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volume

12 number

5

friday

11 june

1971

. a I newsfeature

Architecture

i -

serving

the

university

o,f Waterloo

program

. Degree /

tabloid

change

The architecture graduating class is prepared to sue the university over the administration’s refusal to grant them an honours degree in architecture. The conflict arose as a result of a last minute decision by the . registrar’s office to withdraw the f enalready printed bachelor vironmental studies, hono Hrs architecture degree and substitute it with a general degree. Dennis Mahon, Steve Fancott, Peter Milne, and Verne Black, four of the graduating class working in the Kitchener-Waterloo area have been investigating various ways of having the degrees changed to honours. They are to formally ask administration president Burt Matthews to have the degrees changed either today or monday. If there is a negative response from Matthews, the students will I initiate a suit against the university for mis-representation. < According to Dennis Mahon, one ~of the spokesmen for the class, the degree should be an honours degree- because the only general degree in environmental studies is the geography degree. I “The transcripts that have been sent out, the marks statements, the confirmation slips sent out before convocation and even the diplomas, before they were changed at the last minute, had honours marked on all of them. “We haven’t been told what the mistake is yet, but it appears that the work terms are not-going to be Fencirlg was ON oj’ the sports accepted as academ& terms. When we were accepted to archiworkshops demonstrated drw tecture, we were told that the irzg last week ‘s CAHPER cow work terms were to be interpreted jkrence. See sto(ics 012 pages as academic terms. 3 and 9. “It’s just a case of a promise

may \ bring lawi suit

that hasn’t been kept. ” When asked about the possibility that X the action was brought about by the recent student pressure that forced ’ architecture chairman, Tore Bjornstaad to resign, Mahon said, “There is no connection between Bjornstaad’s resignation and this incident. ” Academic vice-president, Howie Petch has said that the degree

Three

is neither a general nor an honours degrees. “It’s just a steppingstone to the bachelor of architecture degree which is a five year honours program. ” Administration president Burt Matthews calls the degree a “preprofessional architecture” degree but admits that “I really don’t know what happened. I didn’t know there was a problem until tuesday.

accalimed

“The diploma has no meaning except - to have it hang on the wall. ” If a law suit were’to be initiated, -the chances of it succeeding are good according to federation lawyer Morley Rosenburg. When asked about the possibility of the university being sued, Matthews concluded, “I don’t think there is any need for that at all.”

in by-electiorw

Nominations closed monday for the four seats in the federation by-elections for the coop engineering and coop math constituencies. Ron Quinn, electrical 4B, Ivan Gati, general engineering lB, and Rudy Sundermann, chemical 2B were acclaimed to the engineering seats. Chief returning officer, Tony Wyatt declared the math seat vacant when no nominations were received. When asked about the effective-

ness. of the federation in serving engineers, Ron Quinn, commended the job the present federation was doing, but qualified his answer. “I’m not convinced that the present structure is ,the ideal structure. I’d like to look into things before I say which is the best structure for engineers.” While Quinn has heard of the proposal for a federation of societies, he is not certain that’ this would be the solution. He concluded, “You can’t get along with-’

UBC hostel

opened

The university of British Columbia last week announced plans to set up a 56-bed hostel for this summer’s transient youth. UBC is among the first of Canadian universities to demonstrate a degree of community responsibility in dealing with the problem of accommodating youth. University administrations in southern Ontario have remained silent. The university of Toronto, York and Ryerson Polytechnical, in Toronto, have the facilities but have not extended any invita-

tion to- the 150,000 youth expected to pass through Toronto this summer. Even the university of Water-, loo is refusing to open vacant facilities to summer travellers., In a recent interview, when questioned about his responsibility to the community and prol vince in offering the empty rooms of village two to transient youth, administration president, Burt Matthews stated that the university had no responsibility to the community in this respect.

out a federation.” Rudy Sundermann, says that the federation is doing a fairly good job in providing services to en‘gineers. He sees two main issues with the engineers - activity fees and a separate school of engineering. Sundermann thinks that the engineer’s gripe about compulsory fees is not justifiable. Using the example of the university of Guelph, he explained that when the federation tliere ma,de fees voluntary, the union quickly dissolved. Later the societies that remained took a vote of all students and re-instituted, compulsory fees. “Compulsory fees should be in effect here. ” He saw the proposal for the establishment of a school of engineering as detrimental to !engi- neering students. He cited the lack of humanities subjects in such a school as the main reason for his dissatisfaction of the proposal. Ivan Gati thinks the federation is all right in providing movies and pubs. He concedes that he would like to see better movies on campus.


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Engsoc conf rants fede~ration acts .

Representatives from the engineering societies and federation of students debated Wednesday night on the radio Waterloo program “Federation Reports”. They discussed eng sot’s dissatisfaction with the operation of the feder,ation and the resulting senate move to seek a student referendum concerning the collection of a student activity fee. Federation president Rick Page denounced eng sot’s action in going to the senate without trying the mechanisms available within the federation to bring about change. He saw this procedure as a weakening of the student decision making process. Eng. sot. B president Peter Davidson said- the reason for the senate move was a result of the imposition of academic sanctions in the form of withholding degrees from students who refused to pay their fees. When eng sot rep Frank Deegs agreed that the issue was a moral one and not a legal one Page asked him why all non-academic fees were not included in the issue. Page went on to state that he couldn’t discuss the, morality of federation fees without talking about the morality of all incidental fees.

. Deegs theh decided he wanted to talk about whether the federation was worth 22 dollars a year. Page said, “What we should talk about is whether this organization is doing a job as a whole that is worth 22 dollars for all 12,000 students and not for any individual because any individual who says he wants his \22 dollars back because he isn’t getting his money’s worth is selfish and isn’t feeling responsible to the other students on campus. ” Page agreed that the societies should exist but disagreed strongly that a “federation of societies” could operate with less funds. -Federation vice-president Carl Sulliman pointed out that a federation of societies would not have the power that the present federation has to do things like help students with landlord tenant disputes requires a strong voice. Contracts made in the past by the federation as a corporation would be invalid. The discussion died out after Page said, “The federation is giving students more than their 22 dollars worth. You can’t argue that. We can monetarily prove that but it would be ridiculous.”

No CIA or FBI on campus -Matthe& At his pressconference last friadministration president day, Burt Matthews stated that as far as he was aware, there are no CIA or FBI agents on the campus. He also stated that there are no RCMP people on campus that he knows of,, and that he has had no contact with the RCMP since he has been here. He also said that if the RCMP ever asked him for information, he would not give them any-primarily because it is unlikely that he would have the desired information anyway. In further business, Matthews - revealed that the president’s advisory council is to be expanded to include faculty and student members. This council helps to determine general university ‘policy. At the same time, Matthews is instituting an executive council, consisting, of the deans and the vice-presidents to deter. mine operating procedures. The item consuming the largestportion of press conference time was a discussion of the committee, that has been established by the university to oversee the care of animals-defined as live, nonhuman vertebrates, thus not covering worms, insects, wpk etc. - owned by the university, and the uses they are put to for research. The committee is headed

by Paul Morrison.- The formation of this committee was necessitated by Ontario provincial bill 194 and covers all aspects of animal care use and disposal. All procedures performed on animals must now be approved by the committee. The researchers at uniwat generally agree that the act provides adequate protection without inhibiting research. All animals used’ by this university are purchased from licenced suppliers, who are also covered under the act. It was interesting to note that there are no laws covering the care and environmental conditions of people that are as thorough as the laws now covering the care of animals.

CAHPER 7 1 conference

The province of Ontario should pay up to 100 per cent of a first year student’s expenses to give the poor a better chance at university, entrance, a committee of university students, faculty and administrators said Wednesday in Toronto. The committee, which reported to the council of Ontario universithe council of unities - formerly versity presidents - said the abil-

Hamilton said that the association has not yet had sufficient time to make any suggestions for the regulation of cable broadcasting because it is a recent development. Radio stations operating on cable are not subject to the broadcasting act or the Canadian radio television commission. One member of the commons committee suggested that one station could be on the air in about three weeks for under 3,000 dollars. He pointed out that cable radio stations could be used by revolutionary groups, but he had been told

,

Plan to assist amatuer “But government can do little more than encourage. .Our programs can do little more than assist,” said Ron Stewart, speaking on the government’s efforts to aid amateur sport, and get canadians off their asses. Stewart, special assistant to the health and welfare minister John Munro, read Mum-o’s speech at the Canadian association for health and physical education and recreation, monday, on campus. Commenting on the kind of perversity in society where nothing gets done till it is past “the point of simple solution”, Stewart said the same was true for Canadians and physical fitness. Now after many reports telling people that North Americans are

Campus

war

The subcommittee of the federation of students started its investigation into the research going on at the university of Waterloo. Groups were formed at a meeting at the campus center last thursday to investigate some research projects known to be connected with the american military, and to investigate industries funding research which may be complicite with the US war effort. Another group will investigate

Free university

COI&l i ttee condemns Mr. D.M.E. Hamilton, vicepresident of the Canadian association of broadcasters, predicted tuesday to the commons standing committee on broadcasting that cable radio will become a significant threat to broadcasters regulated by the Canadian radio television commission or the broadcasting act. He told the committee that two such stations are operating in Ontario, one in the Kitchener-Waterloo area (Radio Waterloo) and one *in Toronto, (Radio Varsity) and that they are reachof about 50,000 h ing audiences

Thestickerabove was found on the windshield of one of the cars that attended the CAPHER conJ’I?Ycnceheld this week in the phys-ed complex. See story below and on page 9.

entrance

ity of students of low-income families to get into post-secondary institutions has improved during the past five years under Ontario’s students aid program, but warned this trend could reverse under schemes proposed to replace that , program. One of the severalflproposed schemes, all of which ‘were condemned by the committee as unworkable and unfair to poor stu-

cable

radio

that some of the programs are exceptionally educational and interesting. Dave Cillick of radio Waterloo said Wednesday it is obvious that radio Waterloo-is being listened to with great interest by the people in the community and by local broadcasters. He said radio waterloo has received nothing but support for its aims and interests from the people in this community at all levels. He also stated that radio Waterloo has no intention of competing with local broadcasters.

flabby and unfit, a federal program is being offered. The program is supposed to give every opportunity for those who excel at sports and to “encourage our citizens to use leisure time for something more than sitting around and to encourage our young people to understand that the essence of good health is physical fitness. ” Stewart explained people recognize the athlete who has attained national or international fame, even though he may have lacked adequate support, in way of facilities, training and coaching, but “we haven’t recognized most people who aren’t excellent at anything but can be good at many things in physical activity.”

research connections between the national the defense research council, research council, and NATO. Another group will question members of the administration to determine what the universities reseach policy is, and another group will compile a statistical analysis of the research Anyone interested in participating in this research can contact Abie Weisfeld through the office of the federation of students.

for poor dents, would not give out grants. Advocated by the council of ministers of education of Canada, it would make students pay all the costs‘ of their university education. Part of the committee’s recommendation is similar to the present student. aid program: first year grants would be based on need and in subsequent years more of the aid would be in the form of a loan. It differs in that repayment would be based’ on income after graduation, and part-time students would be eligible for grants. Under the present program all money borrowed has to be paid back after graduation-even if the borrower is unemployed-and only full-time students are eligible for grants. The committee also reported that some students are getting awards from the present scheme which they do not deserve. Since the scheme came into operation it has been a well known fact among students that a lot of loan and grant money goes for Xmas and Easter vacations, new cars, dope and other non-academic pursuits.

sport _’

Stewart said, there will be a second series of sports following the Canada Games, with its purpose directed at selection and training of Olympic athletes, for those who excel. “We’re providing massive assistance - at long last - to students (excelling athlete) who want to participate in sports but can’t afford to do that and continue their education effectively,” said Stewart. In the area of general public ) and physical fitness, he said there is presently a survey being undertaken to find out about sport facilities, programs, population densities being served, leadership training, availability of coaching .. and the legal and social barriers and recommendations for limited use of facilities. Stewart warned those at the conference of the fragmentation in sports. ‘3t is not merely a fragmentation of programs’ and of jurisdictions it is more seriously a fragmentation of philosophy and policy. “Those problems will only be overcome when we begin looking for solutions in a very professional way and the professionals in the field are the physical educators.” Asked how he felt about the speech, one delegate said, “He, (Stewart) reads well.” At a press conference in the faculty club, with local newspaper men and a few beer, Stewart and Ron ‘Lafaive of the fitness and amateur sport directorate, outlined the following: l not nearly enough money .is being spent on sports. “It’s a matter of priorities, said Stewart. l the greater use of facilities, especially at high schools and universities. To encourage this Lafaive suggests that people talk to the province directly, and indirectly, get parents and citizens to pressure school board and the PTAs to open facilities. “If you make people aware of the problems, they’ll find the solution,” said Lafaive. 0 how to get Munro’s proposal of “harrassment free medical attention” enacted at the local level. Lafaive said nothing could be done by the federal government since the treatment of people is under the authority of the provincial and local governments. “Within five months there is going to be a massive campaign to bring some the solutions that can be brought to the problem of drugs, ” said Lafaive. ’ He explained how the campaign will be done in the total context of the situation where alcohol is the biggest drugproblem. friday

1 I june

1971 (12:5)

47 3

_


-Lights ’ Grand

Ballets

Canadiens,

: \ Paranoid?

You \ should be, -we’re watching you. *

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-4 _ 48 ... m

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moment

in

use of colour. I_-. . z ,, f The music and lyrics were writ’ ten by .PeteTo%?&hend, John %ntwhistle and ‘Keith Moon, <of the _ Xnglish -?rock :group, The Who,. It We

tion to the sensitivity .and theme only Tommy’s v&on -permeates of the ro& ,opera with the creed, leaving no .form of seIfwhich :he &.as ‘been identified Al- -’ . . exprasion *or -t’hemselves~. ‘The . though -it has-been argued that an c -messiah %? &~@dont?d,tith.cGes .$;f ‘artist 3s necessarily -separated ,, . ‘!Beject -,-him, :forget !him ‘rbetter *-from his work,::&ven t&message 1 -> still’! “’ seeks to relay, this ’ I-j * 3% ‘<of the -ensuing;’ disappo& lseems a spoor rationale. -The artist ‘Went -and donfusion A?VO~V~S:.tli& -is here*;the -antagonist of the arthe . :beginnings -1of :a realisation, by h as created~ -If :thWe is 24 :message - Tomy -and _his peers 4hat they .:in -this qerformance, :it :.would :be ,. . .mi@t,:find meaning inthemselves well 50 considertio giveesit . . . +-d -teach other; in togetherness, A -diXfieu.l@.&%es from what, . ’ -~equ&ityand cio$#imunicationF of ..~9 +Tltq harmony .-O;$’ *7novement, - -seems -to Ibe an5ncomlWibility ‘. .music ..and .colodr provides :an :ex-‘ the -messa‘ge :;and -context of the through .. . . +perience both relaxing and stimu- ... work, l:and ‘-.the;:inedium lating, -and creates a fluidity of : which It is expressed. As an actual, contemporary situation, the theme ‘episodes ,which’ -might otherwise havebeen disjointed, bound as they- of passively alienated youth, when * were ;by song. The caricatures + exe&ted in pure .art *form i loses .i ts ’ * were -effective and well-cast - the- 9 sense of reality-; .Just as Tommy <becomes an insufficient messiah musky ‘pink and powerfully sensual in failing to lead his disciple* to. AAcid-Queen; the small, pale, unconfront their -personal realities,wholesome> uncle with his quick, production remains , sly -.movements and his curious . so the-&tire ’ -fingers; the blond, -brash, insolent similarly limited, drawing the alldience, its subject matter, into its.. :+ young cousin whose every gesture. own vacuum, rather than project. conveys aggression and contempt; . . , ing its message into the context of , g$ng$:y& ~~~~$$,‘$$$ . reality in which the audience, as individuals, experiences this same with unbalance,. :bewilderment alienation. The-audience identifi- .warning;- Doubly ]unethical.Part-*. . and ipassivity,. symbol -of .his lost In.’ this ,. cation ‘with Tommy remains ab: ner takesout the double because it * and i -tortured generation. stract, the performance elicits-no ’ is patently out of the type that is role, Alexandre Beiin3 rendition. real self-confrontation in those known :‘as “impossible”: -for’ ex- is sensually and emotionally captiwho witness itThe applause, esample, the doubler has limited his vating. -The troupe in its entirety deserves credit ’ for -a, sensitive p=iallY at the end? expresses a . hand by an earlier sacrifitie raise, delight with the production as a and he doubles a bid of, let us say;. .and beautiful performance. I. I successful rock opera, a sensitive _ five odd, when it is -apparent that e The ‘choreography is .done by ballet, a performance which enter-’ the .op-ponents are on their -way to ,Fernand Nault who .utilises simple tained fully as a passive- escape six or seven. This is the worst. of- sets, <drawing fromthe taped muinto the unreality of the art medfence of the three-not .because it sic a visual odyssey of body interwas unethical <for the player to preting mind. The troupe appears . iumdouble,, knowing that his partner in fui force upon a stage bare. of ’ Youcan forego this prod&ion if could notleave it in, but ‘because, back-drops, in what seems an atyou happen to have the record, a by his tone he hopes to mislead the tempt -to..demonstrate-that the entab of acid, and an artistic imaginopponents beyond the confusion’ suing .drama is not to -be consideration. This excellent combination that he might have created -by the :ed 1merely as an ente’rtaining in- . will allow you a remarkable halluXdoubleitself. terlude in the audience’s reality,. tiination; You might miss out on but‘ rather_ an extension of it. To the truly sensual motions of the A player leads the kingvof a suit - and his partner huddles beforefurther this .effect we are present-, . we&defined bodies of Les Grands dropping the queen. The huddle .ed with a sequence of film shots Ballets Canadiens - it’ll be your was unethical because it was in- depicting the violenGe and cohfu-own trip anyway. . tended to convey to partner: that the huddler did-not have the queen , alone,- #nor was his play a signal “Tommy"

to underlead because he had the jack, which would be the normal meaning of the queen when played as a signal card. How about the’opener who then continues with the ace and a- third round, giving his partner a riff? He- is equally guilty - perhaps . even guiltier. - edited from “Laws and Eth- its” written for the A.C.B.L. by .Alvan Landy.

-/’ 1 .

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the’chevron

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the existential

himself in traumatic shock; aegating .his senses of sight, speech . and hearing Touch r.emains .for him only as .a niechahism -though 1 whic’h I he is$urther -assaulted. :by his cruel and ignorant environment a Lthe :i@orant seek :to create of, Tommy a normal and ,well-adjusted boy ; the .cruel find :amuslieJruen~ in ‘his caffliction His -un-c.le ;mofests 1him; :his cough, torments -him; both ,.:assaults 8re -itieompreh& -~b~e~.~-~he-t;a~tilP!.:Tdmly.-EYen ‘the attempted seductions of the ;pubes&ni :‘J’tmmy &y .‘thh ‘.&id_.Queen, rin a -crude effort -to rouse s.his -normality, -prove - useless -against the autistic state -Tommy * .hascreated3orhimself. -‘How can’. .he:be saved?” is-the gry taken -up ’ -by)& -desperate -paraw and his

._1 _. -.. . The druggist’s son asked, -“Pop, a. A remark, question, gesture . .what is ethics?-?’ or mannerism which might convey see; ” .mu;sed the boy’s information to partner or -might -7 --“Let’s .parent. “Suppose a customer mislead anopponent. .+ pays me-with .a $20 bill and leaves . b. A call made with special em-without his change. Ethics is, phasis, inflection, haste or undue ‘should I tellmy partner? ’ ” hesitation. Many of the incidents that lead c. A play made with emphasis, - ‘to -,a, breach of ethics originate undue haste, or unreasonabl_e ,: ‘.vvith a situation where a hesitadelay, when the act might ‘convey tion or perhaps an overswift a& information to“partner or might f tion ‘tells something to partner. ’ 1 mislead an opponent. I Unless this is done deliberately, d. Any indication of approval or . Lhowever, it is not ‘in itself’ a viodisapproval of partner’s call,,or of lation. It is simply a practice that satisfaction with an opponent’s . should be avoided at all costs be- call. -cause it is unethical -for partner to. Suppose that when dummy puts . take’advantage of the information. down four trumps to. the K-J as Yet it is perfectly \ proper for the part of a big handon which his sidehas. bid a small slam, a defender ’ opponents to draw their own conelusions - at their own risk. says “Looks like you missed .the . This brings us to the first ‘and boat. ” The laws say that declarer , worst case, where deliberate hesitakes advantage of such a remark tation is unethical - a procedure at his own risk. But if the garrulthat many neophytes are surprised ous one’s partner turns out to have to learn is improper: the huddle the queen of trumps the ,remark with a singleton, or when an honor was foolish.- And -if the speaker is led which the player who hudturns out to have three to the dles could not cover if’he wanted queen, it was unethical. Either -a to. obviously such remarks way, The proprieties - which2 are should never be made. more important _ than any ‘other A player doubles a bid almost as part of the law because no precise soon as it has been made, and in a ’ . penalties -are specified - begin as vicious tone. Unethical. Partner follows with the listing of acts that has a doubtful leave-in, but passes are breaches of ethics when combecause the tone and tempo of the knitted intentionally: double made it a “hands-off” 1

-_ \ I

on the rnDving

the vis’ Tommy

r ._ 1)-. . .. z .*

:play subtly

._

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chevron staff

1776

Playing - this weekend at the Royal Alex in Toronto is the musical 1776 It is difficult to tell whether this play is a subtle satire on .the U.S. or a serious piece of propaganda. If it is a satire it is overly subtle indeed, and if it is serious-as might be suspected from the fact that it is president tricky Dick’s favorite-it still cannot help but point out the hypocracy of american, establishment oriented, rhetoric. The play is the story of John Adams’, Ben Franklin’s and Thomas Jefferson’s struggle to convince congress to declare independence from Great Britain. Of all three, Ben Franklin comes off as the most interesting. Rex Everhart does his job well portraying Franklin as a sage, wit and dirty old man. The play cannot help but be compared to the contemporary situation on a couple of different levels : one level being that of many underdeveloped countries trying to get rid of american exploitation and tyranny by using 1virtually the same words and rhetoric the american congress, used in order to justify breaking away from the British l

When Tom Rush first came into the limelight his style was o.f’a highly spirited nature. Later with the making of’ the Circle Game, his second last record. he had (MPted down. One side of the record was love sopgs the other side was of’ a melanchob nature. Tom Rush has a new album out and the style has once again changed. Ij’you are interested in finding out how, he will be perjbrming on The Hart and lorne terrijic hour, jkida.y June 18 at 8 pm on C.B. C. television.

by cousin Brian chevron staff

GREAT

WHITE

HOPE

It was the eleventh round. For the previous ten, the heavyweight champion, Jack Jefferson had allowed himself to be battered mercilessly. Jefferson, the heavyweight champion of the world, had been forced to agree to throw the fight. But he has used to it; his whole life had been rigged against him. Then -suddenly his dulled eyes caught fire. His fists lashed out at the head and body of his huge white _opponent. Bashed and bleeding the challenger stumbled to the ropes and held on until the Yet, Jefferson - round ended. could not escape his fate. After all, what else could a nigger ex- pect from the -U:S.A’. in 1914 except humiliating defeat. Basically, this is the story of The Great White Hope, now showing at the Odeon theater. The film is a dramatization of yet frustrating the colourful, life of Jack Johnson, the first black heavyweight boxing champion of the world. Around this simple story is woven a number of themes that turn the Great White Hope into a film as complex and as involving as a spider web. Each strand is blended with a subtlety that must have had the audience going home to just sit down and spend a few quiet hours thinking about it. _--Individual and history One of the problems that I’ve always had difficulty with, is trying to understand the role of the individual in history. This film answers that problem in a way that left me flabbergasted. In one scene early in the film Jack Jefferson is on his way to the ring to fight Brady for the heavyweight championship. He is stopped ‘by a handful of blacks led by a preacher who had come to pray for him. Jefferson for them represented a sign of victory, which for at least a moment, could raise the black people of amerika to a pinnacle of glory and self-esteem. Bitterly, the future champion scorned them and denies any racial role for himself. As he I says, “To you, all I am is a big black fist”. But history is bigger than one man. White culture is threatened by the example of a smart-mouthed nigger who has a white woman, and who can physically beat the best that white society -can offer. This man must be stop-

ped from parading around as a massah and put back among the field hands before the cotton’ croppers start getting funny ideas. As the whole of the white establishment falls on him, Jack Jefferson can fno longer act for himself. When he is given a chance to get a pardon he resists. He is no longer a free agent. His pride has become the pride of a black man. Subjectivity and objectivity merge. Greatness and tragedy become profound. Black

versus

white

Quite rightly, most of the interpretation of the film must be seen in the frame-work of black and white. The present tragedy of America cannot allow us to look at events in the past without looking through the glasses of today. Jack Johnson of sixty years ago is too close to Muhammed Ali of today. Yet within the racial conflict is the deeper neurosis of sexuality. In 1910, a great black migration from the country to the city had begun in America. The beginning of the present black ghettoes was under way as the growth of industrial complexes drew the super cheap black farm labor to the mushrooming cities. The fear of revolt preyed on the minds of the capitalist leaders of America. As Cameron (played in a superbly Snidely Whiplash fashion by Hal Holbrook), who represented the bureau indicated, a black man who refuses to knuckle under is a dangerous example to the oppressed black population. Yet when the-popular campaign was unleashed, Jefferson was not attacked as a free man amongst black exploited slave wage laborers. The press and popular pressure groups instead focussed on the champion having a white woman.- In a society based on political and economic exploitation and repression, an unpadlocked penis is a vital threat=: Parallels between then and now wouldn’t be complete without examining the whole question of violence. During the fight scenes, Jan sitting next to me winced and cowered as leather flattened flesh, and blows split skin and gouged out blood and sinew. Boxing is violent. Even if it is tamer than the lions vs. the Christians pageants of an earlier decadent,

Dumont

declining culture, it still is a brutalizing spectacle. Yet the mind boggles when an audience squirms in the face of two men bashing away at each other but laughs at the jigaboo antics of a degraded black man. For behind the latter is hidden the story of a race originally used as slaves and later freed to take on the role of cheap free labor. It is a story not only lynchings (coon hunting) ,but of death due to malnutrition, overwork, poverty wages and denied physical and cultural health. What is perhaps even more ironic is that boxing and other sports (a la Jack Robinson in baseball) allowed a handful of black men to make it in white Indeed like hockey Amerika. in Quebec (remember Rocket Richard in the fifties? ) =these sports and the minority heroes they fostered allowed the oppressed groups to identify with their heroes and the good life these few, had attained so that they could accommodate themselves to the shit of their everyday -life. This truth was recognised by Jefferson in the film, and as he pointed out to the black preacher, winning a boxing match didn’t mean anything. If the black men wanted to get up from under they would have to stop looking for symbols and live the fight themselves. Engrossing

EIBgiJXl Another level of supposed identification with contemporary society is that of radicalism and rebellion. Here the author lays out a fairly redundant theme for rebellion revolving around morality. In 1776 revolution was also shown to revolve around pragmitism-as shown when John / Adams strikes out the

film

The movie, based on the broadway drama written by Howard Sackler, is a powerful film. Rapidly in terspercing landscaped countryside and pictoral european city sets with terse dramatic dialogue, Martin Ritt had directed a totally engrossing story. The cast, mostly drawn from the broadway production of the credible and play 7 is totally most perform - superbly. Yet towering above all the other characters is James Earl Jones as Jack Jefferson the black boxer. He is on camera in al‘---’ most every scene and in each one he dominates. Not only people but the sets themselves shrink before the imposing size and strength of his body and personality . When he flashes his toothy grin, the whole screen smiles; when he thunders angrily the audience shakes in the waves. The only regret I had about the film was that I saw-it with a white audience.

ABORTION

anti-slavery clause from the constitution in order to win the “south” -and by the desire to promote the development of inindigenous capital and further the vested interests of the amerikan ‘property’ owners. The morality issues were a rationalization developed in order to justify the break and sidestep the real issues. The rationalization made it easier to dupe those who had nothing to gain, and convince them to go out and get killed for those who would gain. Edwin Cooper as the .congressional custodian managed on occassion to hit the nail on the head. When his assistant wanted to join the army, Cooper pointed out that you “won’t see them going out to get killed. And another time, when the congress danced. a minuet and sang a proclamation ‘always to the right and never to the left’-. The custodian then asked his assistant and the audience “how would you like to borrow a dollar from one of them?“. The acting is definitely professional in caliber, but the musical scores are mediocre and bland except for “Molasses to Rum” sung by Michael Davis. The delivery is good and the message is sharp. The song deals with slavery, the part played by the New England merchants and their hypocracy. Despite the excellent performance by the actors involved I cannot recommend people to spend their money and go see a play that does not go beyond amerikan propaganda.

INFORMATION

Considering a trip to New York? Save yourself trouble and money. See us first, U. of W.’ Birth Control Centre, Open 10-5 Mon.Sat, evenings Tues and Thursday, 7-9, Rm 206, Campus Center, Open to all, -we don’t chargefor our services.

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Production manager will supervise entire production of the paper, including coordinating and preparing for production, all departmental pages (excluding news). Duties include supervising final ---production of paper one day per week at printer, and distribution . of paper on campus. News editor will prepare all ne‘ws and news features for production (including assigning, rewriting, copy-editing and layout), and will assist the production manager as required.

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11 june

1971 /12:5) e

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Which way to the Bog? by Dianne Shulman chevron staff

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Many students are taking advantage of the drastic shortage of summer jobs, by truck-. in’ it cheaply either across Canada or to Europe. For those planning on going to England, Dianne Shulman offers tour and travel advice.

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AKE UP, SLEEPYHEAD: you may think its four in the morning, but breakfast is being served, the sun is blazing merrily away, and that patch of green through the clouds is North Wales . . . and London is less than an hour away! But in all good stories there is a catch, and this one is no exception. Both Heathrow and Gatwick Airports (where all of the long distance flights land) are cheeringly efficient, but you have forgotten something: as in all big cities, the airports are a long way -from downtown and the five hour time shift should hit you about half-way through the long ride in, especially if your flight was determined to be an all night party. . . -London is to Toronto as Toronto is to Kitchener: bigger, livelier, infinitely more varied, easier to get around without a car, far more cosmopolitan. Climate permitting, (you don’t go to London for sunbathing or skiing), if there is any kind of people you want to meet, anything you want to do; you’ll probably find it in London. I

Inexpen,&e, but good

My interests, fortunately, were inexpensive. and easily gratified: art, architecture, and good theater abound, and it was quality-as much as I wanted-for less than two dollars a day. (I never had to pay more than $1.50 for a good seat at some of the best theaters in the world). A friend of mine lived with a group of hospitable freaks, and did the pub and concert circuit for a similar budget and delight. And though I didn’t do much real buying, the window-shopping was marvelous. Of all my adventures in London;, though, two were the most disconcerting. The first, and worst, was trying to cross the street, a standard british game in which the foolish pedestrian pits his agility against the four ‘cylinders of an angry Mini. Almost every person I met in Britain (on foot) was quiet, courteous and helpful but the drivers were a holy terror. . / The facts that the British also drive on the ‘wrong’ side of the road and that the traffic laws are general&ignored only add spice to the contest for the true devotee. I tried always to cross with a crowd, if I could help it. If you can’t do that, buy insurance at Lloyd’s.

The second hazard, though unlikely to be fatal, can lead to the most embarrassing moments of yourtrip: the british public toilets. In Canada, the visitor in need has the work of a moment to seek out the nearest restaurant *and/or -gas station ; by law such institutions are always well-equipped. In England, though, no such laws exist, and ‘Ladies’ especially, can be few and far between. Public ‘conveniences’ are operated, usually for a fee, in many locations around London, but unless you know where they are *you could wander for hours of increasing distress without finding one. (And deserted back lanes don’t exist, at least during the day.) . Even, if you dig up the chutzpah to ask for directions, remember that (a) most of. the people you’ll see are tourists as ignorant as yourself, (b) the gentlemen won’t know where the Ladies’ is, and vice versa, (c) you may be a mile or more away from the nearest one, and (d) there will inevitably be a line-up when you get there. Accordingly, I would suggest the following precaution for the first few days at least, and whenever you visit unfamiliar territory: ‘if you see a toilet, use it! . Good places to look are public galleries (only if you are inside the gallery), theaters (ditto), and major intersections (Oxford Circus ; Trafalgar Square: look for a wrought iron railing around an island in the middle) ; and always carry a one pence coin. (P.S. The toilet paper is like newsprint, so if you’re sensitive, take your own. )

lu

OST OF THE TIME you’ll feel very much at home in London. Even the traffic jams have an air of reassuring normalcy, but there are innumerable tiny details that don’t quite fit. The fruit vendors, for example, with their ubiquitous, overflowing carts, are parked right on the road; in some streets they blithely usurp the entire right of way. Bands, musicians and even Mary Poppin’s ‘scrivers’ (who paint from memory directly on the sidewalk-you can probably persuade me to paint your portraint, for a small fee, and photograph both him and it) beg gentelly along several main streets. (my favorite striver works just north of the National Gallery). But perhaps best of all are the british pubs, a glorious example of the joys of civilized drinking laws. “Pubs are.for pleasure” and come in all sizes and moods, from ‘Banker’s Lunch’ to ‘Seaman’s Leave’ and every shade in between. Many offer good draught sherry as well as beer; hard drinks are always for sale, and you can even stand for a while without any drink at all. You can go to a pub for a good conversation, for a cheery cheap lunch and a rest for your feet, to meet a new friend, or just to read all the silly jokes on the walls.

The Hemmingway

Pike

One pub I was in had balanced a great iron penny-farthing on top of a narrow ledge, threateningthe two stag heads supposedly shot by the Burtons

(Richard and Elizabeth, you -dope.) and a giant pike caught by Ernest Hemmingway . . . (do you, suppose,they would be for real? Everyone sang lustily ‘till they threw us out and closed up for the night. If you find one that suits you, it could be the best part of your trip (even if you don’t drink). The drastic #British ecnonomy of space manifests itself in tiny cars, including many of the three wheeled variety, as well as the famuus double deck- 1 er buses, but is belied by the three beautiful giant parks (Hyde, Regent and James) that stretch through the downtown Skyscrapers. Private land and detached houses are all rare, though many fortunate Londoners treasure postage-stamp backyards. Blocks of townhouses are the rule, not the exception, in London, from entire suburbs of identical \ flats to streets of clashing diversity. i The three-foot-wide passageway between two blocks I took at first to be merely the receptacle of ,garbage cans, was in fact a crowded, cobbled street and lined with a warren of little shops.. Such discoveries are everywhere under one’s nose, and - well worth the seeking; but they’re not on any map so you’ll have to find your own. If you’ve got the time and the inclination, do turn off the main roads and explore any lane that appeals to you: if you’re looking for the more curious parts of non-tourist London you will rarely be disappointed. (Note to girls travelling alonethis is not recommended at night. ) If you have brought good shoes, the tube (underground, subway) is the_ best way to get around London: it’s clean, comfortable, and inexpensive. What’s more, it bypasses the perpetual traffic jams, and has,been known to beat a taxi. The British Rail, or Overground, is mostly designed for longer trips, but it generally runs on schedule, and can get you downtown from the suburbs in fifteen -minutes. A tube and rail map is invaluable and free (pick them up at the Victoria tube and rail station when you arrive-the run in from the airports ends there) but you’ll do as well to forget the buses for ‘anything under a two week stay. With two exceptions you’ll get there faster if you walk the few blocks the tube or train won’t take you, and you’ll see a great deal more. The two exceptions are (a) the Green Line coaches, which run on schedule and are designed for fairly long trips and (b) the Rou,ndLondon sightseeing tour.

-0

NCE YOU HAVE settled in, and are ready to tour the city, the first thing you should do is to buy a good map of London. (I highly recommend the Visitor’s Guide to London for its index,\ completeness, and clarity. ) Next, go either to Piccadilly Circus,, or back to Victoria and take the sightseeing tour. It costs one dollar a head, lasts two hours, and offers a com,plete introduction to the major sights of London that you could never get on your own. (Remember, London is big. Afterwards, everyone will have his own priorities, but I am particularly glad to have seen the following, in order of my preference: ri

4

50 the Chevron

Westminister

Abbey

you’ll pass the british much like ours - the outside, it, looks a bit I by the icing. ~To reach the south 4 St. Margar&s. Tough Westminister, it can h in time, and prepare 1 inside (I shall not spa yourself quietly to one -ing through, for there than meets the casual 1 The original clean bc long been sacrificed t ials of hundreds of fa may tread on the gral Sir Isaac Newton, Ro ton Churchill, kings ar early, for it will be ver Hampton

Court Pala

by Wolsey’to Henry 1 and will take at least it. Go on a sunny day where you get your tic Both buses and trair Court, so you can wa! If you have any que guards, but do prono one Yorkshireman an exchange because nei a word that the other s Hampton Court 3s should be (don’t miss hurt). i If you’re there in the bunch of the royal gral come first served” as I have to stand in line. National

Gallery

((

pollution is so thick o even killing the pigec in the’ fountain envelc birds-so long as you b Don’t overlook the n have any interest in er ate entrance on the t The main collection i covers the spectrum of A note on postcards reproductions of their less than the ordinary 1 The Victoria

& Albert

of museums three tin Palace, exhibiting lot, Holbien’s miniature 1 most beautiful musica

Anyone for v\ If you’re short of tin six hours there and b


It’s cheap and fun, and you’ll be surprised how many british people do it. l Supper is eaten anywhere between six and midnight, so if you’re going to an early play or concert you ought to wait until afterwards. I Much of the british food is greasy and bland, though, surprisingly, curries are available every- where, even in the,hamburg joints! . One restaurant I do want to mention is Cranks a health food restaurant next to Carnaby street that I often walked miles to reach. The food is delicious, unusual, and varied, the decor is bright and and the people interesting and friendly. (I shared a table with a young dancer from the Royal Ballet). And besides, the food is good for you. . Theater, concert, and movie tickets are best obtained by going right to the door; agencies are expensive, and often sell only the best seats. You should never spend more than hop ($1.50) for a seat; London theaters and halls are generally small and well designed, though finding the top balcony can be a real adventure. A good small theater often overlooked is the Young Vic; it was my introduction to London, and I loved it. Do check your tickets carefully: each theater has its own curtain time, and you won’t getin if you’re late.

the way to the abbey , 3ment. Don’t ‘go in-it’s astonishing part is the wedding cake hijacked go through, not around et and humble beside )u to begin to step back ?lf for the Abbey. Once t first moment) attach e numerous tours passuch more to the Abbey of the of the church has lmmodate the memormen and women. You Geoffrey Chaucer and Irowning and Sir Winsens . . . but try to dome vded. . is famous palace (given sn’t strictly in London, t&noon, but it’s worth e sure to buy the guide syou’ll be totally lost. frequently to Hampton ? your heart’s content. feel free to ask the your words carefully ; d a long and fruitless If us could understand t everything a palace laze even if your feet If august, try to buy a ley’ll be on sale “first ; they ripen, but you’ll Lfalgar Square): The algar Square that it’s )u can cool your feet i an adoring mass of em. / Portrait Gallery if YOU istory; it has a separle and closes at five. until six o’clock and ng from 1400 to 1900.. gallery sells beautiful nintings for five cents ; hawked elsewhere. is part of a complex large as Buckingham es, rhinocorous horns, e of Cleves, and the ments in the world. m

zoats? k to the V & A. I spent 3vered the first floor.

There is an exact replica of Michelangelo’s ‘D&rid’ a waistcoat belonging to Charles I and a bewildering array .of other things; curious and beautiful, too numerous to list. Other suggestions: St. Pauls Cathedral (Wren’s famous masterpiece) ; the Tate Gallery, (20th century and english paintings including four bronzes of ‘The Back’) ; the British Museum (in which I came face to face with a roman sarcophagus and was overwhelmed by the real antiquity of Britain; You can also see the original Magna Carta) ; the Tower of London (for its grim halls and the crown jewels). Skip the changing of the guard; it’s really very dull. b =r

street; Regent street (for cooking only) is reputedly the most expensive, street in the orld. Cmaby street, for expensive, institution 7 lized hip, is just a few blocks away. My favorite shop for real buying is Mark0 and Spencer (the main store is on Oxford street) for inexpensive, top quality knits; I bought a whole pantsuit for 15 dollars; you can get Shetland wool \ sweaters for 4 dollars. ‘Clothing and books are the two best buys in London; cameras and what-not you should get elsewhere.

1 N BETWEEN, take advantage of the gorgeous green expanses of London’s giant parks; try Speaker’s Corner for sheer hilarity-you can even make a speech if you want. \ For a longer rest, take the day off and go down to Brighton. Stay glued to your windows; rural England is everything the stories say: lush green, spotted with picturesque cottages and even thatched roofs, giant flowering rhodedendroms and walls of Rose bushes. Brighton itself is even more so, from George IV’s Regency Palace (even more fanciful than parliament) to crowded warrens of curious shops and the original promenade by the sea. For a more modern London, think like a sardine; windowshop. The best (and most crowded) street is Oxford

Fortnum and Mason have the world’s best collection of exotic foods. Portobello road (Saturdays) or Petticoat Lane (Sunday) are really only for squirrels’ (addicted collectors) but they’re fun to stroll through. Don’t go shopping with traveller’s cheques though; change them into british money at a bank either before you go, or when you see what you want; and, in the markets, don’t be afraid to bargain. Lists of hotels, hostels and restaurants are widely available, so I won’t repeat them here. A few general tips are in order, though, about meals: l Always eat a good breakfast; it’s cheap and ‘filling, and you’ll be doing a lot of walking. l Lunch-try eating a pub lunch, or pick up bits and pieces at the numerous take-aways, some fruit from the vendors, and have a picnic in the parks.

Bargain %\ on Petticoat -Lane

A

NYTHING GOES in London as far as dress goes, though you should be more conservative on excursions. It helps to be clean, neat, and courteous. * Expect warm, spring like weather; the last big London fog was over ten years ago. Don’t forget to allow up to one dollar per person a day for tube fare, especially if you’re staying in the suburbs.

It’s the shape that counts of money: 1OOp (new pence) equal one pound which equals $2.40. Unfortunately, one pound also equals 20s (shillings) equals 240d (old pence), and both sets of money are in use. For the sake of your sanity and your budget, ignore what they say, and go by the shape. Pound notes are bills (though british paper money, like american, all looks alike). The octohedral sliver coins are’all worth half a pound (the old ‘crown’) ; the big round silver ones equal lop; the ones that look like quarters equal 5p; the tiny silver sixpence is only worth 2%~. CopRer coins are all round, and in order of decreasing size equal 2p, lp, and %p. Don’t mix british and Canadian coins; they’re too much alike and caused me endless problems. Try always to carry a lp (for the leto), 2p (for phones), and 5p and lop (fortube fare). Bus drivers, for example, won’t accept notes. Everything else you’ll have to find out for yourself. Do take a camera (photography is fun, and gives you a focus for your wanderings) and have a wonderful time. And don’t forget: you are the one with the accent. Speaking

friday

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7971 (12:5)

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tSizes

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Mini

Softball

to Maxi

In what was probably one of the finest _ exhibitions of summer recreational softball to date, the furri freaks out hit, out hustled and out haired the jolly green giants 11-10. Although they were a little weak in the pitching department, their fielding was most impressive . . . depressing for the opponents. In other league play, them eng 3A remains undefeated in four games. While in league B, the iron Fing appears to be brass knuckling , everyone with their 3-O record. --The two jock teams (4A and 2B) will settle their positions this week. Kin 4A has allowed only two runners to get around all bases, while romping around 43 times themselves. In this summer’s league, these jocks have to be the team to beat. ’ In league D, the philosophers are

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Girls Sports

55

Under threatning skiep, the glove grabbing, base hitting girls of Waterloo met on Columbia field to display their various “talents”. At 6:3Q the “recking” crew played the Staffers and last word has it that the-“ret’‘-ing crew was losing 5-3 when the sky broke and ended the game. Weather also cut the Suffrajocks and -Kin 2B number 1 (formerly called the “other” team, now called “the” team) gameoff. A few-of the more optimistic Suffrajocks felt that ifit hadn’t rained the score would have been closer, but face it Suffrajocks, after the 4th, rain or no rain you lost. inal score was 13-3! Wit t the weather still very uncertain the Kin 4A girls and Physics Co-ed started to play. From the beginrilng Physics Co-ed displayed the talents that has been making them unchallenged winners. Jan Meyer slammed a few good ones for the 4A girls, but the team just couldn’t come up on top. Clem continued to prove that vim and vigor outweigh age, by slamming home two good ones. Final score was 27-10 for Physics Co-ed. Next week Kin 2B number 1 vs Physics Co-ed, the Suffrajocks vs Ret, and 4A vs the Staffers.

0 Pts

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should be substantially strengthen* ed. The new members represent a wide cross sectibn of cricket loving nations - Australia, England, the West Indies, India Ceylon and even Canada! The team should be strengthened in all departments as the recruits include batsmen, bowlers, exceptionally fine fieldsmen and above all, great enthusiasm. The old members will be pushed to hold their place. The new recruits showing great promise include Peter Green from Australia a fine all round player. From the West Indies comes Louis Pinder a batsman in the Garfield Sobers mould. Other newcomers to the club round out the other positions. The Stratford Festival Cricket Club will present uniwat with it’s first match of the session in Stratford on June 20th. The club has also arranged games against Guelph, Waterloo, Woodstqck and other cricket te/ams in the southern Ontario cricket league. Practices are held on Columbia field, mondays and Wednesdays at 6:30pm. ’

Interest

Points

Student golf day this week: Wed. June 16 half price, buck-and-a half at Foxwood. . . all day. Open mixed two ball golf tournam&t Tuesday June 22 at the Doon course. Tee off times are from one till two in the afternoon. Register by Friday June 18. Liberated soccer became a reality on Monday as two co-ed teams battled and belted to a 3-3 tie while Cricket the engineers stepped on the bagbitters 3-l. The coming season should prove League convener, Gunther Zeeb to be highly successful for the unireports that this form of soccer is wat cricket club. The club has lost a spectacle to watch - especially several stalwarts from the prethe throw ins. Monday at six on vious year but the standard of recruits is so high that the team”‘?olumbia field

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and numberless ’ social a& tivities’ were planned and attended by profs teachers. and experts on campus this week for the bi-annual convention of the canadian association for health, physical education and recreation. The experts, however, must have been more impressed at the social functions than the .observers were at their presentation of papers and on current research. At the -end of each paper, the listeners were left *with the impression that the area covered .suggested possibilities .for further. probing rather than conI . clusive findings. The relative newness of the field no longer serves as -an excuse for the -poor quality which showed in. excess at the recent convention. The’ graduating class in the fields represented by the visiting :.conventioners.+-s,aw -papers ;equal- -1ing’ and ’ sometimes of a ‘lower ’ quality than their own being pres-’ ented in rapid suticession. The university of Western Ontario was represented by a research paper on the ‘active leisure -activities as related to oc- . cupation’. With no marks off for poor delivery, the paper on it’s 6yn f,ailed dismally in many other aspects; including validity. So what if research proves that unskilled workers do not play’ cepted sense, but rather ‘.a:mechgolf as often as professionals? anism .for controlling .ownership -.Any person with a “minute’s deof iprivate property!. . -individual : lay can explain why. So what if status level .and -thus st&‘ilizing ’ .mowing the lawn is the most widethe tribal .soci.o-economic level’. spread physical activity in smallThe puritan code of ethics el-town, -Michigan? Maybe the fact .iminated this vitalpart of the-la-’ I that -almost everyone has a lawn . -ccosse. -game .involvemen t . _for instead of a squash court in .front the Indian ..and a once subjugaof his house offers clues. .tion was instituted, -the.,game:was While the gentlemen were presreduced to ‘ a sports match:.$i.:the enting, their wives, probably betraditional european sense and. cause of a foreknowledge on qual-held no. attraction for the origity were busy sunbathing on the inators. Interesting. to. note, is ’ lawn outside village two or ’ that on the indian lacrosse team, . boosting the twin city economy the shaman (medicine .man) ocat one of the shopping malls. * cupied -the role of -coach: Olympic Alli was not dismal at the condecathalon champion Bill Toomey vention however, many papers :has stated,’ It’s ‘not the ‘athlete showing points of originality -and with the best coach ,who -eventnew areas such as the sociology ually ,wins,: shut the one with ,the 3 of sport proved worthwhile. - __ <better :pharmacist’;Which “way isman’s developmentheading? The papers presented all dis. SociOlogy .of sport *. ,ciplines within the fields, .howev In this vein, Michael Salter er, many visitors complained of a from the university of Alberta very hectic three days. Some offered a refreshing look at the Inwished to hear speakers presentdian game of lacrosse and the efing simultaneously so, they eithfect of european influence on it’s er ‘forfeited one, or spent the changing role and ultimate exsession running in between both. tinction within the culture from Athletic scholarships which it emerged. ‘An interesting topic was disTo the north american Incussed by a panel of representadian, the game \of lacrosse fultives from some Canadian univerfilled many- functions. The game .The topic was fitness and and it’s implements served as a sit& ama.teur sport athletic scholarmedicinal agent, a medium of di: ships. Present from athe fitness vination and a means of influencand sport directorate was L, Leing the elements.. . protecting faive who outlined the aims and general health, as a method of propreparing for conflict and as a ,direction that the scholarship .gram would take. Other members means of improving the economic of the panel included Maurice status-of the tribe.’ Regimbal, Laurentian university . Salter pointed out that land Dr. Van Vliet,, university of Alrights and precious -articles changed hands as the result of a berta, and Dr. Macintosh, Queen’s university. Reactionsto the single lacrosse game. As athspeakers were given by Dr. Pat letes prepared themselves for Lawson, university of Saskatthe games which sometimes exchewan and Dr. Earle Ziegler tended to encompass several from the university of Illinois. ’ days, the professor says they The purpose of the athletic were also getting ready for any scholarships, Lef aive explained type of armed combat. The frewas to promote participation quent games kept the fitness levin sport in Canada by stopping the el of the tribe to a very high deso called “brawn drain” (i.e. gree. the flood of Canadian athletes to The Europeans, however, America). Lefaive points out thought “that the Indian should that his directorate is not trying display the same attention to to foist athletic scholarships more important. matters”. Recon the universities but instead ognizing the game as a harmless is- offering an alternative methpasttime, the invaders allowed universities its condimation’ As to the ef-’ od to how ‘american recruit athletes for their profects.. . do not perceive any sergrams. ious evil results, if we exclude that his Some problems the gambling. ’ type of scholarship avoids is that there is no recruiting of athletics Economics of lacrosse since the university has no say Salter pointed out that the as to who gets the scholarship. wagering which occured in conThe athlete is free to choose junction with the game was not whatever university he likes and gambling in the frequently acthere is no obligation to participate

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icle, the engineering rep’resentatives received the impression that several council members deliberately left the room in expec‘ ‘ A newsf ea ture tabloid servtation of a quorum call. Whether ing the university of Waterloo”. or not their impression was corI question whether you are servrect, it was the reason for ,their ing anyone by your irresponsible .claim of immoral behaviour; -by distortions, careless conclusions, council members. Your error of and reckless sensationalism. ’ is most unfair to the Sometimes the chevron is an omission excellent “newsfeature tabloid” ; engineering representatives. Fortunately, the spelling “ensometimes, it is atrocious. I refer, .for example, to the may 28 gineers’ ” and the absence of a issue, specifically to the page 1 main verb in the last paragraph article entitled “Senatesifts serve to reduce the impact of the federation”. article. Finally, I would like to express My perceptions of the Senatemeeting were somewhat differmy sympathy for Mr. Smith’s with Ontario -en t from those pf your’uniden ti- disillusionment Place;’ -.Perliaps disillusiontient fied reporter:’ -For instance :-. I ’ . is not the right word, for it iml the Senate agreed toask the plies that the observer’s expecboard to ask the federation to run a referendum, and recommended tations were disappointed. In any case, it is a pity that Mr. Smith to the board that the referendum requested should have conditions was so put out by Ontario Place that he was forced to such exwhich would ensure its validity namely, that a minimum vote be tremes of hyperbole and clumsy required and that the wording of sensationalism. Visually, the chevron is probthe referendum be approved by the committee of society presiably the finest university newsdents. I fail to see how this conpaper .in -Canada. It is unfortunstitutes ‘ ‘assuming to influence ate that this impression can somestudent opinion’ ‘_. times be destroyed by reading the thing. ) l at the federation council TIM HICKS meeting referred to in -the art4A math

Chevron Canada

-ti -the uniierkities

-athletic pro-

gram. Also the scholarship is of -a .fixed amount so that there is no bickering - .about the pay the -athlete should receive .for his talents. Lefaive also stated that the : -athlete -must demonstrate a _need -for the money. and that all ,that is necessary to keep the scholarship is to maintain one‘self academically and to main.tain a high standard of excellence -‘in sports, Lefaive also mentioned Hockey Canada scholarships follow much the same lines as the above mentioned except that the* athlete must participate on the school’s hockey team: This is done for the purpose of improvb ~ing Canadian university teams to the point that they could compete against -american and international college teams. Many, of Canada’s young hockey players with aspirations to turn professional-want to also get a good education but are forced financially to turn to the States for their education. Hockey Canada hopes by means of scholarships to allow the athletes to receive a Canadian education without harming their chances for pro hockey. !

Third

party

finest in r reader

grants

All the panelists were in agreement that third party scholarship will work and that they do in fact avoid the problems that are being encountered in America. The problems of high pressure recruiting and commercialism of sport. However there was some disagreement as to the ne-cessity of university sports. Dr. Ziegler suggested that other types of schools should be set up to accommodate those interested in turning professional or setting up degree courses in physical motor learning skills. (i.e. football). The main aim of the scholarship is to keep Canadian athletes at home but I do not believe that scholarships alone will do this. Many coaches outside of university recommend that their athletes go south for better coaching, facilities, and more competition because they do not believe Canadian universities will help the athletes in achieving higher standards. Needed, is more money for better facilities and to hire qualified coaches from abroad or at home. Money is also necessary to transport athletes to high calibre competitions or to bring the competition here to the athlete. _

MATH

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STUDENTS

\’

There will be an ELECTION Wednesday, june 23, to fill three co-op seats on the Math Society Council. Representatives will serve the remainder of this term plus january-april 1972. \ Notiination office, M&C

forms 3038.

Nominations 18.

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also disturbing, because, it is the noticeand in Yarmouth becomes the supreme able sign that democracy is finished. ‘. I - y. criterion in the choice of news stories. “They sometimes add, in a questioning. + A service note from the assistant di-. m _ rector of the news department, dated rierre iego, & !n at C/M&i; was also : 1 tone: ‘And is this army effective,since, Laportes murder happened- right-, undecember 15, 1970, -as harmless as it ap, sbmmoned to apF bear , in court: in rela. -- d&their * noses?- ,!: . . I , ; pears at first glance; gives an inflic=ltion. \ to ~a, charge. brought by 1 the%, Crown _ ___. _L L, . , ~ 1 ~ I.“SQme went further: ‘It’s .a horrible 1 ’ tion. It says that “in the choice against tne union, ieaaer, lvrichel Charsituation, we didn’t believe the FLQ 1 stories, it must -be remembered that I_ trand< would go’ that far,- but we, mustn’t be , ?glsjournal is more national.. than proterrorized by fear to the point of backing . vincial, and consequently, it must be , ’ Censorship in the. , down on our ideas. There are still a lot thought of. in terms of the ~wh5le councorn munications M e&,a r of things to change, a lot of things, /_ try.‘.’ Dkng the October Crisis \’ ’ ,, but we haveto wait, this isn’t the proper - ,-1 . -2 The following- steps, then, had been ,’ moment.’ ‘7 _ ’ i \ 2 . followed since the-’ month of november: ). ’ -A 1 I ; .~ , ” Jqurnglists Molested and ’ Y zfi i story by Rose-Anne Giroux ‘-(of l First, the’ restructuring of the news Prpfessional Equipment Damaged re /P&se, urban affairs section) was L ’ n november 3, 1970, at a news *conservice -according to that )which. existed \ - _’ turned down by the newsqaper’smanference, the syndicat g&&al du cinema 1. several years ago, and which had been \ agement ‘on October’ 22, 1970. It concernet de la &vision (SGCT) condemned abandoned towards ‘the end of the mak arcel Rivar * h , a journalist with ed an interview with Robert Lemieux. ~ \the anarchy which had governed the was- given _ Antoine Desrochesi agement‘ of Bruno Cormeau, in 1964-65. Y _ i’llnipn de Victoriavhle,, ‘assistant news di_ coverage of the October events, more The- I reporters. do not have the confi- _ a bone to pick with the ,policeman Pierre rector at La’, Presse, returned Mme. particularly: ., in, the ’ days immediately i dence of management because they are Beliveau,. the night *Pierre LapOrte- Was ’ Giroux’s copy -with this note: “My deep following the invocation of the war meaunionized. So they mustof be placed under <kidnapped. The journalist was driving .? regrets, but in- the opinion of our *legal \ 1 sures act. Radio-Canada (the CBC’s . thesurveillance G I non-unionized _ in the streets ’ of-- Victoriaville when he L ^ counsel,- we cannot publish your inter- -. french-language network) owed it1 to people whose sole function is to see that ’ passed Beliveau’s patrolcar, filled with’ view with Robert Lemieux.” The’ same itself toreact. ! 8 : management’s ‘wishes are followed f people.’ He turned around, and took picday she tried to learn from Desroches On november.9, it fired the two main .-f I tures as these people were enteringwhich legal points had caught the counspokesmen-for the Syndicat and the next l Then the* declaration of the corporathe police station.‘Then one -of the two sel’s attention and led, him to recom- day, it ‘appointed members of ’ the edition’s absolute right to give the public . present told him he did not r /a x policemen mend not -publishing ‘the article in questorial staff (among the most conservathe information it deems necessary to ’ have the right“ to take, pictures. “What! .’ tion.. The answer’ came the following tive elements) to positions as temporary provide. We maintain that this is to’ deIl’ I’d sure like to see that!” said the jour,day: “In transmitting the, text of your supervisors. A -fewGonths later, des- -. ,/n-y, in fact, the public’s right ;to informa. nalist. “You’ll:,:see it, ‘buddy,” the oth. interview to our legal counsel, the news X, pite the freeze on positions and the< tion ahd the’ principle which subordinates . er replied. Summoned into the police sta-, I director, Roger Mathieu, specified that abolition of hundreds of jobs, the news all’ rights of the press and of journalists ’ tion, Rivard, refused to go. There ensued in normal times I would authorise its department’s management obtained L . to-this fundamental right. I_ ‘.‘..a/+crimmage during ,which the jourwithout hesitation. The authorization from, the general manageAny direct or indirect , statement to ) _ -publication - . i/ < .‘nalistys camera wasdamaged, *legal opinion which’ we received in re- . y ment to, create five additional super- the effect that news media or ordinary r A-~ , ..I. -Y‘Mr. Desroches con’ posts: . . j ,/ sponse- is clear,” - . journalists can set Ythemselves up as :’,I. , , tinued. “Our legal’ counsel, says, in fact: Taking into account the other members I - * the exclusive judges of the information 5 “Given the regulations decreed by r vir- , of the news department’s mhnagement, , .I? ‘eng Mailhot, a journalist with CBd j that should reach the public must be I tue of the war measures act, I do not,bethe 400odd reportersof the ~BC’S f,renchfought and condemned.. Otherwise, we TV news,, ~was brutalised several times - lieve that one can publish the attached . language network in Montreal, are now become dictators of shall ‘. soon when he coyered events related to the : document. , _. . ; J,I ,, under the direct surveillance of l0 sup-opinion--The facts must be ~reported as ! Cross affair (details in chapter l).. \He ervisors whose role is to see t&t “the’ ’ ” honestly as” possible; otherwise, we‘” also, received blows during. the demon. CBC does not a,bdicate L its manageshall be -using our work for. personal , . . n October 18, ,Louise Cousineau, LI \ stration against bill 63, (a bill guaranteea ,, merit’s 7 exclusive responsibility / to ; _ _ ends. All these principles,). are. de@&$@ * , ing parent&the right to choose in which .- _ La Presse reporter, interviewed. evaluate the orientation ’ and effect, ofr from the- same philosophy that moves us: - $ language their children . are _educated, people chosen at random in the streets j ’ the information it provides to the pubto protest each time the news service passed in 1969). ,’ . of Montreal to get their reaction to the’ lit.” (Excerpt from a statement issued management gives the police material army’s intervention . -Several people ‘z . . by Radio-Canada, november 9,1970: ) \ , f \ for the purposes of: ,an investigation, _ the, I government’s blindly endorsed, Journalists’ Appearances I , ’ ‘1 In this same. communique, the- car-, whether QF: not this material ‘is used on \ position and were pleased , by the ar. in,Court I F poration proclaimed that, “the estabtheair. v: :. rival of the soldiers, without asking themlishment‘ of principles and norms gov-. Examples of thei use , of the airwaves ’ i /’ selves any questions: ‘O-thers were much erning ‘the use ‘df the corporation is its ’ for personal goals, or the use of mater. \ ‘morecritical, evenhostile: ‘n& Lauzon, i news- -reporter at exclusive --jurisdiction.‘T , This was. the I .ral for police investigation, A or for labor’ ’ _- CKLM, The reporter -then returned. to -the“ has complained . sf suffering answer to the union’s accusation *statingmanagement relations, are multiplynewspaper offices, where she-wrote her - that principles damage from the judicial authorities, and norms were tragical: ing despite statements to the contrary , article in which she- reported on the inhaving been called into- court many‘ ly lacking in the newsdepartment. ’ \ from members of management. ’ ’ terviews she had. just carried out. Then’ \\ Since then, as before, one is obliged to d . ‘L,’ times in the trials of Paul -Rose and MiFinally, in trying to set up a network,, r she went home. -’ ’ chel Viger. He fears further summonses. depend ^ upon I certain-indicators, toun. in trying to-, create an I<atmosphere in_ ,to: appearat, future trials !in connection . ~ : The _next. day,, her ..article. appeared in derstand the ‘policy’ followed by Radiotended to be -favorable to national unity, / La #Presse, but her by-line and all ex.. Canada ‘concerning news, in’. the ab- , in describing w,ith the Laporte affair. Lauzon Says he as prq.vincial any news pressions of opinion which were in any J - has been inconvenienced in his work sence of clear indicators which would be L story of interest to Quebec, the corporai by ‘having to testify, always on the same way/reserved or unfavorable ’ concernI furnished to the corporation’s persontion is no longer allowing information a ,ing the government decision had. been ,/ ‘subject: an FLQ communique which he nel, administrative or unionized. to reach the public. And the (public is * removed : Pierre Loignon, ‘assistant Thus, the fact that televJsi,on newspro-, went to find on Mountain st., in the becoming aware of this. This ‘new‘ or; in color in- course of fulfilling his professional - _ managing editor, appointed himself. ex- - _ grams are now broadca’t ien’tation gives us numerous insignifi-c.--. ecutioner and-struck out all the parts ‘of stead of black-and-white has become an 1 function. ~auzon protests against the cant news stories in the/ newscasts, * criterion in the selection of , fact that journalists are obliged totestify j - ‘the article which might have shown the ’ _- rmportant stories which are carried only because theory. ’ news stories. .The good employee is the 7 about events ‘that they, have witnessed J fragility of the’pppular-unanimity they come from a province other than 2 (they make up , one who chooses the color image, even during the exercise of their journalistic \ The suppresed - parts Quebec. At best, this will have-the effect half the article) are as follows i out:of-date, rather ’ than the more up- ; of diminishing functions, He also protests against i the audience, I at worst: . ’ the fact that he had to give ‘his finger“People are say&g: ‘It’s good that the ’ to-date black-and-white image. -of presenting an insipid image of Cana_’ . ?. prints to the Montreal police. Indeed, army’s here, it should even have’ been Thus, the fact that. the 11 p.m. TGle’da with the political consequences that _ I- the police came to get the prints in the , journal is now put together in M,ontreal * will necessarily result. . \, here for a long ,timez But the arm.y is 1 _ / .< . i .I / / .’ ’_ I ‘1J \ \ .’ ’ ~ -/ , ’ \ .

Extensively couering the harassment of lbec‘ journalists. . . during after last. *‘II.*. - and a --. octooers rLu crisis m uueoec, uossrer L .: _ was compned by the Federation profes’ _‘. sionnelle ,des journalists du AQuebec and made pubI& at a journahsts’ conferenceS 1 /’ ’ in Ottawa last month. _ Here is the conclusion of the report and Y I winds. up last, week’s presentation of un(, m’otivated arrests of - journalists, direct , _ interference and uncalled-for searches. / 7 Thjs has been the first-printing .of DOS_ . sier 2 .at any canadian university,. and is f robably one of its-first exposures in any‘, Ifl nglish-speaking -press. -all6 -

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THETI,ME

~~~co~~tobe what we are to the best of our abil,ities, and if our morality or the inforced morality of our employer gets in our way, we must scoff at _ the turd known as circumstance and forge ahead with that which we love. There is no glory in compromise . .I but there is no life - in the dedication of-mind and body to a morality that’will not fit ~ reality. Keep your morality: . . hold it well ahead of you and use it when you caln, but if it stands between you andthe fresh air of love and -. life, silently lay it aside for another , day and acceptthe sorry of the realization that there is no glory in compromise. Do not taunt the authority of your own mind-or the mind of your employer or the mind of the law, but if either of them or all of them get in your path, then silently bow your head and follow /--_ your heart. j For, you see,-you can do nothing original, write nothing original, act nothing original, be nothing original. But you cannot let this stop you, for you haven neve-r done or written or acted these things beforeeven though others have . . and to stop because you will not be unique is to stop on the way to-Ottawa (even if you have never been there before) just because others have been there. And hey. . . that’s noway to .x -live . -

member: Canadian university press (CUP) and underground press syndicate (UPS), subscriber: liberation news service (LNS), east european international news service (EEINS) and chevron international new service (GINS), the chevron is a newsfeature tabloid published offset fifty-two times a year (197 l-72) by the federation of students, incorporated, university of Waterloo. Content is the responsibility of the chevron staff, independent of the federation and the university administration. Offices in the campus center; phone (519) 578-7070 or university local 3443; telex 0295-748. summer circulation: 8,000 . Alex Smith, editor

Switching from an eight to a twelve page paper on a wednesd>y evening has got to stop. Period. Luv ‘n stuff to Bryan and Meg who entered the magical kingdom recently amid the joyous fanfare of several thousand stuffed frogs. And hello to epr w~ho was supervising Lukachko in the office this afternoon. A note to all campus secretaries: the first one to supply a genuine scoop piece of -information to the chevron gets to go out for dinner with the editor.. Work on it, girls, tips will be evaluated on a ten-point scale. Production editor: Al Lukach kd coordinators: Steve lzma (photo). Mel Rotman (entertainment), Dennis McGann (sports), Hod Hickman & rats (features), Gord robertson, paul sperl, roy wuertele, peter hopkins, jane liddell, jack morris,- ra!ph riener, john skelding, ban-y brown, eleanor hyodo, brian switzman, joe handler, mat-y holmes, tony de franco, janet stoody, peter warrian. joe michno, paul hartford and anica. And finally, We find Ourselves exhausted. ‘TilJnext time, then . . .”

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He tried to sell me sixty poundspfracini air. * i “It’ll get you places real quick, boy: i --? ‘\ * ’ ,From downtown to uptown in seven secondsflat; N You’ll have the f,astest bike in town, ’ . / / . Put down all those other boys. 1” . You’re better than all the rest, * I * But you gotta fight, -\ : t And you need us, _ 32useyouain’tnowherenow.” ’ ’ ’ ’ / ? , c A i L \ 1 Well, I ain’t going nowhere without my friends: . I \ I ’ And I know how good his racing air is: 3 It’s colour’sno different from what I breath, His just comes through a fancier mouth: ’ I .i-\ , ’r \ ButI took some anyway, - It’ll keep him happy, \ \ --. Until he tries to cash my Bank-of Kanada c%eqhe / IL I ’ Signed by Rip Toff. \

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1971-72_v12,n05_Chevron