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Note: Imprint publishes every Friday, The deadline Afr#can Weekend continues with an African Ifor Tuesday. disco/dance ,_,, at 8:30 in M&136. Adrkion is-$l;OO. _ *campus4<vents,is 4pm the preceding _ Voices; a dav be noted feminist author Susan G$iffin,‘will<be presented a< 8pm in the Kitchener ‘,I :Friday, IMairch 14-. YWCA, corner of Weber and Frederick Streets. Synchroniied Swimming f&o;;;’ at 430pm in the Admission is $2.50; for more information, call.576. PAC pool gallery, put on by the WaterlooUniversity 7Ol’6. -\ I I .f‘,.’ ” -’ ~ Varsity-@ Recreational Swim Team. %

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,/I .l . A non-credit course in &istian Bbctrh will be givenby ‘Chaplain-RemkesKooistra at\7pm in Ira Ne&dlesHqll .rooin 3002. - . -1 ’ ‘ ’

The CC Pub,will be open from 12 noon to lam until F$Iay and from 7pm to lam Saturday: There will be a disc jockey after’ 9, as wdl as,,aone dollarcover charge for non-Feds._ 1 i .~ . ’ I For more information ‘on the Birth r Contrbli , :, I Centre, see Monday’s entry. &ay “Liberation if Waterloo (GLOW), formerly ’ --S&i&, Makkh 16-j 7‘. 1 . ’ h ater109 U’nlversityys Gay Liberation Movemeht, is /, I r ‘I \’ ? I’ The Komagata Maru ‘Incident continues in ’ ‘sponsoring a dance with DJ, cash bay and%foodfrom .‘. ’ 7prn’to; 1:30amin the Psychologytounge, 3rd floor. .* 41~are welcoirie. .’ .’ , , ,I 1 i-t , j Synchronized Swimming Show in the PAC pol~l- ’ -Wednesd&Mamh Afr$can Weekend begins: from 2 to 5pm in , _ ‘” 19-x.’ CC1l3 there will be speakers qn &rican c’ ,@!eW, l:QOPm, Put o+nby the UW Varsity & ’ GOD&ELL i: here! The Broadway mu&al&ased ,Recreational Swim Tea*. .development. For .full details check posters or on the ospel ccording to Sf. Matthew. It, starts iphone-886-8263or’884-8929,At 8pm’ in the’ Great The Outers Club sponsors kayaking in the PAC tonight 71 at 8:15J m-in Humanities Theatre,and runs Hall a film onAfrican develobment will be shown. . pool from 4 to 6pm , ; _ . until Satyday. All seats $5. I, ’ _.r s ^’ I ‘I t!$bti Bi? ‘80 continues tonight land tomorrow A. campus ‘worship serv’ce sponsored by the KWJRed“Cro&sBlood Donor Clinic at First United night; a nostalgic musical revue. A presentation of Waterloo Christian’ Re ’ rmed Church wilbabe Church,- King & .William Streets, Waterloo; from the KW Musical Productions. 8: 15pm in Humanities held at,10.30am insHH280i , ~ 200 to 4:30pm and 6:00 to 8:3Opm. Quota - 380 . . I Theatre.‘All $6. 1 \ I I 1 donors. ’ _’ J, I’ seats . ’ From .3 t’o 5pm in CC113 the Islamic Students *The Komagata Maru incident&iii be performed in A&o&ation holds an Islamic .session including: ’ For more info on the’ WCF, see Monday’s entry. \ the’ Theatre of the -Arts, at 8pm tonight: This Tajweed, recitation of, the Holy Qur’anand Asa a nema Gratis:?‘0 Lucky Man” will be screened in dramatization of a true Canadian event issporisored , ’ the-CC Great Hall at 9:30pm. Admission is free. by the UW Creative Arts Board. Tickets $2.50I ‘myer* I’, ’ ’ .,(studerits/seniors $2). 1 ‘- T-1YOndaY 3 MBrCh, IT, ’ <The Environmental Filtn ‘Series presents. “Unit Agora ieahouse from 8pm to midnight Iin CG-110. Waterloo Christian Fellowship has ,open hours Nine: Time, people and p’erception” and “The City”‘between 12:30apd li30 in ENV350,. , An &‘ernative> place to-find conversation, herbal from lk3Oam to 2:OOpm in CC207 (the. World Changing : teas, munchies &’ music. ; - , I ; ,Room). Library & drop-fn Monday to Friday. , The Waterloo Chris&n Discussion Fellowship The 7th Impromptu Meeting of the BMbC will take The Waterloo ‘Christian Fellows&p sponsors a with Chaplain Remkes Kooistra meets for fellowship in HH28Q (supper at 6pm; discussion from 7:30). ‘place in CC110 at 2pm: A constitutional vote will time of, conversatjonal pra@r akd fellowship in the I . “‘The food we,may eat (and should eat).” take place; be there. , World Room, CC207, every weekday at lQ:30am,. Topic: J’, ‘FED Flicks: “The Last Waltz” will’be shown in the Free workshop:‘ Chan’ge with&t &&i& is For ‘more information on the- Birth Control ; Arts Lecture Hal! at 8pm until Sunday. Feds: $I;- meaningless. ,Learn how to understand & direct Centre, see-Monday’s entry.others: $2. ,- 3, I : , ’ ’ char@ in yourself and your environment. The The Legal Resource &ice will be open from 11:3b ’ Community: 8pm in CCll3. . /n, ‘to )4:3Opm. ‘Free legal counselling 4 available in h-ie Legal Resource Office-&ill&e openf&nll:30 , ’ . 4 ‘<i _ ’ to. 4:30pm. Free legal counsellingi Is available in The Birth Control Ceqtre is open and, has CC217Al CC217A. I : ‘;c’-( “’ _ *. ,~ information on birth control, unplanned pregnancy Relax, have a coffee,’ .doughn&s and friendly . 7 counselling and a resource library: PamphletsandTF;-bm 730 tQ.. 16:3Opm the Muslim Students shirts are-available.The centreis open from 12pm - conversation at the Gay Coffeehousedrom 8pm to *Association holds an Islamic -session includir& 4pm, Monday to Thursday in-$X206, ext. 3446.. ; ’ 12am in CCllO. AlI are welcome. Phone ext. 2372. any time for. recorded’ information on what5 , Fish, ‘Tafseer and ‘Isha prayer.. Friday: prayer ~ (Gumma prayer) will be, held fro-m 1 to~~2:30pmin‘ The Legat‘RCsource Office will be open from 11:30 happening in the KW gay community. 4\ cc113. 7, .I -’ _ to ,4:30pm.Free legalcounselling will be available in CC217A. ’ The Quters Club rents :equipment .{a anyone LThqkhay, -March 20; interestedsall day, every day i.n PAC2005. Included ‘The UW Stage. Band rehearses it 8pm in A&. are sleeping bags, backpacks, ‘snowshoes,,, etc:, , Anyone playing brass, per&&ion, keyboards or Godspett continues in Humanities -Theatre. For rental fees ‘arevery reasonable. ’ . saxes is welcome. Sponsored by the Creative Arts mor,einfo)see Wednesday’s entry; &od 01rock ‘and roll never dies! Every Friday night Board* : , ’ 1. ‘-., ’ ‘,‘. s Stage Band Concert featuring big bar&l sounds, M&r+& 18-,’ ’ \sponsoied by the Creative ‘Arts ‘Board. Tonight in Ahthe CC Pub Fezz’spins the tunes of tI!&60’s. For 1I -Tuesday,’ . . ., more information oh:the ‘pub‘see TieidLy’s entry: ‘ .y ‘, -.Y .\ . . I ’ Theatre of the Arts at 8pm. Tickets $2.50 I ’ For info-on’the Waterloo Christian Fellowship, I &udents/seniors $2). , -There will be a Chamber Ensemble rehearsal at see:Monday~s.entry ’ ,-t ‘;‘j _ ‘6pin at Conrad Grebel Chapel. If you play a’strin$l ,/ , ’ , 1 : ’ ‘. Computer Science ’ Club meeting tonight 1in or wind instrument, come auf; Ther?eisbaroqueand 8’ I ‘, ’ 1’ . . ’ .’ v’ ‘#’ MC5158 at 8pm. ,Kenneth Iversonl recipient of the. *iassical- repertoire as wells-as some small-group, Continental ‘style breakfast sponsored by WCF 1978 Turing Award, will speak on “Notation,as-a selections; ’ A’ \ ! q’ < i ’ at’8:OOamin CC207 (The World Room). Join us for ‘Tool of Thought.” Everyone welcome. f ’ < 7’ praver and fine food. For more info on the WCF, see Mqnday’s entry. ’ The Waterloo Jewish Students Association. sponIJ+atuydg&; l&&h ii: * .- ’ ’ sors/a Bagel Lunch in CC113 today from 11:30am The final meeting .of the Waterloo Christiant ‘IThe Komagata :Maru i&d&i continues~ in to 1:30pm. Everyone welcome, _ FeRowship for this term is a regular supper meeting, ‘. Theatre of the Arts today,’ at 8pm. For’! more: in the HH. Undergrad Lounge from 4:30 to 7pm, The Legal R&o&e Off ice willbe openfrom 1230 entitled “Agape Feast.” Check campus posters for information se,eFriday’s entry., I6 ’ to 4:30pm. Free legal counselling will be available in>* specific details. .i I . Sign up. in the Watsfic office MC3036 . for, a - &217& ,. / Dungeons & Dragbns to&&tent &&y (third For information on the Birth Control Centre, see A coherent and meaningful life is’ a product ,,of ‘qualifying- rounds), finals t-o,-be*‘held tomoirowwl ‘. e Monday’s entry.! _ Tear& ofsix are’preferred,~but-individualscan enter ~.i&erhalwork. At 8pm in the Campus Centre W,orld ’ .and,be assignedto a team. .Eniry‘feeis $2per p&son. Room +h,ere will-,be free instruction and practice The Legal Resource Off ice will be opei from lo:30 “and p@e.&n excess of $150fO0may be won. Fiist presented by fhe Community for the Equilibrium to 4:3Qpm. >Ereelegal counselling is available in CC217A. , ,1 ’ _ andDevelopment .of the Human Being.‘ ; round,abegins af 9am. / , I \ ‘: \ ’ .. ‘. f / r , ^-. f. , ’ 1 I’ . 1 I 1

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- P-olitics, A symposium on the politics of energy’ and conserservation was held on Thursday eveing, March 6, in the Arts Lecture Hall. The symposium, sponsored by the KW Probe and the Waterloo’ Jewish Students’ Association, looked at the social problems caused by the energy shortage and the political and economic adjustments that it may eventually force upon~ us. The meeting drew -an interested audience of about fifty. The symposium mode-rator, Professor Keith of the ManEnvironment department at UW opened the discussion by stating the basic assumptions ,-of the symposium - Canada must achieve energy selfsufficiency and the most promising way of doing this is through energy conservation and the development of alternate sources of energy that do not require complicated technology or huge capital investmerit. The first speaker, George Burrett, who teaches at Conestoga College and is the chairman of the local region of the Solar Energy Society of Canada (SESCI), talked about possible methods of conservation and energy resource development and the resistance these proposals are meeting. He enumerated several energy sources that could be exthe burning of ploited: waste, tidal power and solar energy, among others, and stressed the enrgy savings that quite simple conservation measures - could produce. The problem with these methods, he said, is that they are politically unpopular. Burrett gave as an example the treatment of his own particular interest, solar energy. Some proposals are much talked about but seldom acted on. Most politicians doubt that it is economical or are strongly in favour of nuclear energy as the main .future source of energy. More important, he said

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MONTREAL [CUP) - Montreal or Toronto could be held for a-billion dollar ransom if a shipment of deadly plutonium to Canada were to fall into terrorist hands, antinuclear critics have warned. Nine kilograms of plutonium, the key ingredient of the atom bomb, are to be flown secretly to Montreal or Toronto this year from France and Italy for experiments at the Atomic Energy of Canada reactor at Chalk River Ontario. Fred Knelman, co-founder of the Coalition for Nuclear Disarmament warns that terrorists could use public documents to build a crude atomic device that could flatten either city. Gordon Edwards, chairperson of the Canadian-Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility, said Canada is a likely target for plutonium thieves because of the country’s unfamiliarity with tough security measures. “Something as major as this ’ should be a matter of public accountability,” said Knelman. “One millionth of a gram of T - . ,

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long distances and absence of public transportation people must travel by car. Jacobovici was challenged on his emphasis on OPEC members of the middle east. He replied that the major oil producers are there and wield great influence in OPEC.

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and Abu Dhabi as exampoliticians favour constant down growth and brought In answer to a question ples. Abu Dhabi has a about why the government growth in the economy, a on inflation. as everyone goal incompatible with the raised prices to. try to cover population of 35,000, onewill have to control energy energy increased costs. sixth that of Kitchener. consumption if the public is use of alternate These must b-e joined to sources to run our society. Saudi Arabia is an absonot, Stollery said that it energy conservation mealute feudal state where would be a necessity people Burrett found the apathy sures,to be practical: This in slavery unofficially contiwill pay high prices for oil of the public equally disbefore cutting back on conturbing. He believes most turn implies a limit to the nues. In such places the amount of economic growth money from oil sales is not sumption especially in people have no knowledge possib-le. For these reasons, of the problem and very used for the good of the Canada where because of population but for the enlittle interest in it, Few solar energy meets political richment of those who rule. and bureaucratic obstacles. people are willing to spend Jacobovici added that third/ The need to conserve money on energy conserworld nations that are not energy and find new sourvation methods, such as part of OPEC have suffered insulation of ces of energy will cause increased terribly from the rise in oil homes, in the absence of changes in the way we prices since development live, he added. Alternate government pressure. there has been checked by sources of energy generally What is particularly deoil prices that_ have risen Burrett’s are not as strongly conpressing in beyond their means. opinion is that intere-st in centrated or as easily colIn the discussion period lected as oil or natural gas energy conservation and following the talks, people are, Stollery pointed out.>It alternative energy sources questioned _Stollery about will be necessary to cut is presently in decline. the effects on personal freeback on energy in order to Power and natural gas comdom’ of the increased have enough to go around. panies are advertising for powers he believes the more customers now that Stollery predicts that there government will gain. He they again have surplus will be expansion of labour repeated that in the conintensive service industries capacity. Only a mild winstraints of a conserver soter saved Canada from seand some contraction of the ciety, government intervensect or, vere shortagesof heating manufacturing tion’ will be necessary to which uses a lot of energy, fuel, yet energy policy was achieve the needed level of as we move tmoward a steady not an issue in the recent investment since investfederal election. state economy that ‘devement may often not be lops but does not grow.’ . Nevertheless Burrett sees profitable enough for priHe also believes that in a switch to conservation in vate enterprise or may rethe next fifty years as the future, the government quire too wasteful use of inevitable, since waste will and international bodies George Burrett. ’ resources if done by them. eventually force thrift. will have considerable conThe next speaker, Protrol over the actions of cc . . . the end of hunger... fessor Ken Stollery of the individuals firms. and department of economics at While Stollery was not UW, spoke on the economic enthusiastic about the inchanges a shift to energy creased power of governments which might be used conservation and alternate energy sources would to set ‘depletion quotas’ for cal mass” by getting as many The Hunger Project sebring. industries and les’sen varicures the initial commitment people as possible to sign the Stollery began by sketchation-in income among socards, Anutosha stated that of people who wish to see ing the role cheap energy cial groups, he ‘thought it “this commitment will enerworld hunger ended, but played in the development would be necessary in order leaves the direction of each gize and transform the indiof the economy. After World to use scarce resources individual’s activity to other vidual” to motivate him to do War II, he said, there was an efficiently and fairly. One organizations. something about the probcharitable unprecedented period of problem he foresees is inlem of world hunger. She For information and to proreal growth in the western creased competition among vide those interested with a said, “The more people we world. This was in good social groups for a share of sense of what can be done, get to. say so, the more likely part the result of governthe economic pie as it hunger will end,” and added, they are sent an edition of the ment economic stimulation becomes smaller. On Monday night an or“We do have enough food and energy and inexpensive The final speaker of the ganizational meeting was manpower already to feed supplies. Cheap energy evening was Simcha JacoWhat /it will held to begin the establisheverybody. made it possible for highly bovici, a graduate student ment of a local chapter of the mean is not only the end of automated energy intensive of political economy at the Hunger Project. The Hunger hunger but also the end of means of production to be University of Toronto. His Project is primarily a catawars.” used to supply large quantitalk focussed on oil prices lyst organization “in which ties of goods at low prices. and oil supply in the short the members of the project, The wave broke in the run. Jacobovici agreed with attempt to get people to sign 1970’s when OPEC raised the other speakers that we cards to express their wiloil prices. This slowed will ultimately have to lingness to see an end to Job oppurtunities learn to use new sources of rworld hunger. fuel and e1ectricit.y and get The-meeting was headed along with less. However, by Professor Hotson, the he -said actions to drasticChairman of the Economics ally economise on energy Department at UW. He was should be undertaken now assisted by a former UW Yes, you can-do something to break up the oil cartel grad known as Anutosha. with your BA! This was the OPEC. plutonium is dangerous.” As explained by Anutotheme of the talk that Donna One one thousandth of a The West, he stated, has sha, the purpose of apScott gave Wednesday aftergram, if ingested, could cause underestimatedthe ability proaching people to sign noon of this week in Hagey of the organisation to hold death within hours. Only 1.3 these cards is to “enrol1 the Hall. Approximately 150 kilos were used in the bomb together and get the price it willingness to end hunger.” Arts students/were in atthat destroyed Nagasaki in wants for oil. OPEC operShe stated that the program tendance, ea,ger to hear some 194c ates by restricting supply was about “collecting the good new about their career thus driving the price up but While the risk of radiation will - . which opportua Bties. And,,- good making -certain that the- collective poisoning in an air crash has sounds ridiculous but by news they did hear. price is not quite high led US. airline pilots to refuse signing a card you are Scott herself was an exenough to make it worthto carry plutonium, an official signing that kind of commitample. She graduated from while for buyers to find of the Canadian Airline Pilots ment, being willing to will Queen’s University with a substitute sources of enerAssociation said its members the end of hunger.” Bachelor of Arts degree and gy. To beat OPEC in Jac,ohave no objection to carrying To date, over one million began her career in the bovici’s opinion, it would be the material. signatures <have been colpersonnel department of the necessary to decrease our U.S. president Jimmy Carter lected. The goal of the group T. Eaton‘Company. Now she, oil consumption by IS-25%. banned the commercial use of is to collect over one and a is the publisher of two, would OPEC members plutonium two years ago. In half million by June. Anusuccessful magazines; Flare break ranks and cut prices the event of a crash and fire, tosha compared the collec(formerly Miss Chatelaine) when faced by lessened Edwards said, the plutonium tion of these signatures to the and Teen Generation. demand. would burn and fall over the collection for a petition but Her experience-has shown The argument that such area in a deadly ash. He added stated that they’ are not her that the opportunities for an action is an attempt t0 that transport by air is not a organized as a petition. She Arts degree graduates arethird-world nadeprive wise thing to do. said that the Hunger Project endless, partially because tions of a fair price for their is a “communications group” the vast majority of busioil is false, argued J.acoJohn Beare, director of Safewhich aims to collect signanessmen today hold BA’s and bovici and arises out of guards for Atomic Energy of tures in order’to form a”critican understand what prefaulty assumptions about Canada, said security is so cal mass (which) will make sent day Arts students have strict that the atomic energy I the political nature of some things start happening” at a to go through, and partially members of OPEC, the oil strict that the Atomic Energy spontaneous grass-roots lebecause the possession of producing nations of the Control Board will not told vffl. _ such a degree proves two when, where or how the middle east. Having created this “critithings; first, that the posHe cited Saudie Arabia shipments will be coming. ..%, .,._ .A_. _ . . jr,, .‘. A ..I , ,.. ,

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Hunger Project news bulletin entitled “A Shift in the Wind” four times a year. The Hunger Project is a non-profit, charitable organization which relies on the optional donations of its members to finance the publication of their quarterly bulletin as well as advertisements in major newspapers: On campus, Professor Hotson or Professor Olsen of the Economics Department can be contacted for further information. Celia Geiger

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a use _sessor has a wide range of knowledge; and second, that the possessor has obtained what he or she set out to obtain. . The myth that a BA is no preparation for a job was certainly destroyed.. . The greater part of Scott’s talk involved a brief description of the kinds of jobs open-to BA holders, and the peroentage of opportunities as compared to any other area. Marketing and retailing seemed to be the most fruitful. “It’s where the money is,” she believes. She discouraged anyone from applying for administrative positions, as the position itself is ambiguous and the opportunities.are slim. Other areas of endeavour mentioned favourably were _ advertising, journalism and personnel. So don’t worry. Maybe, as the saying goes, “artsies do have no classes,” but as far as the job and money opportunities go Scott thinks that they areverydeepintherace. Lisa Tripp

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I .’ 1 in, 19$8 fhe Federal Go&nment ‘(Liberal) set it’s aims -. a’t increasing f,unding for Research and Develdpn&nt ’ rrently, to. 13% of the G.N.P: by 1983. Federal funding for R, and I?/.-bit&t a ‘y ; bleak .9%,of the G.N.P....just’above the / leve~l of Turkep. : ? ’ The -increase from .9% to ;:5%‘indi- cates that we need ~O$OO more res’e&ch ‘\ staff in,C&ada by.lg83. Present-studies _ suggest that,at- the current rate,we are , _ ,, only imeeting h?Lf th-ese, pe‘quiretients. I,ti ; 19.78-79 gradu$te enrolment -at i Wat&rla’o alone dropped, b.y 15.6% frhin’: \ the .pSevious year.: W-ales]-oo, is ‘b’y no - meatis an exception to declining g&&ate .,:2; ,enrolment. Where are the nee+d,reseirch staff -going to come from? Where ‘is this promised increase-esearch spendihg? T . Onttirio*as approximately one half the. _ c Graduate stud&t-s in-Canada. Y&t,in 1978/ I \ ?9. we recei&d the sma@s,t _@crea&- in University funding (.&%) of- any province _f_: in Canad&==The Ontario government tias ‘. fl 7 4 ‘

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A not in the .pa$t‘nor i$ -it &day meeting its obligation towards higher educatibn in Onfario. Bett’e Sjephenspfi, Minister df &ltication believes. that the private sector ’ -(-i.e.’ indu‘stry) should take *the’ leading role iri pto+iding funds ,for-- Research and ‘Development. Where does’, thi8, leave ’ ’ Graduate stu&ents’at Waterloo? Aiid more specifically, where does this-leaye Gradu\ ate/students enrolled in-the’ Arts? @ette‘ Stephenson, iS coming to “the . .,m’ University 1 qf Waterloo. td ‘speak on University ,fu.nding on _Mond&y March ’ -: lvth’at 1:3Q,in the <Theatre of the -Arts. Co,me and ask her what-&r government is doing to impbove Research and DevelopI . ’ ’ _ . fnedt in ‘Ontario. I’ . ’ Angus Telfqr \ _ I Treasurer Associatioa - Ontario Graduate I - ‘y . ’ Alex Kostiw < ’ , President . . _ U,W Graduate Club \ j ! - ’

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“This is a poor substitute f6i. the top of ,silent. “Some day you’ll be glad we had a mountain;” lohnrhought toAhimself as this little chat,” John insisted., he ushered.G&ald, his-con, onto the roof “But, I’m. mis&g Gilligan’i Islaqd!” ’ of their, apart-pent building.\“Still, if I’~& G,erald protested. ‘going-. to -do anythItig aS_ ridic$ous as “Darni Gilligan’s Isl&id!” John told the .this, .I may, 9s well do it kight.” I - boy. “This is important!” ._’ “Yes, sir.” , -, -“Dad.,” Gertild asked him, “No& tha’t we’re here, do y,ou mind telling me what “‘There, are a& of nasty, evil people,” you’&’ &@g Lhere?” .Joha began saying, “Whs, enjoy to hold power over aqd’ hurt others. You’ve , “In.good time,-” John >assured him, “In good time.” ’ &v’er fallen in with any of them, thank Gerald mmped as his father’ stared God, bt@ you should be sure to:..Gerald... ! what’s -the ma-tter? What’s going on?” off-into the setting sun. Why was the boy ; always,ih such a htirry? Here was one of ‘I %erald, who was turninga nide shade I nature’s most prFcio& gifts staring him ‘of purple, had bent oyer double, coughin the face, and he cduldn’t see it fop the ing. “Th/e smog,” he blurted out. ‘smog (which, truth to tell, was getting a “Oh;!’ .John-said. ,t‘I’ll try t not to be too little thick). 1 long, then.” . f‘It’s a- big wbrld out there...” John ‘-‘Won’t, make it,” Gerald iosisted. * ’ 3c tentatively began. ’ “fro, eh?” John asked. Gera!d shook his ’ “What?” Gerald, in ,disbelief, exhead. “Ar* you absolutely-sure you can’t’ I stay j&t a little while?” x . claimed. .. - John repbat’ed himself. f’What,“-Gerald GeFald ran f&r the door. 1 responded, “does _that have to do ‘with “I guess not,: John s&d to hims’elf. Me’ stpod there for ,a while watching the anything?” ‘. _ \ + “Well,” John blustered;, “There$ a4o!-, ,gro,wing darkness of night. So much h_ad _ that you don’t1 know ,abqut+‘b_een ieft utisaid,’ would ever be left .~ “I’ll learn,“. Gerald told.him. unsaid. He I ‘wondered (about -Gerald’s - -“But,” John insisted, “Consider ‘mi attempt to talk to his so_n, imagiqing the r experiehce: I’& a fair bit older than y6U two at the porthole-of a-v&t.sta$ship. “I shave some things% I’d like t-o say,” are, and I daresay I’ve !e&ned things Gerald would tell his b&n, only, of which would help you throug,!..::’ . ’ “I’ll learn,” Gerald stubbornly in- _ course, his son would waht to go off and ~ -watch tri-D, --or something like that. sisted. .. 1 j ~ * “I’m- sure you w#ill,” J0hti, tryilig to Damn but being a ‘father wasd’t easy! -, keep his temper, stated;+‘Sur&pou will, With a sigh, John went back’into the , but...” I building, vowing that one day he would “Is that what you‘drought ‘me up here get throu$h to his son. tb talk iabout?‘; Gerald asked. “We could’ . _ have do& this just as easily in the ‘ apartment.” . ’ Damp/the boy, had he no sense of sytibol’ic importance? “This isn? easy,” ,he heard himslef saying, !‘It has to- be done Th6 boy/remain&d t * L just right.” I

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i&&itivity, intransigence and plain‘ stupi&-. j ity. . __ \ ’ conte,mDt for her. ’ - Chris Reid .In t&o a&tiles, I ‘have seen litres similal: to C&lec&veAwice -too . : the one in last \week’s &litorial whibh, read: ( j “Meanwhile, Bette ‘not a tr&elling road-show’ I‘oud to ign&e - Stephenson is’ taking her $‘ho.w on th8 ‘r0ad.“. ’ You attempt to sdy that-this is\Bq$x’ample OF-~ . The Editor, -, Now is tfie time &hen all of the students,of‘ the mi_nister-con>radicting herself to ‘oqnfuke of Waterloo. should_ s&comethh students; In reality, the impressioti this -#*he U niversity ’ more aware of l’iieir position in the educational gives to, me is that Stephenson quite fight13 ioes.not_like‘having to cart, herself all ardgnd world. People say that university life is,not the ; r‘realf world” because the university environthe*pro,vince to bearpit sessions with crowds , * ’ meht is much more protective. While thi-s is Mihose mirids are alieady made up. All she gets ’ true, ,the “real worid” significantly <affects the at these s&sion; according Fo your-cuticles ‘at J lyast, is ti lot of heckling fqom., a rotten univeksity world, es ecially finani$ally. FurI ” c audience,,yei she is still willi g t,o visit most of thermore, this “,p Bote&vene&‘: cab’ giv$ 7 stude_nts a false sense of confidence thaJ all of the universities of the .prov rice to talk with ( 4 I ’- . our cohcerns are ~being adequately v-oiced. . studeits. Unde&ornial circu.mstances, this ? - . , . 1 _ When the government ,decides .!o balance \’ ‘_ . ::’ GouId be considered abngrmally gqxierous of , __ _ it’s / i .’ budget, it usually,meiins instituting cut--backs anyone; especia!lVypeopJe i_n h&b g@e+nent i ’ -! pos$s \MTgOdo&i&r-th& time q-l,lite valuable. ‘. in areas whidhithti de,pmd as not.be‘ing hi&h _,: . , .c . !-a - ,‘b - ,.. ,* .* A..Y. ‘There is’ nothing wrong with Impri& htaff priority. These- decisions tij, the Government body finally: s&i&i, : considerihg decisiG% - Refuse _ t6 ivy the tui&n in&ea$ in ’ : memb& and,, 6ditorial t&i&@ ha&g and of Ontario &re -refl&ted in the cut-backs in - actiori to L show hour disapprove1 of the: Septem beri‘ . expressing their ownbpinions,but I doubt that student seririces whichlincludes’ cut-back’s ih Conservatives’ ,regres&ve $olicy and to pro- _ : . . . ~‘xe&ii+* Com&tiee ,‘, ’ tfse ’ libraries’ purchasi6g power . ‘bf _ne,w tect. 6tir right bf adcess tp a high& education. ’ * . . International Stydent Associgtion I 7” the Impfi.ntw&Id. teceive complairitti from matepi and z-u@-to-date peri0dic&. The&/’ ’ readers that they are hot .putting in, endugh r.The, wbrd ?‘+trik&” may scare some people, .J x’ ’ : nasty cotimants tibotit Dr.‘Stephetisbn,if t%y ” ’ cut-backs if a!reaay’hurting’the qti.ility of 0tir not t acc&tor@dto ‘such so-called “radical” ’, , ,, J were to tone it down.’ fl . >’ jedbcation. -action&.. A fee+ike strike; howr)yer, ,would s , -t , - -,’ , g epO& another point, .I read wich;&me di&nay the 7h0 hard& merit the Adjective radidal, since it / Th-e d&er c0ncern is accessibiity: .’ two,weeks ago the notice &at pn8’ leiter had . i&ease; th-e gllowanc;e of-autbnomous fees, would oilily b&to ensure that we retain-rights ’ *: ,T _ _ _-a not beelipF@ted l+cause it contained what the , and the lack of an-‘eccessibility study- which t haf wB Ialready . have, and to force the , ’ NOI a\ page -unturned *f editors eonside?ed libel:“Thi$ bothered me, was proniided bg the Government of Ontar@’ sprovincial-gotiefnment to keep td polici& thi it -ihot\ a tix& untrue .. . . / .: because during ,the Ped:electio,nsi the Chevron . MinistTy of ‘LColleges and Unitersities-two &a& aIready made. A strike-& merely. a . +eftised to, print ,the answers, to a question. years a@o, all p@itto-.the Government’s lack of -coll@tiv& action by a - group with corndon \ ‘_> . The ,Editor, - s.l&t by one candidate for the saxne reasoq., In interest iti providing equal opportunity for the interests and a commongoal, an action that is On behalf df the .K-W Chamber Music speaking with t&t candidate, I found t&t the entrance of qualified qieople- into university: _ not only ‘condoned, bui e&&rag&d in a “free” ,f ‘Sbciety, i would like to convey our thanks to -. y- remarks oould only baire:been considered libel ’ The group of students whb will probabiy be society., Without tyy”i,tii$ to pontificate about -) ,Celia Geiger for her gen&bus offer to turn . t against the Chevron.,-what I would‘like to ask hardest l@ a!9 .women., In _-tin . Ontario ~democTatie ideals; .I believe it is. our duty to - ’ pages for,Anttin~I(uerti atourconcerf of-March -‘, the letteirs editor of the*Impriht is, is the letter . Federation of ‘Student! publication, “Bridging , m a k e f u11Use of blir freedoms to achieve’what 2nd. It is a small but crucial job, ca@ for :) yoq rejected the same, one, that Ms. I$( Rowe’ the Gaij: Wome‘ri:. pkl Pdst6ecoridtiiy Eduwe th&& is $$ht arid fait. To be submis’sive, to ., concentration, and is hard on tpe nerves since . I later publisbedih the Ch;evron. IRit was, the,n I Lcati0n” ,is an examination ‘of the particulgr accept his incredible policy of rising,fees, is no a false move could pasily cause niajor havoc in \’ : must q*estion your not printing it. ‘The’ problems for w&men to re’maiti atuiiiv&rsity in less than a “cop-out” and would demonstrate a dhamber mueic concert ,-w-here’ timing I ’ allegations,. althowh most probably false, .th% fake of high tuition fee’s and cut-backs.- our spineless acceptance of any disaster&he between the players is vital. Our previous / “[ were against you a&l the Federation, and with This article and many &her publicatigns on Tories ‘are to inflict o-ll society. arrangements fop a page&turner had fallen students and thee rising cDst of e‘ducatibn are y,, the Federation’s permission, yet Co& hive A,strike, this-f&, if it is well o_rganized and thr’bugh at the last’mifiute, andit -was-both 1 a?ai!abke from -the UWlFederation of Students I: printed ii’without risk of suihg yourselves for intekligetitly led, ,de&ves the support ‘of G-11:-., kind and:b ravd’df c $dGr v\iriter?to tax& on the Off&e in: the Campus Centre. Oir pact -- atudents,“whether ;, libe& MS. _ o& is cefiinly ‘entitled tb her or nqt ‘they themselves are job, which she_ carried out admirably,” tdo. / ’ , ;opini4@, nofn at?er hoti ridicti&&s it may be, rote a -detailed p$esident, -M&rk McGuire, <able to afford’the tuitibn @crease. A successful Our compliments also -on the nic_e article - _ - ,: and, assthe c$+ntof the letters is not your. - l&tory of cut-backs in’educa F ‘dn whichcanibe’ strike,,which depends uppn cobctive. aetibn, ’ about Jhe ,cohc!/rt. May there b_e many; more ’ .: re$po$ibility, ‘there iit no reason’ foupdk in the last pages of +the -Student ! needs the c,ommifme’nt of-everyone.: _.. I why _..you ’ s&h! (I ho@ also that our organizatiofi’will ggt I I q -\ I r‘.1-.shoiild not have firinted it. , Hatidbook. ba\te Dubbihski ’ * Fentioned in future coverage, hoth’beforti and , ,-Pm1 I realize that .the”above complaints concern yIf.you are.qneof thosestudenfs whG,belie&s’ .’ 2 3 _ ’ Chail;iaiian % after- the .con&rt; KWCMS is an independent c that igeoragce is. bliss, and yov ride. on the ’ _ . +’ on’3cy‘“asqall fraction -iof the material. you have , , _U of ‘& New .Democrats . the‘ . orgahiziition, not a part of th&Univ’ersity, _ 2’ publis.hed, but T felt ydu should- hear these , hope’ of cl&in8 y,otir eyes and bblding your i-l ‘, ‘\/I Federatibn of Students, ‘or any’ other body with, ’ .- . ,I \ “views. and con&+ if yoc~ are taking on some byreath, pou,‘r,e%eat. The only, way is to kno’w * 8 pipeline to!public or quasi-pub& sourties of 2 .’ Chevro&ke.&titudes. * _’ ’ -. , ~2 ’ beca‘uge then i,ou’ll knoti why ybi s’hotild fight t 4‘ . r ‘Situation for visa-% -C 9 - funds. XWe depend allmost e&rely ori sub“1 . %&-Templeton ’ ,back, acd you’ll ha,vC the facts to bac.k you 6~. I 1 scribers and ticket-buyers far otir suJport, and -\_’ :, - ( v2BMath I ’ hayen? learned ,it all. yet, but. I a&’ learni_qg. -r-t.students int&rable . ” ‘,(. we .n&ed all the Belp we can get!) . _ ., ‘. Read Federation.pos&s, j&n in rallies March . ! I 1 ‘\ : __Jan Narvei& The edit&, ’ ,27, coqe and talk to Hon. Bette Stephenson6n ~, .<I Sttipidiiey &e ca&e ’ , . President In May, tuition ,for undergraduate visa. , cI Mar& 17‘in t!ha Theatre bf the,Arts at, 1:15. ‘f \ , students $11 iise to $1,628 for two ter&srThis ,,_, -, ’ 1 Get, involvedd, btit most im&rfatitly, .be of imptiri&‘ni’ &&ke.- ? kxborbitant fee representsthe acc’umulation of awaFe, be ‘informed and be together.- Separ‘I The-Editor,. * L * \ at’ely, we are j’ust a Tower of Babel, but if all’of ’ a $100 increase ih 1972, the discriminatory ! , / ” The’fee hike-sttiike now .being-brg&.zAd is _ us: females atid=-&ales, Arts, Erlgineering, -? PiffEfBrential fe&imposedin January 1977, more \ , 0sensible, pragmatic ,and thoroughly justified. ,+ ’ Math& .Fine Arts, Science, Efi,vironmental than doubling t-b fees for visa studehts,,a 5% + Priirate corpor&iotis, which behefit gre$tly year. and -Computer Science students bind-. . hi&ease last y&e+ and a 7$%increase,this . Planned obsolesce& -. ’ ., .._ z from the .skSlIed’labour,-bf university *grads, ’ Studies Substantial irI,creases ifi th? cost,of living, t together as ~people concerned for our future ’ \ ’ pay a,small andkiier.decreasing proportion of ’ books, etc. have -m,ade the situation even more . ’ in Psych dlass& ’ ’ and the future of eduya‘iion as we know it, then ,’ \’ .:.the -posts of- :university education while . . we will have a vojce ~OQloud to file awayunder difficult, .and in addition, Visa students are ‘~someti~~;‘~ I. ’ ,’ , prevented’ from obtaining jobs to defray I some _ Deal- Edi@ students arid taxflayers-pay more. The higher ,x -_ Recehtl-y’our introductory .psychology class’ ’ tuitibn feei Will further reduce gcqessibility, - ‘* ’ ~ .’ ‘Dianne Mark Smith-. Of their eXpC?IlSt?S. ’ / has been subjected to’ a number‘bf outdated ,’ : thus lowering the- quality of education‘ as A ’ *I This, situation is intolerable and, we mu& qo-or’dihator _ -I. i; films pf questionc kducational mdrit. Do universities will be forced/ts_lower admis,&ion , take action-noiS.to’reirerse this trend. Students’ ’ ,Wome& jnt&est Gro,gp 1 ._ ijustify -substitvuting -r ‘at VW are -pres@y..,prganizi.ng a fe_e hike ’ university ’ cutbacks ‘standgrds in -order to maintain - enrolm’ent ’ ’ secondlrate movies for pros? Will- the levels and revenue from tuition $&s. No 4 .i strike for September 1980 an$ vi& s&dents ’ e L proposed tuition increase guarantee the&urn Gtidt’ of freshj ’ air. i . advanced .aociety c&n tolerate a governmpgt .’ , ‘should join wifh their Canadian’c’c&@rparts ., ): which idiotically treats education as merely an -- I ~ - 1’. in stud& ‘@I&$ ‘_, 1. 7, , 1 ‘to’ m&4 thi’b f&‘-hi-k$ strike.a success.‘, ’ .* - 0f profs to the lecture halls? It seems unlikely.- I - rn Se@P;mber, refus;e” to pay the -tuition .,--- We fin+ the prospetit of- pafing mbre ‘forda F , h _ , .’ . - expe&.e rather t$ian as a valuable invehtment, t I, .: v sub&and&d education disturbing, @-say ‘the ’ m&Editob, _, . _ 1 / 1 .. a,priviiege rather t-han a right. e inCre&$,‘&st p?y last year’s amount. T. _= There, has been rnucbdin <ihe’ afi recently stidents ‘uniired in actionat VW ctin put, an !gGt* , -‘ No one should be qurprised at #the posit‘& _ K.A. Sub&h L -I .. ’ students- are taking.‘-The. fee hike strike-.& -’ abqut a‘ Lfee-l$k&.,,strik,e. this, XSeptember:*.‘Fbis &d to -the~tui’tion incretises! j * . I,-_ -4 ;J. Zegers r ,‘nece&ary ?a@ proper ‘in- the -._/face of- such . air to $6 the.stude@ ( JSuppo’rt the,fee’ Kike-strike! _\ .-has .been, a^ gusjt of., fresh ..4 ., */I \’ I 1 / ,F 1 -I‘, \k.&* c ‘1 j ’ > “, , ,._. I I * c --(’ \ ,. . . . \ 6 -_ _ ‘>- , \; _ .’. .. \ - , I I - . _. \-, . ’ ‘-3,~ .-\_. \, .I / ’ t , I . . 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,On Tuesday,; afterno-on, torture, although th”at is not laxity-on the part of the night Timothy Jenkins spoke on x always the case, he added. warder, the escape was not ,thesubject of humanrights ’ For a week they were+not discovered until 7:99am the - - in-South Africa at,‘Conrad allowed to sleep, they--were - next . morning.., ‘The UnderGrebel Hall; Jenkins-and two kept in solitary confine, ground got them tothe border,, -others managed to escape a mentfor a month. The police 250 km away: - : ‘- .. maximunrsecurity.prison in ’ gave them’ only? the “.mini- Jenkins then spoke for a few \ PretoFia; he had been senmum necessities in food:‘? minutes on the situation in Y- tented to 12 years for viola, ,” South Africa today. The tions of the :Ter-rorism Act -’ goyertiment, he said, has Y and the Internal Security - “‘made its face up” with Act. , apparent changes, such as in _. the . integration of sports. Jenkins spoke a-bout the However, Jenkins note.d that history of the African National his high school, holding -600 Congress, formed in 1912 as a . i people, had much more equippolitical body to unite the. ment and better facilitie-s than blacks in South Africa. After a a black township containing . demonstration in March 1960 45,000 people. which left seventy dead and ‘Blacks have f never been .-over a hundred wounded, the c allowed legal trade unions, ANC was banned. In 1961, the - &jut the new labour legisANC decided to “use every lation, .he said, would put the available means” to establish-, unions under -white control, equality: This includes vio- :_ undermining their purpose; lence as well as legalchannels. > The excuse of ,foreign’?n-He first encountered the vestors (that they provide plight of the black South employment) is nonsense, he African ‘while a student at the contested. because it hasn’t. University of Capetown. In Black unemployment -is more ‘1974, he left SouthAfrica and than two million. “Investment made contact - with ANC just provides more capital.” . “offices in London who trainJenkins then recounted -the ed him and sent him back situation of -_James, Mange, -The-trial was held in June, into *the country. With a who has been- sentenced to 1978. The government’s friend, he set up an under-hang. He is the first personto contention, noted Jenkins, ground cell. was-that whites were res- - be charged with high treason. They acted as. an internal His actions, however, are ponsible ,for,, isciting the ‘propaganda and informalegitimate under the / UN’s violence. A (“stooge” - was -I tion #bureau. With mailing declaration that the South brought in, called Mr. X, hr-lists and leaflet bombs African govenment is illegal, ,who-spoke to- the court _ (packages of ,leaflets conadded Jenkins, about the military training :;taining an explosive charge Mange-was ,part of-a dozen given in the ANC, and which throws the leaflets their identified-a leaflet’ bomb as _ I people. who ditiissed -into the air) they attempted a device -for “blow-ing-up .c_ defense dyring a secret triaI. - to supp’ly information to the They sang songs during the buildings.” Jenkins retorted, “blacks. They also published trial. Each person had an extra “It _was obvious he was a a journal. In So,uth Africa, year- added onto ‘his sentence stooge.” possession of a leaflet of He .s_ubsequently was, sen- . --for contempt of court-Jenkins this nature is punishable by felt that -Mange’s sentence. tepced, to twelve years ‘in a five years in prison. was ,I. . whit6 _ maximum securitv / I* equival,ent., to adeath penalty for contempt of court. In March-, $978, the-police prison. There-were ten white; came- to get him. They there, in separate cells with %.; Mange has been given leave to appeal his sentence. Jenkins _hot’and cold run-, surrounded the block and inattresses, gave addresses ’ for a letter . sent security officers to the- -ning water and toile.@. Robin campaign, to have -Mange : apartment he and his friend Island, home of the black -freed.‘ . Some . o’f the prison+ has mass cells, holding-occupied. With regards to his future officers .-had- Moo-d pn their u.q. to eighty people each. ‘pants as an intimidation There are 650 prisoners on, . plans,-he feels’ that ‘ffor Ihe - time, being I’ll be- travelling Robin Island; he said, and .tactic. Jenkins was @rested . around Canada and back to I -andY- his apartment ran- I more merely being’ detaned. Britain.” He. -also hopes to, sacked. The . arrest -was The details of their ‘escape, return to Africa. ” . most probably a result of. eighteen xnf3ir!%s- later,-&.tst The=talk was sponsored by remain a secret for security . 5 careful police,worki he said.. WPIRG&nd CUSG; I a . Because they were white; _ reasons, but they left by the 7--* - --John McMullen - . -there was%o real physical front-door at 5:OOpm. Due to .-. c

According to a recent.Ontario Federation, -of Stude$s ’ (QFS) news release, important new rights have been won for the 32,000 students wholive in the province’s post-secondary residences. “For the first time, you have the right to ensure that issues like residence fees, food and rules are discussed in ’ committees where the-people -A who have to live by those rules, eat the food and-pay the fees - have smost of the votes,” said the release. ’ - ,OFS ChairpersonChris MCKillop said that a pamphlet, ’ now being distributed- to resi\ -dence students across the _ province is “the climax of our _ w0r.k on this issue. We pushed for residence rights at Queen’s Park and won,” he said* “and now we want to l,t people \ -know, about the improvements.” _These improvements, ac: * cording to the “pamphlet inelude the right to “know the residence rules before you ’ accept an offer of admission” and-the right to. fhe ,use of a j _I

, ’ residence-established judicial - gave’ eviction powers, usuto system %“if. you’re accused of -c ally accorded exclusively _,breaking the rules.” \_ federally appointed -judges, “If - administrators to proviqcialIy appointed ignore. consultation:’ $e p_amphletResidential Tenancy Officontinues, “you can do somecers. I Since its intervention in thing about .that too. The law -says that without consultation the: Supreme Court _ three, the Residential Tenancies Act weeks ago, sections ofthe new+ RTA have’been replaced (RTA) I applies to residences and it is much stricter than - in the County Court by the these guidelines:” * older Landlord-Tenant Act Perhaps the best news of all, (LTA). Other portions of the RTA, notably the parti conin the light of ‘tuition fee ‘increases, is the Iegislation cerning rent review, are still operative and enough Resirequiring administrators to justify any residence fee indentialc Tenancy Commissipners have been appointed creases “by providing alI the information’necessary fo resito oversee the rent review dence committees” In addiproceedure., -The non-constitutionality tion, ancerates are established, -they cannot be changed after - of the RTA however, may throw some doubt on the people have been accepted for OFS achievements in- the residence except in very spefield of -residence rights. ‘cific and limited cases. , . The. new legislation, how- ’ j Whether or not these newlyacquired rights will be inever, is tiedin with the &cently eludsd in the nullified porintervened RTA (see Imprint, Feb.29,1980); ’ _ tions of the -RTA as yet remains in question. ,_1/ - : - Part-s of the RTA was _ ,’ found by a panel of judges to be unconstitutional since it/ _ M-arg Sanderson .

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A_ survey ‘conducted at Queen’s Un- __ Gf the\Manus ‘study, he, adds: “New .-iversity among 550 newly-graduated Guinea always *offers .a challenge, The teache,rs sho.ws that, contrary fo currentunexpected always-occurs." .t popular belief, there are -teaching jobsCo-bp stud6nts available, particularly for those willing _ - to relocate. tiin p&es -,.The survey, conducted by teacher Sixteen applieclscience and engine=placement officer Alan ,Tr.avers of ing students. at UW have won $lQO -Queen’s faculty of educationi shows that prizes, offered by a number of industries over 65 per_ cent of Queen’s, 1@79 B.Ed. and the Sandford- Fleming Foundation graduates have found full-time teaching term reports in. jobs, Another 45 per cent are working in . for the best work Waterloo’s co-op-erative education proa field related to teaching,.,havereturned ’ gram. -Ths..winners are students who ao further studies, or have another full. were working in industry last fall and timezjob. are now back at UW for the winter. - Travers says ‘he finds the surveyof $100 industry-sponsored results highly encouraging. “The results - Winners prizes for work term reports are: 1( show that if,our grads want to teachDoug Beringer, of -Kitchener, third: -and-don’t care where-their chances of / --year earth sciences, Union Mini&e finding a job are good. The big factors are and Mining Corp. Ltd.; versatility,‘determination andmobility.” , Explorations Catherine Cope-land, of Ottawa, thirdThe high success rate among Queen’s Borden Chem’ ‘*graduates hunting for jobs can also be- ‘year ical coapplied Ltd .- chemistry! . attributed’ to the university’s unique Ken Chow, of Georgetown, third-year lteacher placement office. One of very civil engine,ering, James --F. MacLaren few university teacher -placement ser,. . Ltd.;. vices in Canada, T.the office takes a of Scarborough, positive; aggressive approach in placing. h Cindy. Drummond, . third-year the_mica1 engineering, S.C. new-teachers. .Johnson & Son Ltd.; /. Of the graduates now teaching, oneVijay Dube, of Ottawa, third-yearthird’ found jobs outside .-Ontario, in ~ systems design engineering, Into award;- other provinces orcountriest There are \ Robert Saunders, of Newm-arket, : 1979 Queens B.Ed;“ grads teaching in t bird-year mechanical engineering, Babevery province of Canada (except PEI) and five in the ‘North West Territories. ., co,ck% Wilcox Canada-Ltd.; Ralph van Haern, of Guelph, third:” More than 20 are in other countries.-, year electrical engineering, Allen-Bra& Technical‘and vocational teachers are in ley Canada Ltd. demand,; according to Travers, as are .- Winners of $100 prizes from the ‘teachers of French, music and physics. Sandford Fleming Foundation are: A.R,\ Students with specialized academic . Butson, of Stratford, fourth-year elec-backgrounds arte also getting jobs. trical engineering; J. D. Clarke, of I For those-who have nofyet found-a Weoodstock, third-year electaical engin; teaching- job; Trayers can offer “hope. eb ‘ng; Jane’Clemo, of Oakville, fourth“There -are still positions open for year chemical engineering; Tom Hawk-, February, 1980,” he says.-. ins,-pf Milton, fourth-year civil engin,~ UW--PIof \in _I . _eeting; I.E. Heads, of Mississauka, third; year -mechanical engineering; Brian . New Guinea Study Hooper, of Courtenay, B.C., third-year Dr. Colin De’A$h, associate-professor chemical engineering; K..A. McGillivray;’ “with the Departmsnt of Man-Environ-of Hamilton, third-year civil engineerment Studies at Waterloo University,*is ing: D.A. Ross, of Ruthven, fourth-year “part of a team recruited by Canadian I mechanical engineering; Mark Turchan, University. Services Overseas (CU!3$)) of %Kitchener, second-year systems de--to carry out a rural development study sign engineering. = , on the other side of the warld. Sin@le P,arents losk _ De’Ath, who has travelled all over-the’ - - -i L _globe. since he ,left’-his native New , i for more cl&t - 2 \_-Zealand as a-teenager, will Ieave -for Canada Student Loans (CSL) ‘-and Papua New Guinea in the South Pacific ’ Ontario Student Loans (QSL) aqe not in-late March -on a 15-m&nth leave-of-’ ag‘ain available to singel- parents on absence.’ , 2 r Family Benefits, Assistance (FBA) or For 10 years, CUSO has beenrecruitGeneral Welfare Assistance_[GWA). The iRg skilIed Canadians to -work on twoStudent Assistance ’ Program year contracts in Papua New Guinea. I’ Ontario (OSAP) policies for the 1979-80 school *%USO has recently-‘been involved in that single parents on helping ‘Mantis, Papua_New. Guinea’s + ye’ar stipulated FBA/GWA were-no longer eligible for \ Lsmallest provjnce, to plan an Integrated any Student loans. Rural Development Study to investigate The changes in OSAP policies were ways in-which M&n@ can- be developed brought ‘about by a number of conand how local,-people can be involved; ’ cerned students throughout the pro&anus is a group of islands just south vince who voiced their opinions on of the equator. The area is isolated and: treatment of single pare,nts: Although the only -communication is by -radiosingle -parents can now obtain both phone which has to- be booked in loans, a number pf issues, such as ’ advance. There are only a few flights in _ inadequate childcare, still require to Manus-each week. improvement. . For De’Ath the trip will almost be like -- The differential treatment is the result - going home. He was an assistant-district of. complaints -received by the Ministry in Papua New Guinea -- commissioner of Community and Social Services -when it I was’. a protectorate of the (COMSOC), according to the Ministry of Australian’government many years ago; ‘Education. COMSOC claimed that single then worked for government there: he parents were adequately provided_ for has returned three- times in the last decade as an advisor and researcher for through its ministry* The only. way students on-FBA/GWA various international development agencan possibly hope to secure continuation cieb. He spent a year fhere on sabbatical, of financial aid to then, took six months ‘unpaid leave to -‘and improvement -work on -a study of the effect ,of . upgrade their education is to voice their -needs in unison. Auniversity education deforestation on local agriculture for the Lgenerates costs over and above those : Institute of Applied Social and Economic. covered by COMSOC. Research. He spent last summer back in For this reason, the Single Parent‘s Papua New Guinea completing-the study Action Group has decided to call upon and will soon be issuing a book on the students on FBA/GbA in allof Ontario’s subject. colleges and uni-versities to develop a De’Ath .has been involved with CUS’O network of -single parents which will -’ ever since he arrived in Canada Icyears provide the necessary clout-to influence ago to teach at .UW. He’d picked up, the policy making processes in the degrees in education and - political education ministry and COMSOC. _ science ‘and a Ph.D. in anthropology Further information regarding the during his -world travels. He’s been Group may be, chairman of the CUSO canvas commit- ’ Single Parents’ Action obtained by. contacting Elsa Rayner in tee at Waterloo. De’Ath has two adopted Dundas at (416) 627-3788. I , :. sons in Papua New Guinea and says tnat


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visible if they are to gain true ’ t _ < “Dooh -and Gloom” was ‘interest;” and that’“equality Aequality. She was also in the forecast at Ibe syniposfor women is uneconomical.” While the government is ‘_favour of a tax-strike in ’ . \ ,’ ium “Feminist Vi&ions of the e@a’n- ‘Canada, irivolving a?!+Futufe: Vision Two - The I willing to contihue \ Ecofiomy,” he14 in Toronto sion - of armaments, said contented + taxpaying cltlCohen, it’ is cutting back on zens. Ho-wever, she did not on Ma’rch 2. , ; -’ .n Propose a. $rategY for imc The event was’spons&ed _ social services because they ; by the National &&ion,Comclaim them to be inflationplementatlon, but ‘instead left it as an idea for future mittee on the Status of ,ary. , Since wqme’n are, the primary us&s o*f social serv; consideration. ’ .ytirneti, and; intilueed preThe only bit of sunshiie4o ices, it is thhy who arekhurt sentations by three’economdcspel the “doom and gloom” first andmost. Cohen further isis, one union organizer,.+d _- ’ of the meeting came from of NAC,-Lynn added that women are better, * I then president off in society today because . union organizer Madelaine h MacDonald. Parent, She believks that/the everyone is better off; howEconomist Marjorie Co\ ,hen, speaking on’ Economic ever, thgir relativeqosition _ way tq receive equal pay for work of equal value4 and to ’ Barriers to Liberation, r& hasnot improved. In a subsequentspeech ,elimigate th “female job vealed that a-recent meeting between Pierre Trudeau and MacDonald maintained that ghettos,“- is t t rough collective-zbargaining. members ,of <I)JAC prov,ed* women have so-far r.eceived .Parent spoke out tigainst unfruitful. Apparently, the op.lp token improvements in the seniority ‘system’ tihich T Liberal government believes society, and that they will * that w-o&n’s interests are need to, become,jmore poli,leSsens the importance of other job performance fac_- .not a part of the ‘!-national ‘tica’lly active and public,ly . _ I tois and leaves most ,wom/en . in positions of 10~ pay and ..- _ -...E HEADI1II‘ARTERS p&&&5. ./ Perhaps the most sytibolic illustration to emerge from __l_l_-....---______-.....-...~..-~---..~~. , the -sym@osiup came, not CYCLE 6 SPORTS LTD frbm the s,peakers but from~ YOU& SPORTS I HEAbQUARlERS the furniture in the.*confer. en& roo,m. .Wtirn’Ten, sp’eakers found it peyessary to stand on two telephone books in order to see o&er the top-of the KATE EXCHANGE - SGAFIPENING ? pGdium.- FOG the present, at ‘RADE UP MENS .. EOYSL~DIES -: .’ least, it seems that sytiIICYCLES SPORTS EQUIPMENT ETC posiums are geared .almost exclusively toward the m,ale. r. > ’ _- ’ 7- Debi’lrock ,” 2 -,. ‘: _ <-.

Montreal Grou’ps to Take - . South A&” ’ .Actioh Against. MT$ ’ i A Concentration Camp? MONTREAL - Several Montreal groups -:MONTREAL - L$e in 80ufh Africa

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is are planning to tak6 legal ction against similar to &at in a “concentration camp”, the CTV Television net J ark for &lleged accordi*g to tin exile from the country. distortions of facts in a public affairs “Human rights are liot only lacking,-but’ program on international sfudents. ’ / are totally abseqt ,,in_ South ’ Africa today,” Philip Taylor, who voluntarily _-’ The Mctmtreal Ad Hoc. Committee. left the country in -1970, to14 ,McGill Against W5, composed of nI%pk Chinese students during -the recent community groupsi wi!l be taking‘ legal * Uni\rersity South Africa Solidarity Week. action against the-- W5 show, “The Taylor is one of a few blacks to. have Campus Giveaway” within the next twd been granted’ a quality education there. weeks. Before lqaving for Canada, he studied In the W5 programlscenesl of Chinese law. He received a masters from MdGill stpdents on -Canadian campuses were’ ih- political science. He now teaches shown while a commentary talked about speci.al education in Lachine, Quebec. foreign students crowding Canadians Taylor told, the audience-that South out of *any university programs. But npb-whites must carry passafter investigation, the comniittee foun&‘, African * bo&s’ ~““at ‘#1,.‘ times. The passbooks that all but two of the alleged foreign ‘. contain photos, detailed personal infor-: students shown on the program were tiLtion and racial and religious’ descripi C_ahadians o-f CMnec_s.e ,+&cent .. . , tiggs; They must bear an employer’s The conirpittee is lobking Aor, su&ort sig@ture. Any irregularity means poss-. from Mon’t‘pebl&; >The’ Chi&& --Neigh: .it+ Imprisonment, fine or sometime’s bourhodd Association, under the ausbanishment from a region. ’ ,pices of the Ad Hoc Cammittee, will b-e anon-whit’& are told ‘which schaols considering suing, the producers df ihe they may go to, and even what streets show and the network. Their opiions tire ’ they may travel during what hours. The a-- class action suit , or an injunction white- mino$itpgoverhment also tells calling, fbr equal air time. -them with whom they can socialize. The ,Sitikebng-Lee, committee coordinat6r;-“color bar’” even appiies for hospitals 7 -planA to gain ared, sueport by showing matiy won’trreat non-white Eases. Said the W5 film to Montreal universities and Taylo?! “The position is likely growin&% :p CEGEPS, , pointing out the distortions worse, particularly in rdral areas.” and circulating a -petition. The coti? In-gene@ practice, the non-white ig mitt&! also hopes‘ to stage a rally in seen, only in his function as a labourer,f%+il. ‘, - _ :‘, ’ Wh,ite employers will oxily grant six, rntihth contracts. Experienbe or per-. forn%mce &aTantees -nothing. %A hog-1 &i; ‘&&rat~(&, -1, +,i@ doing the same job .as a whit+’ worker may get one-tenth the wages. c .’ / .: .6f Dep#!ence ~.t_ ’ Answering a student’s question, Tay; *I *. / lor agreed that the Sotietto u’prising “‘may be writing on the wall.” But close - WINNIPEG - The University Grants Commission (uGC) of Manitoba has #$Vernment SUWfi?ihNX? and the thre@ bf imprisonment aqd hanging -admitted the provincial &overnment d&t+ revolutionary moveinents -,from ’ hands it spending’ “targets” even before getting started. The mere expression of,.a the UGC has made its “independent” can constitute an offence I complaint budget requests. The inform/atio,n came to light at th& against- the gOVerIiment. “South Africa hanging! rate ifi the March meeting. of the- Univerbity of has: the highest .1Manitoba Senate,. when correspondence wor1d”, he said* between .the ~university presidbnt and 1 / Willard Condo, chair of the UGC, was ‘, Asbestos Probkms ifi c presented to-senators. ~’ I’ President Ralph Campbell &bre$sed ’ OntarW Schools A dismay ,and surp’rise at Condo’s explanatidptis: in th,e,Jet~e+... s + ., .,. ., \. 4s many as 150 educational instituThe rofe qf thkUGC has beenreduced tions in Ontario hive -been told by the /to ‘.‘one of . making -a few simple provincial government ‘to replace Sr arithmetic calculations,” Campbell said: cover ‘portions of buildings constructed i One Sehator pointed-out this revelausing asbehtos. Inhatind asbesfos part” tipn makes a mockery of the university’s icles can; lead to serious lung disease , long detailed budget procedure which including cancer. Thamaterial is used if s deter‘mines the size of the budget request a fire ret@dant. to the UGC.,One lett& from Condo ends “We’re telling them this is a,danger to on a somewhat omipous note - the health, that for safety and security they ,commisSion members have asked me .to should do it (remove -or seal the i& ‘cate to you (Campbell) “that the tone material),” says Stan Orlowski, associ. of 9_ our communication on’Feb.19 does ate chief architect for the ministries of nothing to .improve relationships l beeducation and colleges and tiniversities. t ween the university . &l- the, UniOrlowski said the- institutions known kversities Grants Commission.” to have asb&tos were built in fhe-1960s The, UGC is suppo@dly ar) i&$tirtial and ‘are located thro’ughout the provinc,e. body which -requests funds from the .Although some of the schools have veby provin&j government for the operation. little’ asbestos;, . Orlowski say&’ any and tiaintenauce &f Manitoba’s uniamodnt is enough to-cause concern. !‘If Geq;sit@s, and distributes these f&ls the material iS flaky, it doesn’t mattelz ‘amongst the’ institutions. whaf the percentage is - they have to do \ ry something about it .” I , Orlowski\ added the Education Min-. i&r Bette Stephenson has not decided A&d theWinner is... who will pay ‘for the necessary repairs, /-\ . , but he-added”that .most schools”wili-have ‘AUSTIN - The University of Te)tas’ to do their own work. Each school h’as version of the Rhinoceros Party ‘- a been sent L9manuaI with inforpation on - candida& known as “None of the Above” i asbestos and Instruction on ta’kitig - cgme UC the big winner in recept * &mples,-removal and sehling. student &&rnment elections. , New Democratic Party MPP, Ed “N&e of, the Above”, who ran for Zieaba, is angry at gover.nment inac’tian several student positions, captured 42 :;on the.,asbestbs problem. He said that percept of the graduate student vote, 34 asbestos hazards are, taken much more ke percent ‘of the se&or’ vote, 33 percent af - seridusly in the US- than in Ontario,. the_ junior v&e and 20 percerit of the “Students are especially at risk,” , sophombre vote.. I -w ote Ziemba in a letter to Stiphenson: But despite “None of the Above’s” L “T “h eir r’emaining life exptictancy propop$afity, the candidtite ‘was unable to vides a long development period for achigve electoral success. asbestos-related diseases.“., \Se . -

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“The person who gets a ‘job,” Lisa Avedon told her audience during ;la_st Thursday’s Career Day forWomen, “IS. the person who already has one. ” Avedon, in‘ & very candid and informal y with . ten to discussion fifteen listener/participants maintained that almost any firstjob can lead- to oppdrtunities’ because% it “shows-that you can hold a are ‘a &proven jsb -and worker”. Avedon also urged her listeners to-be awa.re of their own values in relation to the values af- their potential employers1 She cited-a study of a:large corporation (“note unlike IBM”)_ that found. “to - b-e highly’: women interested in the quality of -the work and interpersonal relations while the male employees ‘were much more concerned with such things as the profit margin and the balancing of- their budgets. Women who- are aware of these discrepancies in values are better able to either seek employers” who have ideals- closer, -to their own, or to understand and control-these value c&ashes. Another recurri.ng theme of the day-long programme was the need for women td take risks. Each person, -claimed Avedon, has his or her own particular risktaking behaviour, which can-in part, be gauged by the Sesponses to the situations in their lives where-it was necessary .to take chances.

With the ’ use of- a chart, participants were able to determine the number of times that their fear oftaking risks became an . obstacle to tbem. If there are Y too many instancesof this, the listeners could work on _ their assertiveness, it was \ i - . suggested. ’ Finally, Avedon told her audience, it is important when looking for a job to “let people know” that, you need ’ age. Somebqdy who knows somebody will tell you about jobs they are aware of, she, / said, and job-seekers. should constantly be getting information from- everyone ,they know.* New fields are-opening up all the time, Avedon’ stated, . and some - positions s,are so new that they don’t; even have -titles and- therefore can’t be 1 advertised -through the usual channels. I Gail Reitz, from . UW’s Planning, ,and , Car%& placement Centre, put Forward a strong case for meticulous,-9esume writixig. Resumes are much more of the job’ than a formality seeking experience, Reitz told her audience. Their format is o.ften so criticalthat an improperly produced resume can actually prevent 1 you from getting near the job L - Fo6 which you’reapplying. said that many . Reitz resumes are screened by . armed with ‘a - secretaries list of reasons to. whole reject apllications. “Something as trivial as cluttered

margins may keep you from ever .meeting their person who could interview or hire you for a job, even if the content is excellent,” she maintained. e ’ As well as resume writing,. Reitz . and her associate; Ellen Shanks, -also from UW, discussed other tecnicaliXes 1

Sunberg, from UW as well, of -the’ job search such #as should let men who are provided a number of covering lett&rs, interviews, sexist or unfair in their broadcast letters and specific examples -from her dealings with fellow follow-up analyses of own experience regarding - employees know that their the obstacles faced by interview sessions. , behaviour is not acceptable,. The concluding-speaker of women in their-jobs. “It is. , and do so “without, the dayi, Sunn,y Sunberg, ,important,” she felt, “That defensiveness or apology”. concerned herselfmainly - women I should have an ’ with interpersonal relationI ongoing dialogue with m-en.‘! . ships ’ iu _the workplace. 3f it _ is possible, women Marg Sanders& -. - I

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I .. G ueen’s University at Kingston offers a modern, _ discipline-based approach to the study of management in the complex’brganizations of today and tomorrovv..The ’ learning atm sphere@ the School of Business is-livety, -informal, inti ?hate and flexible. Persons from almost all , academic prdgrani’s will find MBA studies rewarding. Financial assistance is available.. _ I /Q-2 Professor J. C: Ell‘ert Chairman, MBA Program School-of Business, Queen’s University , i Kingston, Ontaiio K7L 3N6- ’ i

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.Monday, March* 10 &as* the-day UW . ditures had taken plaqci:sintie /the first in contract researcti with the - priv&e everyone is-& co-op.‘ ,President Burt Mat-the.ivs got, a first-hand sector ‘in the last twelve months, but hr introdtiction of,, the budget \aod that the Matthews was -wil,ling & concede ;hat , look at just how a number of students he’re extra amount was “already in,our budget.” there has been t‘some real deterioration in , thifiks t-hat business -should pick up more’, -feek about t& -fee ‘inqrease. -Federation j He alsq noted that wh&le DFr fe:qB are now &e universities” due’ to the lack of of the. sIa& For the’meantime tholgh; he President Neil’ ,Freeman pre&nted Mat-’ sees fees -being indexed td grants in thk u)5%. of theformutZa fee bn t_he ayerage, ftinding. He feels htiweve_r, that what UW -d tbews with a+ogy of all 4600 signatures future but doesn’t -agree with implemenfuniiiersities such ad Brock:‘and Trent are>- will now be receiving is still not enough, on the Federationrsponsortid petitfon ’ ,as high as 119%. - “There @g the controversial PS R’oss Report. has beeli a ^ but’ tl@ the aclded revenue “will solve , - ’ circulated last month., ; Matthew consyers “the report “ti significant eriatioil in-fhe3ormtil.a fee for _:sgrnLe of the problems.” Matthews acceptedthe st&k of pet& express@ of oginion” with little studeel years,” he- {aded., Free$‘& tias,again, left - Matthews theti stressed the ‘role of _tibns cal*ly and proceeded to a t&te-h-t&e unsatisfied. I( OSAP iri the’ increase. He didn’t -want .to input. Current!y fees are running at 15% of with Freeman. Several topics camf: open university expenditur&s, and until there i‘@ - yhen tb . double-&lgAd“ p&lem -of’\ ‘sbe the iricrease refiected in OSAP, ) ‘for discussion, in&ding ‘OSAP, UW’a .’ G$cceTsibilitjr’@nd he whnts to&eep them at qualitytof-educ’ation.w,as , __ be&be he biliev& that it would inake it _ proof otherwise, I budget, the fee increase and th‘e quasity8f i brd8ched.. that level, not raising it to ZO~_~s some of.. the -real differences mo& difficult .for uni.versi&s ,to justify 1< i education, here and in gedral. .-:., became apparent. ’ ‘IT& - dnus’, IS _pn /the the 10% ‘or any portioh of it.‘Again, little ’ suggested by the Ross report. The meeting eiide& ‘,with -very littfti \ ,_ _ Freeman’s i+& point^ sfl‘ contention gavernmient and university @mini$trg$eed was paid to IdW. B&hi still‘doesn’t was the. latest Council. .of resolved between the two leaders. Hogk -. ’ however, tibns to prove it (that accessibility wil&iiot .+@bclieye that .the increase will result inwan _ Uiliversities (Cara)’ ruling- td accept be -affected): st‘ated Freeman. Matthew% ‘ “elite university system.“.--+ ever’, both agreed that- “nobody likes tti have an increase in their costs? tihi& wonomotis fees and to.‘use ,them as\sach ’ 1 was completely opmsed ‘ and put ,the _ - As ’ a ‘taxpayer,Matthews .‘stated ‘he e .1Matthewsi2 definitely&t prepaded toroil institution sees fit. L&t April, the UW burden of proof on OFS and the, studerits; ; - “wouldn’t b& happy” seeing ff&go to zerb, 1 back the 7.5% increase pending & . Setiaie passed) a rmotion;r,,drafted by He argued that co-op salaries bad rieti’ btit would& min$ it ai -university ’ Matthem& tihich- stated’ that- fees/shoul& faster thgn fees, but_ r&dize;d that not _ ‘president,. There’has been a_30% incre_ase accessibility study, Freeman confided 1 ?_. t&t there i-s “a lot of sympathy on thi?. not- be increasti’d with&t an &&ss,ibilit$ , . .i campus for a-fee hike strike.‘! . study and not t‘o have auttinomous fees I -’ (such,as the 10% autonomous fee set by the - Mark tD’Gabriek *\ mihistry). - Howe&,.-&hen the COU motio-n-came, up; there was little support fey U.Ws’ position. Matthews said that _tlie :o.ther tiniversitfes include‘d autoriomy in fe&Y. : getting in- their general atitonpmy. “Th& I.* ,. ~ only- things central .to qutoliomy is th$-. right-to decide what will be taught,r7iVho,’ *WilJ be-- tang&‘- and who w-ii!. do the - teaching,” Qoted Matthew?. He a$d&d,’ “S&me ptiesidents argue that autwomy \ (for’feesris essential. I don’t beiieve that.“’ , 5 ~ Freeman though, vyas quite annoyed &hen helearned that UW bd ‘iettr&d for .the compron&e finally adapted bi the CdU. He- sees it as an ace&ptacce. .(&f fee 1 \autonomy by+Matthews Tver ?he ruling of the Senate. ‘. , pr 2: UW’s budget’, which goes to the .March I 17 Senate meeting, next cpme undbr -fire:.. . / When the origina! retiommend,ations ’ on - the 1966-81‘ budget tii+e annoupced,‘?hey I were-,worked out utider the assumption of a 4.6%-increase in provincialgrants and-/ allowed for no fee increase;-The fir@1 oopy ’ .. includes-b&b .the 7.2% grant’ &&ease and, 2 7.5% fee in&ease. Freeman- i&&d .'io‘ (from +ft to right) Board sf Communic&ons chairpkrson Larry Kfiight, Board _ know what th_e univer&ty inten&@o do . r . with the added revende &&why Relations chairperson Peter Hoy and-Pl’esident Neil Freeman’ . fees -&+rti- . - of External .-discuss, strategy for the proposecJ fee hike stri!e oat VilZnge 2. . &o&d toe in&ease ~“0 r&Th,~wh& none; ’ wa&:pI&,ned for. 1’ -xi -_A I. Pbqio -by Kklierine c / ., ’ I ‘Mdft&tis countered &at large expen-, ,_* - - , ‘-‘..Ib _ r’ ‘+ -, , I

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Another question was about t&se &ha _. are on co-op work terms at the mom&t / .J , I _- ’ and what they can do about the &&ike ,_-_a&were-d, saying $hai - On Sunday, M&&h 10, q ineetihg on the \ -mrth more_- &an _-what! - --_ the e:u&veisity zaid of apy&Gdent persecuted because of : Again, Freeman .$ %.‘. ..-1 --, they will find out-this summer and be keni proposed fee’ hike strike was held~ in ‘the -’ Tparticipation” in the ‘&ike. Exact> details. would get hom’the fee increaies. -. informed o&r ‘the fall. The first -fef - Village 2 dining hall< Speeches were@ven He also nc$e& th&-w@e loo’s fees are ,- -. will bc sent +o &dents in ihe summer . *. increase will bk felt in-Ma_y. d by Federation president-Neil -Fr&iilan, - already >above t& I formu f a fee. A’ 3%’ - regardijng the strike;’ . . ‘3 Freem’aa also avswered i &estior :Bo&d of. External Relations chairperson increase ‘w&ld bringthe fees here UP te ’ Hay stepbe up to the sp&k&‘s po$ition $egarding whit the uhiyersity wilE bc ’ . _Peter Hoy, and Board of Communications ne$. .J!-Ie mentioned that Stephenson will the new foBinula&e. ‘. 2 ; 1 doingwith the money, saiing thaa it haan’. 1. chairperson iLarry Knight, after ‘which :‘The* bedline fait ‘. is; accordi’ng to ’ be viSitSng UW 3n March 17, giving a ‘-> been allocated yet in, the budget. Ho\ ,-‘there was F-n open quesfio’nhatid-answer Free&an, tha$ Uti could survive u\iithout - speech and ,answering-quegtions in the -_ __~ _ session. About fifty villageriyand students ’ any fee incr;ea&es. Theattie of the Arts st&ng, at 1:15 pm. ’ added that monky should be c’omingfron : the Otitario government, not the students attended. Freeman- also, mentioned the Ontario She’s’ awar* of our concern, Hoy said, as After the meeting, Chris-Reid, a Village . -- tiei Freeinan waq ;he first speaker Student Assis’tance Prbgramme (OS@‘x -We have had 4006 signatures, about 40% of h ‘2 resident, said that he had calledf the ,I talking about the trend&n fee ificti&es ,ThF living ,allowance will remain -unl the ofi-canipus stqdent body. -a i and cutbacks meeting as a rygult of anoth$r meeting 02 ’ in the past: few years. There will also be an OFS ralb in the changed next year at $65 pef week. This zL Wedn&day, March 5, held‘in East quad o ’ s LOntario onc’q had the lbwest tuitionfees in’ - will be the third ye&at March 19. Other this has&&n the -.,, Arts qtiad cm Wednesday, ’ Canada‘ now it_ has the ‘setiorid-highest; ’ means of action are being considered as- _Village & -The- studmtr need to b --same, and it is no longer adequate: A more U of T, _ ~- informed, and meetings such as this, c;, Ontario also had one of the highest well, including o&up&ions. x -r realistic- figure would be $96. per- &eek, _ help. I’ . grantlstudent ratios, now it has one of the Lalikentian, and Carleton all have had wl$h was considered to be “radic81” by Student opinion was in fadour of the bl -l_owq?st. occupations egrlier- this year. , ,Siephenson. However; students are-being \ hike strJke. I Dave Wright, a first-yea ‘Qver four thousand sign&uqes were onasked to pay up to 16.3% more in-fees. There will also -be a- rally at Queen’s Policitical Skience student, said, “Th the petition that circulated around,UW a Park-in Taronto on March 27 St 1:OO pm. *_ Fre_enkan also mentioned that althoughstrike is needed. The extra $57.50 could b -_ few weeks go. At a meeting of the Ontario the fees will be covetied in OSAP, only Bu’sse,S &ill go there from UW, w*$h room, -. spnt on other things.‘? . \ Federation o$ Students .(UFS)- executive for abolit 400 students. The rally will be $3.3 million has been allocated to @$&P “The-fee increasks won’jt affect nie &nc last February ,253, ,Bet.te Stephenson, complete with placards, banners, and -a-. for-the’increase. \ Ian MacNeil, Mi&ster ,of Colleges and Universities, ’ P With all this restrajnt and underprocession. Anydneinterested is as.ked to I I *won’t’ be b?ck;“‘&ate& - _ rejected UW,$ apd .-all other petitions, funding, many feel that the limit has been contact the Fed office in cC235. third year Geography-@dent and don G A . . ’ saying that she didn’t feel anything -was - Knight spoke last,. haying that *posters :‘; F,ast EiT in Village 2. “The Onttiri rea&ed. Freeman will make a motion in I - wrong with-her guideli,nes. 2 . Govertimenf is negiecting their iespon ’ the next Federation Council meeting to j and buttons w-ill be -ayailable shortly; He f ” Freeman also pointed out &at ;he accept a- fee Ftrike.. He ,butlined -two also mentioned the possibility of adver-sibility for equal quality in education President of U- of T suggested that the .* ‘.possible‘st.r&tegies to the audience at the -ti$idg OD radio and TV about the ‘Student’s Making’univereities autonomdus will 1eL students there pay 20% of their educatipg predicament. 1 -to a’two-tieied system. or worse.” -. Village. -\ costs.‘They will?now pay about 14% with . The firstis a fee &ike:to pay for tuition A . question-and-answer sessi;n ?fbl- .’ Nattt Shaka, : a first’ I year Enj$is the increase. ~l- , a-in- two inst~allyents, witho’ut‘ paying t& r lowed, chaired by Federation vjce-presstudent, commented that “-Bette Stepher With the increases ‘this fall, s)udents sbn said something about harsh econoini second, This way,’ ‘the student would i-dent Wim Simonis.: The.’ first questioti-, I , L will pay 7.5% mqre (12.7% for,Optome3ry) -which was brought up again repeatedly -times require drastic sacrifices? First yo . already - be regiatered’in classes.“ Tb ’ t.han tl$ey did this year. The University is_ . secotid is a fee hike strike,- paying last throughout the evehing, was &hy not&g’ need. something to sacrifice. Fee increase ‘,I1-J receitiing a 7.2% increase ingrants next-+, ,was being done rig.ht at: the moment. year’s fees -ogly> will r&e itimposs<ble.for me, a poverty , year, tihen they budgeted for a 4.6% Freema replied that time was needed to &&em ladsfrom the Maritime‘s, to atten Freeman added &it the .Ol!J.S will @crease. This is 2.6% more than they -7had ’ . make the uniyersity populace aware of the . support ady ulii&rsityhatiing a f;e strike,, \ $Jnivers.i&y. . -*/ plannedfoS.Tfieusurplus 1s by a.nd that the Feder$itin -will’ c.ome to the -J issutis.? R is still deeded, Glenn, St-qeirnai ,, ’ . .-\‘r_. .-- a$’ is evid&t >_ . . _ \, -i ’ , . ? I , 4es / -1: , _- ; a_. ./ .I I . . ; ’ / c h

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INTRoDUCTION that students should not recieve OSAP to “No increase in tuition fees should be cover the autonomous portion of their fee. made until a more extensive study is done Matthews did not believe that this on the social impacts of the tuition fees would create a two tier structure like the imposed.” - motion carried by the se’nate I vy League in the United States. It isn’t on April 16, 1979. that students without likely, however, To date, no such study has been pade, private funding would be -able to attend although the Board of Governors passed universities such as Queen’s, Toronto or the tuition increases. Mark McGuire, then Western. Federation President, asked that, in COURSIZS OF ACTION considerastion of the Senate mdtion, the A petition was the first step in affecting increase be delayed. student aims, but it was rejected by Bette University President Burt Matthews Stephenson, the Minister of Education claimed to be no sociologist, and that he and Colleges and Universities. The couldn’t be sure that accessability would number of signatures on the petition adds ie affected. He was confident, however, credibility and has given direction to the that the increases would not affect any Federation of Students. one and was assured by the Minister that On March 17; Bette Stephenson will b& OSAP would cover the increas2. speaking at .Waterlao; the Arts Student ,. U nion has already called for Arts students “Tuition fees for the same programmes should be the same at all universities to b oycott their classes that after&on. offering the programme and should be the Neil F reeman, on behalf of’the Federation same as the “formula fee”.” - statementr is asking students from- all faculties ta arl’ing from Senate meeting of April 18, -boycott classes in a protest against 1979. underfunding and tuition fee increases Matthews stated that he wasn’t in from about 12.00 o’clock. favour of autonomy even though he did Engineering Representatives on Council vote in favour of an additional amount of are working on a stu,dent survey in their money being added to the optometry fee f acuity in order to gauge ‘opinion on above the 7.5%. Matthews went on to say cutbacks, tuition increases and a fee hike

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tentions claim to have no choice in the ‘batter. Under the heading ‘Support From’Other the Executive reported that Groups,’ qedia support was excellent and that editorial backing for OFS’ position on the increase had been received from such commercial papers as the Star and the Globe, as well as from student papers. Support had also come from Ontario’s After a short recap of the interim period between this plenary and the last, the report began discussing ‘The Administration.’ The report pointed- out that, whereas many Boards of Gqvernors were establishing or supplementing their bursary iystems out _of increased revenue, any bursary money awarded to a student would be deducted from hsher OSAP money. Thus, the student w-as, indeed, falling behind. Another trend which the Executive noticed was a tendency on the part of some administrations to “thwart or minimize student reaction to the increase” by opposition parties, -the Ontario Staff and -Faculty Associatiqns , (COUSA and OCUFA) and Cutbacks -Hurt Ontario’s People (CHOP). A number of different tactics were then

sit-in

Laurentian On March 5, approximately fifty students from Laurentian University occupied the administration offices at the institution to protest an expected 13.8% tuition increase for the coming year. This follows similar actions at the University of Ottawa and the University of Toronto last month. Of the increase, 7.5% has.already been accepted by the university, while the amount of autonomy to be used will be decided upon at a Board of Governors’ meeting on March 27. ’ This is a poor choice of date, according to Ron McKay, President of the Laurentian Student Union, because of the OFS rally at Queen’s Park on the same date, and because it comes in the middle of a student election‘ and fund raising cam. paign. The students took dver the top flobr of the university’s 11 storey library/admihistration building early in the afternoon and barred access to elevators for employees, administrators and faculty. All of the students using the elevators were given,pamphlets and made aware of the situation, ‘McKay said that the main purpose of the occupation wtis to educate students about &e problems of funding postsecondary education. “The occupation would have been counterproductive,” he stated, ?if the message -had not been gotten across.” ’ ’

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Another group (calling themselves an istrike. ad hoc committee) is calling for a fee hike Bette Stephenson will be qeaking in the strike. Their motives are not related to Theatre of-the Arts at 12:30. To make sure sttident ‘concerns; this group, in fact, \you have a seat, it is:suggested that you refused ‘to sign the Fed petition. They arrive early; audio-visual will have believe that your concerns over increasedtelevision sets hooked up in the lobby of tuition affecting accessZibility, fee the Modern Languages building for those autonomy and improving OSAP are, who can’t get in. Background literature indeed, misguided. This ad hoc committee will be provided. CKMS will be refuses to identify themselves on their broadcasting the event live. posters, and will take no responsibility for A letter has been sent to all faculty the results of what they, are suggesting. members explaining our concerns about , The only group which can organize a fee underfunding, tuition increases and hike strike must have a mandate from the autonomy and asking professors to cancel students. The Federation has your support classes on Monday afternoon in a protest (4000 strong)- and the Federation is the of those concerns, tily body which has the mandate to The Federation Council will meet represent and support students during the Monday evening to discuss the meeting course of a fee hike strike. The Federation with tTIe Minister. Freeman will intro&uce will, as well, be the only body recognized a motion to hold a fee’ hike strike. After by the admini’stration or the government. that, it will be up- to Council to decide. urges students to, in the Ira Nayman _’ The Federation future, read carefully any leaflets, posters Your Student Federation is actively or other printed material that is fighting cutbacks in government funding distributed. If it is not identified as being and the tuition increase. Action must be sponsored by the Federation of Students, J taken. Student support is a IleCeSSitY, \ it has nothing to do with us. however: if we hope to havetany siirccess in Neil Freeman, Prksident confronting the government’s regressive Peter Hoy, Chairman of BEER policy on post-secondary education. Federation of Students

OFS plans -,strategy, After the meet& with Bette Stephenson, Minister of Education and Colleges and Universities, on Friday, February 29, the Ontario Federation of Students (OFS) held a special plenary to discuss strategy and tactics for the final month of the term. Most of the delegates, angered by Stephenson’s attitudes and remarks, were eager to take action. The-.OFS meeting began with a brief discussion of the meeting with Stephenson. A number of contradictory statements by Stephenson were pointed out; notably, that an accessibility study had been started by the Ministry even though, at the University of Western Ontario, she had stated that the Ministry would not have an accessibility study and that Research and Development should be increased even though, again at UWO, she said that grads didn’t need an expanded R c and D programme. The only order of business was to accept the Executive Report and enact the recommendations contained with the report. Members of the Executive introduced various portions of the report, which-was over twenty pages __. -. long. announcing their plans for it during Reading Week. And it was noted that schools who have announced their in-

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explored. The first dealt with the Board of Governors and recommended lobbying of Board members, as- well as suggesting boycotts of classes and occupations of offices. Most important of the tactics suggested by the OFS ‘Executive, though, was a rally at Queen’s, Park, originally scheduled to be held on March 20, now set for the 27th. The rally would be held one week after a major press conference and a number of MPPs would be sent relevant material beforehand to “inform them of the rally and its causes.” Lobbying of individual MPPs on the 20th would be a major part of the rally. On the subject of the possible-Provincial election, the Executive pointed out that, with the support OFS has at the present‘ time, the organization would be in an excellent position to bargain. The Executive did not feel that it.could plan a province-wide fee strike because first, several schools require payment well before September and a fee hike strike would not work for them; second, many student unions had yet to -discuss the subject and get a mandate from their students; third, setting the date for such a mass action would be difficult, especially considering the fact that’it was not known when‘some universities would make their announcements; and fourth, most of the representatives at the conference would not be in office atthe time a fee hike strike would probably be-carried out, and it wasn’t fair to leave the action to their successors. Neil Freeman, Federation President, . fought for, and won, OFS backing for a fee ’ hike strike for campuses which felt ready to hold one. CWe haqe a mandate...we spelled (it) right out in the petit&” he 1 told his fellow delegates. Ira Nayman

\ McKay pointed to a minor akount of conference”, again pointing to the infavourable response from the students, formational nature of the event. but cautioned that the occupiers weren’t Laurentian, like most other univerexpecting any short-term results. Y’et, sities in Ontario, is not ready for a fee between 9:30 and lo:30 on Thursday,“a hike strike at this time. member of the administration phoned ~ from Toronto with a number of conIra Navman cessions which included student representation on the Board of Governors; the guarantee that he personally would fight against the implementation of the auto- _ nomous fee (it was his feeling that a-7.5% increase was probably too high] and the guarantee ihat he would work towards A changes in-the OSAP. _ community awareness program to inEDMONTON @UP) - Alberta students Representation on the Board of Govforti the public about student financial will gather at the provincial legislature ernors was particularly gratifying for problems. The organization’s members March 27 to conduct amasslobby against McKay, who pointed out that it was will contact community groups and proposed tuition fee increases. made up largely of members of the The student action is the second inchurch organizations for letters of community, not people who are associ-’ support that will be sent to the provincial Canada announced for late March. In ated with the campus, and that they do conservative government. Ontario, thousands of students will not know the impact that the decisions march on the legislature on March 27 tb f’We have to get out to the community to’ which they make have on students. explain why students are concerned,” show opposition to fee hikes. McKay was also pleased to note that Frank says. “There may be a feeling in the But the Alberta protest will not be a all three-student unions on campus had public that students just want a free ride. demonstration, student organizers say. a hand in the planning of the occupatiqm There’s much more to it than that.” “A lot of people think this means a and that all three groups were united in A community edition of the- FAS demonstration; it doesn’t,” explained their stand against the hikes. newspaper, thti Alberta/Student Voice, Tema Frank, University of Alberta An occupation was a good tactic to w&&so be distributed in Mid-March as Student Union vice-president. Frank use, McKay said, because it did not take part of the campaign. said the lobby, organized by the Fea lot of students to act (unlike a fee hike The lobby and community awarenesg deration of Alberta Students (FAS), is strike, which takes the concerted action not going to be a rerun of a 1977 march on program are in response to probable of a large number of people). In this tuition fee increases of 10 per cent across th& legislature by 5,000 students. respect, McKay likened the occupation the province. The Federation also decided to begin a to nothing more than a “glorified press

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Part ‘r’:>SDrivinAgxdown thelong, winding, icy * i--%r~ 8: The sedatives are wearing off. There 1 _ in the audience as XTC _. driveway toBiigeman-Park. We have tQ ship -__ is a @ndl explosion bursts into the- bouncy “Helicopter!‘; suddenly \ for a t&i& “Think. we’ll -eqer get back. up the driveway?” she says. “We maynotget down,‘: 1, .- the front of the stage has a little- life: New guitarreply.. It-‘is hard-to imagine that XTC, a- band ist Dave Gregory, who showed about as much \ stagedpresence as a mike stand in Guelph, is_ . - that _has just Sold out Massey Hall the previous -‘playing with much more confidence and power: . night, and *hose third album, Drunk imd Wksis in th& too five of evervalbum chart in --tonihht. While he does&? trvto conmete with Partridge or ba&ist Colin- Mouldiig, he is Ontario, is playing a roller skating rink in , _ ‘. = + much’more for$rd than before.%In a word, he - , Conservotown, Canada. looks 5comfortable; and. XTC’s sound; -even - Port -2; Talking to the promoter.. “Are you .I going to lose your shirtqonight?” I ask .her. ’ during the more rhythmic and quirky num_ “No-" She savs. “I won’t,-but someone will.” bers, sounds streamlined. - --I ----.r 4 -’ ’ ‘John -Kiely of the K-w Record mumbles _I Partridge is a-pairing.of opposites. He has something about how it will take a half dozen ’ those -rosy, roundish cheeks-. that your aunt ‘. . good new bands to get it, through- people?s would call pud-gy;S’boyjsh demeanor,simple closthes, and he :(seems to enjoy clowning thickskuilsthat it’s not the mid-70’s anymore. : G )P&t 3: A quick check around reveals-that ., aroundand maki&faces.~Yet his intro-to “This : the average age of the crowd‘ is probably --‘Is. Pop?” - a speech about’ free will and’ _ I sixteen. Most _-of the kids are .wearing j.ean “confidence in what you)e-doing, see-ms to take jackets or leather; it.appears that the safety pin fl _ the-audience by surprise, and his sinister, low-, brigade has stayed home. But the thought - key beginning -to “Complicated Game” is r occurs‘ ’ almost frightening; At times. ‘Partridse looks ------ ..to -- me t&at .perhaps most of the likg a man -about to go .mad: CZ&n’ Moulding ’ , audience”hasn’t gotten into the punk dress ’ looks distracted and appears to be showing the even yet. Expect Mod to make a comeback , effects of eight weeks of constant ,touring: -about 1984 and :ska in &986, or, 1987,, However tired;he may be, he does manageto turn in an aggressive and emotionally charged ’ ” “Making Plan For Nigel”.,‘A two song encore, .(. and the bapd is off to its dressing room. . I- Part& Waiting to talk-tot& band. A young ’ guy from a local highschool is hoping to get a guitar pick one of the band ‘members has _ prom,ised -him* He can’t remember whether it w&-Andy or Dave; he can? remember-which side of the ,&age he- who offered it was on-&m not sure he can tell left from right at this pain!: ?. i: He as,ks us if we tour ‘with the band to take pictures. I realize we could make ourselves a .dozen fourteen-year-old friends very easily. - but I reply, “MCI, we, only work _.for -.a ,- _ newspaper.” Our. friend asks bne of _the . y ’ ?oadies how long it will,be before.he can sRe the band. “Ow loni duzit take to out ver trousers - x ’

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P&t -10: We talk to Dave Gre3ory ‘cause . - he’s the only one not surrounded. He’ is as reticent sitting.with us as he is on stage, but he j . is frie~ndly: We wonder’ if this was’ the most’ . .boring audience he ever played for, buthe says :he thought the, audience wasn’t ‘that bad. We ? are surprised.-He explains that the,band didn’t have -a great night (though not a bad one) ’ because it is at the end of along &u@nd that-it isno&r to blame the audience for ebervthing: ‘- I thought th&andplayed a fairly good set, and ’ * : that the-audience ought to be shot, but I don’t 1tell him.,He.looks tiredand a bit bored withour 1 A bqndaged Johnny of the G $ti?uh -‘G Rays _ . prattle, and not ‘up-to arguing, Perhaps he’s I bar@ at th$ audience at Bingemari Par$$ptl just ;being.polite in not wanting to offend us. I \ .Th~r~~~. I, photo by Kath&mF &ipe to. gti $ilt .$nd:capture a~few~~pe$eto see s - c -a,-.‘, what tli& t&ought &the’show, bujr the, hall its - Pai; $Johnny and the G Rays begin rather - empty,, .and the fans are- already ‘on their way _ . back up the icy, winding hill. unceremoniously. Though we’ve not heard a gJason Nktchell’ good‘ word said about them, they%& rather : ‘: I i ;.?. VT , , i I ,‘;, tight. \band’a. curious-mixture of hard pop, ’ 1 - ’ dZ _ ’ r _ r&&lly and heavy metal meandering. Their - longer songs get a bit tedious, but the short& . numbers are‘toe-tappers at the very least; The _ lead guitarist bears a striking resemblance to Bruce’Springsteen; and has-nearly as much energy %$s the Boss._ If-would have-been ‘a - -* pleasure to watch him’had the sounasystem ,not been-blowing our collective brains ‘against the -end wall. The mostly cement building is,, bouncingthe sound around like so many super _ balls in a squash court; ,If (one doesn’t pay, attention3 one sooner or later gets hit in the r head,: I wa*^considey‘ingasking the sound man. if he could tone~things down a little, but after watching .him%oll a ratherlarge joint about two numbers intC;,the ,set, I realized that he was in his own little-world. Goodbye ears. _ I Part 5: ;1.and the G-B*; set is almost over, ,and nobody has -so muc-h as mo.ved from their 4 5 &pot onthe floor--yet. Itawrsthatsomeone --has put sedatives: in the popcornbeing’sbld;in - the building.. me?:_a _ _ rT Port- 6:XTC has&been on-the sta efor ten secondsbefore guitarist Andy Parti-i j ge urges, :- &e crowd to get “up, up, up..‘? Enthusiastically they obey; but after one song Partridge says, “You can dance if you want to. You look like ..\ penguins, -all’ ,huddled - together out there.: -, Penguins, however, are much betteithan end , tables. ,A ;:-‘ ’ -* . -Part 7: A stroll to the back to get away from the pain of ‘standing near>the speakers. Inthe middle of the audience is a man in a wheelchair , who seems to point out just-how pathetic all XTc’s Co& Moq;ding n&es plan for Nigel; these ‘-people ,are just standing around and gtiitbri& A$dy-Partridge (a6oviz right) makes a swatching; I wonder if ‘he would have danced-if ? pbo$q by Katheriqe l+ould. , S , -- +Y., ,, .>T .I..:. ; -’ -..- -J )~ / ;-, face.: q , . * I . _ -.-_ .


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=/n :yhat has to be described as one of ihi n&t .. efijoj+ab@(bot@ tq play ai@ t’o watch) intrabural---, . even& eier,:co-ed rio/ieyba&took&&t@ PAC i&t Thursdai &venin@ Thirty-six i&arm were tihittled .. .downr to three ch&@ions - th6 T l$. .Ds,’ the ; Biobuggers, and’the Meatb&ls - in the, spa& of A , ’ +“i _ , / >, five h p&s. “. ‘- ’ . , v

exc& gamewasplayed i’n the Thirty-six teams, apprgximately 36P Ijeople;~converged _ finals between the Biobuggers,’ 00 the PAC gym March 6 in one. and rower Factor. The Bioof, the larg&t tournaments of buggers came into the--game with .a nlj(mbet ‘1 -ranking’ahd the year. The gamkwas volley then set out to .prove .it. The ball- and the actio& hot and he&y.-‘-’ Power Factor could .not.%atidle the hiobtiggers a&they, went e.~.j~~~~~~~ After, the first -koUnd of $T,,;41.; d<own io defe&.The Biobuggers games, teams wer’q seeded info ‘~:~.&$$ A, .8 and C. divisions and, the “emerged as the ttiurriament’s B ’ -i championship rounds set up. _tih.ahpions. ’ . In/‘t‘he ‘C’division, the MeatT%elye teams competti ih each l,evel and at the-end three< balls with a number 3 ranking.teams emerged as champions faced St. Jerome’$- 4 r>o w&e not ranked in -the top” 6. Ttie in Their respective ditiisiops. in ‘-enthusiasm-ghich i.s typic+1 bf>‘., the A division, the T &D’S\6net the Kin Kfds fbr the championSt. Jerome’s _teams’ pre&iied . ship, v&h the Kin Kids &njpyihg - as?ih&Meatballs ca_me up flat in a first placit ranking. ,P@rbapS a, the finals . St . Jerome% came little overconfideht, : arid per- ‘. through with’ a win to Capture ‘harjs,a litN4, overcome by! the T the C,division championship. , size Of theT & D’q;at the net, the -{Thanks to allYthe competitors Kin Kit+ went down to defeat. ’ ‘arid a spedial ,thanks to .hike Mullen who,did an’excell.ent job \ The T &. D’s crowned . _Iwere1 I... c . . - -‘- _I - ._._:--‘LL_.Jnv iin the faces. of’thk Biobuaac champlons In tne fi-aivIslon. of orga_nizing ana running Fne . .---i -- - -- -- -i-7-_. --- -_--,, -----CT--. MS immediate/v ? In the B c@&ion, an equally ,tournatierit., j I _ 1 r

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photos-by

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_The Wotie&‘qAlpine Ski Team finished first ov&r&lin this s&aso@s Ontarlo university skicom&t&&. They’re-in Lake Placid th{s week, racing against the leading teams <from Quebese?$ the northeastern,-U@ed States ih the Oan-Am& ( As of prws time, results were unavailabl~~ From left to right: Jennifer, Peg, FaEy, Sylula, Cheryl, DonOa *and L$e;. ’ T , *

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@Ontario

STUDENT

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Ministry of Education/Mini&y of I Colleges and Universities . Special Proiects Branch _- ’ -l&h Floor, b&vat Block- . ‘,Qti,ebn’s’Park . _ . -3orontp,Ontqio M/A 1L2 (46) 965-691J -

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Preston Plus, winners of the women’s A Basketball finals. Presttin Plus defeated Renison thb iinals. l/r the 8 division Conrad Grebel defeated St. ~aul’s,~20~8 to t?ke the title. photos

by Jacob

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Th6 Bend~vers (above). vyere 55’33 winners in the-B @vision basketball championships. They beat the ReccerHn C, Sbuth ,I beat the Door Mats 48-‘45. IfiA the Ti y Toddlers upset the Flyers 76- 74 in ih&&d o&time piriod oh the stre @h ofKal Klef’q two 7 fee throws with 5 seconds . KieJ ended up with 30 paints. Mi x e ViFser had 34 for the Idsers. remaining.

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. A monitor is a post;s’econdary’st&lent tiho enrolls$iH~time in an itistitution’(usually in another province),and at the:$ame CMC? helps .a second-language teacherfor 6 ‘to,8 hoursper ? week. .F&nine months’ iarticipation in the program, the,‘ monitor receives up to $6:000 and one return trip bep.een the province of residence and the‘ host province. ~ ’ ‘I J To’ receive 6 brochure and’& application form, contact your provincial coordinator as soon as possible: I, ‘- Roy i. Schatz -+. - ” ,Student Activitjes and: S$ecial F?rojects, Branch- ,:.‘< I _ _ Ministry of Education 14th.floor - Mowat Hock, bue&‘s f&irk ” ‘” Toronto, Qntario \ fv17A 1L2 ‘> . I ‘ : (416) 965-5996 . / ’ ~- I 1 T .o__ r _ , . ‘f&&rests for application forms @itt be accepted until hilarch . ,18,19805 Completed application; forms _‘. , until-March :. _’ 26,198O. i I-

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1979-80_v02,n24_Imprint