “not as dense as his last effort but it packs the sonic wallop that most industro-electronic body music weenies can only dream of.” (4) Pixies - Doohtth - “an album about the forthcoming end of life as we know it that establishes the Pixies as the most vital, important American band working today.” [ 5)

u.].c. - Like Ninety - “Should you pay money for this? If you like the band, why not; give them some money and - who knows? - one day they may put out another real album.” 13)

New Model \Army - Thunder and ConsoIation - “A fine addition to Wyndham Hill’s “Battlezone Environments” series. It stands proudly alongside such classics as the Neverending Explosion and MusicjFrom Dying Bodies.” (43 Judy Smali - Home Front “Carefully written lyrics that reniind us of atrocities we would rather forget. Unfortunately the melodies are often familiar and predict able.” (3) ,I Guilt Parade - Coprophobia “Unless you happen to be a country die khead, it’s worth spinning around your table. They live up to their billing as the best hardcore band in Tordnto.” [3) Corpus Vile - What Does It Take? - “ The most boring hardcore I’ve ever heard. My lower colon threatened to leap up my spinal cord and strangle my brain.” (I/Z] Tin “Like tion well ever

Machine - Tin Machine listening to Station to Staat 78 rpm. This could very be the last good thing he releases.” (4)

Guadakanal Diary - Flip- Flop - “Energetic, pleasant and listenable - and after hearing it half a dozen timed, I can barely remember a thing about it. There’s nothing to distinguish Guadalcanal from a host of other guitar based Southern bands.” PI

Band Of Swans - Love Agenda - “A triple axe attack that serves up some groovy hooks and foot tapping rhythms. pitture the Bangles with some gutb, brains and dressed in more than their underwear,” 14) Wire - It’s Beginning To And Back Again “Head and shoulders above last year’s A Bell Is A Cup. Thumbs up to a great album!” (4) Bambi Slam - Bambi Slum “Ftir the most part, pretty standard stuff, Nice, but as with most nice things, it won’t change your life.” (31

Xymox - Obsession EP - “The style isn’t all that new but if you still like that techno-pop sound of your youth-gone-by you should enjoy this.” [43 Various Rip Dudes - Ghosts of the Civil Dead Soundtrack “Foreboding and positively eerie music when juxtaposed with the grisly monologues makes for some genuinely spooky late night listening. At least, for the first few listens.” (3 I/2)

Martin Stephenson & the Dain= tees - Glodsome Humour and Blue - “the energy and ‘variety of his music is matched by the personal relevance of his lyrics. A complete songwriter.” (4)

Continued

on page 12~

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Imprint,

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I, 1989

ARTS

Live Skull Positroction “Somehow manage to rise above their boring “alternative” origins and Pull off some interesting tunes. Through an unholy pact with he-who-cannot-be-named (Martin I Bisi) they make that tired art-damage formula work.” (4) driving’n’cryin’ - Mystery had - “The album is split between country balladry and lumbering hard rock. Unfortunately they’re not very exciting in either mode.” (2 112)

The Oyster Band - Ride - “Provides pleasure at every turn; relief from trashv hi-tech elevator

De La Soul - Jenifa Taught Me EP - “Display unprecedented wit, originality and inventiveness in a genre that’s becoming increasingly stale and predictable. Clearly humanity’s last hope.” (3 l/Z)

Love and Rockets - Motorcycle EP- “Familiar and predictable. The song titles are boring but the music’s worse? (1)

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metal- band. -The songs sound alike, the lyrics are inane. This album sucks more than a souped up Filter Queen.” (1)

WE DELIVER LUNCH & DINNER I

2399 363 King

1

Bill Pritchard - Three Months, The Stone Roses - Stone Roses r Three Weeks and Two Days - “Despite a cool sleeve and a “A sound that’s inoffensive, elefine and pleasant album, the gant, even dignified but not very - Stone Roses don’t live up to their interesting. Mainstream pop billing as the independent Sethat’s fun at first but quickly cond Coming.” (3) * wears out its welcome,” (31 The Silencers - Bhies For Buddha - “Simple and soulful, the SiIencers could do big things in the future. Lush, vast, and full of

i I

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.BUY A ‘! RACK OF-RIBS AND GET ONE AT l/2 PRICE OFFER EXPIRES SEPTEMBER 30, 1989 NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFER

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I I


ES FEATURES

FEATURES

details revealed in I .

Shocking

FEATURES

FE:

.

l

The sexual’ pdlout! w about

Chaicesm Cow t est y Centre

Sexuaiit

y

Resource

Beginnings can be both exciting and frightening. A beginning is a time of changes and a time of choices, and beginning your life as an independent person will involve these choices. There may be opportunities available to you that you’ve never had before, and you’ll be making a lot of decisions. Many of these decisions will affect the person that you are and will become. Some of the choices and new opportunities are going to involve your sexuality - what you feel and how you express yourself sexually. Choices about your sexuality may be new and unfamiliar to you. You may start to hear voices real voices toti, not imagined ones. You’ll hear the voices of society, the media and the books you read. There’ll be the voices of your peers, of a close friend, and even the sound of your own voice. You probably have heard many of these voices already. Still, you may be surprised at how different they can sound in a new environment. Some will say that sexual intercourse is special - that it is sacred, a gift, or an emotional need. Others will say that sexual intercourse is an appetit& or a physical need - something ex, citing and inviting, Most of the voices will say that sexual intercourse is part of being an adult. Each person will have his or her own ideas about sex. However, what you perceive sex to be will influence the decisions you make regarding your sexuality, especially your choice to be sexually active or not. There is a choice. You can choose not to havesex and feel good about it, Some voices will say to you that a person who does not have sex is abnormal. In their opinioti, to choose to go without sex is out of the ordinarv, Goinn without

Sexuality Health Health work

and Safety ext. 3541

and Safety

Resource

885-121f,

ext. 6277

Sexuality (formerly tre) Campus

Resource- Centre the Birth Control

sex is understandable to them if the opportunities aren’t knocking on your door. But denying yourself of free and available sex’, to some, is like going on a diet at Christmas. If sex is what you’re looking for, it’s always available somewhere, but it is never free. In a sexual encountel’, you may exchange needs, ,talentg, cash or caring, but there’s always an exchange. Some exchanges are more satisfying than others.

People do decide to abstain from sexual intercourse, and for a variety of reasons. For instance, you may choose not to have sex: 1. When you’re not able to distinguish your sexual needs from your other needs. We all have needs; at times, many of them. Because your sexual desires can get entangled with other needs, it can be confusing and difficult to separate the two. The need to be loved, to be wanted and to belong are basic human needs and part of sexual intimacy. But they can also be discovered without sex. Some may reach for a warm body when what they really want at the time is a warm heart.

resources

The following on-campus organizations can be contacted for information regapding birth control methods and/or sexuality:

885-1211,

l

Net-

- offers education about HIV and AIDS, support ‘for individuals hotline: 741-8300 (10 a.m. - 5 p.m:, 7-11 p.m. Monday to Friday) 86 Queens Blvd:, Kitchener Birthright - pro-life group, provides support and assistance for pregnant women 30 Francis St:, Kitchener, 5793990

885-1211,

Cent&, Room ext. 2306

Cen-

206

Community Justice Initiatives - self-help groups for survivors of sexual abuse 298 Frederick St:, Kitchenef, 744-6549

The following community ganizations can also be tacted: ACCKWA Cambridge, and Area)

(AIDS Committee Kitchener-Waterloo

orconof

Planned Parenthood -primarily birth control and sexuality counselling contact at 743-6461 (Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday) 119 King St. W:, Kitchener

sex

2. When you’re feeling pressure to be a successful adult by having an active, exciting sex life. Being successful has become very important to the contemporary man and woman. However’, you can often lose ‘your personal definition of success at the expense of adopting a definition reinforced by society and the media. A definition of success that you’ve created for yourself will lead you to the sense of fulfilment and happiness that the word success implies. Such a personal definition involves knowing what you want and going after those things or qualities in an appropriate manner. Success with your sexuality involve! making responsible decisions in your own and your partner’s best interests. 3. When you’re not ready to sexually express your appreciation of your partner and your relationship. Each couple needs to develop their own style of being together. There’s no right or wrong way of relating to one .another. What is important is finding a way of relating that allows both partners to feel comfortable and natural. You can still enjoy closeness and pleasure as a couple without intercourse. There’s always outercourse - ways of giving and receiving pleasure and gratification without the worry of an unplanned pregnancy or a sexuallytransmitted disease. Holding, kissing and mass aging can be a part of outercourse. Intimacy is a meaningful part of living. It is only when you equate intimacy with sexual intercourse that it ‘is difficult to imagine a happy relationship without sex. Intimacy, howevet, involves .much more than the actual act of coitus. Z.

A disaster

in the making?

No, not if they’re

careful! photo by Suomi

I

Birth Control Centre changes name by Al Wadley

Sexuality

Resource

Centre

I

Effective September IT, the Birth Control Centre (BCC) has been renamed became the Sexuality Resource Centre [SRC). There will be no major differences in the operations of the BCC and SRC - the name was changed to more accurately describe the services that were already being provided by the BCC. One problem with the old name was that some people thought the BCC only had informa’tion about birth control methods. However, we also had information on sexually transmitted diseases, AIDS, planned and unplanned pregnancy, reproductive health (i.e. premenstrual syndrome), sexual assault, fertility, sexuality and sexual dysfunctions. Student volunteers at the Sexuality Resource Centre will continue to provide information about all of the above topicg, including birth control methods, Another weakness of the previous name was that the Birth Control Centre was frequently mistaken for ‘a Birth Control Clinic, Volunteers were often asked if we did pregnancy tests or dispensed Pills. We will be glad to refer clients to campus and community organizations where they can obtain such services. Hopefully c1ient.s will no longer be surprised when we say we can’t do these things ourselves. Our information and counsel-

.4. When you choose to be single because you’re. not prepared to be part of a couple or you’re enjoying being single. Being involved in a relationship is very time and energyconsuming. This is especially true of a relationship that involves sharing oneself sexually. Single people who choose to abstain from sex often find they have more time and energy to devote to other things. Living a more autonomous lifestyle can be a time of productive activities, self-growth and pleasure. The decision to be sexually active or not .is a personal choice. When you make your own decisiond, you’re more likely to understand them, and be able to communicate them to others when it’s necessary, such as when anoth.er person is affected by a decision you make. As in any decision’, you have to decide how you feel about your ling is always provided in a condecision and clearly define what fidential and nonjudgmental you want out of it. The voice that manner. Although some of the should influence any decision information available at the Sexthat you make on your sexuality uality Resource Centre is also iS yours. It’s always with you available from Healthand and it knows you best. Safety@ there are some important That’s the voice to trust and differences between the two seract upon. vices. In a time of choices, an inOne difference is that the SRC formed decision is up to you. aims to have a more informal at-

mosphere. The trained volunteers (both male and female) are all students, meaning our clients are talking with their peers, Als6, the SRC operates on a drop-in basis and appointments are not necessary. The other difference is that the Sexuality Resource Centre has a resource library that can be used by students researching papers or essays. Library books that can be signed out for a week and vertical files that can be reviewed in our office or photocopied. The Sexuality Resource Centre is operated by the Federation of Students and is open to all students and members of the Waterloo community. Feel free to visit the SRC to do research, to satisfy your curiousity or to get the information and support you need to make a difficult decision regarding sexuality. We are located in Room 206 of the Campus Centre. If you are standing at the Turnkey Desk facing Scoop$, walk half way through the Great Hall -and to your right you will see a set of stairs. We are at the tqp of those stairs to the left, If you would rather phone US, we can be reached at 885-1211, extension 2306. You can also write down your questions and send them to us through on-campus mail. If you give us a return address (with or without a name) we will send a reply. We recruit for volunteers at the beginning of each term and, because this is the start of the term, we want you! If you are interested in sexuality. can commit yourself to a three hour shift each week and can attend our training sessiond, why not be a SRC volunteer? Drop by the SRC and pick up/fill out an information sheet from the envelope beside our door. We will contact you about our first organizational meeting which will’be held soon.


146

Imprint,

Friday,

September

SEXUAL PULLOUT

1, 1989

“Step -- by step, inch by inch”

Use condom (Sexuality

Resource

Centre)

If you are concerned about sexually transmit ted diseases, AIDS, or unplanned pregnancy - you should be using condom sense. The first step in practising condom sense is buying them. Latex condoms are recommended because they provide protection from both pregnancy and STDs. Natural fibre condoms (i.e. lambskin) are not as good at stopping’ the transmission of viruses. Many brands of condom are lubricated. As long _-as a female does not have an allergic reaction to a lubricant, the Iubricated

condoms would likely be more pleasurable for her. Some condoms (i.e. Shiek Elite) have spermicidal lubricants that provide additional protection against STDs. A condom with a reservoir tip will be. less likely to break during ejaculation. Condoms are available at drug stores, convenience stored, the Campus Shop in the Campus Centre, and the Village I and II tuck shops. Single condoms can be purchased for $I from dispensing machines in the washrooms at Fed Hall. the Bombshelter - ---- -------and ---the Campus Ce&e. The Sexuality Resource Centre (CC208) has

se use it. Using contraceptive foam as well as a condom is a good idea because when the two are used together, their effectiveness in preventing pregancy is similar to that of the Pill. Condoms do not have to interrupt your sexual activity males can insert the foam for their girlfriends and females can put the condom on their boyfriends. Many couples have made this an enjoyable part of their foreplay. Males using condoms for the first time might want to practice by themselves before using them with their girlfriends. It doesn’t take long to get used to condoms - be safe.

a limited number of condoms for free distribution. Once you have purchased your condom, the next thing to do is make sure that they are carried and stored safely. Prolonged exposure to heat, sunlight or friction can weaken the latex and increase the chance that the condom will rip or tear. Coat pocket& knapsacks and purses are good places to carry condoms (as long as they are protected from purictures). Wallets or pockets of tight pants are not good places for condoms. The diagrams printed on this page shows wha’t to do with a condom once you are ready to ir

k

.

1

7. Throw the used rubber awry. You should ne ver use a condom

more than once. And llwv~ use the same

condom to have sex with more than one partner - doing that could help spread infection, from one person to the ofher.

d Compliceted? 1. Open

carefully.

Rough tearing fingernails can condom.

2. Get

or long damage the

the iube:

Make sure it’s water-based (like K-Y, Lubafax, ForPlay or Muco). Don’t put any on the penis - but put a drop just in the tip of the condom. This increases sensation without letting the rubber slip off.

3. Place

and

pinch.

Put the rubber at the end of the unlubricated penis (if uncircu-mcised, pull back the foreskin first] andpincbout tbsafrinthe receptacle tip. This leaves a space to catch the ejaculation. (If the condom doesn’t have a receptacle tip. leave a half-inch free at the end - and make sure there’s no air in it.]

4: Roll

it on.

Unroll the rubber right down to the base of the penis. Smooth out any trapped air bubbles as YOU do. Air trapped inside a condom could make it break. ’

5. Lubricate.

Not really. And not once you get comfortable with rubbers. You and your sex rrtner wi’1 be more comforta le with each other torj knowing you’re taking a liitle care to keep each other hea’lthy.

6. Afterwards...

Use lota of luba - the more Pull out lorm after coming. Hold slip ery the rubbef, the less l t tba Of tba like Py it is to break or come off tha penllrubber to make surebrwit doesn’t slip off and no semen spills d~8s~x~ake BUre it,s watarl

out.

based tube. Oil-based lubrican-ts like Vaseline or mineral oil

Pamphlet courtesy of Aids Committee of Cambridge, Kitchener Waterloo and Area(ACCKWA) - 741-8300. Reprinted by Sexuality Resource Centre, Health & Safety Resource Network and the Federation of Students.

SPEAKERS

SERIES

WOMEN AND THEIR PROFESSIONS Women in the labour force wilt be coming to the university to speak about their professions for each of the faculties. Questions are encouraged.

Arts

Science

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18,1989 Hagey Hall, Room 373 - 700 - 9:oo Professions present: lawyer, principal, social worker

MONDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1989 Davis Centre, Room 1304 700 - 9:m Professions present: dentist, optometrist, doctor

-

Enviromental

Math

MONDAY, tiagey

TUESDAY,. OCTOBER 17, 1989 Davis Centre, Room 1304 700 - 9:oo Professions present: accountant, _ teacher, programmer

Professions urban

Engineering

HKL!3 MONDAY, Davis

NOVEMBER 20,1989 Centre, Room 1304 7:oo - 9:oo Professions present: engineer, engineering consultant

MONDAY, Davis

NOVEMBER 13,1989 Centre, Room 1304 7:oo - 9:oo Professions present: chiropractor, health admin., special \education

Everyone Sponsored -For

by The more

Women’s

information,

Studies

OCTOBER 30, 1989 Hall, Room 373 700 - 9:cn p.resenti;.architect, planner, teacher

is Welcome Issues

Board,

please

contact

Federation Kim

at Ext.

of Students 6305-


SEXUAL PULLOUT

Imprint,

Friday,

September

1, 1989

1%

Side effects of the Pill

by Sarah Sexuality

Clarke Resource

Centre

cal, skin and breast cancer have all been linked to the Pill, and anyone with known or suspected Whether you’re using orakoncancer should not use it. traceptives right now or thinkOther effects of the Pill ining about starting, you should clude headaches, diabetes (in know the potential side effects of some women the Pill, like pregthe Birth.Control Pill. The Pill is nancy, can precipitate diabetes], the most popular and convenient and depression [possibly one in form of birth ccq#ol. The Pill four women are more irritable, prevents concewdn .4primarily anxious or depressed while on by inhibiting @II with two the pill). :&t radio1 .(a. synthetic hOr Many women women expesynthetic estkogen) and nore- ’ rience changes in their sex drive thindrone (a synthetic progeswhile on the Pill. When the fear tin). Most brands of- Pills have of pregnancy is removed, many both hormones. The MiniPill is a women feel more comfortable progestin-only Pill. and freer with sex. Others may complain of less sensation in the Besides preventing pregvulva, and dry vaginas on pro, nancy, the Pill affects the body gestin-dominant, low-dosage esin ways that medical researchers Women with trogen pills. don’t always understand. All the dryness problems could try side effects that can be attribusing a lubricant [see the article uted to the Pill are not yet on lubricant in this section for knowa, and for most people the more details). Pill will have minor side effects. Nausea may be a common early effect of the Pill, as your People who should absolutely stomach adjusts to the high levnot use the Pill inclyde anyone els of estrogen‘, but usually goes with any disease or condition asaway after three months. sociated with poor blood ciyculaThe Pill changes the normal tion or excess blood clotting, vaginal environment and creates including bad varicose veins and excellent conditions for the heart disease or defect. Women rapid growth of microorgawith hepatitis or other liver disnisms. Women on the Pill may be eases should also use another more susceptible to yeast infecmethod of birth control. tions and vaginitis. Those people strongly advised If there isn’t enough estrogen not to use the Pill include women or progestin in the Pills you are prone to migraine headaches, taking, or if you miss a Pill durthose with hypert ensioti, diaing your cycle, a little of the linbetes, and smokers, If you smoke ing of the uterus may slough off. fifteen or morp cigarettes a day, This is called breakthough you run a higher risk of stroke bleeding. Breakthrough bleeding and heart attack, and most docdoesn’t mean that the Pill isn’t tors at Health and Safety sugworking as a contraceptive, but gest that you don’t smoke at all if it doesn’t stop after a few while on the Pill. months, consult your doctor to make sure you have the correct Women who should probably hormone dosage. recdnsider using the Pill include The Pill may also be assothose who have experienced a ciated with skin problems, like weight gain of ten pounds or eczema, hives or rashes, and gum more while taking the Pill, and inflammation. those don’t have regular periods The problem of cervical dys(at least ten per year]. plasia, or growth of abnormal cells on the cervix, is more comThe synthetic progesterone and estrogens in the Pill affect mon in women using oral contraceptives than women not using the body in the same way natural hormones do, but may have exthe Pill. This may be more aggerated effects on some closely linked to the fact that women on the Pill may be more women. sexually active than those who Between five and seven per are not. cent of women on the Pill deDr. L. Sorbara of UW’s Contact velop hypertension. Some stuLens Clinic says that use of the dies indicate that this effect may Pill also has implications for persist even after discontinuing people who wear glasses and the Pill, or increase with dura-. contact lenses. Women who have tion of Pill use and age. just begun to use the Pill experience a hormonal change that Studies looking at the Pill and changes the chemistry of tears, cancer are inconclusive. Cervi-

FR!, VEN

/

SAT Skf*it

Where

SUN DIM-

Resource

Centre)

“I always us? a!ubricated condom, I don’t nebd to use any lubricant, right?” =Not necessarily. “Lubricant is only used for anal intercourse, right?” - Wrong again. A lot of people have heard about lubricants such as K-Y jelly, Lubafati, and Mucd, but don’t really know about its benefits. This article discusses how lubricant can make sex safer and more pleasurable for any

sexually

active

individual.

Lubricant plays an important role in increasing the effectiveness of co’ndoms in preve,nting sexually transmitted diseases and unplanned pregnancies. Adding lubricant to a condom will reduce the amount of friction between the vaginal walls and the penis during intercourse, which in turn decreases the risk of a condom tearing. Insufficient

is one cause. of condom failure that could easily be eliminated. I The use of lubricant can also make intercourse more pleasurable for both females and males especially when using condoms (latex is not the same as skin). Although the condom might already be lubricated, that does not mean there is enough lube to make intercourse pleasurable for the female. The more lubricant there ig, the less friction [and more pleasure) there will be. When condoms are used males can also directly benefit from lubrieant. If a drop of lube is placed in the inside tip of the condom [before it is placed on the penis], this will allow the condom to move freely over the head of the penis during intercourse. The fact that lubricant can increase the enjoyment of condom lubrication

This column is here to answer questions you might have about anything related to sexuality. The column is prepared by volunteers of the Sexuality Resource Centre (SRC) and each week we will answer one or two questions that we have received. In the past we have answered questions about birth control methodti, sexually transmitted‘ disease& indicators of pregr nancy, delaying ejaculation and more, There are several ways that questions can be stint to us. You can send your question through on-campus mail to the Sexuality Resource Centre, c/o the Federation of Students office. You can also leave a note in the, envelope on our door (Campus Centre, Room 206). Questions will be answered anonymously - there is no need to put your name on them. If you have questions that require a faster response, visit the SRC or call us at 8854212, ext. 2306. Our hours are posted on our door (there j will be more hours as- volunteers become available).

pleasurable

THU JEU-

FRI VEN-

SA’I SAM

\

An important thing to know is that full-time students can have their pills paid for by the UW drug plan. Note that males whose girlfriends are not at Waterloo cannot claim -the cost of their partners’ prescript ions. If you have a prescription filled at a local pharmacy, you would pay a service fee (about $4) although the drug plan will pay for the actual packages.

Full-time students who have a prescription from a doctor at Health and Safety (on campus) can get their pills there without paying any service fee. In order to get a prescription from Health and Safety, you would have to have a complete physical (even if you have had one within the last year). The physical would include an internal (pelvic] examination and the doctor will also take a family medical history. This will ensure that the Pill is an appropriate method of birth control for you, Health and Safety is located off Ring Road across from the Campus Centre. Appointments can be made b$ calling 888-4096; be sure to ask for a “long” appointment. If you ever want any information about alternative methods of birth control or potential side effects of the Pill, talk to your doctor, Health and Safety or visit/call the Sexuality Resource Centre: CCZOS, 885~lWC, ext. 2306.

.

cab be pleasura-

ble. Females might appreciate more lubricant even when a condpm is not part of intercourse. The amount of natural lubricant produced will vary depending on factors such as hormone levels and degree of sexual excitement. Sometimes nature could use a little help. One potential side effect of the PiI1 is that it can decrease the amount of natural lubrication in the vagina. If this is the case, lube should probably be a regular part of intercourse. The Sexuality Resource Centre (CC206) will have free sample packages of lubricant available in mid-September for those interested in safer and/or more

WED M&R-

WT$I,COMI@BACK

use has implications for safer sex - people will be more likely to use condoms *hen they disthat they

IUE MAR-

DEAR SEXPERT: ‘I’ve just arrived in Waterloo and I’m going to need my Pill prescription refilled soon. Can I use the prescription frdm my family doctor while ,I’m here? _ ANSWER: That will depend on what pharmacy you currently ’ have your prescription with. If your local pharmacy is part of a chain that has branches in Waterlob, it should be fairly easy to have your prescription transferred, If this is not the case, it may be simpler to get a new prescription from a local doctor and have it filled here. -

I

cover

MON LUN-

do I get my Pills?

The joy of lubricant [Sexuality

degrees. In fact, besides freedom from pregnancy, the Pill has other beneficial side effects. Women taking it have shorter, lighter’, and less painful menstrual periods. Prementrual tension tends to decrease, benign breast growths are less frequent, and the Pill also protects against pelvic inflammatory disease PI?)* Any other‘ quest&s or conterns .you may have can be answered by your doctor, at Health and safety, or at the Sexuality Resource Centre.

have had time to adjust to the hormonal changes. Women on the Pill should pay close attention to the food they eat, as the Pill alters their nutritional requirements. The Pill also alters water metabolism, and users may experience’ fluid retention’, recognizable as swollen ankles, breast tendernesd, or a weight gain of up to five pounds. . All this sounds fairly foreboding, but remember that the Pill . does not affect all women in all these ways, or always in serious

and eyes become dryer. Contact lens wearing may become very uncomfortable. The shape of the eye will also change slightly, and your prescription may change (making you slightly more near-sighted). When you go off the Pill, the eye returns to its original state. Therefor&it is very important to tell your optometrist v opthomologist that you are on the Pill, and the length of tim;e you’ve been on it, Long term users of the Pill will not be as affected by these changes because their eyes -

sex.

We Offer Packages at Reasonable Prices

1

FREE Class Photo Included in Package (cl&ses 20 & up)


16B

Imprint,

Friday,

September

The information in this article is based on the U W pamphlet “Sexual Warassment is not u CompIimerit.” It is important that people understand what constitutes sexual harassment. Sexual harassment on any level humiliates, insults, and threatens the . victim. Any time someone is forced to endure unwanted sexual attention, whether it be lewd comments or coercive intercourse, when acceptance of sexual advances is a condition of education or employment, when rejection affects grades or performance evaluatioti, or when unwelcome sexual advances interfere with the recipient’s work, there is due reason to register a complaint of sexual harassment against the offender. No one should have to endure this.sort of intimidation and disrespect, Sexual harassment ranges from unnecessary touching or patting, verbal abuse, leering, demands for sexual favourg, to insulting remarks directed toward members of one gender or one sexual preference. Victims of sexual harassment do not have to be in a position of aca-

1, 1989

demic or professional inferiority. Often it occurs between co-workers and class-mates, and while women are most oftenjvictimized, some men also encounter it. The victim of sexual harassment is not to blame because harassment is imposed sexual attention - the harasser is responsible for the abuse and the abuse must be stopped. A victim of sexual harassment should document any encounters with the harasser, keep noted, pictures and write down dated, incidents, and names of witnesses. Witnesses will serve as ‘a vital resource if charges or complaints are laid. The victim may al& cliscover that others are suffering the same abuse. Most importantly, the harasser must be informed that his’ or her actions’ are unwanted and offensive. Often a letter or a verbal statement to the harasser voicing these opinions will stop the abuse. The Sexual Harassment Officer can help you with the letI ter. Complaints should be registered with the Sexual Harassment Officer or with the department or faculty con-

SEXUAL PULLOUT ‘1

ckcned. The University of Waterloo’s Sexual Harassment Officer, Denise Angove, at extension 3541, is available for confidential discussion’, information’, and support. Other resources include members of the Ethics Committee, Counselling Services, the Personnel departmen& Health and Safety department’, Sexuality Resource Centre, and the Ombudsperson.

by Al Wadley Sexuality Resource

Csntre

Although chlamydia was only recently discovered, it is already the most prevalent sexually transmitted disease (STD) and is rapidly spreading. It is especially serious because many people 1410 have chlamydia do not have any of its symptoms and are therefore unaware of havin it. Chlamydia affects both ma Hes and females regardless of sexual orientation. In males, chlamydia can cause inflammation of the urethra. If this is left untreated, it can lead to inflammation of the testicles, which in turn can cause sterility. Some studies have found a connection bet ween chlamydia and Reiter’s syndrome (an arthritislike condition). In femaleg, chlamydia is far more serious. The infection usually starts in the cervix and can then spread .through the uterus into the Fallopian tubes. This can cause scarring in the tubes severe enough to cause infertility or increase the risk of ectopic

pregnancy (tlhe embryo develops in the fallopian tube instead of the uterus). Chlamydia can also result in pelvic inflalmmatory disease (PID), an inflammation of the entire female reproductive system. PID can lead to sterility, spontaneous abortknd, stillbirth and, in rare cam, death. Chlamydia. can be passed on to children during birth if the mother is infected, This can result in eye problems or pneumonia in the children. Generally chlamydia doesn’t let you know that ou are infected until it is esta 6 lished and irreversible damage might have occurred, It is estimated that 60 _ to 80 per cent of females and up to 30 per cent of males have no symptoms -- no scratches, no blemishes, nothing. The symptoms that do show up in females include itching or burning in th.e genital area, vaginal discharge, dull pelvic pain and bleeding between periods. Symptoms for males include painful urination and a watery discharge from the penis. lf you think that you have any of these syrnptoms (or that you might have had sexual contact with someone who does), you should see a doctor immediately. Specifically request a chlamydia test because it is not included in the standard test for STDs. It is important to note that chlamydia often occurs with gonorrhea. If you have (or have had) this STD, you should be checked for chlamydia as well. Chlamydia is treated easily and quickly with antibiotics such as tetracycline. You should also inform anyone with whom you had sexual contact in the four to five weeks before the symptoms appeared that they might be infected. Chlamydia is one of several STDs that are prevalent at the moment. Other STDs to be concerned. about are syphilis, herpeg, trichomonad, venereal warts and crabs. Ariy potential symptoms such as unusual discharge from the genitals, painful urination, sores, rashes, abdominal pain or itchy genitals should be checked out with a doctor. Early detection of sexually transmitted diseases can often make them easier to treat and will also decrease the chance of passing on a disease to a partner. You can reduce the risk of getting STDs by using a barrier me- ‘. _ thod of birth control-[condom or diaphragm) even if you are already using another method. Spermicidal, foams (i.e. Delfen) and condoms (i.e. Ramses Extra) that contain nonoxynol-9 pro.vide additional protection. Even though many sexually transmitted diseases can be cured, here is sne reason why you should avpid getting them in the first place. A recent study suggested that the risk of being infected with HIV [the virus that causes AIDS] is higher for people who have had genital ukera iions due to otherSTDs.


SEXUAL PULLOUT

Imprint,

Friday,

September

1, 1989

178

\

To Your Health C’mon m l

l

test your sex Q!

This column is prepared by the Health and Safety Resource Network, located in room 121 of the Health and Safety building. You can visit our office, leave questions in the question box of the main foyer of the Health and Safety building, or call us at 8851211, ext. 6277. This week, we bring you your first mid-term of the fall; a quiz to test your knowledge of sexually transmitted diseases, otherwise known as STDs. 1. An STD is: a) a dirt bike b) a skin tight dress c) a contagioub, sexual an infected person d) a standard tape 2. a) b] c) -d)

STDs weirdos people people motel

3. a) b) c] d)

Who’s at someone someone someone someone

symptoms

often

go unnoticed

7. Gonorrhea is: a) a gum disease b) King Lear’s wicked daughter c) a sequel to Godzilla d] a disease which, left untreated, could cause pain in the testicles and lower abdomen. It could even cause sterility.

% disease

generally

transmitted

B is: a) a vitamin b) a heavy appetite c) a potato beetle d) a liver infection common ual partners

by sex with

only happen to; and wackos who smell bad with sexual cant acts doorknobs

do you catch an STD? from a public toilet seat with a net by having sex with someone by reading a dirty book

among people

Q. Condyloma or Genital Warts are? a) successors to the Zits and Sex Pistols b) urban blight in Condo City c) warts appearing on the genitalia which with cancer of the cervix d] man-eating plants from the Amazon

risk? with a new partner with several partners whose partner has several partners who knows little about his/her partner

who have several

could

sex;

be associated

10. Herpes is: a) a Greek god b) an overpriced perfume c) a colony of nerds d) painful sores that may keep reappearing 11. Chlamydia is: a) a clam disease b) Vampira’s half-sister c) a cold damp fog d) a serious infection that’s

who has an STD

5, What is Gonococcal Urethritis or Cervicitis? a) a new type of sushi bj a mouthful of syllables c) a doctorate in basket ‘weaving d) an inflammation of the urethra or cervix that if left untreated could damage the reproductive organs of men and women 6. Syphillis is: a) a boring opera b) something under

STD whose

8. Hepatitis

4. How a) b] c) d)

c) a serious d) a sphinx

hard

to detect

and can cause sterility

12. Candida, Trichomonati, and Bacterial Vaginitis are: a) lunar landing sites b) California cults c) the three witches of Oz d) prevalent, micro-organism caused, vaginal infections obtained with or without sexual intercourse

Continued

a rock

on page 19B

Courtesy

Planned

Parenthood

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188

Imprint,

Friday,

September

1, 1989

- SEXUAL -PULLOUT

-Lonely anxiety This

poem was received

anonymously

by Imprint.

My name, it is . . . I will not teI1 It’s not important to this tale It could be you or your friend It changes not what I send

Now my mind begins to wander To my life, which has been funnier Than most of the people in this world Full of wild and unusual t.wirls

You may have passed me in the hall You may never have seen me at all The story I will now relate Could happen to anyone you might state

And

I study here just like you My only concern to make it through Until this last experience My life has changed, permanent

I think of things I’ve With my friends, my They will remember Their points of view

I must assure you at this moment I am frightened to depths unknown YOU see for these last few weeks “Maybe AIDS?” I to myself repeat.

Even as I write these worlds Few are aware of my curse Maybe some time in my life I’ve talked to some in this strife Ignorant of their trouble Which Ioneliness just makes double

that I’ve had the Lord but still feel sad wish, that if I dile They remember me as a nice guy

I’m not what-you or I’d consider A typical candidate for this matter The victims that I thought w.ere typical Were drug-users, bi- and homosexuals.

sex is a deadly

And all the time in my thoughts I try to figure out the odds Saying “Why me? I don’t deserve . . . I’ve been good . , . It’s just not fair!”

The fault perhaps of my youth I could not face the frightening truth Death is possible at any age The eighties is the time of AIDS

sinl

I think of that man all bent up Who struggles daily to j.ust wake Confined to electric wheelchairs Life to him has never been fair.

In the past

Speed, Read.i ng Read Over 1,000 words per minute

I await now the results of tests Which will dictate what is next Suicide? Anxiety? And disgrace? Do any really deserve this fate? I walk the halis and talk to friends Outwardly appearing the same and then I,think to myself “Do they know, The fear and pain that insit$e me grows?”

How if I Like My And This

Y

There is nowhere that you can run To end the circle your mind’s begun . Denial then disbelief The possibility then repeats

a stranger

But I HAVE heard it on TV The’total impact now I see They hit me to my very soul Where once the words found no hole

.

I ask the counsellor 1 still face To do some things, just in cuse The results of this fateful test Don’t work out for the very best TO For To I’m

Requires 30 Minutes of Homework per Day Six week cmmse begins Wednesday, September 20 in MC 4058 Fee including course materials is $90 (FEDS) $95 (NON-FEDS) Office

tell my 1’11 not tell the sorry,

At least a million I recall the events At the party i met I had known from

We laughed and joked the whole time I brought her home and she was mine For one night and that WCIS all Unprotected sex, invincible to aII She looked as I do today !Jealthy and happy in every way She probably wus not even aware Of her fate which could appear If I had it to do again My choices would be different But hind-sight is perfected When we think our life’s affected

Daily life is ignorant bliss Until we’re forced by death’s kiss . To face our own mortality It’s something we’ve refused to see

But these thou hts don’t seem to help It’s always dif f erent when it’s YOUR health. A spectator, that’s all they are They know not how the feelings are. die every day In some accidental way But death comes quick and what IS for the loved-ones, a heart-felt

-

times a day of that date the giri! years before

of there’s one thing I’ve lelarned from this I’m not as brave as I thought I’d have been I want to live more than anyone else Death’s n,ot romantic, if i’t’s yourSELF

friends of my fate . remain in this place one. i could have loved I didn’t plan this stuff

He says all the rhetoric “You could die at any tick A bus, a car, or some other thing Could take the lives of even kings.”

It’s true

can I face another day hear death’s on the way the man and his wheelchair mind and I are an inseparable pair just like the man, I must beware closest of friends creates my terror

How ironic this seems to be My mind has become my enemy It’s the only thing I cannot beat And the only one which won’t retreat

I look no different than four months ago To my friends that think they know The real me and what makes me tick But that’s before this life’s trick.

Why haven’t I heard from some of those Who’ve had the experiences in these proes? Perhaps I wilI not have met the fate I now dread, regret and hate

Improve Concentration and Retention

up

I see him now in a different light A,brave man in a deadly fight Every day he’s had to cope With death, not too remote

I sit and face the person who knows All the reasons now for my woes And it just can’t help but muke me wonder I’m not the first to make this blunder

Improve Comprehension by 10 to 15%

Contact the Federaiion cc 235

I used t’o say “The fags deserve it anyway” I was so flippant and judgmental But now the coin of my fate tumbles

1 have sought out counselling from So understanding of my danger Perhaps the worst of this ordeal IS the loneliness in what you feel

done this week tongue in cheek all our talks forever rocked

Mabe I could’ve been more open To their grief sg weIl hidden Uike to think I would have helped Ease their minds from lonely he/l

But you see I’m none of these Innocent perhaps to this disease ’ I always thought myself invuIneroble TO death, disease or any trouble

Unyrotected

for the years

I thank

My final

peopIe

remains pain

But AIDS is different,than accidents . With every waking moment spent You’re forced to watch your death approach Ushered by Q viral coach

It will be easier however to face If there’s purpose in it’s place So if I can stop just one of you From going through what I’m going through Perhaps this will give some meaning TO the experiences I’ve been feeling YOU really are not invincible AIDS is here, it’s just not visible I walk the paths-?‘ve always walked And talk to friends I’ve always talked Life us USUQ~ for one and all Not-quite true and that’s all. Anonymous

/ ~

r &C-e


Imprint,

SEXUAL PULLOUT

Friday,

September

1, 1989

198

How much do you knciw about STD s! Cotitinued

from

page

l7B

13. AIDS

is: a diet supplement strictly a gay problem a global rockathon a serious disease for which

a] b) c) dj

4 there

k is no known

The Women’s centre

15. If you think you have an STD, who a) Ghost Busters! b) the hair dresser c) a doctor d) the Fuller Brush man 16. An effective way to prevent a] wear gloves at all times b) make a pact with the devil c) wash up in scalding water d) use a condom as directed

The Women’s Centre provides a meeting place where women connect socially, share ideas both personal and political, and form various groups for action, support or discussion. The voiunteers turn ideas into events, such as conferences, films, dances, and concerts. As a resource centre all people can obtain up-to-date information about women’s issues and services both on and off campus. The Women’s Centre sees itself as part of the wider women’s

provides Lesbians the women lieved in and power when we

movement, and functions within this context. The centre raises public awareness of women’s issues on campus and initiates positive social change. Our priorities include: staffing the centre, profile, International Women’s Day events, networking with women’s groups on c a m p u s’, and supporting women’s achievements. The Women’s Centre &tempts to free women of patriarchal discrimination’, domination and oppression. The Women’s Centre

do you call?

an STD is to:

Now that you are over the stress of your first mid-term, I hope you take a well deserved break (maybe in bed?). If you have sex, make sure it’s fun - not something you have to worry about afterwards. For more information on safe sex measureti’, you can caI1 us at 885-1211, ext. 0277, contact Health and Safety Informatioti, H&S Bldg. 885-1211 ext. 3541, or the Sexuality Resource Centre, Campus Centre, room 206 885-1211, ext. 2306.

a safe environment for on campus. For years at the centre have bea collective strength that can be achieved work together.

At any time through&t the yeaf, new women are always welcome to join in the Women’s Centre’s activities, attend meetings or discussion groups, borrow from the resource library, or just enjoy the small but private space of the office.

Answers: 1. c 2. d 3. all 4. c 5. d 6. c 7. d 8. d

Hollywood

l

cure

14. How do you treat an STD? a) with soap b) by inviting it to dinner c) with proper medication and treatment d) like any other Short-Term Deposit

Era

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9. c IO. d II. d 12; d 13. d 14. c 15. c 16. d

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208

Imprint,

Friday,

September

FEATURES

1, 1989

Camms

sedce

maralecral _~- - ~ provid-ei and

landlord tenant advice The name df the Legal Resource Office (LRO) has been changed to the Landlord and Tenant Informatian Office (LTIO). The office is still staffed by student volunteers, and the Federation of Students still funds the operations. The name change, however, occurred to assist you, the clients, in understanding what services the LTIO provides. The office still houses many informative materials about different aspects of the law (which tiny client is welcome to read], but the focus of the office is, as the new name suggests, to assist students and me-bers of the community in u tderstanding their rights and bligations as landlords and-ten lnts. Thk volunteers are trained each term in the fundamental aspects of Landlord and Tenant law. They are not, howevet, trained lawyers. They provide

their clients with correct adirice about particular legislation in the area of landlord and. tenant law, and each case is treated with strict confidentiality. If you feel that your legal problem is too colmpleg, or it doesn’t involve landlord and tenant issued, please do not hesitate to inquire at the LTIO anyway. Another service the office provides is a complete and current list of resource numers that you can call in order to obtain professional aid regarding your particular problem, Therefore’, do not wait until your problem develops into a crisis; visit the LTIO in the Campus Centre, Rm. UOB, during office hours (posted on the door), or call 888-4634. Also, if you are interested in volunteering,, fill out a volunteer application form in the Fed Office, and place the completed form in the LTIO mailbox located there.

(Cancer canbe beaten.1 Landlord

causing

you problems?

Perhaps

the landlord

and Tenant

lnformatioq

office

can help.’

BACK TO SCHOOL

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FEATURES

Imprint,

Friday,

September

1, 1989

2tB

Imprint will not be published -Friday, ,September 8. We will resume publication Friday, September 15.

Need career advice?

BACK TO SCHOOL

SPECIAL Career Services, located in Needles Hall, room 1001, has everything you need to make your future bright. They have full-time career counsellorG to advise you, career planning and job search workshops, run gra.duating student interviews, and an alumni referral service. They also have a career resource centre, shown above, that has fites on employers, university calendars, travel information, and much more. Career Services also runs the Student Vocational Advisor (SVA) program. Trained and responsible volunteers can help you identify your skills and-interests, writeeffective resumes and letters, develop successful interview skiIts, and plan your career and job search. Check for your SVA representative at Needles Hall; office hours will be posted there in September.

808810MHz

Got a problem? Talk to Matthew There may be problems you will encounter at the University of Waterloo that you cannot handle on your own. The Office of the Ombudsperson was established in 1982 to assist you with these problems. The primary objective of the Ombudsperson’s office is to ensure that a client’s problem is dealt with in a fair and equitable manner within the university system, and that his/her rights are maintained. The ombudsperson is... - a source of information - a facilitator - a conflict manager - a problem solver e an agent of change The ombudsperson deals with... - admission problems - registration difficulties - financial aid difficulties - academic standing

promotion evaluation discipline housing concerns co-op problems difficulties with university services I, - community problems - personal problems The ombudsperson’s - prompt - confidential - impartial

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help is... LIMITED

The Office of the Ombudsperson offers an independent, impartial and objective service. All cases are dealt with as quickly as possible and in the strictest confidence. If you should have a problens, a complaint, or a question’, feel free to contact the Ombudsperson’, Matthew Erickson. The office is located in the campus centre, room 15~~2, and phone number is 885~IZIT, ext.

l

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226

1.

Imprint,

Friday,

September

PHOTO QUIZ

1, 1989

Follow the ducks for winter. 8. It’s generally

2. This

was

an eventful

year.

4. What

was

a nice

5. Come

see the

light

not picture

snack?

by Marie Sedivy Imprint staff

northern

lights.

9. When will we be safe references? 3. Big boys

a

have

big new

perfect.

Brom Jaws

toys.

TheUniversityCatholic Community Welcomes You ToTheUnivers’ty 1 of Waterloo2 -

Roman Catholic Campus Ministry Offices: St. Jerome’s College 2nd Floor: Rms 218, 220 & 222 Phone: 884-8110 Evenings: 884-7725

6. The physiques

behind

the’physics.

10. Shed

sdme

light

on a rat-infested

field.

Mass Schedule Weekends:

(Siegfried

Hall]

Beginning September 16 Sat: 5:00 p.m. Sun: 9:30 & 11:30 a.m:,7:00 p.m.

Fr. Charlie Westfall, CR. [Chaplain) - Louis Hall Rm. 14

Weekdays:

Krystyna Higgins (Secretary) Call: 884-8110 Ext. 31

Beginning September 13 Mon. - Thurs. - 12:30 p.m.

Chris Brady (Peer minister) Marg Craftchick (Peer minister)

Watch for changes during the holidays

Notre Dame Chapel

Join us SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, for the annual ORIENTATTON MASS and BARBECUE, Weather permitting, the.celebration will begin in ST. JEROME’S QUAD et 11:30 a.m. In case of rain, we will ‘use Siegfried Hall at St. Jerome’s* SEE YOU THERE!

7 . . . over

troubled

waters.

11. An assurance

of stability.


imprint,

1 PHOTO QUIZ

Friday,

September

1989

1,

238

So you think you knpw your way around campus? Are you the observant type? Here’s your chance to test your eye for detail.

;I

All 20 objects

in the photos are outdoors, clearly visible, and on clue is provided under each photo, but beware, Identify as many objects and their specific g location as you can’, and bring the entry form down to the Imprint fl office, Room MI in the Campus Centre. The deadline is S:OO p.m:,

’ the UW campus..A

I the clues

are cryptic.

1 Tuesday, September 13. I This contest is open to all UW students except Imprint staff. 1 There is a separate category for fro&+ so don’t be shy if this is i your first week on campus - one walk around campus should be 1 enough to spot many of the objects. In the case of a tie, the first 1 entry received wing, so get moving. Winners

: Imprint, 1 NAME I 12. Atoms

and compounds

and molecules,

oh my!

17. They

get led up the garden

and answers

Friday

be announced

in the next

issue

I I a

n B I m

, :

of :

15.

I I

PHONE

DEPARTMENT

path.

will

September

m

1

8 YEAR

DATE AND TIME ENTRY (Must be signed by Imprint OBIECT AND LOCATION:

RECEIVED

staff

\

member.]

1. .,.*.~*.*,,,.......*.....*........~*..*.....*......~~..*~~.

. . . . . ..~.*..*....*.t...~*..~...*..~..~..~~..~...*~~~~*~~~~~

3. 4. 5. 6.

8 .

see3hrough

those?

...*.........*..........*..

.

.

l

**...*.....*...**....

I.......****......*...*..*.*..*

. . * * ~ ~ . t * . . . . . . . . . * . * ~ * . . ~ * * .

.

.

. . * . . * . . . . . . . * . . I . * . . * * * . *

l .~....***L.....*.....*~*.~.****.....

l *.....*......~......**..*.*..~

* . . . . . . . . . . . . * . I . . * . * * * . . * . .

9.

131 Can you

l

. . ..*..***.....

. .. .. .

l *......*.*...**.*.....*....*..*.*.**.

10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*..**.......

..,.***...........**.....*.*.

13. ~,.*.........*,.............,.~..*..*....~..*..~~.*..,.~..

. ..~.*....,,....*..*.*..,~.....*~~~.......*....~...~~~=~*.

14.

17.

.....

18.

.............................................

18. A touch

Like a bridge

of Europe

at this

outdoor

.

...*

l

l

l

l

.

.

l

.*

I....................

l

*

.

.

.

.

..*.....*........

20. *.*~~~.*......**~,**.............*.~~*..*~~.*.**.....*..~.

cafe.

. . .

...........................

.............

19. 14.

..........................

FROSH: ; First Prize: The winner will receive a $20 gift certificate Reuben and Wong’$, University Shops Plaza II. ‘-

donated

by 1I

1 Second Prizei The second place winner will receive dinner for two (a $15 m value) donated by the Grand China Restaurant, University Shops Plaza I. i I OTHERS: First Prize: The winner will receive a $20 gift certificate donated by m Hucksters Restaurant, University Shops Plaza Ii. I ’ 1 Second Riax The second place winner will receive a free extra large 1 two-item pizza donated by Gino’s Pizza, University Shops Plaza I. ~ur-r,~~~~rrrrr~ur~.-r---~-----

:6 --ah

if, * Futon Fashions 19i Highland Rd, E. Kitchener I I

jays!

19. Recycle

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I 1 m I : I 1 I

INC

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744-8240

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$ I

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16. You won’t

travel

far on thk

Lilliputian

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20. Ships

roll into

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SEPTEMBER

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248

Imprint,

Friday,

September

1, 1989

FEATURE

Thirty - two. years .of by Martin Van Nierop Courtesy Information lic. Affairs, UW

and

Pub-

This year (1989) marks the 32nd anniversary of the founding of the University of Waterloo. Thirty-two years ago last ]I.& 75 students gathered together on the campus of what was then Waterloo College (an affiliate of the University of Western Ontario now known as Wilfrid Laurier University) in the city of Waterloo. The original 75 were entering a new university-level engineering program’, the first in Canada ever offered on the “co-operat ive” principle according to which students alternate between their studies on campus and related jobs in industry, business or the public service’, every four months. Seen in retrospect, the attempt to establish a school of engineering within the Kitchener-Waterloo community becomes readily understandable. The “twin cities” of Kitchener and Waterloo had, over the years, acquired a diversified industrial structure

which included the electronics, plastics and rubber industries, utilizing state-of-the-art technology. The ’50s were years of intense new interest in technology development; the Soviet Union had just put the first man in space;

1958: This water

tower

solid state physics was promising miraculous new electronic devices; atomic energy generating plants were seen as the hope for the future; serious concerns over environment al problems had scarcely begun to emerge. The University of Waterloo

engineer cools off after climbing and painting “beer” on it.

the

Waterloo

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proceeded to their degrees. Soon, however, they began to realize that not only did the co-opsystem give them the opportunity to earn their way through school, it gave them superior educations, since what they learned in the classroom could be supplemented by workplace experience, as they went out on their work terms. The new program flourished and the build-up of the needed faculty expertise included not only those who could teach engineering . . . but science and mathematics specialists as well. Before long the new program threatened to swamp the small (400~student) college that had spawned it and perhaps inevitably, rifts occurred. The Associate Faculties determined to go its own way independently. Early in 1958 a new 235- acres was purchased at what was then the northwest corner of the community. Much of it involved what was known as the Schweitzer family farm. Plans for new buildings began to be drawn up and moves were made to create a new and completely separate institution’, today’s v university of Waterloo. 1958, the first _ By December, building on the new campus was open’, still known as “engineering 1.”

was thus founded in a social climate of hope and optimism . . S when it wasalso beginning to be recognized that Canada could very-soon have vast new needs ’ for technological expertise, on a scale not previously dreamed of. 1 The founding president, .I. G. “Gerry” Hagey, at that time president of Waterloo College [a small, Lutheran church-owned college affiliated with the University of Western Ontario) had become imbued with the spirit of progress and with the idea of launching a co-operative engineering program. His enthusiasm was shared by a number of industrial leaders in the community, including Carl Pollock, the president of the largest electronics&related company in Kitchener-Waterloo (Electrohome) and Ira Needles, president of one of the three major rubber companies (B, F, Goodrich) and himself a graduate of a- co-op university in the United States, many years earlier. That the venture would be successful beyond the wildest dreams of its founders soon became readilv apparent. Students “flo&ed to the camEarly daya pug, initially attracted by the technology! idea of earning their way, as they

of computing:

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In 1962 the university was physically expanded to approximately 2,000 acres, with the purchase of the 750-acre “north” campus. Renison College (Anglican) and the University of St. Jerome’s College (Roman Catholic) entered into agreements of affiliation and federatioti, respectively, with the new university in 1960. (St. lerome’s had long existed in the community, having been founded in 1864; prior to federation with UW it had been affiliated with the University of Ottawa.) Both colleges proceeded to erect building:3 on the west side of the new campus. They were followed by St. Paul’s College (United Church), in 1963, and Conrad Grebel College IMennonite) in 1964. One boon tlhe church colleges provided, initiall$ was residence accommodation for the

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In 1959 the faculty of science came into being, as distinct from the faculty of engineering. The creation of the faculty of arts followed [the first arts lectures were given in the fall of 1960), Buildings were added, funds were raised, and the pace of growth quickened. -

I I

latest

in

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computing

thousands o-f &dents who were starting to flock to the campus. . The co-operative programs attractpt! unusually iarge number.. from across the province, as wpli as from the Kitchener-Waterloo area itself. Housing became imperative; it was not until 1964 that the young university began to plan its own student housing - known today as the “village 1" complex. Rapid growth continued throughout the ’60s. By 1967 at the end of the first decade the University’s undergraduate student population num,bered almost 5,000; the graduate enrolment was 750 and there were 384 f acuity. The faculty of mathematics was formed in 1967, followed by the faculty of human kinetics and leisure studies, which grew out of the sch.ool of physical and health education. The faculty of environmental studies took form in 1970. Today, Waterloo offers a wide range of academic programs through its s!ix faculties, and the research activities of its faculty members and students covers a wide spectrum including science Continued

on page

25B


FEATURE

Imprint,

Friday,

September

1989

1,

256

history at ’ ,Waterloo, Continued from page 24B (pure and applied), health studies, behavioral studies, social studies, the humanities, languages, the artg, the environment, and the urban environment . . That the University has been highly successful is to be seen in the fact that today it has more than 25,000 students including more than 15,500 fulLtime students; it has approximately 800 full-time faculty members, and close to 2,000 full-time support staff. l

ple as developed by Waterloo is successful is undeniable. Today, Waterloo has more than 10,000 co-op students.. . more thanany other university in the world.

It is the fourth largest university in Ontario despite the fact that Kitchener and Waterloo together are smaller than cities such as Toronto, Hamiltoti, Ottawa and London, and despite the fact that there is a neighboring university (Wilfrid Laurier) in Waterloo. The reason Waterloo has proved so successful is primarily, the appeal of the co-op system, The fact that the co-op

Moreovef, the co-op education concept is now being applied in dozens of other universities, community colleges and even high schools, across Canada. A second major reason for the University of Waterloo’s success relates to the decision‘, made early on in the institution’s history, to allow its students to “hands-on” experience have with the computer.

princi-

Back in the late ‘505, when the university had its beginnings, the computer was just beginning to come into its own.. . beyond its use as a machine for the keeping cf accounting records. Computer modeling - involving complex phenomena of all types - and computer decision making were still on the threshold: but the future had becqme clear enough that Waterloo’s innovative professors felt the best way to equip students for it was to permit them to work with computers directly.

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of yesterday or today? A 1960 demonstration apartheid held outside Kitchener’s old city hall.

first, to make the computer readily available to students and second, to create new software so this could in. fact come about, that Waterloo’s now-vaunted reputation for mathematics and computer research has arisen. Today, Waterloo not only has a major faculty of engineering on its campus, it also has the world’s largest faculty of mathe-

This meant hundreds (initially, and later thousands) of students working at keypunches and submitting their individual programs to a mainframe computer+, convenient to them on campus. It was soon found desirable to create some new. special computer software, to permit the mainframe to handle these unusual (at the time) needs.

Now where am 1 supposed to sign? Can you imagine hpw long registration would take now if we had to do it manually? Good thing Waterloo started with so few students! photos

Students against

PAGE


268

Friday,

Imprint,

September

1, 1989

-

TRAVEL

Dateline Sweden: What am by lennifer

Wain

The land of the midnight sun, a veritable paradise peopled by fitness buffs and beautiful blondes, all specrking Iike The Muppet Show’s Swedish Chef.. . this was the Sweden 1 had heard about, But what do you do when the reality is more than a little different .*

than the truth?

Yuu laugh.

Many times during my stay in Swedea, I asked myself what I was doing here anyway. These people speak funny, the men wear pastel plaid, the taxes are crazy, the beer; and everything else, -is atrociously expensive. To start, I’ve found now, at the end of my stay, that Sweden is incredibly beautiful. As the song goes, it’s summertime and the livin’ is easy. I live on an island called Lidingo (that’s Iead-ingue not Ie-dingo).just outside of Stockholm and now that we have lots of daylight and it’s not raining or snowing, I can Fee miles of forestd, blue, blue (really blue) water, and lots of sailboats from my window. At dusk (about HEHI p.m.

now], a barrage of hot air balloons usually comes over the horizon. There is a long, sandy beach just 15 minutes away from home, and with summer hours at work (we finish at MO p.m.), I get some time to enjoy it. Sweden just celebrated Midsommar, the pagan tradition concerned with fertility. The running story goes that the boys and girls disappear in the forest, and the girls come back blushing. In reality, everyone in Stockholm disappears to their summer homes in the Archipelago. The Stockholm area is actually a grouping of anywhere from 26,000 to 300,000 islands. I’ve been told both figured, and many in betweed, but nobody but the Russians seem to know for sure. Suffice it to say there are lots. 1. Anyway, once on an island, Stockholmers generally make merry by eating lots of traditional foods like sill (herring) and potatis (small boiled potatoes) washed down with lots of aquavit [schnapps or vodka) between singing silly songs. Kids (and some adults too) in white

the Saskatchewan/North West Territories border, it’s pitch black by about 3:OO - 3:30 p.m. in the winter months (from October to March], and if it wasn’t for the Gulf Stream in the Baltic Sea (which is really just a big lake], Sweden would be a very cold place. As it i$, the temperatures are

with flower wreathes on their heads dance around the maypole, and the sun doesn’t go down all night. The general effect of all this is to time-transport the casual observer back before the Dark Ages where this tradition originated. Swedish summers are short

Alcohol is a hot commodity

consumed in

amazing amounts ~--

but intense, and people generally look much happier than they do in the wintef, which is very long and seems to be an e_ternity of darkness. When I arrived in Stockholti, it was late summer and winter was only weeks away. The last few warm days were just ending, and precious hours of sunlight were visibly diminishing. Because Stockholm is on approximately the same latitude as

about the same or slightly milder than Toronto. The lack of daylight causes’most Swedes to go into hibernation’, go on holidays South, and/or drink like fishes. Be warned if you come here someday that alcohol is: - Very expensive - about $8.00 for a beer and $10.00 to $15.00 for a mixed drink. That’s one beer or-one drink. - A hot commodity that is consumed in amazing amounts by

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To make winter more bearable, I did as the Swedes do went travelling. This made me realize two things. One, that Sweden is very far away from mainland Europe (for example, a z&hour tra:in ride to Belgium), and not a convenient base to see Etirope from: and two’, that I’ve hardly seen anything of Sweden or my own country.

Swedes travel to make winter more bearable The strange thing about living in a foreign place is that you do that crazy “hit all the museums and art galleries and other neat touristy places” thing for about a week and theti, exhausted, settle into (some what) normal life. Consequently, now that I’m leaving, I’ve taken a few days off work to see the sights in Stockholm itself. Because so many people live in the Archipelagd, there is an excellent ferry system that operates year-round. In the summer, the “thing to do” is hop on a boat, hop off at any island that looks interesting, and, if you’ve read the timetable right, hop back on after a day Iof hiking. The Swedes have this unique law called ollemans rott which translates into “everyman’s right.” What this means is that anyone can walk around and camp up to three nights anywhere in Sweden. The common Continued on page 27B

MONDAY LIVE BANDS

the locals and then generously redistributed all over the subway system. There are miles and miles of walking/cycling/jogging trails through the forests on my isiand, and if we’d had any kind of winter’, I would have been skiing on them. Unfortunately, the snow stopped sometime in mid-December (just after I bought my skis; some cloincidencej so all we were left with was the cold, the rain’, and the darkness.

Are my flowers falling off? During Midsomer, Swedish children (and some adults) dance, around the maypole with flower wreaths on their heads.

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Imprint,

TRAVEL

Friday,

I doing he<re anyway?

September

1, 1989

278

‘IBII

-

ji

-

Continued from page 26B courtesies of not littering and. not pitching your tent on someone’s front yard are generally observed, so this law works really well. The only place I’ve ever seen a “no trespassing” sign is in military areas, of which there are many. This is a great way to see Sweden. It also encourages conservation and it’s not uncommon to see elk, reindeer’, Swedes, and lots of other wildlife on your walks. There are also are lots of parks, walking/cycling paths, and wild areas in the city as well. The geography is very similar to northern Ontario’s cottage country [lots of rocks, watef, and forests), but instead of

ish is not. Swedish is called the “kissing language” because of all the weird contortions you must put your mouth through in order to I pronounce words properly. think it should be called the “respiratory failure language” because Stockholm Swedes use a sharp intake of breath to indicate the affirmative or agreement. On my first few attempts to mingle with the locals’, I couldn’t understand what was wrong

with all these people. I thought they were either having a collective heart attack or had very bad asthma. Swedish is basically easy to. learn’, but being in an Englishspeaking environment at work, I didn’t get much opportunity to practice it. Most Swedes speak almost flawless .English anyway, and are quick to “help” you. by speaking English after your first few words of garbled Swedish. Other foreigners say that the only way to learn Swedish is to-

Reserwd

Trespassing allowed almost everywhere plowing down a whole .forest or blasting out rocks to make space for houses as we seem to dd, the Swedes plunk their buildings right in the middle of everything. You rarely see a manicured lawn here. As for the Swedes themselves, I have to dispel a common myth. Swedes do not speak like the Swedish Chef on the Muppet Show, Jim Henson got it wrong. The Swedish Chef should be called the Norwegian Chef because he sounds much more Norwegian than Swedish. Norwegian

is sing-songy;

find a special “friend” who will put up with your learning process. This is easier said than done because Swedes are hard to get to know, I think in the year that I’ve been here, I probably know five Swedish people that I say more than hi to (hej actually]. Swedes are polite to strangers when they are introduced, but rarely make the effort to involve strangers in their lives They have been described as cold, but I think that reserved is more accurate.

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Swedish, society is very homogeneous (although they are getting more foreigners all the time and are going through racial growing pains at the moment) and very baby-oriented. Indeed, there are babies and pregnant mothers in mini-skirts running rampant everywhere. Marriage is not a big thing here; the state provides substantial support to unwed mothers and there is no social stigma attached to -kids born out of wedlock. Consequently, when you see wedding pictures in the newspapers, they often portray the happy couple - and their kids. This diatribe would not be complete without a quick note on Stockholm night life. There is not enough to constitute a long note. Sure, there are any major city’s share of loud bars and discos, but there are very few “cool” places where they don’t play

disco and don’t charge you $15.00 to get in, The music scene is underground except for the most recent commercial pop successes, Europe [the biggest thing since ABBA and that’s no compliment), a’nd Roxette. A “live” set at a bar consists of 15 minutes of music; no encore, no second set. People don’t get loose. I’ve been to a few potentially upbeat concerts where the musicians really performed their hearts out, but there was no yelling, dancing, or even a murmur of excitement from the crowds. The crowd at R.E.M. showed more than average rapport. At least a few people were standing up at the front, So what am I doing here? Well, now that I’m on my way home to real pizza and cheap beef, there’s more than a few things I’m going to miss. The language isn’t such a mystery anymore, and though the Swedes I’ve met are few, they’ve become good friends. I’ve gotten used to flat, cheese-less European pizzti, though I’ll never get used to the price of a beer or men in pastel plaid. I could get used to winjers with lots of snow and Midsommar’, when Sweden is at its most magical. It is a tradition I’ll always uphold. Now, if they can just add a little more sunshine to Swedish winters, I might even be back. 1 Jennifer Wain is u 3A Iiterature co-op student cently spent a year on tended work term at Sweden.

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2816

Imprint,

Friday,

September

1, 1989

COMMENT

Are you oppressed? by John Zachariah Imprint staff The owner of the lumberyard where I have worked since January brings the Toronto Sun to work every day so we can read it on our breaks. As most of you know, the Sun’s content is about as far right as journalism in Ontario gets; I thus had the opportunity to glean the opinions of our most conservative colum-

wish, assuming we are qualified, and so on. Does this mean we do not experience oppression? This question is so broad as to be almost unanswerable. Yet it is worth grappling with because it forces us to consider the many ways in which we could be oppressed, and to match these possibilities with our day-to-day existence for the sake ofcomparison, Such an effort would perhaps reveal the injustices

analysis, a process rather than a for oppressive post-colonial gomoral code. It does not hand over vernments. the truth to its adherents, but inThe project of liberation theolstead gives them the tools to disogy involves a re-interpretation cover it. Liberation theology of the Bible in a modern-day; allows people to see how they Latin American context, the reare being oppressed and gives sult of which has had an empowthem direction in ending this opering effect amongst the poor. By It is emancipating. analyzing their day-to-day si- . pression. .While liberation theology is tuation in biblical terms, practimainly practiced in Latin Amertioners of liberation theology ica, it bears more than a passing believe that they can begin the construction of God’s kingdom resemblance to Situationisin’, the on eakth, that they can start the critique of modern capitalism process of salvation while still in formulated by Guy deBord,

The most obvious difference between liberation theology and situationism is the context: the former operates in the Third World, the latter in the First. This difference, t bough, should not mask a very basic similarity between the ltwo. The aim of both is to peel away the official version of reality, and to help people realize what a sham it is. Armed with this knowledge, they will then be free to forge a new and hopefully more just order. In La tin America’, Ii bera tion

denial of ideology the temporal realm, through their actions. (This, by the way, is Pelagian heresy, the belief that we are saved through works rather than grace.) Liberation theology is extraordinary for a number of reasons. It interprets the struggle of the poor as a class struggle, and thus overlaps into the political sphere. Such a view has been prompted by, among other thing& the new reading of the story of Moses and the Israelites. Liberation theologians see this story as a triumph of a group of

Raoul Vaneigem and various members of the Situationist International. While Situation&m never made much of a ripple in mainstream Western culture, it is considered by many writers and observers to be one of the influences leading to the French General Strike of 1968. The Situationists saw modern capitalism as an attention-diverting project, In Western society, they said, all our desires and spiritual needs had been cornmodified, creating a climate where personal satisfaction

theoiogy is proving to be relatively succe8ssful, at least waking people up to the oppressive reality of their everyday life. It has a large and vigorous grassroots support base and has been embraced by many of the Latin American clergy. Situationism’, however, has not caught on in a very big way in North America. For the rest lof this piece, I’d like to speculate on why this is so. Todd Gitliti, writing in New Perspectives Quarterly on postmodernism‘, says of our time% “Every belief comes pre-

could only be achieved through consumption. This idea is relatively commonplace; what made the situationist critique different was the idea of the spectacle. The spectacle is the context in which Western consumerism takes place, and according to the situationistd, it includes almost everything we see around us: television’, the movies, newspapers’, public parks, school& etc. The spectacle diverts our attention away from other people, from interpersonal relation-

wrapped in quotation marks. Shock, now routine, is greeted with the glazed stare of the total ironist. Where there was passion, or ambivalence, there is now a collapse of feeling, a blankness and a knowingness that corrodes any positive principle,” The numb smugness Gitlin writes about could well be the result of the cancer which Allan Bloom said *was sweeping America, which was people’s willingness to believe anything, as opposed to their refusal to be-

birth... nists vis a Lis the Beijing tragedy earlier this summer. The content didn’t vary much, but one comment stuck in my mind like a piece of popcorn husk in my teeth. George Jonas (whd, it should be noted, is one of the most level-headed and sophisticated of the Sun’s critics] mentioned that what happened in China would never happen in a “normal country” like Canada. Jonas’s description of Canada as “normal” indicated to me not naivete or ignorance, but complacency, the conviction that, despite our nation’s faults, its ideolo ical footings had been sound Qy cast. To call Canada normal may seem naive or ignorant, but Jonas, judging on the basis of his writing, is neither, What Jonas was saying is that in Canada’, we have no reason to fear oppression. #As most people view oppression’, this is true. We don’t have armed soldiers wandering about in the streets, we are free to speak our minds and express our opinions, we can take any job we

suffered by tiomen and by minorities, or injustices suffered by labourers in the workplace. The way we know of these faults, howevef, needs to be examined, because our failure to correct them may indicate a flaw not in our process of correctiorl, but in our process of crit icism. In other wordg, our inability to start fixing what ails us may mean we don’t know precisely what’s wrong to begin with. If a fresh perspective is needed (and I think it is), then we’re going to need a method to apprehendjt. The first method I’d like to consider is liberation theology, a primarily Latin American phenomenon, the tenets of which were solidified at the 1968 Latin American bishops conference, CELAM, at Medelliti, Colombia. Liberation theology is precisely that, a theology of liberatiori, a theology which dignifies and empowers the poor and oppressed. Liberation theologians reject the traditional role of the Latin American church as an advocate of inaction and apologist

work,.. economically oppressed people over their oppressors due to the help of God. The theology ‘is also noteworthy because it demands action as part of the salvific process. The method of liberation theology is orthopraxid, a cycle of seeing, judging and acting. By such an interpretatiori, faith without action is meaningless, for true faith, say liberation theologians, demands action. But perhaps the most significant asuect of liberation theol-

negation of cant

school...

ogy is its denial of almost all ideology and its negation of religious cant. This rejection is not really an end in itself, but rather a byproduct of the cycle of orthopraxis. Practitioners of liberation theology use for the interpretation of their situation their own everyday experiences and impressions rather than prepackaged explanations from other sources. The word “pradtitioners” is chosen deliberately because, as a weltanschaunng, liberation theology is a hermeneutic, an

1

ships, and draws it towards a pre-fabricated constellation of images, sounds and experiences which substitutes for our most basic spiritual needs. The only way to escape this spectacle, said the situationists, was through a societal reorganization which promoted sponateolis creation and the construction of “situations.” Such a reorganization would eliminate the ossified, structured society which stifled creativity, personal growth and spiritual development.

lieve anything! For Blooni, relativism has been the scourge of the West, for it has left us bereft of the ability to make any sort of judgment on the increasing amount of information we are receiving year by year. The problem is exacerbated because we are given the impression that we must keep abreast of this burgeoning body of knowledge in order to be members of the “new global’information order.” In an article in Daedalus, Daniel C. Dennett says “ Common knowledge’ is no


COMMENT

Imprint,

Friday,

September

I, 1989

You decide! longer the relatively stable, inertial mass it once was . . . . The obligation to know - a burden that weighs heavily on every academic, but that in- milder forms i$ ubiquitous today creates the situation where, if we read everything we ought’ to read, we would have. time to do nothing else.” In such an information-glutted world, the number of “pressing issues” [i.e. environmental collapse) we are faced with will always be increasing. Relativism makes the task of prioritizing them impossible. We are called to be new global citizens; fight apartheid, join

of powerlessness, the loss of identity.” . Nothing in our society has any meaning, so it’s possible to tarn everything into a joke. If the situationist critique is correct, then we’re not likely to stop laughing either. John Zerzan’s “Vagaries of Negation” (in Apocalypse Culture) provides a catalogue of Western decay. Zerzan examines the symptoms of living in the shadow of the capitalist spectacle, and considers how they have recently wol;sened. Teen suicide rates have tripled in the past twenty five years, In 1986, the National Centre for Disease Con-

We’ll never-stop Amnesty International. Doing these things is easy, because it’s pretty hard to make a good case for racial segregation or torture. Live Aid was popular because everyone knows that starvation and poverty are not right. All these causes are easy to believe in because they require no moral reflection. But when we are confronted with more of these black-andwhite issues than we can handle, what do.we do? The nuclear predicament, eco-disaster, international terroristi, all these things make us afraid. “All-absorbing, all-corroding irony,” says Gitliri, “is a way of de,naturing and disarming very disturbing feelings: the fear of desltructioti, the fear

thing for so long, we don’t even know what we are doing any more. The only things we demand are more than happily supplied by the ringmasters of the spectacle. We must learn that we are oppressed, and the sooner the better. If we’re smug, we’re doomed. We cannot separate fact from fiction if we are acquainted with neither. Reject rent-a-crowd militancy and find out what’s going on in your own backyard. We’ve been thinking globally for years, but we’ve never learned to act locally, Mel Lyman put it like this: “Nothing is sacred anymore’, in-

laughing

trol reported “that mental stress caused by unsatisfactory working conditions has become America’s biggest occupational disease. . . .+’ Zerzan also informs us that every day, seven hours of television is consumed per capits in the U.S. The point is, things aren’t getting any better, they’re getting much worse. The environment was decaying long before the supermarkets introduced environmentally sensitive productd, and it’s too late for band-aid solutions. The industrialized West is is need of some sort of liberation hermenuetic, a mode of analysis that will show its citizens what a failure late capitalism has been. We’ve been told to do our own

eluding sex, love, religion and honest accomplishment. We have lost respect, we have no values, all things are equally worthless + , . . The few who know our deepest needs are still unfulfilled are regarded with great suspicion and contempt for not allowing people to do their own thing’.” Our society is burning up fast, and it has nothing #o do withpoliticians, businesspeoplti, media giants and other easy-to-hit left wing targets for contempt. It has to do with ud, with how we live our lives, where we live, what we buy, and who we respect. Things are only getting darker, so let’s pull together before we find ourselves begging for our lives in a world rotten with tolerance.

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Go With the blow! The Conrad Grebel College mus+ department invites all students, facultgr, staff and community members to join any of the six musical ensembles that it sponsors and organizes. You can perform in any of the ensembles listed below for course credit, or just for your own enjoyment. Regular attendance-at rehearsals is required. Attendance at dress rehearsals and performances is mandatory. All of these groups will present at least one concert during the term.

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Chamber Choir The chamtber choir, under the direction of Wilbur Maust, meets every Tuesday and Thursday in room 151, Conrad Grebel College from 3:30 - 5:OO p.m:, beginning the first week of classes each fall and winter term. This small ensemble of about 30 voices performs madrigals, cantatas and other motets’, works suitable for a small choir. To audition, call the music department secretary (885-0220, ext. 26), or isign up at the music office, room 266. University Choir The university choir, under the direction of Robert Shantg, meets every Tuesday in room 156, Conrad Grebel College, from 7:00 to 9:oo p.m;, beginning the first week of classes each term. This large choir performs a varied repertoire of works from the past and present. Sign up for an audition at Conrad Grebel College. Chapel Choir The chapel choir, under the direction of George Wiebe, meets every Monday from 3:30 - 5:OO p.m and Wednesday from 3:30 Q:OO p.m. ati the College chapel, beginning the first week of classes each fall and winter term. This choir is a group of about 40 singers who perform at the College chapel services (Wednesdays, 4:30 - 5:30 p.m.) and in area churches. To audition, call then music department secretary (885-0220, ext. 26), or sign up at the music office, room 266. Staga Band The stage band is a small jazz ensemble under the direction of Michael Wood. It meets every Monday in room 156, Conrad Grebel College, from 7:OO - 9:OO p,m:, beginning the first week of classes each term. To audition, call the music department secretary (885-0220, ext. 281, or sign up at the music office, room 266. Ore heetra The orchestra, under the direction of Bill Janzerf, meets every Thursday in room 156, Conrad Grebel College, beginning the first week of classes each fall and winter term. To auditioc, call the music department secretary (885-0220, ext. 26), or sign up at the music office, room 266. Concert Band The concert band, under the direction of Karen Tomlin, meets every Thursday in room 156, Conrad Grebel College, from the 7:oo - 9:oo p.m. beginning first week of classes each fall and winter term. No audition; come to the first rehearsal. Note: For lmusical reasons, admission to any ensemble is at the discretion of the director.


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