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Votes

non-confidence

Generd by Bob Verdun Chevron staff

A general meeting monday called by federation president John Bergsma supported Bergsma’s motion to reverse council’s stand on bail for Sir George Williams University students. &n a subsequent motion with depleted attendance it narrowly voted nonconfidence in Bergsma. The questions of. the bail and non-confidence in the president were connected throughout the meeting. Friction over rules of order led the meeting’s chairman, council speaker Roger Kingsley, to step down halfway through the meeting. He was replaced by Jim Pike, mechanical 4B and former external-relations chairman. Order was a problem throughout the meeting as many of the students wished to dispose of the bail question and go home. The meeting. called for 3: 10 pm by Bergsget started until ma. didn’t 4:05 because Bergsma had not booked the campus center great hall and a Biafra teach-in was in progress. BERGSMA ASKS SUPPORT Bergsma started the meeting by introducing a motion to “urge the student council not, to extend its bail-granting policy beyond the members of the Federation of Students.” He went on to say if the precedent of the Sir George bail stood it would open the way to “local drunks and petty thieves” to ask for bail. He also said he ran on a platform of student programs and felt the loaning of bail could restrict student programs. Larry Burko, arts 3, shouted, “Why didn’t you object in council then? ” ( Bergsma had abstained on the motion 1. Bergsma gave no

reply.

Rick Powell, poli-sci 3, said, “The resolution before us is a coverup. So-called responsible students have voted for an apparently radical measure. The real issue now is that student council is unrepresentative and should lneet the same fate as the .Iler council. * ‘. Ted Gill. mechanical 4B, wanted1 to stick to the bail issue. He was opposed to the Sir George grant and asked. “Who is going to decide who outside the federation will get bail, who?” Former councillor Pete Huck. civil 3A. asked Bergsma why he didn’t vote on the student council motion. Bergsma said most of the councillors could not condone people being held in jail because they couldn’t raise bail. Personally he felt the money was needed for programs. ILER REFUTES BERGSMA Past president Brian Iler said that adequate money was available and that there would be no ‘handicap to the federation’s operation of programs. He was not challenged. Iler continued, “The only argument is whether it’s just or unjust. human or inhuman for those people to be held in jail whether they’re innocent or guilty. They are handicapped in their ability to prepare a defense. ” E3rian Gordon, poli-sci 3. brought the issue back to Bergsma’s leadership. He was ruled out of

in Bergsma

meeting order, and in the ensuing procedural debate, chairman Kingsley accepted a less restrictive format on the basis of precedents and allowed Gordon tozontinue. Gordon said Bergsma’s changes of opinion demonstrated his lack of leadership and that this was affecting the whole council. an EngSoc B Dave Berry, spokesman, said, “The issue is that council pulled a boner. They made asses of themselves by pulling a publicity stunt that kicked turned around and them.” Someone shouted from the audience, “Our jobs are in danger.” Berry said, “No, not really,” and dropped the subject. Larry Caesar, history 3 and arts rep on council, defended the lending of bail money. “Some people were out on bail-backed their government by someone, or their parents-and there were others being held because they didn’t have the money.” This was met with cries of “let ‘em rot!” Caesar replied, “Then you believe rich people should have more rights than poor. No one can represent you. If you’re Christians,. and I / doubt. i-t, .then you’ll fry in hell.” Retiring federation treasurer Joe Givens pointed out $5000 had already been sent friday to bail out a student and that it was not expected any pore would meet the qualifications for federation money, so that the question was an academic one. HUMAN FACTORS COUNT Bill Snodgrass, - out-term engineering rep‘who voted for the bail motion, outlined some of his reasoning. “I have run into racism, __-_-_______c____-_________ Council votes confidence Bergsma. Story page 3 ---------------------------

in

I know what it’s about. Those students had something definite to protest. I don’t agree with violence although there are legitimate arguments for meeting mental violence with physical violence. ’ ’ Snodgrass felt the unequal treatment of students because of financial backing was a stronger argument in favor of granting bail than the suggestion of support of their actions weighted against the bail. “The $10,000 we’ll get back. We should be helping those students in order to build wider student unity.“‘ Newly-appointed external-relations chairman Ron Golemba said that some of Bergsma’s executive were put out at the lack of leadership by the president. He favored holding some sort of confidence vote. Burko said, “council isn’t doing things the least bit representative with our money. It doesn’t have the right kind of leadership. The leader of the students for responsible action did not voice opinions. he didn’t know what was going on. “‘We don’t want to call general meetings every time council botches up. The thing to talk about is whether this is the council we want. This council obviously isn’t representative. ”

k.

retracts

MOTION TABLED Burko proposed tabling Bergsma’s motion on rescinding the bail so a motion on representivity could be brought up. In a standing vote on the tabling motion, the chairman could not decide and called for a division of the house. He ruled the motion to table carried, bu.t was challenged. ~,The eventual decision was made by coin flip, and the motion was tabled. Confusion again erupted when Alex Smith, arts 1, attempted to move non-confidence in the president of the Federation of Students and was ruled out of order by Kingsley. Cyril Levitt, poli-sci 3, argued that the precedents set for general meetings of this nature allowed such a motion to be in order. The procedural debate was eventually resolved when Kingsley stepped down as chairman and Jim Pike, mechanical 4B, took over. Pike allowed debate to continue openly without a motion on the floor. Syd Nestel. math 1, mentioned the Toronto engineers’ subway caper two years ago that did a quarter million dollars daqage. &‘How’ tiany ’ people would say let them rot in jail?” Nestel said council had to make a decision and that they were probably fairly representative because they didn’t run on nonradical platforms. “The person who ran strictly non-radical is John Bergsma. and he abstained,” said Nes tel.

favor or he’s really incompetent.” Robin Briggs, arts 1, demanded to know why Bergsma couldn’t at least take a stand by defending himself. Bergsma replied by explaining why council voted the way they did-that is, to protest the bail system. Then defending himself he said, “This is supposed to be an educative discussion.. . And to those who condemn me, may I remind them I was re-elected by a large majority in the last election.”

bail Bob Swift, r6ath 2A, said he favored sending the bail , and asked. “Why is it something like this that makes the reactionaries come out of the woodworkthey’re just worried about their jobs.” Stewart Saxe. Chevron editor. compared Bergsma’s actions on the bail issue with previous radical presidents. “In such inflammatory actions as draf tdodger assistance two years ago and the matters of continued

on page 2

INCOMPETENCE CHARGED John Stafford, math 1, condemned Bergsma for incompetence. “He tries to be responsible, but he can’t. Why hasn’t he spoken at this meeting other than introducing the motion ? The only excuse he’s offered for not lending the bail is the budget problem and Brian Iler has fully refuted that. Bergsma should now either be in

Joint

meet

A joint meeting of the board of governors and senate yesterday gave the go-ahead for work to begin on a new University of Waterloo Act incorporating a singletier governing structure with student representation. A committee was established to draft the new act, planned for presentation to the Ontario legislature in October. The drafting committee will consist of several faculty, administration officers, an alumnus, a church college rep and two students (the federation president or his delegate and one chosen at large). The new governing body. as yet unnamed, will have approximately equal representation from within the university (students and faculty) and outside (community reps and alumni). Initially the community reps will be chosen from the current board of governors. A fifteen-member administration hierarchy will complete the voting membership. Attempts by graduate-studies dean George Cross and librarian

accepts Doris Lewis to have the function of the new body discussed met with failure as the 50 persons present debated the legal stature of the meeting. representation on the drafting committee and composition of the final body. Glenn Berry, student rep to the board of governors. said, “It’s obvious that the new body will be the supreme governing body. That presents a reasonably clear -picture of what it will do.” Science dean Pete McBryde disagreed. “Mr. Berry has suggested this is all there is to it. I’m not sure that isn’t an oversimplification. ” He referred to the seeming inability of the senate to act as more than a rubberstamp and the inability of board members to be more than superficially aware of the activities in the university. John Federation president Bergsma presented a recommendation from student council which would increase student representation from the proposed.

one .I tier five directly elected undergrads and 2 grads by%adding five federation-appointed undergrads. Bergsma read a short speech in which he justified the increase by referring to the diverse interests and knowledge of students and the idea that sotie students should be direct student council appointees who are more concerned with student programs. Debate on this was postponed till later in the meeting. In setting up the drafting comm,ittee, Berry requested an additional student above the one originally proposed because ‘-we need more than one rep to be able to make competent decisions. It may be hard for one rep to make all the meetings in the summer. These are also going to be green people. not the ones who have been involved in the past.” At press deadline the decision on composition had not been made. but the original proposal was expected to pass. See page 4 for details of the report.


Generd continued

Bergsma

declines

to send more bail

John Federation president Bergsma refused to send $3000 to Montreal Wednesday to bail out the president of the Sir George Williams arts council, one of the remaining few charged with conspiracy. The original council motion granted $10,000 for bail for the Sir George students. $5,000 was. sent last friday. However, the extralegal general meeting on monday reversed

University

the council -decision by a small majority. Later that night, council moved to adopt the sense of the general meeting, vowing in future not to extend bail to’ anyone outside the Federation of Students without holding a referendum. Bergsma has interpreted the motion to include the $5,000 remaining from the original allocation, although he has been strongly challenged by arts rep Larry Caesar and Renison rep Paul Dube.

purpose

pure math chairman Henry Crapo and associate engineering dean Ernie Holmes. The debate will be opened to the audience after initial statements from the panel. Organizer Lawrence Etigson, grad math, expects the debate will deal with such topits as whether the university should be an*agent of social change or a purveyor of bourgeois values, whether it should teach creativity or productivity, what are the roles of faculty, administrator and student and how the university should change in the future.

off-limits

to noisy events

Village weekend has run into several organizational problems this week. De1 Shannon was to appear at Seagram gym for a concert-dance tonight. Weekend chairman Larry Burko was informed, after he had / arranged posters and tickets for

Radicals

from page

housing and Habitat ‘69 during Iler’s presidency, the president ensured that no action was taken or money sent until the problem had been taken to the people in a referendum or general meeting.

this event, that Seagram gym will no longer be used for events which result in excessive noise. There have been complaints about dances held there in the past. Burko decided the only altei-native was to move the event to the Village and take a loss.

“In the two times this moderate (Bergsma) has run, he has talked about feeling the will of the people better. This was a legitimate alternative to the radicals when introduced, but now John has shown he can’t &hieve it.” Renison rep Paul Dube said he personally knows Sir George Williams professor Perry Anderson who was accused of racism.

Pressure began to mount to get to the vote 01. the bail issue. Dave Geller, elect 3B, wanted to amend” the motion to deny bail to any members of the Federation of Students who are arrested in in an action not condoned by the student council. He said if a guy was arrested for hitting a child with a car he should be bailed out, but not if he damaged the university’s computer in a protest. The side opposed to the bail successfully got the motion on the floor’and debate ended. In a standing vote with the house divided. Pike was able to declare a close but clear majority for Bergsma’s motion to stop granting bail outside the federation. Large numbers of people began to disperse, but before the meeting was adjourned Levitt moved nonconfidence in the president. Pike ruled the motion in order. Speakers continued to hit Berg- . sma’s lack of leadership and the issue of job security. By the time the vote was taken on the confidence issue, the attendance had dropped to about 300 from previous highs of up to 1000. About 700 had voted on the bail motion.

Praxis is’ a tactical and theoretical journal designed to link various left-wing student groups throughout the country, and the U.S. to a limited extent. Mark Rudd, leader of the ColumbiaXJniversity chapter of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) is a subscriber.

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The motion of none-confidence carried by 148-142. The count. had to be taken by having the students enter the building from different exits. The meeting adjourned.

OPTOMETRIST

void voting for countries where political, social, and racial disorder is prevalent. ” This should leave the engineers with a choice of going to Antarctica or if they want something nearer, Baffin Island. It should be very educational for the fellas and so far as a vacation spot, you can’t beat watching penguins all day.

There seems to be some queries and doubts about the existence of the class of ‘71 and what it is doing. Last summer the society of the engineering class of ‘71 was formed to realize a number of goals. Many of these goals are centered around the famous engineering pastimes, the opposite sex and booze. But foremost of these goals is the financing of a grad trip, to be chosen by ‘the members. At the present time the committee in charge of the trip is handing out questionnaires to these members so they can decide on where to go. * Included on the form is a list Of general instructions, One of them states the purpose of the trip is two-fold; academic arid vacation. Yet another of -the instructions orders “Each member should a-

the president can abstain from voting on such an issue.” Dube then asked Bergsma if he intended to stay as president for the entire term of Office. Bergsma said yes and denied t.he rumor he was planning to quit in may so his vicepresident could hold office as president and run as the imcumbent in the byelection in September. a

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“I don’t believe Anderson is a racist,” said Dube, “but I couldn’t abstain on the bail motion. Anderson’s case >will probably never be properly investigated and he can’t be fully cleared. I voted in favor of bailing the students out because it’s not fair to leave them in jail. I also feel there is no way

The often riotous general meeting monday- renounced the Sir Geroge bail motion and voted non-confidence in Bergsma.

will se/I Praxis next week

The radical student journal Praxis volume 2 will make its appearance on the newsstand of the radical student movement (RSM) next week. The demand for a second issue of the magazine was so great nationally that 2000 copies have been printed. This is four times the number of the first issue. The RSM will charge twentyfive cents a copy to offset the cost of production. Other radical stu-

Subject

I

will be discussed

What is the real nature and purpose of a university? This essential question which has never been answered in administration studies of university government will be tackled by a panel of four faculty and two students. The discussion wwized by the board federation’s education takes place monday at 8 pm in the campus center great hall. Panelists are Math Medium editor Ken McLeod, radical student movement member Tom Patterson, sociology prof David Kirk, chemistry Prof George Atkinson, acting

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Student .

boards

Student-dominated, independent boards have been recommended to set policy and develop overall operating principles for the groups that reported to former provost Bill Scott. The student affairs review committee presented its report wednesday to interim administration president Howard Petch. Petch was generally pleased with the report. “There is the odd thing I don’t agree with, but its a good’ report”, he said. “I would like to implement some of these things quickly” continued Petch. “I support the concept of boards establishing policy. ”

will

The committee was chaired by Jack Brown, director of ancillary enterprises. Other members were Al Crawford, arts 2, Nancy Murphy, arts 2, Deiter Haag, grad German, Leo Johnson, history Prof. and Lynn Watt, electrical engineering Prof. A full time medical director was recommended for health services. Health and counselling departments would integrate their services; both would be under a single board. This board would consist of student, faculty and staff representatives with a majority of students. Three immediate policy ques-

rule student

tions were directed to the proposed .board. The question of funding, perhaps by a student levy, was presented. Health services may mass dispense some drugs. Medical services, may be offered through a mutual insurance plan. The health and counselling board, through its chairman, would direct the two services. Day to day operation would, in practicality, bypass the board to the presidential level but the board could intervene in any circumstance to assert policy. In creative arts it was recommended that the director con-

tinue to report to and be paid by the university. A new method of financing was proposed wherby the next year’s budget would - be available for advanced booking. Either student council could vote funds a year ahead or the university and council could determine a per capita levy for students, faculty and staff to come from general university funds. Housing might operate a joint service with Waterloo Lutheran University. The committee suggested a student-oriented housing advisory board to set standards and develop an inspection service. The housing board would be

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part of a total housing organization. The Grad Society will provide a foreign student orientation and assistance program with the cooperation of housing, registrar and registrar and residence people. The report recommended that the dean of women be continued and a dean of men be established. Both shou!d be tenured faculty with term appointments. They would be selected by the adminisstration president in consultation with the Federation of Students. Both deans would be ex-officio members of all faculty councils. and would report directly to the president. In residences, a director of housing would coordinate all onand-off-campus housing and undertake forward planning in consultation with a residence planning council. The director, with a residence council, would be responsible for efficient use of facilities to meet finanical commitments, always consistent with the principle that each residence. in its operation, must reflect the needs and desires of its occupants. The various student dominated councils hold an in-line position of decision-making as shown on the chart.

Protest proper

through channel

Campus vending machines robbing you? Want to protest monopoly capitalism through the proper channel? Call food-services manager Bob Mudie at 744-6111, local 2704.

Council votes confidence in Bergsmu administration Student council monday night a referendum opposing the council gave an overwhelming vote of motion. Bergsma said he was morally confidence to president John Bergsma. The vote resulted from behind the intent of the council action, but he could not give his discussion of the afternoon general meeting which had voted support to the practical applicanon-confidence 148 to 142. tion itself. Referring to the afternoon vote, Cyril Levitt, poli-sci 3, speaking Renison rep Paul Dube asked from the gallery, criticized such Bergsma what he planned to do. separation of beliefs from pracBergsma indicated that he would tical activity. He also criticized the referendum idea. not resign unless council also voted non-confidence, but that ~ Several members felt that anothhe was considering placing the er election would not be desired question of confidence on the by the students, and that council bail referendum ballot. must get on with its work. Dube- introduced a motion of Bob Sinasac, creative-arts -Jim Dunlop, the Chevron non-confidence. He contended that chairman, stated that his working ’ A fire tuesday mdrning destroyed the arts lecture building and it was quickly replaced with with Bergsma on the executive - an election would be much better a cleverly-disguised to ta&environment computer- from Litton Industries. than a referendum. had convinced him that John was a capable leader. Larry Caesar, arts rep, felt the decision of the general meeting Science rep Hugh Campell, conFunds unavailable should be upheld. He pointed out demned the disruption caused by 2 that the federation had been percent of the students. thrown out of CUS by a margin The non-confidence vote went: that was not very much larger Dube, Berry, Banks, Caesar, than the majority achieved by Berry, and Pickles in favor: from the outside grant and not Despite a previous decision by Even though the counselling Minken, Leonard, Fillimore, Lloyd, the non-confidence motion. provide any new personnel to office is in the far corner of the the president’s council and a proEngineering rep, Dave Parsons Kouwen, Sinasac, Wootton, Parmeet increased enrolment. ven need, the university countop floor of the math building sons, Gordon, Yack, Greenberg, -argued that council should not Interim administration presiand Dick has had very little selling services will not get a feel bound to follow the general Bartolacci, Bergsma, Fish, Campdent Howard Petch said Wednesday significant increase in personnel money for advertising, the demeeting decision, because the bell, Dhawan Driver opposed, that counselling could probably mand still continues to mount. this year. meeting had not been representaand Snodgrass abstained. have an additional full-time alloIn addition to the counselling of _ With a substantial outside grant, tive. Of the nearly 1000 people Members began to leave as soon cation in the light of the proindividual student problems, Dick counselling was able to maintain present at the beginning of the as the- vote was announced. A vince’s operating grants being has tried to expand into discussion a counsellors-to-students ratio , afternoon meeting, only 300 requestion by Dube as to Bergshigher than expected. With an groups. The existing counselling about l-1250 this year. mained for the non-confidence ma’s intentions regarding a reexpected increased enrolment to staff will be unable to keep up the The president’s council (the vote. ferendum went unanswered. 10,000, counselling would only be pace they set this year to get top administration decision-making Larry Caesar argued that the Earlier in the meeting, Larry able to maintain the current the program going unless subbody) accepted the report of the president had been indecisive and Caesar, arts, had moved that 1-1250 ratio of counsellors tOi stantial increases in personnel ad-hoc committee on counselling vacillating, and that the bail council follow the wishes of the students. are added. in October. This report decided the issue was a good example. He general meeting and accept the Dick is very concerned about Dick also noted a shortage of university needed at least one criticized Bergsma’s failure to restriction on granting bail. The the situation. The counselling counsellors is developing across full-time counsellor for every 1000 office has been overloaded state his position during the orimotion carried. with Canada. students. ginal debate, and the number of After the reversal of the general cases since September, and since “With better ratios at other times he changed his mind folmeeting decision on confidence. february have been forced to universities In preliminary budgeting this such as York where lowing the meeting. he attempted to have his earlier place students on a waiting list there is one counsellor for every term, counselling director Bill Bergsma had abstained on the motion rescinded. pending the for one-to-two weeks. 600 students, we will find it inDick was told he could have monbail motion, but following the referendum. This was ruled out “This is contrary to our philocreasingly difficult to attract and ey for one more full-time counmeeting -had attempted to have of order as one of the dispersing sophy of crisis counselling,” said sellor. This would only replace the keep competent counsellors,” he his vote changed, and had signed members called for adjournment. Dick. money that would be unavailable said. h

Counselling

pressed

for personnel

frida y, march

7, 1969 (9:46)

84 1

3


Joint board-senate discusses one-tier. The board of governors and the senate ‘met yesterday morning in a special joint session to consider plans for the new single-tier university government. - Student council hailed the progoverning posal as “a viable structure, but others, including former federation reps to the university government study committee have called it “co-option”. Brian Iler, former federation president and unigov committee member commented on the board and senate proposal. “The only good thing it does is to end the artificial separationand operational of academic decision-making.\ It does not change the power relationships. I know people don’t like! to talk about power, but if real change is our aim, we must.” The proposal brought before thursday’s joint meeting follows closely the general outline set out in a university press release in january of this year. It calls for a single supreme governing body with membership divided about equally between people from within the university and from the community outside. The main difference between the initial release and the present document is the inclusion of a definite membership proposal. The joint board and senate steering committee which produced the brief called for a body of 56 members: -one faculty member to be

Princeton

keeps

PRINCETON (CUPI)--PrinceI ton University Wednesday refused to liquidate its holdings in ,39 major companies dealing with South Africa. The decision to retain the $127 million worth of securities came after a series of demands made by a coalition of white and black students was presented to the administration. The securities represent one third of the school’s investment portfolio. Administration president Robert F. Goheen spoke to a large crowd of students and staff and said he represented the executive committee of the board of trustees. He pledged the university

meeting proposal

chosen by the faculty members of each academic unit having faculty status, initially five -members of the faculty at large to be chosen by the Faculty Association, one from each academic unit having faculty status, initially five -two faculty members to be chosen by the university council on graduate studies. -student members who are duly registered students in the university, to be elected by the student body in an election procedure to be determined by the Federation of Students, one from each academic, unit having faculty status, initially five -2 graduate student members who are duly registered students in the university, to be elected by the student body in an election procedure to be determined by the Federation of Students. -15 members of the community at large to be selected initially from the present board of governors -5 members of the community at large, not necessarily alumni, to be elected by the alumni associa tion -ex-of f icio members: officers $f of the university community as follows: president, chancellor, vicepresidents, treasurer, dean, director, or other senior academic officer for each academic unit having faculty status, dean of graduate studies, chief administrative officer of each federated or

South Africa

ties

would not invest in or accept gifts from any corporation whose primary business was conducted in South Africa. He said none of the 39 corporations named was in that position. Included in the Princeton portfolio and doing business with South Africa are: IBM, Litton Industries, General Motors, Mobil Oil, General Electric, Firestone and Union Carbide. Goheen did agree to consult blacks and concerned whites every time a decision involving South Africa is to be made and will accept a student brief on the entire matter, The students opposed all investment in the African country because of its apartheid policies.

UNIVERSITY DRAMA COMPANY MARCH IO- 14 72:75 P.M. MONDAY THE FERRYBOAT

affiliated college, Federation of Students president, Faculty Association president, (total initially; by 17) Leonard Melfi Students and faculty together, inDirected by Judy Dunlop cluding the ex-officio reps, but excluding faculty in administra* * * tive positions, such as deans, form 21 of the 56 members. The elected and appointed 72:15 P.M. members form about one-third of TUESDAY the membership. Of these, 19 are OUT OF THE GRASS & from within the university, 20 are from without. INTO THE MORNING Of the 17 ex-officio members, GLORIOUS those who hold a seat by virtue Written & Directed of their positions outside the body, by two gain their positions by Gerald W. Paro winchak straight election-the presiA WORLD PREMIERE OF dents of the federation and the Faculty Association. 4 NEW PLAY Amendments to the proposal I have been put forward by student * * *, council, which has recommended that five students, appointed by council be added, and that the alu72:15 P.M. mni representation be decreased WEDNESDAY to two. THE SWINDLE The single-tier model originated bY from a brief presented to the Richard Roland study committee on university government by federation repreDirected by Ebenezer sentatives two years ago. One of Jay Renrut the authors of that brief, former president Steve Ireland, says the * * * new plan is quite different from the original. “We had hoped to take decisionTHURSDAY making power out of the hands of (195 Today Only) the corporate elite and adminisCRAWLING ARNOLD trative officers, and place it in the hands of faculty and students. bY But the board and senate recomJules Feiffer mendation gives faculty and stuDirected by Patricia dents less than half the seats,” he Connor said. Ten representatives of the federation have been appointed to attend the joint meeting. All of them generally favor the adminis-. 1295 P.M. tration plan. j Student membership and openFRIDA Y ness for the steering committee SWAN SONG were requested by council in bY January, but were never imple1 Anton Chekhov mented. Interim administration 1 Directed by Paul-Emile president Howie Petch said that he I Iwasn’t aware that this had been Frappjer requested. He didn’t know who the , members-of the steering committee were. Creative Arts Board “It would be very good if they Federation Of Students could come to an agreement,” he said of the thursday meeting. “There is a chance we can-I’ve tii talked to a lot of people.”

***

I

8

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, One-tier accepted

composition with changes

A motion passed by student council monday night giving general support to the board and senate one-tier proposal was attacked by some members as co-option.

Caesar commended the proposal as being a good example of a liberal reform. “But if we want to talk about a radical demand, we have to talk about what’s happening in society, and that’s what we should be talking about,” he said.

“We should not be co-opted into a proposal for a rubber stamp,” stated arts rep Larry Caesar.

Speaking from the gallery, Cyril Levitt, poli-sci 3, pointed out that while it didn’t talk about it, Berry’s motion was a philosophical document giving a particular political viewpoint.

The new federation policy calls the board and senate proposal “potentially a viable governing structure.” It lists a recommended membership for the new single governing body which varies slightly from the administration proposal. In addition to the elected students reps are added five council appointees, and alumni representation is reduced from five to two. Paul Dube, Renison rep, criticized the policy for failing to deal with the question of the social uses of the university, which he felt must be considered in any such proposal. , Co-op math rep Glenn Berry, who moved the proposal, pointed out that no real policy has yet been developed.

“It is based on the assumption that there is a harmony of interests. There are other points of view, and this should be discussed,” he stated. Bob Kilimnik, treasurer and seconder of the motion, stated that council would be working on a basis of mutual trust with the board and senate. Engineering rep, Rich Lloyd, felt many of Levitt’s and Dube’s arguments were good, but he didn’t see how these could be presented to the people on the board and senate. To a suggestion by King that council call a general meeting on university government, Bergsma replied that meetings on university government would be open. Bergsma felt the proposal was a good one that could be put into effect. “But,” he added, “if we feel that we can no longer participate on our own terms, we’ll pull out.” Included in the motion was a list of ten students who will represent the federation on the board and senate. They are: John Bergsma, and Glenn Berry-Board of governors ; David Greenberg, Dieter Haag, Derek Whitworth, Bob Kilimnik 1 Gerry Wootton and Mike NIartin-senate; Rich Lloyd and Joe Givens-additional reps to yesterday’s joint board and senate meeting which will finalize a government structure.

Former education chairman T.R. King questioned the possibility of the federation getting what it wanted. “These 30 or 40 people on the board of governors are not going to just step aside,” he said. One member suggested that it was necessary to participate in order to prove that students are interested and can be good administrators.

Executive posts now all filled Two vacancies on the executive board were filled monday night. Louis Silcox was appointed board of student activities chairman, and engineering rep Barry Fillimore was madechairman of the newly proposed communications board.

PIZZA 44:

Gov’t

\gives

Tuesday’s provincial budget has given the university almost all the capital funds it requested and operating grants about $llO,000 over expectations. The basic income unit for operating was increased from last year’s $1450 to $1530-a 5.5 percent increase where the administration had expected only 5 percent. The basic income unit is the amount the university is granted (less tuition fees) for a first-year arts students. The graduated grants go as high as six BIU’s for a technical course PhD student. Interim administration president Howard Petch said the operating budget will still be tight. “We can do a few more things that need to be done,” he said. The capital grants were so much more than expected that Petch said they might not be as far advanced in planning to take complete advantage. $7,500,000 was granted, of which about half will go to payments on the humanities building and Habitat ‘69. The new engineering and architecture building will be started as well as site services, architectural finishing, and perhaps construction starts on a psychology building, a chemistry

deal

budget

addition, an administration ing stores and workshop and a visual-aid center.

buildaddition

Petch noted that the tration building might put off by directing the building the final three the library.

adminisagain be funds to floors of

Waterloo got large capital grants in a year when the provincial government said they had limited funds to those projects already approved and new work

Biuffu,

only where absolutely necessary. Waterloo was second to the I!niversity of Ottawa in grants foi new capital projects. “We didn’t expect to be treated so well.” said Petch. Petch also said he doubted that any of the increased operating funds available because of earlier underbudgeting would be available for the library. He felt the library staff would be pressed to handle the increased acquisitions already agreed to.

pot motions

Motions on Biafra and marijuana were tabled by student council monday night. External-relations chairman Ron Golemba moved that council pressure the Canadian government to help bring an early ceasefire to Biafra, and that the f&deration send a donation to a Biafran aid organization. The first section was passed. Questions of amounts of money and actual benefits brought by the donation caused the motion to be referred to the external-relations board for further study. The board of education intro-

tabled

duced a motion calling for the legalization of marijuana. It was defended by RSM member Ron Rurum, who had been sent by the board to a conference on drug use and abuse. John Bergsma opposed the motion, stating he was in favor of removing marijuana from the narcotics list and placing it under the food and drug act, but not of legalizing it. After a lengthy discussion, the motion was tabled pending further study. Larry Caesar, who supported the motion, volunteered to help collate information on marijuana for the next meeting.

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Racism Justice

may erupt department

BIG RAPIDS, MICH. (CUP)Claiming that “some lives may be lost,” Rep. John Conyers (DMich. ) urged the justice department tuesday to investigate monday ‘s violence at Ferris State College. Students, however, returned peacefully to classes tuesday following the arrests of 300 monday night. Under direct authority of Gov. William Miliken, more than 70 state troopers dragged the 300 students-250 of them black-out of the administration building monday night. The students were staging a protest of what they called “the extremely volatile racism” on the campus. A crowd of white students estimated about 500 gathered around the building as police tried to eject the demonstrators chanting “white power.” Police ordered them to leave the scene but they refused. Ferris has been plagued for the past month with sporadic and fights between black serious and white students. Conyers urged the justice department to “take immediate steps to investigate the situation” hinting that federal funds may be “being used in a discriminatory manner. ” He explained in a telegram to the department and the department of health, education and

at Ferris State to investigate

welfare that “racial confrontation between 75 blacks and 200 whites last thursday resulted in the injury of 22 persons and now threatens to become a much more serious conflict. ” Other demands by the blacks include the hiring of a “few” black professors, the institution of a black studies program and liberalization of off-campus housing policies. There are currently 360 blacks on the campus of 7700 students and no black faculty members. Louis Stone, president of the Ferris. chapter of the NAACP, charged monday that he had re-

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,ceived reports some students had been seen with guns and claimed this was the reason the blacks decided to remain together in the administration building. Two black-state legislators have initiated Michigan’s third state investigation of student activism because of the ferris incident. Presently both the house and senate are beginning investigations into student unrest. The blacks asked for the new “Black investigation because students have expressed fear of being attacked by white students and fear of inability of local law enforcement officers to handle the situation.”

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Teacher’s strike ended at Sun Francisco State SAN FRANCISCO (CUP )-San Francisco State teachers ended their two-month strike monday and pledged to devote themselves to an “inside + struggle” to help the striking students. The teachers local of the American Federation of Teachers walked out on january 6, two months after student grofips began their strike. They reached agreement with the-board of trustees last week on the major issues at stake, principally establishment of structures to handle faculty grievances.

Dr. Gary Hawkins, head of teachers local, said the end to strike represented only the ginning of “the struggle yet be waged. ”

the the beto

“Police are still on the campus and the traditional free speech area is barricaded and shut down. demands Legitimate student remain unsettled. Hawkins urged students to return to classes taught by federation members to “protect” their academic status. He said he would join them on the picket line, then go to class.

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tit-for example, in the particular way it educates and trains.” It is therefore absurd to claim a non-ideological and objective social science; (or really any science), for the definition of problems and the uses of research is based upon ideological prerogatives (the ideology of domination. )

W

e are presenting this, brief in response to an apparent breakdown of communications; a breakdown ensuing from our respective and conflicting ideological perspective, not from any absence of dialogue. On the surface, this report may seem to contain superfluous sections in the sense that they will have no visibly direct effect upon the target of our study; that is, hiring and firing at the university. However, as we will demonstrate in the following pages, hiring and -firing questions cannot be abstracted from the context of the university, society, and ultimately the world. This does not mean that we cannot abstract issues, such as hiring and firing, for analytical reasons; but rather suggests that we must understand such analysis in relation to the world.

University

and

ideology

In the post-war years, a new liberal litany has emerged within the intellectual elite of North American academics which is commonly referred to as the ‘end-ofideology’ by social scientists. Although it would be inappropriate here to attempt a thorough-going critique of any of these works, it might be more realistic to discuss several major themes common to the whole body of these writings. 1. History is unknowable, and hence it is impossible to understand its course. 2. The evils of the ‘now’ are not as bad as the evils inherent in revolutionary change. 3. The major antagonisms of society have subsided and the contradictions have been ameliorated. 4. The values of free expression, freedom of the press, freedom of speech, etc. are fundamental and they must never be abrogated. 5. Social science as practised in North American universities has been able to disentangle itself from ideological one-sidedness. It is obvious that no one can know what the specifics of the future are, and in this sense, history is indeed unknowable. However, it is absurd to suggest that man can learn nothing from history in terms of historical forces and trends. In fact, any existing situation can only really be understood as a historical phenomenon, i.e. evolving through time. If we are to allow man the freedom and the possibility of partaking in the transformation of the world, we cannot cut him off from this most potent analytical tool. Any science which denies historicity is a dead, abstract, non-science. The value judgement inherent in point number two is derived from the belief that the evils and injustices of society have been decreasing (in a global sense). Unfortunately the major problems of our world have not been solved and in fact, the trend indicates that conditions are further deteriorating. If North American society has prospered materially in the post-war period, (a class analysis might destroy the universality of that claim) it is due to the exploitation of the majority of mankind. Questions of poverty, racism, war and waste, unemployment and meaningful work are very much a part of our world: In most areas these problems have been exacerbated over the past few decades. Furthermore, the established societal mechanisms for social change do not guarantee any solutions. Quite the contrary, automation threatens employment; a supposedly peaceful foreign policy representing interests of corporate and military elites threatens world peace. All possibility of meaningful change disappears into the giant marshmallow of a liberal society. Words

have been robbed

of their

mean-

The critical

Who Dicked vour H

professor?

-

.

Should vou have had b-s&? m

-

-

uniform? This is the text of a brief on hiring and firing professors submitted to administration president Ho ward Pe tch by a group of interested students. The brief investigates the dynamics of the modern campus as a prelude to its conclusions that more professors of a different academic orientation, specifically those believing in marxist approaches, should be hired and that students should be placed on committees charged with hiring and firing professors. To date the only reaction to the brief has been on the part of a number of individual professors who have gone so far as to corner individuals involved and threaten forceful center-actions, to openly criticize the brief in classes without disclosing its entire con tents and even to misinform classes to the extent of telling them the radicals have threatened to close the university down if the brief is not accepted. All of this seems quite unusual since the brief calls only for representative participation from students and that the university recognise, particularly in arts, that it has a responsibility to educate people to all alternatives. Especially in the case of philosophies that large portions of the world either live under or believe they live under.

ing and critical function. As Marcuse suggests by way of example, “Thesis: we work for peace; antithesis: we prepare for war (or even we wage war); unification of opposites: preparing for war is working for peace?’ It is all part of a one-dimensional universe of discourse; a universe where the weather and a murder can be described in the same passive manner by a newscaster and accepted in the same way by any ‘citizen. We are faced with an ethic of objectivity on the one hand, and a practice of domination on the other. The ethic of objectivity contains the core freedoms: speech, assembly, press, etc..The practice of interest (read class) domination prevents the translation of these core freedoms into social forces. Assume that we utilize our core freedoms to construct a world view. Assume further that our analysis leads us to expose certain contradictions inherent in the operation of our society, and our world. If our core freedoms are to be meaningful, that is, relevant to our lives, we must be able to transform our analysis into a practical instrument of social change. As long as our freedoms remain abstract, they are simply academic. 1 Therefore the whole question of basic freedom (in a bourgeois context) is a complete mystification. In a recent publication, Stanley Gray,

-university

Dissatisfaction with the present state of the university has led a number of students, and now faculty and even administration to seek alternatives. To date. the alternative has usually taken the form of a free college, an ‘autonomous school with democratic government, student centered teaching methods and a minimum of structure. The subject matter studied is chosen by students who are not required to adhere to standardized professional programmes or to recognized conventional divisions between disciplines.

(a victim of our core freedoms). and a political scientist from McGill University, asserted “The bulk of the research done in Canadian and American universities is done in the service of corporations and government agencies. University economists and engineers don’t usually spend their time working for trade unions or the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam, or the Red Power Movement. And the reason again is that corporations and their subservient governments are the major powerholders and sources of funds in capitalist societies. In all Canadian universities, boards of governors and their appointed administrations are dominated by members of the corporate elite, which is one of the reasons that they will never accede to basic democratization. Should the students and faculty ever assume power they may decide to orient the university towards other groups and classes in the society than those which the university now serves. ” Gray goes on to assert that the “oft-used cliches of a community of scholars or institutional neutrality are nothing but mystifications, masking the substantial contributions modern universities make to the ruling interests in the society. Universities are thus politically committed in various ways to specific groups in a conflict-ridden world, whether this political contribution is explicit or impli-

We have examples of the free school in the Everdale Place, at the public and secondary school level ; Rochdale College, at the university level; and now there is a proposal before the Senate to sponsor such an experiment, the College of Integrated Studies, at this university. It is our contention that such experiments are not alternatives nor are they free. We will offer instead the concept of the ‘critical university’. Universities perform certain functions of socialization and control in society, and provide in addition research services. The universities that are supported by the government and business are designed to operate to the advantage of ruling interests and which consequently offer training to students which will allow them to “succeed” in the society which they control. Hence, the existing university trains intellectually and technically skilled productive and superstructual workers who do research for corporations, government, and the military, and socializes the student into ‘bourgeois’ patterns of behavior and thought. A qualitatively different kind of education must therefore be such that it serves qualitatively different needs, and hence must b-e formulated as part of the strategy for social change. Free colleges (the College of Integrated Studies being no exception) do not come to grips with issues of social change, and are in fact a means of increased domination. The free college incorporates alterations of form but fails to deal with the much more important problem of content. As indicated in the previous section, the content of our studies, the very truths and conceptual tools we learn are in themselves anti-democratic and serve to ,perpetuate the ideology of the ruling class. A democratically structured institution that teaches anti-democratic material is no more free than the conventional university, and in fact the illusion of freedom presented by this form only strengthens the oppression by rendering it more palatable and more obscure. People learn patterns of behaviour and a world view from their experience of the structures in which they live, but it is the theories, the concepts which may be learned from the content which makes it possible to understand, critically analyse and transcend the given to achieve qualitatively different things. People cannot be free without this critical ability, and the suppression of it is the most advanced form of domination, for it is the supression and even obliteration of mind itself. Unless we address ourselves to the problem of content when we consider alternatives, it will fall by default to status-quo ideology. In bringing about social change, the criticisms and new perspectives we have must be applied to re-directing social forms in their historical movement. The free college is ill-suited to accomplish this, for it is a . utopian experiment divorced from historical and social realities. It arises out of the ‘do-your-own-thing’ philosophy which cannot generate collective action to redirect social forces towards broad fundamental changes. Instead it * continued frida y, march

on next

page

7, 1969 (9: 46)

845

7


assumes that people can be liberated in themselves, in isolation from the forces of society. Indeed, it perceives freedom as extricating oneself from those forces. Moreover, it assumes that such liberation is an individual process, a matter of personal preference. The College of Integrated Studies brief calls for an alternative learning situation for the dissatisfied minority, statingthat the majority of students are well served by the conventional practices. With this we must emphatically disagree; it is the interest of capital that is well served.

The community

We do not deny the diversification of interests, but believe that the freedom to enjoy them can only be realized when people understand and act together for the basic common interests that they have. By dividing students who seek alternatives, from those who do not by isolating them and giving them an autonomous institution, whose autonomy and whose very difference will become an interest to defend, the College of Integrated Studies will weaken rather than hasten the process of reform. It is argued that the free college influences social change by being an example and a place of relatively unrestricted This is not so, for by experimentation. being island utopias, ‘they are artificial constructs divorced from real historical processes, and are therefore no example at all. Men make their world in society and through history on the basis of shared experiences and aspirations. Yet between the free college and the mainstream insti-* tution, there is no ground of shared experience and common struggle. Without common struggle among people in the mainstream, the only remaining possibility is that those- who hold power might be persuaded to change things. That they would introduce a radical change which runs against their ruling class interest is highly improbable. Even in the unlikely event that the powers-that-be were to adopt qualitative change on the basis of experiment, it could result in a formal and superficial reform which once again would deny the people affected by it the ability to make their own world. There are other criticisms of the College of Integrated Studies approach, but the central points having been covered, we will turn to our alternative-the critical university. As we pointed out the university serves the ruling interests in society. TO free education from the domination of capital, we .must reorient the entire operation of the university itself, an activity which we must recognize as being political. ’ I-Ierbert Marcuse in his essay “Repressive Tolerance”, states: “Where the mind has become the subject-object of politics intellectual autonomy, the arid policies, realm of ‘pure thought’, has become a matter of political education (or rather: counter education). This means that previously neutral, :v;ilue-free, formal aspects of learning and now become on their- own @aching grounds and in their own right political: learning to know the facts the whole truth and to comprehend it is radical, ‘criticism throughout, intellectual subversion. ”

8

846 the Chevron

With their own kind they seem )O ENJOY themselves IMMENSELY... dancing (got a lotta rhythm!)... wearing gaudy clothes! We TEACHERS say if you could be a STUDENT just ONE Saturday night you’d NEVER want

Of all these, the content is the most important, and the element upon which we must take action now. It can be seen that the critical university concept is not so much a recommendation for immediate implementation. (much of it will be impossible until there are radical changes in society) but it is a directiion that the university must take and it must begin with the introduction of critical content.

concept

There is inherent in this approach a denial that there is a commonality of interests. Instead there is a subordinatiofi Of common concerns to particular interests. This focus upon particular interests, on local control of one’s own community and place of work, on one’s own trade or profession, has long been used by employers to divide workers among themselves and to facilitate their exploitation: it was tised by Mussolini and Hitler to fragment their countries and take dictatorial control; it was used by the proto-fascist Wallace to perpetuate racism; it is being used to divide white workers and black workers in the U.S., to prevent them from allying against their common oppressors.

The critical university organization committed

Rrstly, let me say someof my BESf friends are STUDENTS and BASICALLY yxw couldn’t WISH to meet a more POLITE, RESPECTFUL, HAPPY lot when they know their place. Why some of ‘em are even qui to

Now I’ve HEAR0 all thts NONSENSE about the STUDENT os Q NIGGER! About ‘em having no rights and no protection and so-coiled studentteacher SEGREGATION ard l just ‘dent to get a few blasted things STRAIGHT I- I mean I guer, I KNOW my STUDENTS I

is therefore an to radical social

But GOSH DARN it some folks talk &out ‘em like they were US I And FACE it, what contribution are they mdting to the ARTS? How many DOCTORS, LAWYERS and BUSINE!SS LEADERS are STUDENTS? Biologically they’re iust not EQUIPPED to handle FREEOOM and POWERI HowIenvytheanl

So these OUTilDERS who try to STIR ‘EM UP over RIGHTS and such are just making TROUBLE for EVERYBOOYI First thing they’ll want to write on every line and use staff w&rooms and calI us by our FIRST NAMES I And brother, there’s NO-

,

students, but of parity representation and veto power. In the selection of the curriculum and the hiring and firing of faculty, or the admission and evaluation of students. students must similarly gain at least parity veto power. . The critical university cannot exist as an island of radical activity in a society whose only goal is its own preservation. The present university is attached to corporate interests; the critical university must ally itself with the oppressed of society, the working class and its organizations.

And just between us would v want one tomanypwcbghter?’

Classroom HIPS

change. The most essential change must be the introduction of content which provides the conceptual tools for formulating criticisms of the given society, and for restoring the freedom of intellect. If academic freedom is to mean more than license for exploitation by corporate interests, new areas of thought must be added to the curriculum.

Andther

point

of view

At present an entire tradition of critical thought, a whole world view is almost totally ignored in our studies, namely Marxism and its variations. Indeed, there is no one in this university who can competently teach Marxist theory in any of the humanities and the social sciences. It 1s imperative that such persons be hired.

The following are ectly from the brief.

us. ~nar k&or,

Hich,

In addition to course content, there is the field of research. At present, research grants are available for research for corporations, for government and for thesmilitary. Research into the problems of poverty, racism and other “social disorders” is done with the intention of control; that is dealing with disorders such that the stability necessary to the continuing hegemony of capitalism is assured. Funds must therefore be made available to groups such as labour unions, radical political organizations, etc. who require research work. The structure surrounding such pursuits Faculty must also undergo changes. members and students must be freed from corporate pressures by the replacement of corporate. interests on governing bodies by representatives of the presently powerless working class, and by granting, not merely of participation in the governing structures by faculty and

REQUESTS a list of requests

that

follow

dir-

1. The hiring of ten Marxists (as opposed to Marxologists) for the academic year 1969-70. Furthermore, plans should be made for the hiring of more in the coming years. 2. Furids should be made available to the marxists seminars for their social Praxis -(practical-criti_cal action). 3. Creation of a committee for hiring and firing 4. Parity representation and veto power on all committees. , 5. A. tenfold increase in radical library acquisitions. 6. Complete auditing rights for non-registered students.

alienation

There is a contradiction between work required as an exercise and meaningful work (work that people can relate to the totality of their lives 1. Formal education seems to tell the student not to bring his life into the classroom, and similarly. formal education refuses to enter into the life of the student. It is understood by most people that students find it difficult to relate experience of the classroom to their own lives. The students perceive this disorder as laziness. inability or lack of dedication on their part. Even when the student can express his frustration as a particular problem (i.e. irrelevant course work, a poor professor, etc.) often an attempt is made to neutralize this criticism by saying the problem lies solely within the psyche of the student. In the opinion of the authorities “the student is alienated because he’s alienated because he’s alienated.. ..“. ’ We have at this university student societies and unions in all faculties. the departmental unions being especially prevalent in the arts faculty. Both the societies and the departmental unions exist supposedly to protect and to further the student interest; however, before we can point to these organizations as an example of increasing student involvement in decision-making, we must compare what they do with what is meaningful (and hence what they ought to do). The societies are concerned almost exclusively with social events and supplying funds to the course unions, and clubs. These organizations use nearly all their resources and devote mbst of their time in field trips and in paying speakers to come here from outside the university as guest lecturers. When work on education in the university is done, it is concerned with changing the structure, not the content of education. The same ideological underpinning of our society underlies the ideological nature of the courses and the structure of the university. It is this fact that is commonly overlooked-that is, the ideology directs the structure and not the other way around. Unless the course unions address themselves to the problem of ideology in the university and the resulting conflict!. of real interest which exist, the course unions will continue to be irrelevant to any sound strategy for change.

Written and submitted on behalf of the Radical Student Movement by Rod Hay, Cyril Levitt, Tom Patterson, John Stafford, alId Audy Stanley.

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A proposal to increase the acquisitions budget from 2.65 to 3 percent of the total university budget was passed by the library committee recently. According to present projections, this will allow a book budget of $806,000, an increase of $174,000 over this year. Ron Trbovich, student council representative on the library committee, called the move “totally unacceptable” saying it will do little to relieve the emergency situation now existing. The decision came to a meeting held to decide what recommendation would be forwarded to the budgets committee of the university, which is presently meeting to set next year’s budget. The chairman of, the committee, interim administration president Howard Petch, pointed out recent cuts in the library budget are in line with what has occurred at other universities. “Provincial grants are tightening up,” he said, “all universities are down from two years ago. ” Throughout the meeting he emphasized the financial squeeze originating with the government, reporting that Queen’s Park has said it will not release any more funds for library building. “The Chevron reported that the BIU’s (basic income units) will increase by 4.8 percent. I don’t know where they got it, but it’s a very good figure.”

He called the increase “insignificant”. Trbovich favored a 10 percent allocation off the top of the university budget. At present, library acquisitions come from the faculty budgets and each faculty decides how much it will spend on books. Trbovich moved that the library budget now be a sum taken off the top of the university budget. He contended that this would give a higher priority to the library. “Who decides priorities?” said Prof. Hahn. ‘.This is what a dean is for.” Other members argued that some areas, such as certain operations and faculty salaries, had to be taken off the top or fixed in advance, but that to do so with library would be to introduce unnecessary rigidity. “Library needs now come after faculty and a number of other things,” said Trbovich, “we‘ve had enough of this”. Chief librarian Doris Lewis favored the proposal to take the library budget off the top of the university’s grant. Pointing out the academic program grows faster than the library, she said some firm basis was necessary. However, Trbovich’s motion was defeated 9-7. Hahn’s proposal that the budget for acquisitions be 3 percent of the university budget, an idea that originated with Howard Petch, was then dealt with.

Under this system. acquisitions would still come from faculty budgets. but they would be compelled to contribute enough to bring the total to 3 percent. Lewis expressed agreement with the amount. saying that given the facilities available. $800 thousand worth of books would be the “peak of what we could handle.” , Every time books are added to the library, study space is decreased. The recommended minimum proportion of study seats in the library is 25 percent-one seat for every four students. At present, the capacity of the arts library is about 15 percent. There is little likelihood that the administration offices which now spaciously occupy nearly five floors of the arts library can be moved to an administration building in the near future. Tightening of government financing has delayed the construction of the new building which the university hoped to have by 1971. Hahn’s motion for the increase from 2.65 to 3 percent carried without opposition with Trbovich abstaining. . “This change isn’t progressive at all,” said Trbovich. “It leaves the library budget in the hands of the deans and does not give enough priority to books. It brings our budget more into line with other universities, but much more is needed in our understocked and overcrowded library.”

a n a

A three week experiment in free university environment at

;

ROCHDALE COLLEGE MAY 18-31 1969

7

DOWN’

Discussing

*THIRD WORLD PROBLEMS *ANALYSIS OF IMPERIALISM *FUTURE ENVIRONMENT OF MAN

Making considerable use of both the surrounding city and arts facilities, COUNTDOWN will b ring people together to confront vital issues of our industrial society; new patterns of thought and action; new awareness of self-analysis and-new means of establishing international student programs. cuso,

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ANYONE EXPENSES

ALL

OF

MAY APPLY TO WILL BE PAID.

EXTERNAL

ATTEND.

RELA?‘IONS

of Students

frida y, march

7, 1969 (9:46)

847

9

.


CITY HOTEL presents DINE

Beautiful Dreamer, The Mormon Well-41 begin, inhaling my classical-blues-folk bias )-if there are any Beautiful Dreamers around, they are probably engineers who think this university belongs to them. So, if you’re in the market for Beautiful Dreamers, go to the plumbers’ coffee shop-certainly don’t go looking for the Columbia album by that name. Now, not to denegate the technical excellence of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, I must point out that their new album of old Stephen 6‘Camptown Races” Foster epistles has all the appeal of an afternoon spent standing in a sweaty high-school choir waiting to perform at some foosty, creaky-f loored. wall-peeling Municipal Hall (circa 1850) for a bespectacled, buck-toothed, slightly

& DANCE

IN THE

Tabernacle Choir, Columbia balding Adjudicator with baggy pants and a Queen Victoria disposition (“We are NOT amused” ). Complete with cover photo of an irrelevant virgin staring into the irrelevant haze of irrelevant Foster meanderings, this album is certainly a must for Maudie Fricker or John Diefenbaker but somehow, I cant see the boys in Vietnam or the kids in Biafra grooving on the lilting. sweet “do0-doe” goodiness of Hard Times,

Come

/Igain

No

ENTERTAINMENT

NIGHTLY

More.

But if you, yourself, are a dreamer and can believe in the anachronism of perpetuating the Foster-American Myth in today’s somewhat more down-to-earth and self-criticising world, then by all means, Beautiful Dreamers is for you. Personally, I’d advise shoving it.

An Open

Letter

To All Students

Release the Sunshine by The Folklords, Release

the Sunshine promFolklords a long suc-

ises the cessful stay on the folk-rock scene. With a mixture of excellent and a solid instrumentation traditional folk background, the Folklords come across very tenderly. Tom Martin and Paul Seip carry a very strong vocal lead, with Martha Johnson bursting in only ‘one into prominence number, Forty Second Rtver, a new approach to the ever popular wanderer theme. We could use more of her folk alto. However, her most important contribution is the autoharp, the group’s unique instrumental background. A-

Quality long with guitars and drums, it unites a beautiful performance. Jennifer Lee was their most typical number, with a folk theme, refrain, light style, and male lead. Child is a slight variation of their style: it’s a song about a man’s desire to have his own child and it -has much more urgency and solidity than any other number. An unfortunate aberration from the trend was Suzanne Marie. The romantic theme was pushed too hard, and forced up memories of Peter and Gordon. Generally a very good folk album, the delicate style could get monotonous after twelve songs.

Dean Martin’s Greatest Hits, Reprise There are certainly a lot of familiar songs on Dean Martin’s Greatest Hits. Perhaps it’s their familiarity that’s at fault. Maybe I’ve heard them so often, I just don’t feel anything when I hear them anymore. Or maybe it’s because of Dino’s images: a sort of lecherous old playboy soloing yet another dumb blonde into bed. Not

that

1 have

anything

against

the finale, but the feeling of making love tends to be somewhat sublimated in the impersonal atmosphere of a dozen screeching

10

848 the Chevron

violins, soprano in a

an unreal harmony of voices, and some guy tuxedo moaning about “Every minute, every hour.” Idealism is great, but when you try to put it into the world, it just doesn’t click. Besides, a little honest sympathy makes reality look a whole lot better than some dream world, especially when that dream I world is a foil for ignoring realities. Come down to earth, Dino; you can’t communicate with your head in the clouds.

loving

At an extraordinary general meeting of the Federation of Students on March 3, 1969, a mo.tion of non-confidence in the President of the Federation of Students, John Bergsma, was passed by a vote of 148 for, 142 against. This same motion was then presented at a ular meeting of Students’ Council later same evening. At this time the motion of confidence in President John Bergsma defeated six for, seventeen against and abstention.

regthat nonwas one

In the light of the substantial majority support given me in Students’ Council I, John Bergsma, will not consider resigning as President of the Federation of Students and wjll carry on with presidential duties. This is a critical period in Council operations in that a budget must be negotiations are being carried brought down; on regarding university government; and serious work must be started in the search for a new president for this university. John Bergsma President Federation of Students

-


I-Theater

Henry, played by O’Tool keeps Elanor, played by Hepburn, locked in Salisburn tower except for when “I get dragged out for holidays and state occasions.” Here she gets to come home for Christmas.

Lion in Winter I really don’t know what to say about this movie except that it’s great and don’t miss it. I have tried five different approaches to writing a review about it but each one flops because it is impossible to convey in a few words the emotion and strength of the Lion in Winter. Katherine Hepburn and Peter O’Toole star in it as Henry 11 of England and his wife Eleanore. They each give what is one of their best, if not their best, performances ever. Henry is torn between his wife whom he loves intensely but wars with constantly, and his mistress Alais, sister to the king of France. He keeps Eleanor

Minsky’s

Hepburn tortures O’Tool with her insistance that she slept with his father. They seem to love to hurt each other yet by doing this they only hurt themselves.

The road

runner

by Louis Silcox Chevron

staff

All you oldies will be happy to learn of the return of the world famous Roadrunner series is soon to reappear at Uniwat. Also showing will be the triple Academy award winning, all-star movie, HOW The West Was Won. The proceeds of the function will be sent to the Georgia Straight, one of the best “art” newspapers on the continent. Roadrunner will be interesting to Uniwat for one of two reasons. One, not likely is the slapstick humour. More probably we will all be interested in the rampant sex exploitation of the films. Syndicated journalist, Robert A. Fisher has said, “the consistent sequence throughout the film is that of Wile E. Coyote chasing headfirst after Roadrunner. You will note first that the roadrunner is the classic example of the nubile young virgin: long skinny legs, minimal chest, everpleasant smile. The coyote follows as the lecher: narrowed gleaming eyes and long phallic nose. Soon he will reveal his nature as the frustrated engineering type, showing the brutality of the rapist rather than the subtlety of the seducer. ” All sorts of plans, schemes and conveniences are devised by hairy beast in his womb-like den. Throughout the seven cartoons, he will be seen to employ what appear to be innocent apparatus of capture: roadrunner will survive a trip through a guillotine, but the coyote will suffer a gash on his (phallic)

a h/e

MINSKY’s is a mediocre movie. What plot there is, rests only on character conflicts which are rather hackneyed and poorly developed. It’s weak at best. The long scenes from burlesque shows, although authentic in style and brazenly bubbling with bosomy broads (actually rather revoltingly slovenly, fat broads) are hardly enough to hold our attention between the sea ttered segments of the plot. Oh, there are other things, such as Rachel’s (Britt Ekland) not-

overpowering

locked up in Salisbury tower and the movie takes place at one of The main conflict is between Henry’s wanting his son John to take his throne, and Eleanore’s her few times home. Christmas. fierce and scheming insistence that Richard (later known as the Lionheart) should succeed Henry. In addition, the third son, Geoffrey, plots to gain the throne. But the main conflict is not really in the ideas but in the personalities and emotions of the characters involved. This is what makes the movie great. It is this tension, constantly threatening to break,

destroying many or all of the characters, that emotionally exhausts the audience. Yet, at the end of the movie the situation is exactly what it was at the beginning. The tension lieved !

is never

really

re-

The playwright, James Goldman, and director, Anthony Harvey, have infused the film with a sense of life and the love of it that is rarely done on the screen. I can’t help it if I can’t write a review, as such, of this film. It is just more than I could do to do it justice. See it and you’ll know what I mean.

too artificia/

so-unwilling but unconvincingly naive seduction by a stage comedian-viflian type who later turns good. I found the best sequences to be those on the street recreated from the twenties. Filled with shots of people-people haggling, people people being people-these scenes are warm and lively, entertaining even. Screened images and switching from silent-movie-black-and-white

eating,

to fix up what is essentially film.

a poor

But its not really a bad movie, not offensive or lousy. Just dull. An Amish farm girl runs away from home to dance in a chorus line in New York in 7925. There she finds Minsk y’s burlesque house. Her angered and super-religious father comes to retrieve her and in defiance of his opposition to her ‘brispla ying her protruberances”,

philoso nose, rocket whoosh from his back pack, and membranous screens of scenery attract, (he thinks) roadrunner over cliffs. However coyote will not survive, and will plunge into the abyss of orgasm. In the next scene he will appear broken, exhausted, and very unable to proceed without rest. Ultimately, capture in principle is waived, and the pursuant now attempts destruction of his love-object. Dynamite loaded decoys backfire. A very sexy she-wolf is returned and upon embrace (note this) explodes dressing Coyote in the customary black. Another aspect that reflects on the engineering parts of the campus is the scarcity of food, and wildlife in the desert scenes. How many women are there in the engineering halls? I am sure some parallel is apparent to even the artsmen who are without such deprivation. Out of the several stars of the main feature, How The West Was Won, only a few are female. This is one of the reasons it was chosen as a companion feature. To compare the seemingly unfounded socio-political comment of the cartoons with the real life situation. After all the coyote does depend on his technical rather than mental abilities in his attempted captures. Is this a major fault of the engineering profession ? I don’t think so. But what do you think? You can not say until you have seen the series with this in mind. Showings are friday pnd saturday, marches 14, 15 in AL113, probably twice each night. The cause is worthwhile; so are the films; so is my serious debate on the blatant sexuality.

O’Tool does his thing with Jane Neway, his mistress as Hepburn, out of her cage, watches (and learns?) friday,

march

7, 7969 (9:46)

849

11


.

,-Theater Juciues

by Ray Kahnert Chevron staff L

Brel lives!...in

Ray Kahnert is a Toronto based actor currently doing film work in an advisory capacity for the C.B.C. When we asked him to review Jacques Brel, he said, “Jacques Brel? What’s that?”

Without a doubt, one of the most imaginative and beautifully fresh musicals to invade the ever-widening drama scene is indeed “J.B.I.A.A.W.A.L.I.P.” Currently enjoying well-deserved success “Jacques Brel etc. ” in Toronto, only further proves live theatre IS. It promises an evening of involvement ; number after nurnber : (one is clear to you, when another hits you, and the mind is away). To those who know little or nothing of Brel the man, let him only hear the songs, or read the

poems of this unbelievable “vivant”. The Belgian-born Brel, a relative unknown to North American audiences up until a short time ago, has strived to envision man as the truly inconsistent creature he is struggling to live each day without problems, or at least, without sight of his problems. Pess imistic, yet hopeful ; humourous, yet thought-provoking; silly, yet frightening; this is Jacques Bre/ is Alive Paris.

Cast of Jacques Brel, Toronto’s

Ensemble ’

It was a nice evening so perhaps everyone was out enjoying the fresh air; or perhaps they were watching TV; or perhaps there was something interesting to do, like pubbing ; or perhaps they were at the campus dance. Oh yes, the dance. Once again a creative arts production found itself scheduled activity alongside a campus (you might recall other instances of this e.g., Tony Martingro and once again excellent musicians walked onto our stage to face a meagre audience of less than a hundred people. There is no apparent reason for scheduling dances on nights which have been designated as concert nights a year ahead of time; it shows a kind of bumbling attitude and a false belief that the people who go to dances do not go to concerts; that is not true and not quite the point any,way. The point is that these scheduling manoeuvres typify the cultural

12

850 the Chevron

Well

and

Living

in

current hit musical.

performance

by Jean Wallace Chevron staff

and

immaturity of the people around here. Why, when some of the world’s best music is performed in the centre of campus, does only a group of people not much larger than a full trolley-load come out to hear it? Beer is not free, hockey games are not free, FASS nights are not free, dances are not free; but many concerts are free and the ones which are not are reasonSo the claim that ably priced. concerts are too expensive does not cut any ice. One can only surmise that people are not interested in music. But it is, after all, the university people who raise a constant litany about the alleged cultural impoverishment of the Twin Cities; there is nothing in the K-W area but German sausage, beer, buggies, and an occasional movie. So creative arts imports artists from Paris, New York, Montreal, etc., gives the stage to student musicians who perform throughout the year, and less than a hundred people attend the concerts. The rest, after clamouring for culture,

us At first glance, the extraordinary set design gave me an impression of a Paris sewer; mysterious, dark passageways, limitedly awesome, and yet fresh and clean, something I later impressionistically thought as man at creation. Lighting was wierdly played on the revolutionary “flats”, and the accompanying overture in semidarkness created the mood masterfully. Slowly a lone spot reveals the form of a man; seconds later the stage is alive with activity; lights, sound, movement; the four cast members begin to mold themselves man. Jacques Brel says “if we leave it to them, they’ll color the world the color of gooseshit”) weird was my first irrational opinion. Then, as the story progressed, it became so unbelievably complete. The set was no longer a sewer but the mind of man-his essence, his being; man and love, man and loneliness, man’s fear of rejection, his mockery of death-collectively, man in society. The quite varied musical selections were successfully linked into a strange, simple continuity; and the cast presented them flawlessly. It is most obvious that no enthusiasm has been lost during the three ‘month winning engagement. They approach every performance with the vitality of the first, and undoubtedly will continue. The power of Stan Porter the rhythm of Arlene Meadows, the gusto of Bob Jeffrey and the aliveness of Judy Lander combined superbly in such numbers as Marathon, Madelaine, Despera te Ones, and the hauntingly beautiful finale lf we only have Love. Individually, they proved just as capable. Judy Lander, with a voice much like Judy Collins or Mary Hopkins, gives us a very unique story. Marieke, in variations of French, English and German. Choosing one that struck me as the most powerfully revealing, it would have to be The Statueso subtle, yet definitely man’s rejection of his creator. Before the portrait is completed, the audience might well assume from the works of Jacques Brel, that man’s fate has been sealed for doom. But his last word? Love -only then will tomorrow dawn”.

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excellent are out enjoying Kitchener-Waterloo and the very beer and sausage they so openly abhor. But about the concert. Four singers from the Metropolitan Opera Studio Ensemble, Cynthia Barnett, Ivanka Myhal, Grant Spradling, and Jonathan Cromwell, accompanied by Jonathan Dudley on piano, presented a tripartite programme; parts I and II consisted of Shakespeare in opera and art song, and part II was given to musical comedy. The Shakespearean numbers were taken from The Merry Wives of Windsor, Othello., Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, The Taming of the Shrew, The Tempest, As You Like It, Two Gentlemen From Verona, Twelfth Night, Cymbeline, and Henry VIII. The singing was impressive.and all four members of the Ensemble handled the dramatic content well. The Studio Ensemble consists of young singers whose ambition it is to have a career in opera. Judging from the audience reaction on Friday night, the ensemble did a tremendous job.

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I-Books Rhys, Jean Wide Sargasso Sea Middlesex, England, Penguin Books Ltd. Copyright 1966 156~~. Paperback edition. In the Jamacia of the 1830’s a Creole widow, with a dark complexion, inherits a large estate from her late husband, a wealthy Englishman. She is of mixed racial background. Her name is Annette. She speaks English, French and Patois. Annette is ostracized by the white community and is despised by the black ‘emancipated servants on the estate. Alone, she must struggle for subsistence and grapple with. her fate. with no consolation from an invalid son and a queer young daughter. This is the setting for a fantastic tale of tragedy and misfortune.

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This volume about contract bridge bidding is actually two complete books published under one cover. The first part of the volume explains the new Roth point-count system for the evaluation of a hand and the second part presents the Roth approach to bidding. Roth point-count system uses the standard 4-3-2-l point count for counting high-card and distribution points of a hand but the important part of this new system

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Unfortunate events come swiftly into Annette’s life. With her house burned, she leaves the estate while her family’s lives are being threatened. She-escapes successfully only to find her son has died from burns. She becomes despondent, loses her will to live, and finally accepts death in misery. Antoinette, her daughter is the only survivor. What is Antoinette’s fate? You will have to read the book to find out. Although the characters in this novel are appropriate to the 19th century, the problems of race prejudice, violence, destruction and, mental illness are very much a part of our existence in 1969. Therefore. this novel can present to this generation, situations in life which are relevant to our times. Recommended.

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Well its been a while since I sat right down with the intention of writing my little column for all you dear friends of mine up at the, what do you call it, Uniwat? Well anyway, its been so long I have to think of something to say. You all know I never just ramble on and on and on. Goodness no! That would never do.

Parson Brown says that if you have something to say, say it and be done. To hear his sermons on a Sunday morning, you’d think he never even listened to himself, even when he was telling others how to say things, ‘cause boy does he carry on some. The only person I heared carry on more was them group of people who was raising all the fuss about the bail loan. I remember when I got sent up for three days once for having my still so smelly, my neighbor’s chickens wouldn’t lay.

~ $,fydy

Chevron staff

is that a hand is re-evaluated as the action proceeds. The system promotes the value of a hand (adds points) when partner bids one of your long suits but demotes the hand if partner bids one of your short suits. This leads to a more accurate evaluation of a hand. The Roth approach to bidding is an up-dated version of the RothStone system which was published a number of years ago by Roth with J. Stone. The approach presented includes opening strong notrumps (16-18 HCP) with five card major suit openings and the use of a forcing one notrump response to a major suit opening. This approach is designed for duplicate bridge but could be adopted by a (partnership for rubber bridge. An outstanding feature of this book is the numerous quizzes

ship.

II ~~~~~~ ,I I/

by Wayne Smith

Review

(with full explanations) presented after each chapter or section to ensure that the reader has a full understanding of the ideas presented. A summary after each chapter provides the reader with a handy reference to look back at. After reading the book. which takes a considerable length of time because of the amount of material presented, you may decide to adopt the methods presented or to continue with the methods that you now use. In either case, the ideas presented will improve your bridge game because it will allow you to re-consider your methods and also help you to evaluate hands more accurate. For. these reasons I recommend this book to all duplicate bridge players and all other bridge players who desire to improve their bridge game.

film festival screenplay by George Wells. After the winning films have been selected, prints will be circulated to colleges and universities throughout the States. This will provide an opportunity for viewing and study of the best in college films and for expanding a young director’s audience. The first screening of winning films will be at Philharmonic Hall of Lincoln Center in New York City on April 6. Application forms and information are available from the Chevron entertainment editor in the Campus Center.

Black, director of Pretty Poison, will select one of the winners to work closely with him in all phases of his new feature, Run, Shadow, Run. The winner will be involved in pre-production planning, studio and location shooting. and the final post-production stages of the film. Appropriately, Run, Shadow, Run is the story of a young filmmaker on a university”camius. It will be shot on location in and around Los Angeles. The film is produced by Lester Linsk;

i” Indeed

SALE

Rivard

Chevron staff

director’s

The United States National Student Association is sponsoring the Fourth National Student Film Festival. The deadline is March 17 for films made by college students since January 1, 1968. Films may be submitted in four categories : documentary, dramatic, experimental, and animation. The four first prize winners will receive $3000.00 each, and the four second prize winners will receive $1000.00 each. \ In addition to these awards, Twentieth Century Fox will provide a special director’s intern-

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but I don’t know what they mean by that. Anyhow it was the good judge himself who done bailed me out. I’d given him a jug early in the spring and he just hated to see an artist without her tools. Hip, hip and a round for the boys of the puck power. Maybe next year with Bob Pulford at the team’s helm, if thats the proper term, we’ll reach the promised land. Or didn’t you know Bob Pulford is coming to coach the Warriors. Its not official yet, but the boys aren’t crazy over Duke, and he’s going to teach or study for his higher degree, and they’re after Pully. So am I. I’ve sent him all my columns, and some of Fred’s pizza ads, so things are looking good. We’ll have a new football coach too, ‘cause its teach and study year for Uniwat coaches. And I guess seeings how we

rge of the village, instead o-f it just being the plain old Village, it will hereafter be known as ADDLINGTOWN. All men are requested to grow moustaches and change (?) to dirty old men. Thank you Jaques O’Brien for the lovely letter. I am sure there are thousands like you on campus, but most are afraid I’ll attack them (sexually) for writing to the lettitor. Nonsense! I don’t need that much provocation. Just come to my office on the fourth floor of the campus center. And thank you to the Village, council for obtaining De1 ShannonI remember when-,h& first talkie with Greta Garbo came out. Swoon. I don’t know if them old timers will really go over, and $4500 is a lot to pay for an old man. What’s wrong with Omar Sharif, besides his funny eyes. Come to think about it his eyes aren’t funny at all. Not when he!

e4 friday,

march

7, 1969*(;9:46)

t.85 7 l-3


4

/

_

The university drama company is at it again. During the coming week actors. directors, and technicians will combine forces to’present a week-long Festival of Noon Drama. The arts theater will be the setting for five student-directed one-act plays ranging from Chekhov to the newest offering by a UniWat student. + The first play will be Ferryboat by Leonard Melfi, directed by 9 Judy Dunlop. It involves a young man trying to communicate with 4 the girl -on the Staten Island ferryboat. When the boat is almost 4 ready to pull into the docks she finally reacts, coolly insulting him. 4+ He lashes back by finally being as honest as possible, and in doing + so discovers that this is the only way he could have corn-municated with her inthe first place. - 4 + Tuesday’s play will be a world premiere of a new play by Gerald W. + Parowinchak, Out pf the grass and into the morning glorious. This + hauntingly beautiful picture of Mary, Madonna of the-streets will be + directed by its author and promises to furnish some of the most 4 interestingtheater of the year. 4 The swindle, Wednesday’s modern one-act, offers wry humor with 4 a hero about to be hanged, who is introduced to the benevolence of +4‘the state in the form of fried chicken and a pretty prostitute sent to help him while away his remaining hours pleasantly. 4 + Jules Feiffer, author of Crawling Ainold, has written a hilarious, perceptive spoof of modern society and its hang-ups. Concerned with + e a young man in- his thirties who has regressed to crawling on all fours in order to be more attractive and conspicuous, the play pokes e fun both at the maladjustments of our times and the fumbling hope: fulness with which we so often try to cope with them. Patricia Connor 4 directs, 4+ Friday’s play, The Swan Song, written by Anton Chekhov, will be directed by Joseph Anthony. It is the story of an old actor, famous for his comic roles, who dreams of having been successful in tragedy. t + All of the plays will be’presented at 12: 15 p.m. with the exception of ’ * Crawling Arnold which will be presented on thursday at 1: 15 p.m.. , Admission for-the entire festival is free. 4 4 4

Shannon’s ‘Runawdy’ comes to- the. Village

f

4 4 4 school in 1957. In 1362-1963 he was 4 _ De1 Shannon,- one of the, foremost 4 voted- the most popular male artist - singing stars of the past decade, 4 in England. is coming to the university- of Wat4. Shannon has travelled all around 4 erloo. the world playing in every major 4 Shannon’s conquests include 4 city. He has been well received three million selling records, those 4 Waterloo has realbeing Runaway,Hats Off, To :-everywhere.+ ly done something entirely out of 4 Larry. and Keep Searching. Some 4 the ordinary in having an enferof his other hits were, Little Town 4 tainerof this calibre play a-dance. Flirt and Handy Man. 4 He is known well for his easy 4 Shannon’s musical career bemanner on stage and his shows 4 gan in Grand Rapids, Michigan at are more than entertaining. the age of fourteen when he first 4 The concert-dance tonight in the 4 started playing the guitar. To the 4 amazement of most people he Village should prove to be really 4 great and we have been informed immediately began writing songs. that tickets will be sold at the 4 He cut his first major record af4 door as long as they-last. , ter he had graduated from :high i

A wage duve sounds off I’ve often An hour’s Now this For that’s

L

heard the bosses say: work for an\hour’s pay; is quite all right with me,, the way it ought to be.

4 4 4 4

$

But the amount of work that they demand Is one thing I don’t understand; It seems each day they want much moreThan what they did the day before. . And For And Th’at

-4 4. 4. 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 -4 4 ;i4 4 4

in their books it is a crime any one to have spare time, should spare time they chance to find job will somehow be “combined”.

They’re always short of help it seems, But that’s a part of all their schemes; They tell us that we have it madeWe’re “underworked” and “overpayed”. Our attitude is always at fault, And the only ones who are “worth their salt” Are those who work without complaint, And do what they’re told without restraint. If things were ever in reverse., ” You’d really hear them bosses curse, Cause one thing’ssure,they’d never do The work they expect of me and you.2 \

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THE FACTS!

4

4 Who broke the monopoly of the Toronto rental price fix? ’ . Our original ‘quote to the Grad Ball Committee contained in our letter to $ them of January 11th. in which we quoted the price of $14.29, after which the 4 committee went to Toronto with this price of ours, that’s what broke the Tor- $ onto price fix. Tuxedo Junction did not ‘break our price, they just matched it. 4 After two years of our store giving the Grad Ball Committee excellent service 4 this year’s committee was willing to turn their backs -on this proven service 4 and lower price to gamble on’ the unknown service of a Toronto firm, sixty-five 44 miles from this campus, who just matched our price. 4 As for the inconvenience that this Toronto firm is ‘going to cause due to the $ fact that they will have to measure for the formal rentals at specific times on 4 campus when we can measure at our store at the convenience and leisure of 4 the grads over the- next two months, which sounds more convenient? If there 4 had been any indication to me that the committee would like some of the $ grads, who find it not convenient to drop in to our store over the next several 4 weeks, measured ‘on campus, we would have arranged for on the campus mea- ‘: suring. 4 Also, our letter of January 11th to the committee outlined that we would 4 set up a room at the Royal York, prior and during the Grad Ball, where anyone 4 who found it not convenient to pick up their garment in Waterloo could do so. $ Also, this room could be used to change into the tails if necessary. This room 4 would have been retained .until Sunday so that the grads could return the $ garments if so desired. 4 What more, in the name of service, could we have offered? 4 As to the supply of garments, our firm is the only firm with a large enough 4 inventory of tails to guarantee that everyone could be supplied with a first 4 class set of mohair tails. The Grad Ball Committee have been advertising 44 that- their contact would supply Warren K. Cook tails. I telephoned the Warren 4 K. Cook people and, learned that Tuxedo Junction purchased a small supply $ of tails from them two years ago. What shape would these few sets of tails be in 4 after two years of being rented outnearly every week-end? 4 We have a sample set of the mohair tai)s that we would supply in the‘ store $ for your inspection. We guarantee that we would supply the finest set of-rental 4 tails available in the district, including Toronto. Our shop has a reputation for 4 4 quality and we wouldn’t allow any deviation from this standard. Now, after’weighirig all these facts, -1. ,-our price needed no altering, our 44 first price was the lowest price. 2. - our service is proven service. 3. -our supply 4 of tails is the largest and finest quality. 4. -we are right here, in your community. $ With these facts balancing the scale heavily in our favour one would wonder 4 why th-eGrad Ball Committee decided against us. 4 I want this business. I like dealing with university-people. This is evident by $ the way in which we buy space in the Chevron, the Student Directory, and the 4 Athletic Program, as-well as supporting your university activities such as _ 4 the Frosh Queen Contest, Groundhog Days, and the Student Wives’ Club. As $ well as this I headed a team of business men to raise funds for the Tenth Anni- 4 versary Building Eund at the University of Waterloo. 4 \ I am interested’in the welfare and the progress of the university. That is why , $ I am now fighting forthis rental business with the only weapons at my disposal, 4facts and the lowest price for the finest garment available. 4 4 Ross Klopp

SPECIAL /

PRIC’ES

MliHA-IR BARATHEA -Includes

TAILS

-

TAILS +

*

s20.00

reg. rental s1 8,OO

‘-. - _ ~

.

,

4 4 4

:4

4 4 .4 4 .4 4 4 4 4 4 4

s73.33 “12.38

-

Shirt,. tie, vest and jewellry as well as coat and trouselThe above garments are on display in our store

4

-4, -4* 44 4

-

44

aRENT-ALk- i I, reg rental

4 4 4 4 4 4.

ON

-\ FORMAL

~

:.

.

.

:4 4

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.

Y

TH.E OCT&.US c Have

you

ever

i

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orders

7 am - 8 pm Tuesday 95 King

‘The

Octopus

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Sunday

thru

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Man at the center probesJapan.

You

-

Can’t a Afford

To Miss

THE NATU.RE AND PURPOsE OF TH’E UNIVERSlT~

Here we have sumo wrestlers, of religious status in Japan.

One hundred years ago, the “Black Ships” 9f the United States Navy, led by Commodore Matthew Perry, dropped anchor in Tokyo-Bay, and forced the ’ a Japanese to negotiate a trade treaty. One hundred years ago, at the age of 17, the Eniperor Meiji came to the throne, forgot that he was supposed to be just a figurehead, and made Japan endher 250 years of selfimposed isolation’and agricul tural feudalism. CBC-TV’s Man at the center moves from these two shattering events to probe the complexities of today’s Japan, one of the world’s industrial giants, in a four-part series to be seen on successive thursdays at lo:30 p.m., starting march 6, in color. Last fall, a small CBC crew led by CBC arts and sciences executive producer James Murray, spent six weeks in -Japan preparing the series, which is written by Nancy Ryley and Murray and photographed by Rudolf Kovanic. In addition to, being a thoughtful and often very beautiful exploration of the Japanese miracle, the programs are intended as a background for Expo 70, to be held in Osaka, Japan in 1970. The Japan of today-at peace after the turbulent period of wars with Russia, Germany, China and the disastrous attempt to-take on the whole Western world-is a synthesis of the loo-year struggle fo catch up with the West: a conglomerate of teeming modern cities and misty Buddhist retreats; of new world aggressiveness and old world formality; of restless, energetic people devoted to building their new society. “You have to make quite an effort to find the quiet, delicate, elegant Japan you read about,” says producer Murray. “The larger cities are vast, ‘grey and sprawling, iike ours. In 25 years, the experts say, there’ll be one uninterrupted densely packed urban strip over 300 miles long from Tokyo ’ to Osaka. “But we did see the other Japan. Our secret was

A controversial panel discussion sponsored by your groovy. Board of Education featuring (

Dr. G. Atkinson Dr. H. Crapo

(Chemistry) (Dept.

Head,

Puke Math)

-Dr. E. Holmes (Assoc. Dean of Eng.)

Dr. D. Kirk (Sociology) Ken

Mcleod

(Editor,

’ Math

Medium)

/ Tom Patterson (R.S.M.) , Chairman: lairy Etigson (Grad Council)

Mo’nday, Mar’ch LO, 8 pm .

‘.

Campus Centre&eat

Hall

” .\

1 1

- 1.jS

I-

N. Waterloo -L

-

\ ‘,

m

too!

has so many hands

RESERVEP SEATS Floor. . . . . . $3.00 Reds. r . . . . $2,50 vSBlues& G&j& !$2.()()~ . Students (any seat) $2.00

- I

tried.

PFEFFER POTTHAS on a bun FRIKA’LjELCEN on a bun? Why don’t you try these for adelicious chahge iti menu? :

&Television

Question Period Ftdlowhg

,& ,ojd lady in her old ways contrasts with modern Japan. _

The small trek feudal drama.

6&-iSd

io :get sh&s of. thi

that nobody noticed us-we were only four people, so we didn’t distrub anyone, and we were able to film things like the Emperor laying a wreath at his ’ grandfather Meiji’sLtomb; very rare film of the coronation throne; and beautiful ceremonies by Buddhist and Shinto priests. (We even hired a group of priests for a day especially to perform a I ceremony for us). ” The first program in Man at the center: Japan is Land of the Gods, which on march 6 looks briefly at 100 years of Japanese history and at the contrast of ancient and modern. Program number two-The Enduring Land is a picture of rural Japan, fishing and farming; and a family of four generations living and working together ,;-unaffected .by _,the changes in traditional society. The march 20 program looks at the breakup of the family-contrasting-an old couple in the country whose children havegone to live in the city with the young couple living in western style , commuter civilization in Tokyo. Film includes a Shinto wedding a traditional calligrapher and a modern pop artist; and a %teaceremony. ., , The final program,, march 27, called Made in Japan, looks at modern industrial technology. Japan is first in the. world in shipbuilding; second in electronics and automobile production. And finally, the program examines the left-wing student movements and demonstrations, as well as the fanatical right-wing Sokagakkai which claims 15 ‘million I followers. ’ Film editor for the Japan series is Conrad Kugler. Sound editor is Ralph Brujes. Narration is by William Whitehead. Executive producer: Lister Sinclair. ’

,


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feet

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IFTY rose

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CONSERVING PATTERNS is and specialists interaction of all

THE UNITY OF ECOLOGICAL the major concern of citizens alike, who are interested in the life forms with their environment. * * *

Who is their enemy ? Who threatens delicate natural balances in a manic create steel and concrete epitaphs? deed, are the world’s worst rapists?

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than

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1954-55,

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park

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problem.

perva-

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long-range

science”

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the

of

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biological

Department

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as

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hearing

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would

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to

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terior

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A LAWSUIT

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redwood the

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put

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would

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ecologists

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next

national

Act.

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year

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last

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controversy.

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authority

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Adapted

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*concluded

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7, 1969 (9:46)

S55

17


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we

A Programme

tons top

knows,

complex

to

On

but

one

lead

a

tons

form

Nobody

so

of

hydrocarbons

dwellers

and

you’ll enough

2000 of.

is the

take

may

unit

1000

about,

city are

RENAISSANCE

industrial

have

another

day,

air

you

pollutants

urban

oxides,

too.

if

a day most

out,

We

be disposed

most

that

of?

it is.

every

here,

is

IN JTS!W=

MEAL

pro-

the

water it?

out

sewage

it

ISA

out,

it

just

of the

day,

the

water

of

nbt

HAMBURGER

with

people

tons

Burn

to

of

million

same

air,

know

one

much

nitrogen

brew

But

its

A HARVEY’S

you

the separated

take

as

has

the

leaves

sewer,

you

that

pollution

most

cjination

of water,”

There’s-another

you

500,000

cemetery.

that

dioxide,

into

of

every

into

sulfur

technique

pour

after big

produces,

fertili-

all

“waste

method

the

problems

rush

citizens

gets

sewage).

and

aside,

The Normally,

from

Even

the

Pennsylvania

which

waste

rinse

The

unit

in

a pretty

acids;

for sand-

whose

separated

component,

wastes,

100,000

We Have LTo Be!

it

electrodialysis of

of

what

it or not,

someplace

un-

called

every

with

everything

pollution

Erie.

may

believe

should,

car-

various salts.

scale

the

dump

Bury

maining

largely

Monroe

of

Erie,

Detroit’s

Ohio

in

dredge

and

lake

treated;

Lake

streams

and

other the

put

it?

There’s

drinking,

you’ve

do

While

chemical

into in

dozen into

carefully

gallons

of

solution

After you

is not.

to

farms

pour

the

fairly

pounds

pounds the

a

Cleve-

don’t with

techniques

some

and

is that

do

it throws

a breath-

Detroit,

sewage

runoff

what

air

con-

osmosis.

problem

solid

hurt-

left

feeds

200,000

and

pickling

is

addition

zer

irrigation

people

lake.

and of

which

two

on

the

installed

being

dead.

19,000

iron;

electrodialysis

witches’

Detroit’s)

in

million

wasa

Toledo

and

of

of

River,

treated

and

virtually

of

Detroit

are

beauty,

is

it (especially

The

be

the

Sewage

glaciers.

Akron,

pour

every

there

magnificent

Erie

Buffalo,

cities

fish

is

productive

will

from

cry?”

away, Connecticut

highly

water

The

departing

Lake

land,

the towers the

where they

miles lower

they’re

reverse

do

pollution.

what

need

be

you

to

sophisticated

know

late.

A TIME

a thing

blue

shad,

of

town,

waste). on

water

lot

a method

obvious

Thoreau

when

a

There’s

(that’s

remotely

If

going

California

duces,

a pro-

Engineers

“Poor

Cooling

too

David of

fishes

in

of

considered.

Henry

hundred the on

decided

be far

be

work

.destroy

river.

keeping cost

of

a number

something.

natural

you

sizable

The

can

problem.

are

filtering.

mostly

in-

that

don’t

the

must of

what

are

called

decision:

the

the

the a

from

shrines,

wrote:

hears

approximately

shad

the

on

won

preservation

to

to who

proceedings

ago,

horror

permit

lake

another

lake,

with

(one

water

citizens

a historic

factors

bed

easily.

the

and

society,

years

sick

Ed

historic

of

one

as

there’s

the There

spawn

river

just

court,

the

affluent

up

But

the

a pollutant.

dealing

“straw”

into

as

into

spawn,

them

some

Appeals

our

of

Con

to

national

in

is only

gazed

anything

Long

to

gigantic

eggs

but

concern

of

that,

and

all

out

suck

renewed

a basic and

mind ject

it

be-

pointing from

cent

to

toy,

in hearings

Hudson

That

granted

Commission’s

clude

per

plans

King

quit

The

85

larvae

FPC

Storm

wouldn’t United

put

New

of fishermen

area.

Ed

and

pas,

up the

trail

Con

Although its

of

like

King

up

faux

beloved

something

which

build

from

Commission,

Carolina-go

Storm

through can

the

Power

bass-

to

the

visitors

strued

fore

and

“undesirable”

when

sulfur

a of

c? 0

is to

can

0L

be

PHONE 578-0110 AIRPORT’PASSENGER CHARTERED

- PARCEL COACH

AIR

EXPRESS

-

dioxide

still a difficult reality whencost. we’re we

doingpollute. I

Art Srude All Arts undergraduates who plan to take either a General or an l-lonours B.A. at the May, 1969 Convocation should fill out a NOTICE OF INTENTION TO GRADUATE ’ form as soon as possible and deposit the completed .form with their departmental office. The forms are available in the departmental offices as well as in the Dean of Arts office and the Registrar’s office and at Renison and St. Jerome’s Colleges. The purpose of the form is to make certain that under the course - system, the list of Arts graduates is complete.

18

856 the Chevron

; 0 0 &


~IIrl~I~i~l~1,1111,

- ZiOCLI:

1 TH E OCTOPUS Tired of cooking at home? Want a really different meal? Try our European style open faced sandwiches. You choose the meat and we’ll prepare it for you. Delicatessen meats of all kinds. Take your

!

! Fryer cdl

pick,

I

Take

out

orders

too!

7 am - 8 pm Tuesday 95 King ‘The

b

1m

Octopus

1m

thru

-

Sunday

N. Waterloo

has so many

I-

I m

hands

um

to serve you better”

I=

8 k

m

1-1,

CLASS OF ‘69 PRESENTS

JAY

JACKSON

8

H

[ 9:00 pm CAFETERIA

FRIDAY,

MARCH

7 i

t&dled

up

Renison has not been defeated in swimming all year. They captured the individual swimming championship in the fall term by a small mar&n over Phys-ed. However, in the men’s relay championships, they outclassed other competitors by 40 points to win. In the first annual co-ed novelty swim meet, the Renison Trunks and Bikinis combined to s’queak out a win over village east. Going into the last event, the pyjama relav. Renison held a slim lead ovei ‘east. However, St. Paul‘s fooled everyone and outchanged all other competitors and won the race by a length. As a result Renison ended in first place with 56 points, East in second with 52 points. and St. Paul’s third with 19 points. HOCKEY CHAMPS Since ‘being upset in fall hockey championships by Phys-ed 4-2, Eng B. has gone undefeated in hockey. They finished the winter season with a perfect 4-O record, scoring 15 goals while allowing only goals against. In the playoffs, they chalked up three consecutive shutouts with outstanding goal tending by B. Grace. They defeated Wes<5-d, in the quarter finals and St. Paul’s 6-O in the semi finals. In the final game against arch-rival Arts, the score was 1-O at the end of the first period on a goal by L. Hardy at .the. 19.40 mark. Their power showed in the sec+brao

SUNDAY,

MARCH

9

INTERNATIONAL FILM “The Knack, I’

SERIES,

INTERNATIONAL FILM SERIES, Waterloo Theater, 3:00 p.m., Series Ticket, Single admission 50~.

SUNDAY,

MARCH

MADRIGAL

DINNER

6:00 P.M., Festival Sold out.

THURSDAY,

JOURNEY

MARCH

FILM AL113,12:15 P.M.

If Math had won the finals they would have broken the tie with Renison and gone home with all marbles. Also for the first time, floor hockey was added to the men’s intramural program. Math defeated St. Jerome’s in the playoffs on tuesday night with a final score of 4-2. Walt Finden, math, was the top scorer with 2 points for his winning team. ST JEROMES WINS TOWNSON For the first time participation points were presented to the unit which had the greatest number of participants per intramural activity including all team sports. The new participation trophy has been named after Father-Bill Townson of Renison College. Final standings for the Townson Trophy are : 1 St. Jerome’s 353 pts 2 Renison 316 pts 3 St. Paul’s 213 pts 4 Math 194 pts 5 East 147 pts 6 co-op 140 pts 7 Arts 133 pts 8 South 127 pts 9 Phys-ed 124 pts 10 Eng B. 118 pts 11 Eng A. 115 pts 12 West 115 pts 13 Science 104 pts 14 Conrad Grebel 103 pts’ 15 North 98 pts For the first time in intramural competition, there is no clear-cut individual unit champion. After twelve team events and nineteen individual tournaments, Math and Renison are tied with 360 points

ond as they scoreu LlllLb answered gotiTs- by iJ, B@!&$ni~, ‘” B. P@onie and L. Hardy ,addir$g his second. In the final period, follows. Bergsma potted one more with B. Unit Stevens rounding out the score, 1 Math 6-0, Eng B. over Arts for the 2 Renison Bullbrook Cup which was pre3 St. Jerome’s sented to Eng B. captain John 4 Phys-ed McLean by Father Bullbrook. 5 Eng B 6 St. Paul’s INTRAMURALS 7 East East captured the touted con8 West don cup by squeaking a win 9 Eng A over Math 32-34. Math had entered lo South the finals in an exciting overtime 11 co-op win over Renison 38-34. 12 Nort’h Top scorers for east in the final 13 Arts played Wednesday were Lindley 14 Science with 12 and Paul Cotton with 9. 15 Conrad Grebel

Pts 60 360 294 284 277 270 238 238 165 163 160 132 126 106 75

“MAGIC

14

EXHIBITIONS 13 - APRIL13

Gallery Monday - Friday Sunday

Pugliese had been coach ever since the dribble and shoot .team was formed. He has found it necessary to step down because of his responsibilities as director of the school of phsy. ed. and recreation. Lavelle is one of the most successful high school coaches ever. At the three Metro Toronto schools he has taught at, he has taken last place football and basketball teams and shaped them into championship squads. Lavelle believes that his biggest contribution to the students has been to stimulate their desire to do their best. “I’m people-orientated. While winning is important I feel that the game must remain interesting and enjoyable for the players or we accomplish very little.” he said. In addition to coaching the basketball team he will be an assistant coach of the block and tackle Warriors.

Mafmen have two big stars

London. Hall won his 123 pound class by pinning the four opponents that faced him. One of them was the Canadian team’s representative at the world championships in Argentina. Padfield, the warriors heavy weight grappler, was third in his division. He did this by pinning two of the four wrestlers that faced. Unfortunately he lost his other two matches. Both Hall and Padfield are the reigning OQAA champs.

At eight o’clock tuesday march 4 a urinal in the jock palace finally got fed up with the actions of certain students. A known supporter of John Bergsma was quietly doing his thing when he pressed the handle to flush and the urinal retaliated by hosing him down thoroughly. This particular urinal has been known to have definite anarchist tendencies. When this reporter was granted an interview with anarchist urinal he found the subject quite uncooperative. He then moved on to the the faculty staff washroom in order to converse with the urinals there. He found that they were quite content with the way things were being done as everybody knows that faculty-staff urine has greater esthetic qualities than student urine. The implication& of this sad tale are far reaching. Perhaps the faculty-administration anti-student plot is more wide spread than most of the moderates would care to think.

CONSORT

REALISM

Uniwat has a new basketball coach. It was announced wednesday that the job was being taken away from Dan Pugliese and given to Mike Lavelle. presently a high school coach in Toronto.

piss

ETSA

A programme of music from as early as 1140 to late Renaissance Masters of Jacobean and Elizabethan times, Theater of the Arts, 8:30 P.M., admission $2.50, Students $1.50.

GALLERY MARCH

for b-bailers

If pissed off back

13

- FREE

MARCH

RENAISSANCE

Iln-

and Walt Fin-

Dinner

FROM

FRIDAY,

9

denhadseveneach. A tiew coach For Math Vinnette

trophy

-

T!ALZK

IN CANADA”

Hours: 9:OO - 5:OOP.M. 2:00 - 5:00 p.m. Some of the neat rough ftdn to be had from

floor

hockey friday,

march

7, 7969 (9:46)

857

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141 126 115 108 97 85 71 66 64 55 53 46 43 31 3 316 255 225

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Rich Lloyd Dave Parsons Henry Older Martin Holmberg Bob Flovd Renzo Bernardini spoiled total : ARCHITECTURE John Pickles

219 199 176 166 123 35 9 1298 acclaimed

GRADS Gulshan Dhawan Nick Kouwen Bailey Wang Dave Gordon Dieter Haag John Stegman spoiled total :

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REG MATH Tom Berry Dave Greenberg Stanley Yack CO-OP MATH Glenn Berry PHYS-ed Hugh Cuthbertson RENISON Paul Dube ST. JEROME’S Joe Bar tolacci SCIENCE Gerry Wootton Hugh Campbell Chuck Minken Charles Gallagher Bruce McKay spoiled total :

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RIGHT NOW, I PERSONALLY WILL

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ACCREDI-

TED. STUDENT, STAFF OR FACULTY MEMBER AT U. OF

W. ANY

OF -OUR _~. I,!., 72 -2 :; .,r. 1.j ‘;‘z-1969

Victoria 20

858 the Chevron

& Charles


I.E.E.E. Lecture

Next

series

introducing on campus research etectricat engineering DR. S.N. KALRA - INFORMATION SYSTEMS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5 12 Noon Pl50 Wednesday: Control Systems

Author

of a Best Selling Autodiograph

in

y

“THE SEVENTH STEP” Former

*

Cellmate of Caryl Chessman at St. Quentin Lecturing on PREVENTION OF JUVENILE DELINQUENCY PRISON REFORM and REHABILITATION THEATRE OF THE ARTS UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO

9 6

WEDNESDAY, 4:75 Admission

Warrior Robinson

MARCH 19

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lues beat us again by Jim Dunlop

f Specials for Week Beginning March 12 f TOP VALU

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at 8 pm Sat. & Sun at 2 pm

I

“ULYSSES” SHOCIUNG ANDEMBARRASSING!

to sweat as Laidlaw looks for rebound.

Chevron staff

For the third straight year the Warriors have been denied the OQAA hockey championship. The U of T Blues won their fourth consecutive title by demolishing the Warriors 6-0, at Varsity arena Saturday night. The Blues deserved to win: they were the most aggressive team on the ice and had the situation well in hand for 45 minutes of the game. The Warriors had advanced to the sudden-death final by beating Rouge et Or du Laval, the eastern division champs, by the score of 4-2. *Lava1 must have played one of their worst games of the season. They continually missed passes and were shooting wide of the net throughout the contest. j This year’s edition of the Warriors has had the habit of playing just as good as they have to. The Lava1 game was yet another example of this. It prompted one of the Warriors to say after the game, “I hope we got the bad one out of our system. If we play like that tomorrow night we’ll get the shit kicked out of us.” The Warriors were led by Ron Robinson, who scored one goal and assisted on the other three. They were scored by Orest Romashyna, Rick Bacon and Ken Laidlaw. The Blues earned the right to play the Warriors by virtue of a 10-6 victory over the Carleton Ravens. Steve Monteith scored three goals to lead them to the win. It seemed the Ravens might pull off the upset of the year until the third period when the varsity squad took over. The championship game was a hard hitting one. Both teams came out with the idea of playing both the puck and the man. The referee in charge handed out 18 minor penalties and one major. Once again the officiating was up to the rigid standards of the OQAA. For those of you not acquainted with

these exacting limits it has been said that the officials used in most of the games could pass for a famous Walt Disney character when they are on the ice. The game proved tb be exciting for the first 15 minutes of the opening stanza. The Warriors killed off the major Laidlaw received for spearing and then came right back with a powerplay of their own that should have resulted in at least two goals. Robinson and Laidlaw both had golden opportunities but they were foiled by the Blues’ Adrian Watson. Watson continued to play a great game in nets for the Blues and there wasn’t a person in the arena who could say he didn’t deserve the shutout. The first of the Toronto goals came at 16:55 of the first period. Gord Cunningham’s low point shot was steered past goaler Arlon Popkey by Paul Laurent. The Warriors were two men short at the time. The next three U of T goals were scored while we were shorthanded. Laurent scored again as he drove the puck through a maze of legs to beat Popkey early in the second. Steve Monteith and Len Burman added powerplay goals late in the period. The other ‘Toronto goals were scored by Bryan Tompson and Cunningham. Popkey was beat for six goals but he should still be called one of the Warriors stars. He made many fine saves during the game. Four of the goals were scored while we were shorthanded and the other

twd came late in the game after the defense had fallen apart. Throughout the season the Warriors only lost three games. None of them was a whitewash like we received from Toronto. There are some reasons why we lost. First of all, the team was composed of rookies for the most part. The team they played was a well polished machine, the best of it’s kind in the country. Every one of the Varsity lines is fast and well balanced. Coach Hayes was forced to go with his first two lines in an attempt to win. You can’t expect people like Rudge, Laidlaw and Robinson to last forever. Perhaps it is best summed up in the words of one of the Warrior fans, “We’ve got a perfect,excuse. They’re just too good for us.”

The continuing story of why we lose continually The OQAA hockey all-star teams have been announced. The only Warrior to make the first team was defenceman Dick Oudekerk. The first team was dominated by Toronto as they placed four players on it. The he-shoots he-scores Warriors got three players on the second team as Ron Robinson, Ken Laidlaw and Ian McKegney earned positions. It is interesting to note that Arlon Popkey didn’t make the second team. He was certainly next best goalie after the Blue’s Adrian Watson.

REWARD

.

$2.50 Saturday Matinee $2.00 For a special student group sales call 5764550

A glass coal-oil lamp disappeared from the food-services building earlySunday afternoon. The lamp was on loan from the local sea cadet unit and is considered extremely valuable by them. A substantial reward will be granted to the person returning it to the EngSoc office (or telephone local 3327). No questions asked.

How can we win this if you don’t get off my back! fridw,

march

7, 7969 (9:46)

859

21


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m

by

Norman

Fadelle

“If anyone wants to follow in my footsteps, he must give wp all right to -himself; day after day he must carry his cross and keep close behind me. IS

This demand draws a grim, sobering picture of a sombre procession. The King leads carrying his cross, and reaching ‘The Place of the Skull’, is transfixed there, the body of flesh put to shame. Behind him march his followers, all similarly equipped and all about to sur’ round their king in a symbolic crucifixion of their bodies. Where Jesus ‘emptied himself’, so his followers ‘deny themselves’-and self-denial is not the mere deprivation of a few things they would have preferred to possess, but a repudiation of themselves, a consignment to shame. ‘Look upon that’, God says in effect, ‘confess that this is your proper end. Make no claims for yourself. Put away your pride and rebellion and come to me for what I can give, and I will have mercy and abundantly pardon.’ And so Jesus erects a costly standard. He doesn’t beg anyone to enter the Cause. He points out that the price is high, the way narrow, and the recruits consequently few. ‘The Kingdom will cost you everything you own, all you are. ’ And he confronts us with it now. The Kingdom is right here-‘at hand’. It stands at the door and knocks. Who will open and let it in ? Who will say yes to its coming? It is a pearl of great price-you must sell everything you have to get it. It is like treasure found in a field-you must gladly surrender all you have to acquire. It transcends all earthly concerns-you must leave father and mother, wife and family, house and property, as if you hated them at its call. If it were a question of gouging out your eye and entering it blind or having two eyes only to be excluded from it, you wouldn’t hesitate to mutilate yourself in order to get in. No call to be trifled with this-like the man who put his hand to the plow and then turned back. No call to be answered with a measure of moral improvement, a burst of zeal, a few New Year’s resolutions to live a better life. This is a call to total radical obedience, to an utterly impossible righteousness, to be perfect as God is perfect. But Jesus does not call men to a new religion. The religious act is always something partial, whereas faith is always something whole, an act involving the whole life. The call is to new life, not worship; the challenge is to follow, not adore. These teachings grip men’s minds and stir their hearts, for we are urged by his strong, demanding, compassionate, uncompromising love-never happy with any., thing short of supreme effort.

New

SciSoc exec announced

The new executive of the Science Society was introduced to a general meeting of the society wednesday night in the campus center. President-Mike Wolf, first vicepresident-Ron Sauve, second vicepsident-Geoyge Greene, tress-

urer-Bob Hartley, secretaryAnn Jonker, education chairmanJim Matthews, athletic directorsGlenn Steen and Rom Bilyk, course club coordinator-Ken MacMillan, social chairman-Gary Watson.

RECEIVERS

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ON FEBRUARY 76 AT 6 pm, Peter stood waiting for a trolley at the corner of King and Gaukel streets in downtown Kitchener. As he waited, a young officer-badge no. 66-of the Kitchener police force approached him and proceeded to question him. The events and dialogue which follow actually did occur. Cop:

What’s

your

But Jim isn’t on duty then. so constable 66. slightly hurt. leads them do[vnstairs. As Peter and Mike enter a small room in the basement of the police statiin. they are met by a burly. red-faced jailer paging through a large, black book. Two officers stand nearby. Along with the three *‘arresting” ol’f’icers and a special corporal interrogator. there are now six policemen facing the two boys. The corporal conducts the entire interrogation in a yell.

name?

Peter : Peter. Cop:

Where

do

you

Corporal:

live?

Peter considers this cides not to tell him. Cop:

Why

Peter:

you

and

No,

I just

to

tell

here

me?

wanna

know

your

name

cop tell

I’ll

me

me,

tell

where

you

eh?

Would

the

station?

up to

you

after-after

live...so you

you

you

rather

won’t

tell

took

you

we

I’ll

You’d

charge

ance.

better you

What’s

be

with

your

quiet,

buddy,

creating

a

Wait

question.

Answer

come phone: le of

So

minute-l

with

me

Come uncooperative

right

now

and

the

detectives

over on

asked

way to

down; ones

keep

you

up

book

lay

that can

in

there

night

over

you

check

a I could

you

(spieling

better.

from

citizens. thousands are

a job.

Just

up.

an

ask

for

is is

dollars in

and we

got the

felt

and

trying

to

a chip

on

civil

they

should

biiked day

streets you

Mike

mean

Ah,

cooperation being

every

the

because (allegedly

Peter

apparently

yelling)

Public

out

shoulder

doesn’t

disturb-

we

of

men

do your

off still

The

our

erties

or

All

you

ILlike: We just want asking for our names.

a

Corporal:

the

lock

speech;

that’s

it !

that’s

could

got

charges

lib-

deserved)

waste

all

our

time.

Mike: I’m not answering without a lawyer. Cop:

We

I’ve of

while

of

name?

a

you.

Corporal:

Mike : MMPHTT. Cop:

joker!

thick-full

memorized

At this point, Mike-a friend watching the procedure-enters the hassle. Mike: You’d better have reasonable and just cause for taking him to the station. Cop:

name?

Mike: Well. OK... Mike-----( he gives his name and address 1. -

Why?

:

0 K

this

on

your

MMPHHTT.

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Soon a cruiser arrives driven by two constables. Peter. Mike, and constable 66 get in and are driven to the station. At the station door. constable 66. in an off-hand “I-do-this-all-the-time” manner. calls into the intercom: Hey. Jim-open 2 and 3.

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The two officers from the cruiser after Peter. 1’like and oft’icer 66 a ride back downtown. Peter and Mike accept., but 66 refuses: b/ell. I got rn). lunch here at the station. he says. so 1 think I’ll sta! c and eat.

Applications for the following positions vvill be accep ted until 5:oo Pm Frida y, Mar. 74 by the B. S. A. office VICE CHAIRMAN B.S.A. CHAIRMAN Clubs & Organizations SECRETARY of B.S.A. CHAIRMAN, Winter Weekend ‘70 CHAIRMAN, Auxiliary Events B.S.A.

Further information positions is available A. office. Available

at

PARR &WALLER 150

King

St.

W.

about these at the B.S.

t

Louis Silcox Chairman Board of Student

Activities fric/a y, mar-c/l

7, 1969 (9:dG)

86 1

23


N

OW WHAT I WANT TO talk about to finish up is college as an extension of the kind of life that it’s preparing us for. College in many ways is a very bad place. But it’s a very logical place. And it’s always bad things that make sense. I remember being told by a teacher once, “You’re doing very good work, keep it up, keep it up.” Keep what up? Sitting at that desk for three hoursyou know, sitting in a system of reward and punishment. Of course, there’s the sympathetic principal who comes home to your parents and says, “Joan is a very promising student. But she just can’t seem to apply herself. She just has no span of attention. Why don’t you work with her?” And so having been given that reinforcement, the parent begins to say, “Joan, why are you such a discipline problem? Why can’t you be a good girl like So Joan begins to feel that all the other good girls.?” there is a priority being placed on being a good girl. And we see how the definition of a good girl is set.

‘Good’

means

‘obedience’

A good girl is a quiet girl. A good girl is one who does the assignment. I remember in third grade, writing a paper on Balboa. Why did I do it??? Because that teacher was going to put it up on the wall. I did one on Balboa, one on Da Gamma and one on Cabatha De Vaca. Now if you were to ask me who Balboa is, who Da Gamma is or who Cabatha De Vaca is, I couldn’t tell you. But I can tell you that all three of them were put up on the wall and that’s why I wrote them. I didn’t write them because I cared about those three names, in fact, Cabatha De Vaca could have discovered Balboa for all I know. The main thing is that I wasn’t writing these things because I cared about these guys. I was writing because a whole system of rewards and punishment had been set up. My job was to get that thing on the board. And its interesting to know, that the teacher placed it up so high on the board that you couldn’t read it even if you wanted to. This makes it very clear why its up there. It’s not up there to be read. So we can talk about what it’s like to work in a school which produces people who do things not because it is important to do them, but because the more papers you have on, the wall the better it looks, no matter what’s on them. Now, isn’t this the same thing as working in a factory which produces televisions that are made not to work in about two or three years, even though we have a technology that could make them work for fifteen? Why do we make a television that we make last for 3% if we can make it last for l5? Well, the answer is clearly because we want to sell a lot of televisions. Now you may ask “Who’s we”? You say that we don’t want to sell more televisions. They want to sell more televisions. But you see, they have a way of talking to “we” and it makes it seem that we’re all working together. Their argument goes like this. Look, if our t.v. lasts for 15 years, then we wouldn’t sell a lot of t.v.‘s. Therefore, if we don’t sell a lot of t.v.?, then you would be out of work. See, you have a vested interest in selling a t.v. that lasts for 3 years because that 15 year t.v. will knock you out of a job. Now what kind of relationship is that to work? We’ve been given all that American myth about American Craftsmen. Can you imagine the American shoe-maker in the old days, making a pair of shoes, and then cutting the leather in half. I mean that’s such a crazy concept, you know? I mean, theoretically, a craftsman is one who makes things for other people. And yet, industrial society makes things for profit. That’s what I mean by things being logical-if you keep a system that’s based on profit, then you might as ‘well turn out your own televisions because it all makes sense. If you want $3.46 an hour or $4.12 an hour as a factory worker, then you have to accept certain compromises. And what are the compromises? Well, in order to make $4.12 an hour, which is a very high wage, factory workers don’t usually make that, you have to work in a company that’s highly automated. A highly automated company usually makes its money by breaking down the job into a lot of very small

24

862 the Chevron

parts, and using a lot of technology. I met a girl who said to me, “That’s a very nice toy.” I said, “Thanks. I bought it for my daughter.” She said “Yeh, I used to make them”. I said, “Oh, you used to make this toy? It must have been a good job.” She said, “Well, not really. I used to work in the inspection department”. “You see, when you push the button in little Annie-Fanny’s back, her right arm goes up and down like this. And my job was pressing the button four times. If it worked four times in a row, it passed inspection. If the arm stuck, it didn’t.” That was her job. Eight hours a day, 5 days a week, 48-50 weeks a year, pushing that button, watching that button and that arm go up and down, up and down. That’s what we call “CRAFTSMANSHIP” in America. We have butchers, who don’t learn how to cut meat, we have butchers who learn how to cut fat, pour blood on it, and call it chopped meat. We have farmers who are told, somehow, that they’re paid not to produce. / by an escalator, And another example : Walking I look down at a guy fixing the escalator, and just to make small talk I say to him, “Boy, these escalators are breaking a lot aren’t they?” And he says to me, “You’re damn right and they better keep breaking because if they don’t I’m out of a job.” Now that guy’s job, under the profit system means that he is against me. It means that I want elevators that work and he wants elevators that break. The steel worker wants steel that wears out and we want steel that lasts. The butcher wants meat that’s cheap and we want meat that’s good. The profit system places us against each other.

Profit

Meaningless

.

work

The profit system guarantees that work is going to be meaningless. And that just doesn’t go for that particular worker. Some of you may say, well, yeh that’s true, but you know how workers are.” You say, “Yes sir, that’: why I’m going to college. I don’t wanna pour blood on meat, I don’t wanna raise that arm, I want a job with real responsibility. I want a job that’s going to make me somebody. I want a job with great insight and creativity. Yes, sir, that’s why you go to college.” Well let me speak to about half the people in this room right now. I’m speaking to women. Any aspirations you have about a career, under the present system, will be very, very sad hopes because I will be crushed. Now let me talk about why those things are going to be crushed. One reason why they will be crushed is that we have a system in our country that says that it’s your job to have children. Now I don’t mean for nine months. I mean for your life. You see, men don’t like children too much. Man ? He has more important things to do with his life. He has to go out and win the bread and butter. . Now you may ask “I have a college degree. I can win the bread and butter”. Yeh, but what man is going to sit home and take care of a baby with a B.A.? But yet, you’re expected to do it. Your job now is to be the .college educated wife, the good conversationalist, the person who is brought to parties and occasionally given some baby-sitting time off in the evenings. But basically when you have la child, your relationship with that child is one that you’re going to have for at least those first six years before he goes off to school. And if you have two or three children it’s going to continue for at least six, nine, ten years. Now I have a child. I find it very hard to bring up a child. I find it very hard to be a real loving person, because my child-her name is Lisa-takes up a lot I of my time, sometimes even when I don’t really want to be with her; time when I want to be alone. She demands things’ of me that sometimes I don’t want to give. Sometimes I’m really freaked out and I’m very lonely and upset. But she’s only a year and 3/~ and she says to me, I want something, and what _ I say is “I want’ you to go away.” But then I realize she can’t go away because I’m %er father. A lot ot times I have to take care of her alone, then I have to say to,,myself, O.K. It’s too bad you freaked out. You have to deal with her. So I deal with her. I deal with her mechanically. I give her a bottle and hope that she goes to sleep, *

concluded

over page


even though she’s passed the age when she wants to sleep all the time. I do other mechanical things but basically I’m not with her. Now women are going to face a lot of those problems. The first thing you’ve been told that that’s an. evil thing not to want to be with your kids all the time. What do you mean you don’t wanna be, you’re told, did you ever see Ozzie and Harriet? When did you ever see Harriet not want t.o be with her kids? After all, every -mother you’ve seen on television loves her kids all the time. The good mother is the one who wants to be with her kids all the time. She loves every minute of it. O.K. models are held up for us, models that are destructive, models that are unreal, models that speak emotionally that we can’t possibly meet and that force us to feel lousy because we just think,’ “Man, I’m just not as good as old Harriet,” Instead of saying, “God-dam Harriet. You’re a liar. You’re a fraud.” So maybe people should help us. Maybe they should say that kids should be brought up in some way, collectively, not by the state, but by a group of people who get together and figure out different ways of taking care of kids. Some people really like to care for kids a lot of the time. Other people like to take care of kids three or four hours a day. That’s not the point. The point is that we have to figure out some creative way of taking care of children. That involves men. When my daughter was about four or five months, my wife and I were separated which meant that I didn’t have any option: I had to learn to take care of a child. For the first four or five months of the marriage, I just psychologically said, “It’s her kid: it’s her job to do a lot of those things.” Then all of a sudden I had to learn to stay up in the middle of the night when I wanted to sleep. I had to take the psychological responsibility of being alone with a helpless person; helpless because five or six month old kids are pretty helpless.

New

institutions

needed

why in the hell can’t we think of more human taking care of kids? Why do we have to have all these marriages that are built on false organizations. I’m saying that the answer may be different kinds of marriages, different kinds of marriages where different couples decide on what they want. I have friends who aren’t married, who are living together and who are having kids. I have five <or six friends living in what they call the collective, where they bring up a couple of kids together. Some of them are separated. Some of them aren’t. Some of them have very happy marriages. I have friends who believe it’s right for you to sleep with anybody you want to. I have friends who believe you should only sleep with one person, not because it’s a rule, but just because they don’t want to sleep with other people. What I’m saying is that I’m amazed that we live in the type of society where society tells us that one form of organization is the only way to bring up kids; that one form of organization is the only way to have a marriage when in fact, if you look at the average marriage, you see it’s not working. Yet society’ won’t look at itself and say, “something’s fishy. We gotta admit that ours isn’t the only one and maybe, in fact, is one of the most ludicrous ones.” O.K., so much for a society which makes it very hard to love your own kids. Now let’s talk about men and the few women who will take careers. The kind of careers that’ people take in business are being advertised today as very dramatic, very exciting, dynamic. But let’s talk about it. You are a personnel director. You are told you have a lot of responsibility, a lot of freedom. But what kind of real responsibility do you have? You have the responsibility to tell people what to do. What’s your job? Your job is to get them to work harder. Why? Because working harder makes more profits. Y.ou ought to read Business Week to see what the business men think about you. For example, Business Week advertises that Feder’s air conditioners should be used in the factory. Why? Because the days of the sweat shop are over. Great. That’s a really great idea. Maybe the bosses are getting a little more humane. But wait-why do we want Feder’s air conditioners? Because do you know that cooler workers are happier workers? And happier workers produce more. And workers who produce more make more profits for the company. So in fact, the only way you can sell a Feder’s air conditioner to a factory is to tell people they’ll have cooler, happier workers who will make more money for them by their increased production. That’s a hell of a reason to tell someone they should or shouldn’t have to work in a hundred degree temperature; because in fact we can build all the air conditioners we need. But the only way we can sell them is by selling

NOW, ways of

them to people who see something in it for themselves. There’s a new magazine now called Carreers. YOU

ought to look at it because it’s geared to the young market. Carreers is a psychedelic oppression. What it says is turn on, tune in, and do what we say. What it says is, work for the big companies and we’ll give you everything you want. This guy comes up to me and says “Hey, I’m working You can do anything you for this great company. want. They let me wear sideburns”. “Oh, that’s really great What do you do”? “Well I do what they tell me”. Then what do you mean you do what you want? “Well, that’s a great step. A lot of companies won’t r) let you wear sideburns. ” are trying to do through careers What businesses is take advantage of the, essence of the student rebellion by offering the periphery. What they say is “Do what we want and we’ll give you an air conditioner, an expense account and you can wear sideburns.” But your job still is for you to do what the guy on top says and then tell the people under you what to do. Now I imagine what a lot of you are saying is “He’s interesting and kind of funny, but man he’s so sick. He is so depressing. He’s painting a distorted picture. In fact a lot of people aren’t really that unhappy. I know a lot of people who beat the system. He’s one of these professional revolutionaries who’s trying to stir me up, He’s trying to get me mad. He’s probably some kind of misfit. I’m going to handle it. I’m going to make it. Some people don’t make it. But I’m going to make it.” Now I’ll just say that some of you will make it. But I think you’ll make it in very limited terms. I think the only way you -can make it under the present system that we both live under is by selling yourself short. I think the only way you can make it is by saying that the idea of really doing what you want is Utopianthat the idea of really enjoying life all the time is a nice idea but isn’t practical. If you make those concessions, then you’re right. You will be happy because what each one of you has really said is “I don’t really count”. What you’re saying is “Despite the fact that ,we’ve been told that Canada is a democracy and America is down deep we all kno.w that we a democracy, can’t change these God-damned countries. We know people more powerful than us make the decisions. As a result, we don’t even want to think about the kind of questions I’m raising, because if I’m right then that means what is expected of you-to help yourselves-is to become radicals. If I’m right about how the system treats people, then it means that we have to become socialists. And if I’m right about what I said then what it means is that you don’t just become a socialist by saying to the people who run the big companies, “Well see, I listened to this guy who comes from S.D.S. and he explained to me that the profit system dehumanizes people and. I decided that he is right so I think that you should get rid of the profit system.” What you find out is that if we organize to get rid of the profit system, it will be clear that certain people like the profit system. And the people who like it happen to have a couple of things going for them-to start with, the Armed Forces; and Number 2, The police departments. So we have a real problem. Because who the hell wants to take on the Armed Forces and the Police? Who the hell wants to devote their lives to struggling against the institutions we’re in-seeing those institutions as institutions that aren’t built for us-when with a little twisting around it’s easier to believe in a friendly dean of students who’s going to say, “He had some very good points, but he was exaggerated and we’re working in that direction. No one wants those changes more than I; or as Johnson says, ‘no one wants peace more than me’, but you can’t have everything at once. You know Rome wasn’t built in a day.” That’s true,-except for one thing. I’m already twentyfive, and people are playing around with my life, and I take my life very seriously. If people admit the problems are what we say they are, then they have a hell of a nerve being so reasonable about it. They have to either prove that I’m wrong or act with us. Because if they don’t they’re a bunch of hypocrites. What people are doing is pretending the establishment are their friends. Basically what they’re saying under all that is, “I would.like to help you but I like my job. And the price of helping you is joining you in a rebellion that I don’t want to participate’in. * * * I’ve been rebelling for four years now and sometimes it’s very scary. Sometimes it’s very lonely. Sometimes you begin to think that it’s very worthless, and you’re not going to accomplish anything. Sometimes I just want to give up, and say “I’m tired. I’m tired of criticizing. I would like to believe that killing people in Viet-Nam is a good thing. I would like to believe that meaningless work is meaningful. I would like to believe that unhappiness is happiness.” But when / believe

Craftsmanship Profit

.

syste.m

Children Marriages Conditioners Unhappiness

that, I’ve got 1984.

friday,

march

7, 1969 (S&46/

863

25


Address

letters to Feedback, The Chevron, lJ of W. Be . The Chevron reserves the right to shorten letters. Those typed (double-spaced) get priority. 7: For legal reasSign t t - name, course, year, telephone. ons unsigned letters cannot be published. A pseudonym will be printed if you have a good reason.

feedback

passing this increased operating cost on to the public in the form of higher prices. The indiscriminate issuance of I think you will find that any books from the Engineering and increases in corporation taxes are Science library to faculty memfollowed by an immediate rise in bers for atrociously long periods the cost of living. Witness the (three months at a stretch) must recent rise in insurance company be stopped. The search for knowtaxes and the subsequent rise in ledge is the common goal to all premium rates. members of the university comI also think you will find upon munity-whether an underinvestigation, that a capital gains graduate or a faculty member. tax does not restrict big business; A good number of graduate stubut in fact encourages the trend dents function as teaching assistowards large conglomerates to tants and share the burdens of the reduce tax losses. This is evident regular f acuity members. Considerin the United States at the preing all these factors, the favoured sent. treatment given to the faculty is The U.S., which has a capital unjustified. gains tax is experiencing a rapid Worse still, the library staff rise in the number of huge conwon’t disclose the whereabouts of glomerates and a divying-up of the book, which has been out for a small businesses. .considerable period of time; I Your reporters exhibit a remarkwould imagine even under condiable ignorance of the effects of tions of torture. the Carter Report upon the mining The resulting impact on the industry. At the present time if graduate students could be ‘disnew taxes were placed on mining A good percentage of astrous. companies, several large producthem-especially in the engineering mines would fold and the reing faculty are extremely undersulting unemployment would do financed and they just can’t nothing t,o help the summer emafford to buy the literature ployment picture. needed by them. Some of them Not just producing mines would live on peanuts-literally. Their be affected. Ask any economic purchasing power could be enhangeolgist what increased mining ced by raising their economic taxes would do to Canada’s status from “irretrievably poor” “vast, uncounted, natural resourto “reasonably poor” at least. ces”. Until such time as this humaniThis idea that ore bodies in the tarian act is performed, the faciground constitute a wealth of lities provided by the university natural resources is a fairy tale. should be made available to the A resource is no good to the counfullest extent, to these scholars. try if men are penalized for inWill the persons concerned be vesting money in the risky venfair about this-at least once? ture finding it and developing R. MURTHY it. To my knowledge there are two grad them. major mineral despoits in Canada’s north which are at present marGive $10,000 to Optometry ginally economic and are at prenot destroyers of property sent frozen in the development stage due to the fear of the CarThe Optometry Clinic of the ter Report’s immediate implemenUniversity was destroyed by fire tation. Saturday, february 22nd. On monHow do you expect to stimuday, february 24th, the Student late investment by Canadians in Council of the University of Waterloo voted to give $lO,OOO.OO their country if the government takes a cut of the profits if they to the representative of Sir George win and gives no help to them if Williams University to be used as they lose? bail money. In conclusion may I suggest I have only one question. Is the that your reporters try to read Council going to donate an equal something of a background nature amount to the Optometry Clinic before spouting off. to assist students who lost valuJIM MACKERACHER able equipment in Saturday’s mech 2A fire? I realize that this money given to Sir George Williams UniWanted poster for Christ versity is returnable when and if brings Chevron this reply the students turn up for trial, but Greetings in Jesus wonderful since the Council at their own name who gave himself on the University refused them help, why cross that all who believe in him should we bail them out? Are we might live. prepared to help our own stuRecently I saw a paper dents as well as criminals who published by the university studestroy public property and cause dents called the Chevron. On two million dollars damage? the back page was a reward for Let’s use our money for our own Christ. I am 43 years old and have campus disaster ! read anything like this If we’re still looking for places to never before. put our money-how about bolsI count it a great privilege to tering the supply of books in the introduce to you the one you are Library. Must Waterloo Lutheran looking for and to tell you where always show us the way? He might be found. B. QUARRY You likely know you will never arts 1 find Him in person here, but you Carter Commission .fepoft can find thousands of His folChevron needs background lowers. Almost two thousand years ago I am writing to question your there was a reward for this same stand ( ? ) with regard to impleChrist. Read the account in mentation of the Carter CommisMathew Chapter 26-VI-5 verse 14-16 sion Report on Taxation. also verses 47-49. Be sure to read Do you sincerely feel that the Mathew Chapter 27 verses 3-10. good, humanitarian, “big busiWe know without him> there is ness’ ’ community will sit back nothing worth while here nor to and quietly take a $532 million come. There is no other name dollar cut in profits? Personally given whereby we can be saved I am, inclined to believe that Acts 4 verse 11-12. Christ is not the “Big Business” corporations wi!l . just cover themselves by on trial anymore or can be brought Faculty cause

26

library academic

pfivelege deficiency

864 the Chevron

to trial. Nor is it up to us what we will do with Him who is called Christ. Will we accept Him as our Saviour or will we reject Him as they did two thousand years ago? This will determine your destiny hereafter. He is the Prince of Peace to as many as receive him, not to the nations, but individually. I could not help but think when looking at your paper, the first page and the last-the last page will bring the results of the first page of your paper. There are many more things that could be written but space does not permit. If you are interested in meeting followers of Christ we welcome you to the Wallenstein Bible Chapel sunday mornings at 9: 30 when we remember Christ and the price he paid on our behalf. I also welcome you to the John Mahood School this Saturday night at 8 o’clock to see a film (the Man of Steel). EDGAR B. MARTIN RR 1, Elmira That

ten

will

only

thousand

cfo/iafs

act as a reward

Ten thousand dollars? Just bloody lovely! A group of justiceseeking students turn into a pack of rabid dogs, causing millions of dollars damage to Sir George Williams University and irreparable damage to the Radical Student Movement, and you reward them for it. Ten thousand dollars! Goddamn every one of you! BOB MOLINE out-term electrical Questions

what

have

JEANNE

MOREAU. ‘VHE BRIDE WORE BLACK” F~~o,s

TRUFFAUT COLOR

by

FEATURE

Deluxe

TIMES

I

Continuous

A terrificmovietough,crispand reaiisti~

5XEIVE MCQUEEN As ‘SULUTK ADULT ENTERTAINMENT TECHNlCOLOlP

a BEDTIME STORY..

but NOT for children

after meeting: we elected?

Monday we attended a meeting which was aptly called an extraordinary general meeting. Indeed this meeting was extraordinary. ’ The great hall was divided into two halves, each representing mutually exclusive points of view. Decisions were made based -on the flip of a coin, an obviously biased chairman was asked to stand down, and our federation president was confronted with the proof of his incompetence and in fact with evidence that the students have lost confidence with him just days after he was elected. Perhaps this was the only satisfactory outcome of the meetingBergsma’s great unrecognized incapacity receiving the honors it deserves. The heckling interested us too, however. We e,njoy good heckling, as it can be fery amusing while at the same instant very informative. Not so the heckling at our extraordinary general meeting, but this was understandable and forgiveable seeing as the majority present were engineers. As graduate students, however, one particular heckle raised our eyebrows considering the source. The speaker at the time .was asking if it was fair that the rich could go free while the poor had to remain imprisoned. .The response from an individual on our right was “sure”, this to his own great amusement and to the amusement of the wits near him. The heckler in this instance?NICK KOUWEN, graduate representative to council. What in hell have we elected? ED PENCER BOB MERTL grad psychology

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fee.dback Bail system is evil, but Sir George wrong example I would like to commend our Student Council for their speedy reaction to the holocaust at Sir George Williams University (S.G. W. ) in Montreal. However, I question the wisdom of offering aid to those arrested, in the form of bail money, for the ostensible purpose of protesting the bail system of Canada. It is commendable that they show some concern for a concrete evil such as the bail system, and wish to do something about it. But Council should also look at the consequences of such an action, it should be pragmatic as well as idealistic. In ordinary circumstances, a move protesting the present bail system would be well received by most elements of our society, a truly effective protest might accomplish something by overcoming the inertia of the social structure and achieve a real change. But hell, Council’s move was a political move and it will be well exploited by the conservative elements of society; the students of the University of Waterloo will be accused of condoning the destruction of the SGW Computing Center. All the Globe and Mail has to publish is a headliner (with no story, of course! ) stating simply that the UniWat Federation of Students has offered $10,000 to those arrested. Mass opinion will jump to the appealing conclusion that UniWat approves of computer destruction, simply because it is sensational, we might even be lucky enough to get a magazine article by a journalist-turnedpsychologist-sociologist showing that our capacity for destroying computers has a direct correllation to the size of our computing facilities. I would like to make it clear that I do not condone what happened at SGW and I feel certain that many of my fellow students here at UniWat feel the same. I should also make it clear that offering aid to those arrested does not necessarily mean that Council condones the crimes committed, but I feel sure that it will be construed by the public at large as such. I feel that Council should have submitted this motion to a referendum. There are several petitions being successfully circulated asking Council to reconsider it’s move, whether or not they will reach Council remains to be seen. I do not think that the motive of protesting the present bail system warrants the cost of this University being branded as anarchistic (which could make things kind of sticky for those of us who have draft boards to deal with! ) I believe that the highly explosive nature of this move on Council’s part. and the risk it entails of having UniWat’s name soiled by the primitivistic action of a small group of irresponsible individuals at. another university. demands that it (the motion carried by Council) be subjected to a referendum. Perhaps Council should also consider the fact that it may be trespassing on the prerogatives of the SGW Student Union. I hope that some action will be taken by Bergsma to consult student opinion, and that this financial aid be withheld until such opinion has been heard and evaluated. Council may find itself branded as irresponsible and

.

Address letters to Feedback, The Chevron, U of W. Be concise. The Chevron reserves the right to shorten letters. Those typed (double-spaced) get priority. Sign it - name, course, year, telephone. For legal reasons unsigned letters cannot be published. A pseudonym will be printed if you have a good reason.

counts. First, it is described as a “readings” course in the calendar, whose concerns as I have described them are clearly within the purview of a sociology department. Second, grades will be assigned as is the custom in this institution. F I also have some advice for Prof Haas. I suggest, first, that he not accept accounts of events in the Chevron as gospel. I realize in his case that this must be a very real temptation, but it is one Library situution uw)‘yl which should generally be resisted. Second, I think “dialog and debut no word from Bergsma bate” will benefit if we avoid inaThe Bergsma administration dequate semantics. “Leftist and has not acted on the deplorable radical” still has meaning, but I condition of our library. For this suspect that, today, its signifireason alone I suggest that he cance is largely affective rather tender his resignation immedithan denotative. Its use seems to ately. I for one don’t want to see trigger a seizure in those who the library question hung up in have been negatively condicommittee for years as has tioned to it. been the case with other issues Prof. Haas would do well, finin the past. ally, to avoid prejudging either It is clear from the Ontario the substance or the outcome of budget that things are going to be the course. If he knew me better, pretty tight in the future with he would realize that I am not regard to higher education. likely to agree out of hand with Its about time that the adminviews offered by others, and this istration, board of governors applies to the views of my studand the provincial government ents. Mutual criticism is very (and any others with “business much in order in the course. One interests”) were told that our of its functions will hopefully education, housing etc., comes be a sharpening of the students’ before the laws of the business analytic skills, in terms of the cycle. semantics, logic, and theory of MEL. ROTMAN sociology. On this point, I extend psych3 an invitation to Prof. Haas to join the course as a full and equal Yibrury Action Needed” member, so that he may find the editorial is misleading community of dialog and debate In your last editorial “Library which he evidently desires. It is Action Needed” you’ve slightly my hope that this will be interpreted as an invitation, and not a misled the students at UniWat by suggesting the “RSM is being challenge. more sensitive to the needs of RONALD D. LAMBERT students” as exemplified by their sociology Prof. interest in improving the libLibrary situation awful rary. per haps sit-in act ion It is true that council had to It seems that no one, including adjourn because of a loss of quorour so-called radicals is willing um before the library question to take any kind of action on the came up for discussion. It is to be library situation. noted however, that the members finally bringing about this situaOver the past year I’ve had about 35% luck in my search for tion were: Dave Cubberly, Sandra Burt, Ian Calvert, all membasic books at the library. Further, I’ve often had to scrambers, so faras I know, of the RSM. ble for a seat and sometimes, I N. KOUWEN couldn’t find one at all. grad rep It’s about time that someone decided to do something other R&cu/ & leftist category than call a committee. The book not only political mutters store sit-in tactic seems to be Prof. Ralph Haas expresses the only thing that the bureacrats some reservations concerning in the “white elephant” under“leftist and radical” courses stand. (Chevron, february 14). While he BILL BROWN does not define this interesting exarts 1 pression. the context of his reElmifu business men tell marks indicates that he equates the Chevron about Jesus it with purely political matters. Since some of our members As one of the professors involvhave young people attending the ed, I wish to enlighten Prof. Haas University of Waterloo, it natconcerning the meaning of the urally follows that we show an expression in question as it applies interest in your paper. It is always to my own course. most gratifying when one sees If we define “leftist and radical” in terms of advocacy or actual the energies of youth channelled into useful, purposeful, and departure from current practice, meaningful activities. We would my course is leftist and radical therefore, commend the Chevron in the following limited respects. for its valuable articles. First, the course is student-initiaWe are, however, amazed at the ted. Second, the readings and displayed on the last content of the course constitute a ignorance page of your paper, Feb. 14, concollaborative undertaking on the cerning Jesus Christ. It is evident part of students and faculty memthat you are familiar with the ber. Third, the subject matter of Bible account of Him, and His the course is “relevant.” in the claims concerning Himself; but sense of dealing with empirical evidently that you do not know social systems. rather than quasitheoretical abstractions. Fourth. Him personally as your Saviour is also seen. the course meets periodically for Concerning the reward you offer discussions and informal semin-it was claimed by one. Judas ars on the request of any of its Iscariot for thirty .pieces.of silver members, rather than slavishly almost two thousand years ago. follow the conventional timetable. Using the definition which I Did it bring satisfaction to him? The answer is NO! Great rehave offered, the course must be judged non-radical on other morse came over him and he

anarchistic, and who in power, I ask, listens to such elements in society? I have been told that we learn by experience, and we all should know how society treats anarchistic elements when they pose a real threat, they are generally liquida ted. So lets not give the powersthat-be an excuse to throw our protest against the bail system out with the bath water.

returned the money with the exclamation, “I have betrayed innocent blood”. On the other hand, we would draw your attention to another scene pictured on page 14 of the same issue by Norman Fadelle, “Why J C?” It pictures Calvary with three crosses. Jesus Christ was crucified on the middle cross, with a thief on either side of Him. While both thieves were equally guilty and equally condemned, yet today one is in Hell with Judas while the other is in heaven with Christ. Why the difference? Instead of railing and questioning Christ’s Lordship; instead of looking at the “Prince of Peace” and the “Son of God” as assumed names as your advertisement states; instead of insulting Him by attributing His claims as “King of the Jews” to visionary dreams produced by L.S.D. or marijuana; he feared God, he acknowledged his need, he declared Jesus innocent, and believed in the ressurrection of Jesus by statements such ‘as, “remember me when Thou comest into Thy Kingdom”. When he made these statements he was saved, as Jesus said in John 3:3 “Except a man be born again, he cannot see the Kingdom of God.” This is the way to God for all people for all time. Romans 10 :9 “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and believe in thine heart that God hath raised Him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.” We conclude with the centurion, “Certainly this was a righteous man.” He had witnessed many crucifixions before; but never one like this. Never had the noon-day sky turned dark for three hours: never had the victim uttered words as “Father into Thy hands I commend my Spirit,“; never before was the veil in the temple ripped from top to bottom. Since by your assumed admission that He is alive, our concern is that you too might know Him as the Son of God. It is not a matter of “apprehending Him”, but of him apprehending us. “That which we have seen and hear, declare we unto you, that you also may have fellowship with us.. . and with the Father and with the Son Jesus Christ. 1 John 1: 3. ISSAC BRUBACHER, ALLEN MARTIN Christian Business * Men’s Committee Elmira. Members community

from

university

aid Optometry On behalf of the School of Optometry I would like to express our appreciation to all who helped this past weekend in connection with the fire in the clinic building. The students, both from Optometry and from other faculties deserve a great deal of credit for providing assistance in removing valuable equipment and records while the building was still burning. A special thanks is due to them for reducing the loss. The staff of the University provided trucks out of thin air to move equipment. A sincere word of thanks is due to them. They included personnel from Central Stores, Physical Plant & Planning, etc. The security guards were also extremely helpful. The administrative staff were particularly effective. Dean McBryde deserves credit for assisting in the removal of equipment. Vice-President Adlington, Dean McBryde, A.B. Gellatly, W. Deeks, N. Selinger, and the Optometry Faculty held a council of war before the ashes had cooled

and established a temporary facility. The Optometry students spent much of the weekend clearing and re-establishing the clinic operation and by Wednesday some patients were being seen. Dr. Woodruff, assisted by Drs. Lyle, Bobier, Long and Callender did a fine job of directing the operation. Many student and faculty wives provided special encouragement. To all these, and any who have not been named inadverdently. our sincere thanks. It’s wonderful to be a part of such a fine team. Prof. E.J. FISHER, Director. Scribble, scrawl warriors produce hack & slush copy Hey, I think its really groovy that the scribble and scrawl warriors have succeeded in defaming the get out and sweat warriors with hack up and slash jock copy. I hope you scribble and scrawlers trounce the jocks and really get them all balled up. By the way. I heartily support Jaques (backslap and praise) O’Brien (law 4) who thinks the churned out and pulp Chevron is the best thing since phruggles and shlook. ABLE T. THINGC law 5 Money for Sir George bail should

be

interest

free

It was with great delight that we greeted the news that the students council had donated $lO.000 of the money they control towards bail for the unfortunate persons arrested as a result of the minor disturbance at Sir George Williams. We heartily endorse the federation’s expression of solidarity with those who are being oppressed for their willful destruction of the computing facilities. One last thought, lets show just how nice we really are, and make this loan interest free. BRYAN DORAN math 2A DOUG ARMBRUST math 2A HAROLD McCOLM eng. 2A Just pussecf physis test, u first after many tries Y I would just like to take this opportunity to inform my fellow students and teachers that I have just passed a physics test. You but when may say “so what?” you consider the fact that I have written five physics exams and this is the first one that I have passed you will more fully realize my state of exhilaration. Actually before I wrote this exam, I had a marvellous record of 43, 33. 40, and 21. so you see I was thoroughly convinced that I was dumb. But, I was deceived! It is true, I can pass a physics test. Now I can call myself a man again. Thank you. JIM EDDY science 1 Boy Scout article drivel reprints u better idea Your article on the Boy Scout movement was tasteless drivel. The Boy Scouts provide a basis for international and interracial understanding unique in society. By suggesting that Scout Leaders are homosexuals the authors of this article cast doubt not on Boy Scouts but on their own intelligence. In the future please leave this literary diarrhea where it belongs and stick to reprints from Ramparts. DERRYCK SMITH them 3A

frida y, march

7, 1969 (9:46)

865

27


grad mechanical

John

Matthews

Maudie

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feedback ~ Ten thousand squandered for shake shaky bail venture

bI

How could council have possibly justified a 10,000 committal toward bail for any of the suspected vandals at Sir George Williams University ? If our elected members have the constitutional right to squander such an amount of money without first-taking it to a student vote, then the constitution governing them must be changed. I say squander, because in such a shaky venture as this, we are just liable to lose the whole bundle. It is my guess that any person party to the damages wrought at Sir George would be irresponsible enough to’ allow such monies to be forfeited at the time of his trial in the interests of his own skin; i.e.-he’d jump bail. J. DICKSON mech. 3B Formal leaves

c

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wear doubts

controversy about KIopp

Regarding the article in the Chevron on February 28, entitled “Grad Ball says price fix”. It appears as though the Chevron reporter has missed the point I was trying to make.’ First, to clarify some points in the article, I have a letter in my files from Ross Klopp to the effect that tails rental for the Grad Ball would be $17.50, tax included, if the contract was accepted after january 20, 1969. Unfortunately, Mr. Klopp forgot to type a carbon copy of the letter. I also question his statement that his rentals are the best in Canada and that he can guarantee 500 of them. His next statenrent is completely nonsensical. He says that “There was no p r i c e-fixing involved ’ ’ ; yet he says “we have to standardize prices though, or else we’d be cutting each others throats”. Mr. Klopp must think we are very gullible and naive. Mr. Klopp assumed he had the contract at his price and impressed upon us the fact that he had contributed money to the University of Waterloo via the Tenth Anniversary Fund and advertising in the school paper. Well, Mr. Klopp, the students, for no reason whatsoever, owe Ross Klopp Ltd. the formal wear contract for Grad Ball ‘69. Also, for every dollar you put into the University, how many more are going back into Ross Klopp Ltd. via student business? Let’s face it, you need the students a hell of a lot more than we need you. Lastly, I would be willing to bet a lot of money that Ross Klopp Ltd. is not taking a loss on their revised prices whether Mr. Klopp wants to maintain his integrity or not as a formal wear supplier. Obviously, Mr. Klopp doesn’t know what the word integrity means. Some of the people I have sold tickets to have told me that they wouldn’t rent their tails from Ross Klopp Ltd. even if he did have the contract. I sincerely hope, Mr. Klopp, that your “integrity” will be restored. JIM IRONSIDE Grad Ball Committee Computer but bail

destruction help necessary

wrong

I would like to address myself, to those people who were upset by student councils decision to post up to $10,000 bai- for the students arrested at Sir George Williams University. First of all let me say that I was just as disgusted as you were by the destruction of the computer. I would be the last to condone their deliberate and wanton destruction. friday,

However, I feel that students council’s decision to post bail for those students is the best thing council has done since I have been on this campus. First of all, it was not council but a Canadian court that decided that some of the students should be released on bail. However, some of the students eligible for bail did not have the money to pay. I find it impossible to believe that one person on this campus actually believes that those students with money are entitled to get out of jail on bail while the poorer students must stay in jail waiting trial. It was therefore with great surprise that I read that John Bergsma and at least 800 other students opposed council’s action to give these poorer students the same privileges as the richer students. I was delighted to see that council had taken action to correct a situation which , to me, was obviously unjust. Also I must disagree violently (oops thatg a naughty word) with Paul Morg,an’s argument (Feedback feb. 28) that council should have used a less controversial situation to condemn the bail system. First of all council had already done this. At the first meeting of the “three month council” a motion was passed guaranteeing bail, if the money was available, to any Waterloo student, regardless of the charge against him. Secondly, I believe that council could not have picked a better situation than the Sir George situation. In cases like Sir George, many people tend to forget that this country’s legal I system is supposed to be based on an “innocent till proven guilty” principle regardless of the crime. As unlikely as it seem/s, it is possible that some of the occupiers had nothing to do with the destruction of the computer and were disgusted by the actions of their counterparts as we were. The actions of our student council might serve to remind a few people that the people arrested at Sir George have the same constitutional rights as a kid arrested for drinking under age. I really don’t think our council should have to retract something that they think is right because of what the pro press will do to the story. Finally, I would like to address myself to John Bergsma. Bergs- ma, I’ve pretty well had it with you. Your previous record of abstentions at council on important issues testifies pretty well to your complete lack of leadership qualities. However, to abstain on such an important issue and then condemn councils action the following day has to be the most gross example of incompetence I. have ever seen. If you are an example of a “responsible student “I think I’ll be irresponsible. . MIKE EAGEN math 2 Apologises and lack

for commerrts of judgement

I feel that an apology is called for with regards to the caption that ran under my name Feb. 21 in Campus Question. I certainly intended no harm, but I realize now that it was an ill-considered statement. To those who were offended, my apologies. My thanks to those who though offended, were understanding enough to attribute it to bad manners and lack of judgement. CHRIS SWAN I sci 2 march

7, 1969 (9:46)

867

29


“The streets of our country are in turmoil. The universities are filled with students rebelling and rioting. Communists are seeking to destroy our country. Russia us with her might, and the republic is in is threatening from within and without. We need danger. Yes, danger law and order our nation law and order, 1 Yes, without can not survive.” -Adolf Hitler, Hamburg, 1932

Ninety miles from the fourth reich Jerry Reuben is considered the national leader of the U.‘S.’ yippee movement, a group partially seeking the goals of the hippee but through action instead of by dropping out. In this letter ‘addressed to the movement he takes a look at where things are at and where they are going.

Dear friends, From the Bay Area to New York, we are suffering the greatest depression in our history. People are taking bitterness in their coffee instead of sugar. It’s a common problem, not an individual one, and people don’t talk to one another too much any more. It is 1969 already, and 1965 seems almost like a childhood memory. Then we were the conquerors of the world. No one could stop us. We were going to end the war. We were going to wipe out racism. We were going to mobilize the poor. We were going to take over the universities. . Go back and read some of the early anti-war literature. Check out the original hippie-digger poetry and overflowing optimism, and manifestoes : euphoria, expectation of immediate success. Wow, I can still get high on it., America proved deaf, and our dreams proved innocent. Scores of our brothers have become inactive and cynical. Still, our victories since 1965 have been enormous. We kicked LBJ’s ass. We defeated the Democratic Party. Our history has been marked by a series of great battles: Berkeley, ‘the Pentagon, Columbia, Chicago. We are the most exciting energy force in the nation. It is just because we are striking so deep that, in every phase of the movement, arrests and trials and court appearances and jail have bottled up resources, sapped energy, and demoralized the spirit. Hue y Newton is in prison Eldridge Cleaver is in exile

America’s courts are colonial courts, where White America punishes her black subjects. America’s jails are black concentration camps. Every black man in jail In America we have Race and is a political prisoner. Class Justice, pure and simple. Oakland

Seven are accused

of conspiracy

Which means: organize a demonstration which effectively challenges authority and the courts arrest you for conspiracy and tie you up with lawyers for years. Is that why so few people are into planning dem,onstrations any more in Berkeley? After spending three months there in the fall, I was depressed to see the old Berkeley audaciousness gone. Three years ago we were going to overthrow Washington from Telegraph Avenue. Result: broken dreams for hundreds and hundreds of. people. “Politico” has virtually become a term of insult in Berkeley today. Tim Leary is up for 30 years and how many thers are in court and jail for

of our bro-

gettinghigh?

Smoking pot is a political act, and every smoker is an outlaw. The drug culture is a revolutionary threat to plasticwasp9-5america. If you smoke quietly, you won’t get bothered. If you smoke in public,, or if you live in a commune, or get active politically, or show up somewhere in J. Edgar Freako’s computer, you’re likely to get busted for getting high. Through the power of arrest, the cops have virtually silenced the drug evangelists and have destroyed communities like the Haight-Ashbury. Speck

faces two years in the pen

When America arrested the Baby Doctor for advising young men to follow their consciences, I was ecstatic: the next day I actually expected thousands of intellectuals and religious folk to stand on soapboxes and repeat Speck’s words. No one hardly said a word. The intellectual community was paralyzed by fear. Is it any wonder now how German intellectuals were so easily silenced? Sorry for the bitterness, but I saw the arrest of Speck as test case for the government. If they could arrest and convict Speck without much of a backlash, certainly they could exile Cleaver and jail Leary, and eventually get to me. The government won the test. Now they are willing to try anything. Campus

activists

are expelled

and arrested

Participants in campus outbreaks are expelled or suspended from school, and arrested on assorted misdemeanors, if not on felony charges for conspiracy. Students quickly forget the court cases left behind, and the euphoria of an outbreak turns sour in the hearts of those who go to court and jail alone. When cops first come on campus, the liberals screambut gradually the liberals get tired and go to sleep. Cops and courts never sleep. War resisters

are behind bars

The anti-draft organizations are in shambles. duals are left alone to face 3-to-6 year sentences fusing the draft. Thousands of men have been into exile in Canada and Sweden. The bravest

30

868 the Chevron

Indivifor redriven men in

the army are choosing to go to the stockade rather than eat military shit. Stockades, federal prisons and courts are full of men who have defied the military, and who now must face the music. Unfortunately, there is no orchestra playing behind them. Additup:

Cops and courts have tried to put the national black leadership on ice, knocked the Berkeley white activist movement on its heels, over-run the campuses, wiped out many longhair communities, muted the intellectuals’ and given, with impunity, fantastic punishment to draft and GI resisters. This pattern goes a long way to explaining the malaise so many of us feel. America got where she is by jailing 4 and killing blacks and other colored peoples. If America’s own children-the brats of her white middle class-insist on acting like blacks, well, they will jail and kill us too. any Who the hell wants to “make it” in America more? The hippie-yippie-SDS movement is a “white nigger ’ ’ movement. The American economy no longer needs young whites and blacks. We-are waste material. We fulfil1 our destiny in life by rejecting a system which rejects us. I used to know all this in my head. Now I know it in my gut. In the past six months I’ve personally found out what it’s like to live in a police state. In 1964 and 1965 I was active in campus demonstrations at Berkel.ey, travel to Cuba, and anti-war actions like stopping troop trains. In those days America thought it could solve its problems with white demonstrators by quickly winning the Vietnam war. But we had other ideas, and so did the Vietnamese. The anti-war movement became part of a massive youth movement, student demonstrations spread across the country, and in the summer of 1967 America’s ghettos burned. The solution to rebellion at home became for LBJ a military one, and his administration turned the problem over to the FBI-CIA, the Red Squads, the cops and the courts. Virtually

everyone

under 30 in Manhattan

smokes

pot.

The cops use marijuana busts as a handy club against blacks, longhairs, and political activists. If you are a longhair and a political activist, you got trouble. If you are a longhair, a political activist, and black, you got real trouble. (Hello, Eldridge, ,wherever you are. ) The marijuana charge against me is a felony punishable by 2-15 years in the state pen. When I arrived in Chicago for the yippie festival, I found three shifts of plainclothes cops hounding me Chicago police harnight and day. It was typical assment. Round the clock they tailed the half dozen people they thought were “leaders.” They were there ’ when we went to bed at night and they were there when we got up in the morning. For me they cooked up a special treat. Daley sent an undercover cop, Robert Pierson, alias Bob Lavon, to infiltrate the yippies, act as agent provocateur, spy on me, and frame me on a serious felony rap. At lo:30 p.m. Wednesday, August 28, while looking for a restaurant, I was kidnapped off a nearly empty downtown street by four Chicago plainclothes pigs. I was threatened with beating and death, slugged, bullied, and told: “YOU guys ruined our city. You, Rubin are responsible. Do you like our city. 7 We hope you do because we are going to put you in jail here for a long time.” By chance, Jack Mabley, a columnist for the conservative Chicago American, happened to be in the streets when I was picked up. This is how he described what happened: “No blood flowed in one of the most ominous happenings. Jerry Rubin. . .was walking west on Washington.. . . A girl was with him.. . . . “An unmarked car with four policemen skidded to a stop besides Rubin. Three men jumped out. ‘Come on Jerry, we want you,’ one girl screamed, ‘We haven’t done anything! We were just walking.’ “I have heard Rubin speak, and he was obscene and revolting. In America a man may be arrested for obscenity or revolution. But Rubin was grabbed off the street and rushed to jail because of what he thinks. “This is the way it is done in Prague. This is what happens to candidates who finish second in Vietnam. This is not the beginning of the police state, it IS the police state.” I was then accused of a wild assortment of charges and bail was set at $25,000, more than the usual bail for accused murderers. Whenever I come to Chicago for court appearances the press treats me like a yippie Richard Speck. The Judge has officially restricted my travel to Illinois. The court system, of course, is under Daley’s thumb. It all adds up to a one-way ticket for me to five years in the Illinois state pen and revenge for Richard J. Daley.

An official government document which the Department of- Justice admitted in December to a Virginia aPpeals court admitted that it maintains “electronic surveillance” of me. is tendering herewith to It says: “the government this court a sealed exhibit containing transcripts of conversations in which appellant Rubin was a participant or at which he was present which were overheard by means of electronic surveillance.” Electronic surveillance! The government admits that it maintains either a phone tap or a house bug, or both, on my life. In other words, there is nothing that I can do in the privacy of my own home that does not go into some secret Big Brother tape recorder ! The New York cops, using an illegal search warrant on June 13 and phony drug charges; the Chicago cops, using an agent provocateur and spy; the Department of Justice, using bugging; and the Chicago courts. using frame-up felony charges. $25,000 bail, and travel restrictions, have joined together in a criminal conspiracy to deprive me of my civil rights. These are days when one asks himself the most basic questions about the movement: Is it real or transparent? Does it just concern issues, or is it a whole new life style? Could the government break ,it apart with concessions? Are we creating a new man, or are we a reflection ourselves of the system we hate so much? Are we a new brotherhood, or are we just a tangle of organizations and competing egos. 7 What will happen when we reach age 30 and 407

I am not sure myself, and what I think often depends on how I feel when I wake up in the morning. And this is one of the differences between the black and white movements. For blacks the liberation movement is a struggle against physical and mental oppression. For whites, the movement is an existential choice. One way to feel whether or not we have something real is to see how people relate to one another in trouble. In the past the movement has left the casualties of the last battle to their own individual fates as it moved on to the next dramatic action. Many activists have even been forced to turn to their parents for help, rather than to the movement which is trying to overthrow their parents’ institutions. How can we ask young kids to take risks in a movement which doesn’t defend its own? My brother is 20 years old and his eyes often ask me that question. The movement is more concerned with ideological debate, organizational games, and in fighting than with creating a family. But our movement is only as strong as the friendships within it. Our only real strength is in our identification with one another. That collective identification then becomes the greatest challenge to the cops and courts: Mess with him and you’ve got me to deal with too.

If 1968 was “The Year of the Heroic Guerrilla”’ then 1969 will be “The Year of the Courts.” We must attack the myths surrounding the courts as ferociously as we have attacked the American myths of war, apple pie, your friendly neighborhood cop, and “free elections. ” Lenny Bruce put it right: “In the Halls of Justice, the only justice is in the halls.” Courts come on as sacred as churches. Judges act like they just got off the last plane from heaven.. . . . To challenge the courts is to attack American society at its roots. In campus rebellions, the most revolutionary demand, the demand that can never be granted by the administration, is the demand for amnesty. Attacking the society’s mechanism for punishing her citizens is attacking the society’s very basis for control and repression. Americans like to believe that this is a country of “fair play.” We ought to organize tours for the American people of their courts and jails. Remember the legend of Spartacus. The Romans slaughtered all the slaves, but the moral example lives on. When the Roman Army came to kill Spartacus, they faced a mass of thousands of slaves. They demanded that Spartacus step forward. “I am Spartacus! ” shouted one slave. “No, I am Spartacus! ” shouted another. “No, I am Spartacus! ” “No, I am Spartacus! ” “No, I am Spartacus! ” With love, Jerry Rubin (with a little help from my friends, Nancy Kurshan, Martin Kenner, Arthur Naiman, Stew Albert, Gumbo, Jim Petras, David Stein, Sharon Krebs, Ken Pitchford, Robin Palmer.)

distributed

by LNS


John makes a decision If you look at page 10, you can see one of the weirdest bits of ‘logic’ ever to grace the pages of the _ Chevron. This ‘logic’ appears in an ad in which federation president John Bergsma tells us all why he is staying on in the presidency, despite the non-confidence motion which was passed at Monday’s general meeting. Bergsma records for us the general meeting vote and then goes on to say that since the student council backed him and defeated a similar motion later in the evening, he will not consider resigning. He does not quibble with the results of the afternoon meeting. He bases his decision on the feel-:.’ ing of two-thirds of his council and’ the fact that “this is a critical period in council operations.” Qthers in his retinue, however, are saying that he should not resign because he only lost by six, or because it was late when the vote was taken. But what is most interesting is that Bergsma and his supporters feel they can accept the result of the vote which restricted bail support to on-campus people, which also passed by a narrow margin, and not accept the result of the non confidence vote. Admittedly the number of people at the meeting dropped after the bail motion was passed, but those who left obviously represented both sides of the second question. Added to the considerable number of people who opposed the Sir George bail loan and then crossed to vote non-confidence in Bergsma were the many students who obviously didn’t feel they supported their president enough to stay the extra few minutes for the second vote, which they knew was coming UP.

Turning to other non-confidence motions we’ve had this year, we must ask if the Iler council said “Oh, we only lost by a narrow margin considering the size of the campus. ” They didn’t. They went to the people to find out and as a result the “radical” strength of council was lessened. Bergsma asked his council, many of them people who ran on his ticket, if they still wanted him. Iler could have done the same, probably with more ego-building results. Our president is trying to snow us with the idea of this being a critical period in council operations. As far as the budget goes, it is a convenient time, not a critical one. The new financial year does not start until may 1 and there is nothing to stop the federation from carrying , on using day-to-day executive decisions over the slowest part of the .year until council with new or re-affirmed leadership brings down a final budget in may or june. The practice of holding summer meetings is now two years old. As far as “negotiations regarding university government” and the search for a new university president are concerned, those arguments are so much obfuscation. Neither of these is crucial and anything that has to be done will be handled as well by the people involved if John is on the campaign trail or not. It is evident that dissatisfaction with #John Bergsma is running high. It is only by making your feelings known and by convincing some of those hesitant potential leaders inthe wings to accept the challenge that we will get the quality of leadership we need.

Appearing

in Waterloo:

3 march 1969

Changing- the priorities Only a second-rate faculty wouid tolerate a second-rate library. Yet tolerate it Uniwat’s faculty does, and it has lots of companythe administration and the student council. At all levels the official approach to our library problem is in the same condition as our book holdings-ten years behind the times. Only within the library itself can any officials be found working hard to provide the best service possible within the budget. Within the administration, money is much more likely to be spent on garbage trucks which show a paper profit (saving) over a 20year period than on books that show no return at all. The new student council has ignored the issue because no properchannels solution seems available.

A Canadian Liberation

University Press member, News Service subscriber.

And the faculty have been sidetracked by red-herring arguments that increased costs could mean holds on salary raises. They don’t know the truth because the deans don’t show them the operating portion of the budget, only the academic allocation. In its entirety the problem of locating funds for books is farreaching. At its base lies a government that wants larger universities in order to keep unemployment hidden but does not want to pay the cost for quality in that education. The universities’ bureaucratic and the government’s pro-rich priorities must be changed. Since neither the student council, the administration nor the faculty will do so, in this case the task falls to people being ignored. The students.

THE

Underground

Press Syndicate

associate

member,

the Chevron is published every friday by the.publications board of the Federation of Students (inc), Unii/ersity of Waterloo. Content is independent of the publications board, the student council and the university administration. Offices in the campus center,phone (519) 744-6111, local 3443 (news and sports), 3444 (ads), 3445 (editor), direct nightline 7448111, telex 0295-748. publications board chairman: Gerry Wootton 11,200 copies

editor=inchief: Stewart Saxe managing editor: Bob Verdun news editor: Ken Fraser features editor: Alex Smith photo editor: Gary Robins entertainment editor: Rod Hickman editorial associate: Steve Ireland Struggling through the essay and mid-way-the-end-of-term-exam rut and somehow the paper gets finished with the deadlines not quite invisible in the rear-view mirror. Looking back at this issue: Jim Bowman, circulation manager; Ross ‘crackle’ Taylor, sports coordinator; Bill Brown, assistant news editor; Frank Goldspink, coming-back bureau; Kevin Peterson, he’s tries harder; Anne Banks, Brenda Wilson, Paul Woolner, Al Lukcahko, Jim Dunlop, Tom Patterson, Phil Elsworthy, Carol Jones, Lorna Eaton, Cyril Levitt, Glenn Pierce, Ann Stiles, Rod Mick!ebu,rgh, Phil Bingley (so straight), Paul MacRae, Bruce Timmons, -Dave Prentice, Martin Ahrens, Maudie Silcox, other schmalz slaves that will go unnoticed this week, Doug Houghton, Peter Hopkins, Rick Powell, Jim Detenbeck, Wayne Bradley, Dave Stephenson, John Pickles, Maribeth Edwards, George Loney, Rich Lloyd, Matti Nieminen, and for all staff there is a TCUP happening tonight at R.obins’ (among others) place: 137 university avenue west, apt 1009-and the regular staff meeting is monday at 8.

“Shouldn’t

someone be speaking out about this?” friday,

march

7, 7969 (9:46)

869

-3 1


1.N MEMORIAM The Sir George Case

32

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