Page 1

Volume

9 Number

UNIVERSITY

39

OF WATERLOO,

Waterloo,

Ontario

Friday, January

24,196g

ncfon no MONCTON (CCJP )-Students and faculty at 1‘lJniversite de Moncton went back to classes yesterday.

Leading candidate in WLUS test, Juala Bare, said she finds

egina

Canadian university queen conbeauty contests dehumanizing.

students

Students had been split on whether to strike to strengthen demands for the resignation of administration president Adelard Savoie and four of his executives. A two-day vote ending Tuesday in favor of a strike was reversed Wednesday afternoon when 65 per cent of the 1,400 students voted by a slim majorit,v to return to classes, suspending strike action pending a response to their demands by the provincial government. The campus has been in a state of turmoil since Saturday January 11 when 100 students ocupied the science building to demand more government aid for French-language schools in the province. Faculty support for student demands reached a peak Friday when, after a seven-hour meeting, the faculty association recommended formation of an arbitration commission consisting of three students and three administrators. The faculty also: e supported student demands for

federal aid, although they did not support the occupation itself. l called for a three day campuswide study session to discuss the crisis. l demanded better facilities and co-management of the university by students, faculty and administra tion. l demanded publication of the university budget, now a confidential document. Students went along with faculty demands and were going to leave the building voluntarily but were forced to devise new tactics when they learned late Friday night Savoie had rejected the faculty proposal for an arbitration commission and had called police to clear out the science building. Saturday morning 60 city police and a number of RCMP arrived on campus, but their task was simplified when students decided to leave without resistance. A few hours later, at a meeting attended by 300 students the student council voted unanimously in favor of a strike “until administration president Adelard Savoie and four of his executives resign.” Faculty support grew Saturday. the first day of the teach-in. when

close negotiations

Regina ( CUP )-University of Saskatchewan students reversed themselves Tuesday January 21 at an emergency meeting called over negotiations with their administration. About a quarter of the 4,000 student campus turned out to vote slightly in favor of closing the negotiating sessions as their union and the administration try for a settlement in the fees fight here. Last week the campus voted for

open meetings. However the administration replied that open sessions would force it to maintain its position on refusing to collect student union fees because of student union support of the newspaper, the Carillon. In a complicated supplementary motion, the students also enabled the union to break off negotiations if it wishes. The motion also authorized the union to collect its second term fees on an interim basis to

The external-relations board Monday unanimously decided to support retention of the Canadian LTnion of Students (CUSi on this campus. The CLJS referendum vote is scheduled for ,January 29 the same day as the presidential election. The decision made by the board in favor of CUS came after a short discussion period. Chairman Jim Pike is wholly in favor of CUS. He feels there are two groups on campus, the ones in favor of CUS and the ones who want no publicity about the coming referendum in order to quietly remove CUS. Pike wishes to justify CUS to the students for what it is, namely a national student program. His suggestion was to set up a speaking program around campus. pitting pro-CiJS speakers against anti-CUS people. Tom Patterson, chairman of the domestic-affairs commission said many people are scared of CL]? and that if the referendum is kept quiet CUS membership will be lost. He feels there is a 50-50 chance of retaining membership if the thing is handled well.

Pike and Patterson are to set the speaking program, Names mentioned for the prowere Ed Anger from gram Lutheran, Murray 1Jnderwood from Waterloo, Martin Loney from CUS and any other prominent people who are available.

operate a reduced program of activities and continue publication of the Carillon Other sections of the motion called for programs to educate the Saskatchewan public on the issues by linking with public organizations publishing papers and speaking to as many groups as possible. \Vith the student stand clarified negotiations were to continue behind closed doors Wednesday. There were threats of a student strike last week if no agreement

was reached in the talks involving eight Regina campus students and eight Administrators. Meanwhile at the university’s sister campus in Saskatoon student leaders were awaiting more conCrete action from Regina before responding to the board of governor’s December 31 statement on the Regina union and its paper. :!t one point student councillors were contemplating joint negotiations with the administrations of both campuses to settle the administrative role in collecting student union fees.

faculty joined students demands for Savoie’s resignation. Sunday the faculty began to split over the student council call for a general strike and Monday morning the f’acult! executive resigned fearing “radical action” by faculty. The issue was further complicated Monday when Jean Louis Levesquc. the Vniversity’s largest contributor. announced he is withdrawing support from the university. The announcement. coming ironically during a student struggle for more financial aid. will swing faculty support further awa>. t’rom the students. according to LIoncbton student leaders. The controvers>v ccnters around student demands that the go\‘ernment give the school a grant ot $32 million over the next t\vo years and that hali the provincial education budget be set aside for French-language education. .-2ccording to one student spokesman. the university has received only $1 million during its first five years. while the university of New Brunswick was giGen $22 million last year. Some 35 percent of the New Brunswick population is Frenchspeaking. The latest decision followed a Wednesday morning student meeting with 1000 in attendance. addressed by Savoie. Savoie reported that Tuesday’s day-long board of governors meeting ratified his actions in calling in police to clear students from the science buiiding. They decided not to bring action against the occupants. Students met the report with mixed reactions. The faculty have begun to take up a different tactic. They are planning to hold joint student-faculty study sessions next month and will be petitioning the provincial and federal governments for more aid.

up

When asked for comments on the board’s decision federation president John Bergsma said he had mixed emotions. While he feels CUS is a necessary organization for Canadian students he believes there is a lot of re-organization needed before the union is really worthwhile. Bergsma defined the externalrelations board’s function as far as the CUS referendum goes as being educative. The next council meeting will have to take a stand on CUS although council declined to do so at its last meeting. Bergsma said the idea of the referendum was to give the students a choice themselves. But if council adopts the minutes of the board’s meeting, including the proposal to support CUS, it will, in effect, be approving a retention of CUS membership.

Universal indeed,

Rodent (who has appeared before as a muskrat and a gopher) said Groulldhog is but pleaded for mercy from any demoralizing groundhog hunts during the ~cek.


New The proposed college of environmental studies was the only item on the agenda of the arts faculty council meeting Tuesday. Jack Ellis, electrical engineering professor, outlined the content and th.e scope of a report written by himself and three others to the meeting. The two hours of debate that followed were terminated by another meeting and the feeling that it was supper time. The suggestion of the fourman committee is to form a new college composed of architecture. geography and planning, and a man-environment division, in order to facilitate the study of

Crawford three to one in Village Despite the - Village Informer columnist who advocated regular people’s Village revolutions, Village elections were held Wednesday. Al Crawford, psych 2, was elected president over Jim Detenbeck, civil 3A, as 39 percent of the Village turned out to vote. ’ The vote Crawford.

Radio

was

Elections for Village council were also conducted. The representatives from east quadrant are Paul Cotton, Anne Banks and Bob Siddal; from west Don Godard, Mike Greenspoon and Walt McGregor; from south Cathy Johnson, Bob Wikman, Bill Nelson and Oev Wain. In north Carol Cline and Peter Desroches were acclaimed One seat in north is still vacant.

334. to 111 for

Waterloo

back

Radio Free Waterloo resumes broadcasting Monday with an expanded service. Radio Waterloo now has 27 announcers to handle news sports and weather, not to mention music. They will be on the air noon to midnight Monday to Friday. For the first few weeks Radio Waterloo will be broadcasting only to the campus center and a couple lounges at Waterloo Lutheran. But

‘The spirit

of Che

hop

lives

The discussion centered around two topics ; the relationship of the college of environmental studies to the rest of the university, and the question of orientation to disciplinary study or to problem-solving. The first difficulty brought up was that if the geography and planning department left arts, would the psychology and sociology departments also leave, and would the faculty then create new departments for the people interested in these subjects. but not

in iock

engineers

Waterloo engineers are the radicals of the Ontario engineering students. They tried to drag their colleagues into the present era of student representation. The APE0 (Association of Professional Engineers, Ontario 1 sponsored last weekend’s Conference of Engineering Societies. A resolution was passed favoring student representation on fafulty councils but Waterloo found little support for reps on examination and promotions committees. Hazing and harassment of freshmen during orientation was condemned. The conference worked toward increased communication among the societies and set up a central clearing house for engineering

at Uniwat

to happen

gymkhana

Carleton

subscription mail

fee by

the

included Post

in Office

upset with

Pearson’s

OTTAWA (CUP)-The student council at Carleton University is unhappy with the way things were done in securing the appointment of former prime minister Lester Pearson as chancellor. Council voted 14 to 5 for a motion objecting to Pearson’s unilateral appointment by the board of governors. Student president Jerry Lam-

their department,

Erb Street

WATERLOO -w

!-I?

KING

and YOUNG

WATERLOO

General

ST. K-W’s most complete source for imported cars.

Mechanic Ontario

Phone

285-289

and

Duke

742-1404

ON PARTS

and ACCESSORIES

576-9600

Victoria

N. (South

of Lancaster)

Streets Kitchener

Ontario

WATERLOO

WATERLOO

SQUARE

- Phone

a

743-1651

10% STUDENT

university POST

Ave.

DISCOUNT

The nearest

W.

OFFICE

Groceries

-

cleaners

Sundries

Depot

to the

for

BELMONT CLEANERS

&

University

TAILORS

Phone 742-2016

student

fees

entitles

Ottawa,

and

for

U of payment

W

students

to

receive

of

postage

in

cash.

the Send

Chevron address

by changes

mail

during promptly

off-campus to:

The

terms. Chevron,

Non-students: University

SQUARE

SH 4-2181 Custom gunsmithing Rebarrehng Rechambering Restocking

MORROW CONFECTIONER l(bs

- ONTARIO

I

IO/OO STUDENT DISCOUNT

742-l 35 1

Repairs Licensed

East

MtiPORTED CAR CE

BERNIE’S SHELL SERVICE

‘69

annual

post

pert said later. “It had nothing to do with personality, just in the method.” “Legally they are right and we recognize that.” Lampert said. But he maintains the board should have informed students in advance of Pearson’s appointment. Council also voted 14 to 5 against attempting to delav the appoint.. ment.‘ -

Eleven

In addition to the usual excitement generated by this event, the club will hold a car smash at 12 : 30; and also hopes to have a few personalities from the world of racing make a guest appearance during the afternoon. Last year’s event was highlighted by the appearance of Bill Brock and Craig %ll with some competition Lotuses. class

radical at McGill in February. Han-ever. Western was conspicuou;l!absent from the \\.aterloo conference and Toronto appeared only half a da>.. Thus the .block” is not being considered ‘1 solid en:husiastic body.

OPTOMETRIST

I

petitors and there will be trophy presented in each class.

A

most

Murray S. Munn

had threatened to eat Ovi for making too much noise. Meyer denied any knowledge of the act. After several anonymous phonecalls the searchers were led to the room of Ivan Simpson, residence terrorist. The fish was found submerged in about six inches of water with only a stream of bubbles leading to the surface. Confronted by a growing number of enraged searchers, Simp~~~tre~~;:‘dn’B~~b~et.~~v~w~~~nr , framed.” His relieved neighbor Tennyson would only comment that the whole thing seemed a little fishy.

On Saturday. ,January 25, 1969, the Waterloo College Autosport Club is presenting its fourth annual gymkhana in conjunction with Waterloo Lutheran University’s winter carnival. The Gymkhana, or as some prefer, driving skill contest, will commence at 10 am and will run on two courses so as to accommodate an ever increasing number of entrants. There will be four classes of competition; European, American, studded tires, and female com-

Jan Narveson, philosophy then proposed the possibility of a comman first two years for all students. and referred to changes in the engineering curriculum as the first step.

hut

happily

ends

Cur smash highlights

Terry Qualter. political science. and David Kirk. sociology. suggested the college of environmental studies is similar in principle to the idea of a liberal arts education and that this idea could be applied the whole university.

publications. There were also discussions between students and the APE0 to bring closer relations between them in future. Some felt an Ontario power block was created for the Congress of Engineering Students to be held

The band will be presenting its entertainment on the upper level of the gym in the recreation center. As a minor attraction the Warriors Band has engaged the services of the Penelope Road to provide musical relief for (or from) their own efforts.

fishnapping

678 The CHEVRON

Waterloo

background includes several seasons with the Stratford Festival Company. Some might recognize Smith as a well-known folksinger. Smith, a revolutionary himself, presents Che as an internationalist, far ahead of his time, revealing his concern for humanity. The play dwells on the ordinary individual who houses all his frustrations within for a better way of life. With revolution so much a part of modern life, this play is a must for every one to see.

A campus-wide search for a kidnapped goldfish ended Tuesday night when it was found less than 30 feet from its home. Safe and sound, although slightly waterlogged, is Ovi, pet of Jim Tennyson of Renison College. Ovi disappeared when a gang of toughs who live on his floor entered Tennyson’s room and made off with the finng fellow. The frantic father was soon presented with a ransom note demanding two cans of Mountain Dew. A search party led by A.C. “Sherlock” Hurst first accosted Tennyson’s roommate Paul Meyer who earlier, in a drunken rage,

2

future involve into the Village dining lounge> at St. Jerome’s Dame colleges.

Radio Waterloo is applying for an FM license and if all goes well it will be on the air next September.

The group which challenged the Tijauna Brass for the best band in North America title is putting on a pep-rally and socque-hoppe tomorrow night. For 25 cents the Warriors Band will provide basketball fans with a dance after the game with Western.

Renison

waves

environmental studies? It was felt the disintegration of the arts faculty is both unnecessary and undesirable.

the near

And Radio Waterloo officials hope to eventually include Minota and campus coffee HWY shops in their broadcast area.

Che lives agin. Che Guevara, Argentine, lawyer, and close friend of Castro conducted Cuban revolutionary activity in Bolivia where he was captured and beheaded about two years ago. Sunday, February 16 at 8:30 pm, the Toronto Workshop Productions will perform the play Cke Guevara in the theater of the arts. Che Guevara, written by Mario Fratti, has met with exceptional success during its five-week run in Toronto. It is currently being shown in St. Catharines. Cedric Smith, who plays the title role is a Waterloo man whose

Two-bit

on the plans for expansion halls, and and Notre

problems such as the distribution of water resources, pollution, and urban development.

$4 of

Waterloo,

annually.

Authorized Waterloo,

as Ontario.

second-


Pure math uptight hanges by Syd Nestel Chevron staff

The post office in the basement of the campus center opened this week. It is open daily 9:30 am to 4:30 pm.

Lacks

Rumors are flying around the math faculty this week. The feeling of some is that the top men in math-dean David Sprott and associate deans Ken Fryer and Arthur Beaumont-were trying to make the math curriculum more technically oriented. The rumors stem from an interoffice memo released to all department chairmen. It reads in part: “. . .a minority of students are planning on research careers in mathematics.. .It is to applied areas that we must pay considerable attention and possibly we

information

Federation president John Bergsma says he wants the Ontario Union of Students to hold a conference in February (three months ahead of schedule) because he is unfamiliar with the organization. several other council presidents Coincidentally, are asking for a February conference for other reasons. Bergsma’s request was in a letter Monday to OUS president Brian Switzman in which Bergsma council president stated. “I am a recently-elected and have some interest in the operations of OUS and some interest in meeting with representatives from other Ontario universities.” Bergsma continued: “The most recent information that I have is that of the Glendon (College 1 conference in May 1968. In light of these facts I wollld like to request the convening of a conference sometime during the month of February.”

Seat

allotment

How many representatives will there be on the student council next year? Two answers are available. One says there should be 25 and the other says there should be 27. Every year council seats must be allocated among faculties, schools and colleges on the basis of the most recent enrolment

Election results will be lute Presidential results will be delayed because of a computer The mailing lables breakdown. for out-term ballots have not been printed by -the machine, meaning the return of these ballots will be delayed. Results of the presidential elections will be released February 3.

Bergsma made the request on his own initiative and the matter has yet to appear before either his executive board or the student council. Bergsma’s only experience so far in r’elations with other universities was the anti-CUS conference at Waterloo Lutheran after Christmas which he attended as an observer. Several other Ontario universities were represented there. Members of the OUS executive are questioning Bergsma’s request. because he didn’t request information-only a conference. OUS just held a conference in October and recently there have been other requests for a February confrence. George Hunter of Carleton had been agitating among OUS members for a conference, and OUS vicepresident Ken Stone said Wednesday there have been requests from Waterloo, Queen’s, Carleton, Ontario College of Art and Waterloo Lutheran.

in question

figures. Federation bylaws contain a fairly simple formula for this redistribution. Constituencies receive seats in proportion to their size with the provision that each constituency must have at least one seat. The federation executive gave student-activities chairman the Jim Belfry the job of figuring out the distribution of council seats. He decided the distribution should be the same as last year which is: arts 4 1 architecture engineering i 4 math phys-ed 1 3 science grads 3 1 Renison St. Jerome’s 1 25 total

But a couple Chevron staffers sat down with the federation bylaws and the registrar’s report on enrolment. and after a bit of arithmetic came up with the following figures: arts 4 architecture 1 7 engineering math 5 1 phys-ed science 3 4 grads Renison 1 St,. Jerome’s 1 total 27 Belfry said he had obtained his figures from the coordination department but they were not available for verification. There is no indication how this discrepancy will be resolved or what effect it will have on the council elections on February 19.

should offer some other degree in mathematics. . . .Another degree, for example a B. of Math SC. should be given to those students who are mainly concerned with applications.” Certain pure math professors felt this would turn the math faculty into little more than a mathematically oriented engineerIn addition there ing program. was a charge that pure math was being excluded from the curriculum committee. The terms of Henry Crapo and Ralph Staal, both of pure math, are over and the executive committee’s nominations for the vacancies-Harry Davis and Avis Forbes-are both staunch applied math men. Fryer and Beaumont both sit on the executive committee. When Fryer was asked to cornmerit on the proposed curriculum changes he said they were nonexistent. When confronted with a copy of the memo he denied having ever seen it before, although the memo indicated a copy had been sent to him. Beaumont proved to be more helpful. When asked to comment on the charge that no more pure math professors were being hired for three or four years, he elaborately explained why. Asked if this meant he was confirming the charge he said, no. On justifying the proposal in general Beaumont noted: “Math is the in-thing now. You’ll be seeing more mathematicians in management. Industry needs math. But industry doesn’t hire pure mathematicians. Industry

President candidates all support cus All three candiates for president ’ preted as sanction for the organization as presently constituted. of the Federation of Students Ron Golemba, psych 3. is agree on one element involved in *‘definitely in favor of retaining the CUS referendum WednesCUS.” He questioned what. if anyday: CUS, they believe, needs thing, Waterloo could do to change to be changed in certain areas; further, such change would best be the union if it drops out. implemented from within the “Some structural changes are certainly needed. Hopefully. this organiza tion itself. will persuade Incumbent president John Berthe universities which have dropped out to return. gsma said he believes strongly in the need for a national stuBut such changes should be instituted within CUS. dent organization. He feels CUS has a number of good points, Larry Burko (arts 3 1, stressed but, also, has organizational that CUS has many good points and shortcomings. many bad points. “Because I’m not in favor of “The good things are the travel CUS as it is presently, I don’t. and insurance plans, and the conwane to take a definite stand. I cern for society. But CUS is not think the whole point of the referrepresentative and reform is endum is to let, the students make needed here. ” Burko, too, feels rea decision by democratic proform from within is most desircess. ” able. But he declined to state a Although, he personally favors personal opinion in relation to the change from within, Bergsma referendum. stressed that his taking a stand “CUS has many good points and in support of CUS could be intermany bad points.. . . ‘* he repeated.

Building

fund adds slowly

The progress of the Tenth Anniversary Fund has been very slow. The. fund which was started in 1967 with an objective of $5,500.000 has now only reached $3,684,658.54. The campaign was divided into geographical divisions such as Toronto, London and Sarnia. Development director <Jack Hemphill, said the campaign was still active and that two more divisions, Hamilton andToronto, have just started.

Chevron staffer Pete Wilkinson gleefully (shristens the new coke machine outside the Chevron office, having waited three thirsty months for its arrival. Not to be outdone food services installed a pepsi machine several hours later.

needs applied research. ’ * When asked if this meant that the university’s purpose was to serve industry, he chuckled. “Young men and women realize that in order to achieve the positions they aspire to they need a degree.” When asked for a more coherent definition of the university’s purpose, he refused to comment. Beaumont became irritated when pressed on the issue and accused the people who make these charges of being uninformed.” Are these people aware of what is going on in the real world...are they aware of what is required in the world.” When Crapo, acting chairman of pure math heard of these cornments he remarked that this is typica1 of “their” attitude. He claimed that pure math and research were essential to mathematical development and more important than technical math. This ;jittlr all was the field of the scientists and engineers. “Just bec’;ilI>t‘ Forbes t statistics ) uses CountIn: in his cigarette tests doc?;n t make that math.” The issue \vas partiall!. lx++ ved at Tuesda>.‘s math la(*ultJ. council meeting. Crapo had done estensi\re lobbying preceding the meeting. The results were that pure math rt’tained one of the members at large on the curriculum comnomination was mittee. Davis’ withdrawn and professor D.Z. Djocovig of pure math was appointed instead. The conflict will now be worked out in the curriculum committee. It promises to be a long hard battle.

Both Hempill and Al Adlington. vicepresiden t operations. said they hoped the fund would reach $4,250,000 by the end of the year. Adlington said the balance would come from as yet unfound sourFriday,

ces such as interested foundation: and private sources. There is speculation that Co10 nel Samuel McLaughlin. forme. chairman of General Motors. ha: been approached for a donatior of $250,000. McLaughlin receivec an honourary doctorate of engi neering in October. iAdlington saic no one has as yet personally ap prokhed him. LMcLaughlin is nov in Bermuda. Negotiations seem to be undej wav Adlington sairi L “1 would bc I. a iiar if I said I had not lookez into j t”. Student council Iast year plea ged a half million dollars to th fund. Each student is assesset $10 annually which is return able on request. January

24, 7969 f9:39)

679

2


re hiot

Froren-

We Cut The Film,

Potatoes

knowlton

collister

PURE

I

BEEF

King & Weber

PAR-l-

FOUR.

1215 in which a potpourri of thoughts column going) and another Al finds * * *

is presented the spotlight.

(to

keep

AI-I

One thing you learn in this business of reporting rumor and speculation is to be constantly ready to change your predictions as new gossip reaches your ears. And so this week we advise those of you who are making book on this game not to rule out Doug Wright as a possibility. Our previous suggestion that Doug was heading for a position in that greatest bureaucracy of all-the federal government-may yet prove untrue. Doug has, after all, spent about three years setting up the system of university-government relations in Ontario and he is probably the only man at Queen’s Park who really knows how it runs. With an empire like that going for you why head for new ground‘? It is also interesting that Al Adlington is publicly betting that Doug will finally get the big job. Although that may be nothing more than a smoke screen. :I1 has by no means given up and still looks hard to see what ads he can --un in the Chevron to get his name in front of everyone. In January 10th’s issue he used the excuse of informing the students who were just coming on campus of the parking regulations. I’nfortunately for Al. Howie Petch’s high-class ads for his Petch peeve forums out-do Al’s efforts by a mile. Howie deserves credit for planning ahead, since he started having his ads appear a good few weeks before the presidential campaign became big news.

International “MURIEL”. woman who,

Film Muriel feeling

Series,

tells of a the ap-

proach of middle age, writes to her lover of fifteen years before, asking him to come and visit her. The man is now married but he arrives with his mistress. There is also in the house an adopted son who has just returned from military service and has difficulty in adjusting himself tc normal life. The film is made up of

:\rts dean *Jay Minas’s recent move to establish good relations with the students by employing outcast and jobless engineer (and former federation president) Brian Iler. is also worthy of consideration. .Jay’s approach to the campaign would seem to emphasize cooperation among students. faculty and administration and pushes the idea that mutual understanding is the key to all our problems. Iler. softspoken and loved-by-all. would seem to be a good key to student support for the liberal line. Even if *Jay finally sells out to Howie for the academic vicepresidency (as we have predicted 1 the manoeuvre has good propaganda value.

encounters,

Available

at

Resnais’ there is at once the compelling power and the futility of memory,

SHOES

: + .,

DINE&

King

DANCE

St. TV.

Pi-lone

Series ticket,

745-71t24

Students

IN THE

6. 139FEB. C WINTER TATION: By C.N. TION: Sleeping ent responsible + 3.35 Damage

17

In Canada)

- Private Train for 420 stu Bags in dorms for his own sleeping bag) Deposit

om sale 1200 - I :0 s, Engineering Foyer, For further Informati ircle K office 30 E

$3,50 $1.50 ‘

Jhurs.,

(Largest

sometimes

3remeditated, sometimes accidental, of these characters,

PARR 150

,‘ind speaking of great political shifts brings to mind Allan Nelson. politlcal science fuehrer. Occasionally we run across people who actually believe Nelson is seeking the highest office himself. but such thoughts are usually found in unfriendly minds I not uncommon at all these days). Il’ indeed he is after the regal post. he pulled a real boner which caused the battle-lines to be drawn in his department. The ruling junta fired two popular professors last term and split the department. True to the form of political science departments. the elite didn’t maintain solidarity and secrecy--John Wilson. sornetime socialist, made it public that the unpopular decision had been the work of one man. No one doubted who that man was and Nelson’s already questionable popularity dropped. Now he seems doomed to have to settle for the dean of arts post at best. and that is based on Minas’s either going up or giving up. A shifting of posts which left Nelson without a chair might be a good thing for him. Even some of his best friends have been discouraged by his two-year move to the right. Once a great super-liberal, it might do him some good to be without an empire after his chairmanship expires. He might be able to sit back and rediscover his philosophy of life.

13, FREE.

amuary 26

4. * *.

6230 The 6HEVRQ.N

pm

this

. - Fri.

YCIWCLE

K

Campus

Fri. and Sat.


-is the time to join a vital organization and . to participate in the decisions that form its goals and -that organiza tion will be able to immediately HEVRON STAFF MEETING UNDAY AT IOpm IN THE

John Geiger, math 3, does his thing at the University Avenue entrance to the campus. Geiger is one of eight students *working for the university to man the information kiosk between 9 am and 8:3Q pm. Students took over the booth on a regular basis january 6.

PHI

Have Waterloo students seized main entrance to the university?

control

of the

This is one question visitors half-jokingly ask when stopping at the information kiosk off University Avenue. It has been regularly staffed since January 6 with students rather than campus cops. Eight students were hired through Circle K’Campus Manpower program by Clarke Mercredy, assistant to the operations vicepresident. Be-

Pizza Palace Pizza: up against the wall. Yup, if YOU put Fred’s pizza boxtop up against a wall you

may

get your order free. orders a day may win. And you can get it anytime between 11 am and 2 am at 7444446 or 7444447. EAT IT.

T

TWO

I T

FEDERATIQN

CWS

of STUDENTS

REFEREN

On Wednesday January 29 1969 the following referendum will be held in conjunction with the presidential election. Mark only choices

one

of

the

following

two

1.

Resolved that the Federation of Students, University of Waterloo, retain membership in the Canadian Union of Students. 2. Resolved that the Federation of Students, University of Waterloo, withdraw from membership in the Canadian of Students. * * * The results of the referendum will be binding on the student council, the referendum having been called by a student council president. Ballots polling sidential

will be available at the same stations being used for the preelection.

The main issues in the presidential campaign seem to be student political awareness and the CUS referendum. Larry Burko, arts 3, considers it the job of the federation to keep campus political activity. at the level of awareness of the average student. He thinks most students interests are apolitical and these interests should be catered to. To do this Burko would show people where their $22 student fees are going by sponsoring many free concerts and dances throughout the year. Burko would also attempt to affect a change in the editorial policy of the Chevron to bring it to the campus level of political involvement. Commenting on the apparent lack of campaigning on the part of federation president John Bergsma Burko said: “Bergsma is insulting the voters even more than I was in the last campaign. His refusal to campaign only expresses his condescending view of the intelligence of the people on campus. He expects the voters to come out on election day even though he is incapable of doing anything for them and refuses to campaign so they can see this”. On CUS Burko views such things as the travel plan, insurance, and inter-campus communication facilities good but he considers it lacking in representivity. Ron Golemba, psych 3, views CUS as the main issue. He is strongly pro-CUS but thinks that minor internal changes need to be made. Golemba would like to see the Quebec student union, UGEQ, separate from CUS but he wants to see close cooperation between the two unions. Golemba wants to see a joint federation-faculty association committtee to deal with the administration : “I feel in this type of joint committee there is a very real basis of dealing with the administration to affect the best possible outcome from the point of view of those who use the university ; namely the students and faculty.” Golemba’s last major point was the turning over of grad fees to the Grad Society. He feels that

tween 9 am and 8:30 pm visitors to the campus can obtain directions and parking permits at the kiosk. Student Manpower got started when Circle Ii organized its job-finding activities. I’ntil then anyone needing temporary help had callow the club ior workers. “Since Christmas no emolovers have called. Thus may be due to rumors the iervice has f’olded.” Papazian added. The Circle K office is MC 3040, local 2113.

because of marital status, work load, and age many grads have different interests from the undergraduate student body. Therefore the Grad Society ,should handle grad affairs within the federation. In answer to Larry Burko’s charges of non-participation federation president John Bergsma said that he was participating; but merely starting later than the other two candidates. Bergsma views the three major issues as education, decisionmaking and decentralization. He wants to see programs arranged in conjunction with the faculty associations and societies.

Bergsma will coordinate course and> professorial evaluations with analyses of course structure and philosophy through the board of education with the Faculty Association. Participation in student affairs has increased, says Bergsma. Student representation on the Habitat furnishings committee has been increased to six. The student affairs review committee has 50 percent student membership. On CUS Bergsma is willing to let the referendum decide the issue. As it stands now he would like to see major organizational changes.

Mathfac bars ent reps Math faculty council kicked the Chevron out of its Tuesday meeting and the two student observers appointed by the Math Society immediatly walked out in protest. The incident occurred at the beginning of the meeting. Council chairman Ken Fryer pointed out the Chevron reporter and asked for a motion from the floor to deal with this. Henry Crapo. pure math chairman, moved that the Chevron be allowed to stay. Larry Cummings seconded the motion. After some discussion, Ralph Staal pointed out that a similar motion had been defeated at the November 17 meeting. After consulting the minutes, Fryer ruled Crapo’s motion out of order. At this point John Madgett, one of the student observers (one of three allowed to sit at faculty council meetings) raised an objection. He said he was going to introduce a motion to seat the Chevron later in the meeting. He asked if, under the circumstances, he could bring it up at this point. Fryer ruled him out of order. When Madgett persisted associate dean Arthur Beaumont burst out, “Mr. Madgett, really, we’ve been through this before. .. there is a great deal of business Friday,

Chevron, MCout

before today’s meeting, we don’t have time for this....” At this point the Chevron reporter was told to leave and did. Chevron news editor Ken Fraser was also present, but didn’t leave, maintaining he was there only as an interested math student. Fryer said he could stay only if he was the third student observer-a grad student. Fraser, second-year math, tried to discuss the point but he too was ruled out of order and was forced to leave. At this point the two Math Sot reps walked out in protest. Math Sot president Tom Berry explained, “It is federation policy not to participate in closed meetings-. I personally will not participate under these conditions. MathSoc council, however, will have to make the final decision about whether to send observers to a closed meeting. ” Berry said he would return to the meeting only if he could put forward a motion to open the meeting to all students. Math faculty council later in its meeting defeated a motion to give students voting sea’ts on the council. Other proposals for student participation are presently being studied. January

24, 1969 (9:39)

689


.I. .‘f$$&

::::,

IT TAKES

9N O-l-f0 “ANAVWON“ANAVISION-

PFIEMINGER TECHNICOLOR TECHNICOLOIT

2ND

‘?$g;.

::::&& c::.. =% ..:... ... ...:.:. ..,_:;: ......‘.‘.~.‘.~/.~....,. .. . ........ ......_ “:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.~:

‘.: ‘:I

FILM

COLOR

HIT

STEVE I’WIUEEN CRUIR mPANAYININ MON.

ONLY

“GERMAN STARTS

JAN.

27

SHOW” WED.

3RD

JAN

29th

WEEK

DAVID NIVENm

ADULT

ENTERTAINMENT

STARTS

WED,

JAN.

29

PIRLWI’., . WC,111 PlCnRf?,-“r

You may think someone has flipped their hard hat, but it’s true. Bob Harmer is a professional engineer who is the Construction Manager on the Fortress of Louisbourg restoration prciject in Nova Scotia. Wod.king from original plans found in Paris archives, Bob and his staff of engineers, who work for the National and Historic. Parks Branch of the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, are restoring the famous fortress as it was in the mid 1700s. Louisbourg and other histr,rical sites are being restored to preserve great chapters of history for future generations of Canadians. Bob Harmer is part of the new breed of people in public service.. . college 4ucated, ambitiousanddedicated. In Government service he has found a rewardingand responsible future in the mainstream of Canadian development. The Public Service of Canada has career opportunities for men and women like Bob. If you’d Iike to know about them, write to:

dlGHTLY

Al

7 & 9:30

pm

Career Info., Public Service Commission of Canada, Tower “A”, Place de Villc, Ottawa,

Ontario.

X0 ordi rmry Ime 6tor,\‘.* TECHNICOLOR’

Forrp+ciolrtudmt rotss coil

682 The CHEVRQN

:$J+JA~CO ZEFE’IRELLr

IkOMEO

Matinee Sat urday I:30 & 4:O0. No matinee this Sunfl;muI)day. 576-l 550


by Jean Miehel

The managers in the education industry are up against the wall. They can’t live without us to absorb the unemployment they must disguise. But they’re beginning to find they can’t live with us, either. And. as budgets tighten and student consciousness grows. they’re going to find that things can only get worse. The high schools are the newest f-ront.

When education minister William Davis decreed a two-week extension of the high school year, he unleashed a torrent of resistance. Why did they do it and why did the students react so vehemently? They did it because they have to. There are more than half a million secondary school students in the province of Ontario. Assume that half of them get summer jobs. Taking them out of the labor force for two weeks is the equivalent of reducing the labor force by about 10,000 man years of labor. That’s 10,000 jobs that won’t have to be provided and an automatic reduction of 10,000 in the number of unemployed and a rate of 8-10 I . Somebody in Queens Park has a good head for figures.

Summer

income

cut

From the students’ point of view, the arbitrary extension of the school year reduces their total summer income by 1 6 (2 weeks out of 12) and discriminates against them and in favor of university students in the summer job market. A clever detail, that. They can only hope in Queen’s Park that perhaps high school students will make less trouble than the unemployed university students, and maybe it will even be possible to direct their resentment away from the government and toward the university students who get the jobs that the high school students need. Further, a parent is less likely to be disgruntled if he has to aid his high school children more than he planned, instead of his university-level sons and daughters. This offers a way to reduce real incomes without it showing. All the way around. it looked like a good idea at the time. However, even though the province is making every effort to shift their unemployment problem as far down the age range as they can, t’ie universities will feel it as well. Budgets are being tightened on every campus, but contingency plans are

by being forced to stay in school. but the cost of our schooiing is. in part. being borne bv the workers. In effect we’re sharing the unemployment with them: their real incomes are reducscd to provide us with subsistence.

Hard-pressed being made to accommodate increased first-year enrollments as much as 30’1 greater than this year. Student aid will not go up to match rising enrollments. Nor will faculty hiring. which means larger classes. In fact, we need to keep a watchful eye on our big faculty brothers. They are asking for a 15 to 20’( raise in pay, but will be lucky to get 5’; . This may radicalize a few of them, however, if the Association of Teaching Staff at the I’niversity of Toronto is a typical faculty sample, most of them will get right to work thinking of ways to reduce their work loads and let the student fend for themselves. The ATS. for example, almost voted to withold final grades if their salary demands are not met. So. while we should keep trying to find ways to build ties to the faculty, we shouldn’t expect much and we should keep our guard up. We should be particularly alert to faculty and administration attempts to ease their budgetary problems by means of apparently groovy expedients. It’s clear that a great many ways to cut the budget will be dressed up as “experiments”.

Benign

short-cuts

and administered Student-generated courses ; a reduction in the number of lecture hours per course: abolition of requirements: reduction in the number of courses that the student must take: encouragement to branch out and take a variety of courses-we should expect these and other palliatives to be offered. Not that there is anything wrong with these ideas; but we must be careful not to let them get away with calling “reforms” measures that are simply expedients for them. In particular, we must take advantage of the situation to demand the maximum power that we can get. They will try to offer us specific programs and the appearance of sympathy. No matter how attractive the package

they offer. we should work to get students to demand a role in the decisionmaking process through which the program gets determined. Don’t forget that the revolution is not a course offered in a free school.

Problem

is bad

How bad is the problem? Ke have at least a couple of clues that suggests that it’s pretty bad. One is that Trudeau has hinted at the possibility of year-round operation of the schools. More efficient, he says. And it keeps young people out of the labor force while making more efficient use of teachers who are paid out of public funds. Another magic reduction in unemployment achieved by making it impossible for students to work at all. Not to mention a way to cut down on public spending by exploiting teachers. The other clue is Pelletier’s notorious suggestion of the civilian draft. It would be foolhardy of us to suppose that they’ve given up the idea just because there was such a torrent of negative reaction and because they aren’t talking about it any more. If they’d even suggest such a thing in a country with such a tradition of opposition to conscription of any kind for they’re pretty desperate. any purpose, And if they can find a way to isolate the young people that would be subjected to this temporary slavery from the allies who might help them resist, why shouldn’t they try it? Unemployment will soon reach 5’ I ; tax increases promise some deflation: the U.S. is heading into a recession and will try to shift its burdens on to its most docile satellite-the outlook isn’t bright from their point of view. But we should expect them to try to find ways to treat their present problems as opportunities. Particularly inviting is the opportunity to undermine our attempts to build alliances with other working class groups. We’re easing the unemployment rate

bias

The press. which is eager to prevent any alliances between students and workers. is quick to point this out. They are not so quick to point out that the tax structure of this province makes the working man pay for the government and gives the corporations a lree ride and doesn’t tax capital gains. If in fact economic conditions are getting worse. then workers may become very hostile to students unless we get the message through to them that what we need is to mount a joint attack on the corporations that oppress us both. A tougher corporation tax and a capital gains tax could provide the finance tor both the jobs and the student aid that we need. So they’ve discovered that they can’t live without us to absorb the unemployment that they can’t cure. However. they don’t seem to be able to live with us. either, although no Ontario university has yet been as crude as the board of governors at Regina. where they have cut off the funds for the student paper because it is aimed at undermining the administration.

Regina

will

tell

However. we’re not the only people that hear the news reports. Ke can feel sure that the situation is being watched closely by our friendly neighborhood university administrators and that if they get away with it at Regina their example will be followed all over the country. Fortunately for us. it’s not likely that they will get away with it. But more subtle pressures have been felt and will continue to mount. In summary. then, the managers have a problem. They need us and they will probably feel they have to make what appear to be concessions to us to keep us off the streets. But they don’t have much slack: they can’t go very far to appease us without running into trouble from the taxpayers. In conclusion, they’re up against it. :!nd that’s where we’ve got to keep them. Friday,

January

24,

7969 (9:39)

683

7


r

Waterloo Lutheran the culture center of Ontario? Well maybe not but their first original effort in the theatrical world shows great promise for future endeavours. Peter and the Dog, is to say the least a new experience in local drama. Herminio Schmidt, author and director is a student at Lutheran who created the play and sound track. In addition the entire cast and stage crew is composed of WUC students. While the play itself doesn’t come across as being in a league with Shaw or Shakespeare as far as a message or even a controversial theme goes, the main interest lies neither in the play or the actors. What makes the play a worth while effort is the musical ar-

by Brenda

Wilson

Chevron staff

rangements used. Since it is entirely pantomime the sounds must illustrate the actions and take the place of dialogue. But instead of simply playing harmonious classical music Schmidt has indeed suited the music to the actions from an axe sound while Peter writes at his desk to a simulated storm incurred when peter refuses to pet the fearsome dog The story is weak, the acting is obviously far from professional but the lighting effects and the sound made it worthwhile. The surprising thing about it was that it was only 40 minutes long yet all sense of time was lost while watching it. The surprise mirrored by the audience after its completion and the questioning faces proved it was at least unusual.

notice Both

libraries will uously 24 hou days a week.

Circulation Monday

ome out of your Groundhog loves Oh my Did you are doing on they’ll

goodness gracious. see what all them next week? Lordy get pimples, an-and

services

- Friday

Sunday

9:00 a.m. - 12 midnight I:00 p.m. - 12 midnight I():00 a.m. - ‘12 midnight

ARTS E,M.S.

Land sakes alive I’m just flabergasted. students up there at the ewkneeversity be. They gonna get to so much carryin’ rheumatiz too.

as follows:

8:3O a.m. - I2, midn?ight

Saturday

hole: you?

continI seven

STUDENTS! SAVE 10%

Why they got dances, oh I guess nigh on fifteen of ‘em. Yep, fifteen. I hear six of ‘em are free for nothin. Kids. Why can’t they learn you don’t git nothin’ for nothin’. Oh and they got six regular movie shows too, and they’re all free. And a regular showin’ of some of the old ones for twenty five cents. Just like when we was young. Lookee here at the “This Week Mercy, mercy. I’m so befudled and mixed up and On Campus”. my seein’s gettin’ not so good no more. How will I ever find out where to go. They not what they seem? Enter hero. Hahahahahahahahahahahahaha. What’s the big idea, coming in Heros don’t laugh. with n’ery a knock? Who are you I should be crying. anyway, one of those sex maniTell me more, oh fair prince of all acs, I’ll bet. these far-away places. I am the hero. There will be two hockey games. Yea, who says so? Will Bobby Hull be there? I do. (swoon). Davey Keon? Gump WorOK, no sense carryin’ on argusley ? ing. Rape me if you must you big No! The Warriors. handsome monster. But hurry, Bingo! pa’s finished in the hen house And thereS concerts and dances nearly. l am hear groundhog.

to tell you about

the

You can’t tell me about them varmits, I lived hear right beside the hotel for years. Seen all sorts come and go. Gophers in particular. Evil, evil. Work of the devil, they is. I bring you tidings of great joy, for unto you is begun come Monday, a week, A week to bring happiness to all; a time for joy, and fun. Behold the end of winter is near. A bunch of starry fireworks shall be the sign that the spring is on its way,

Come on young comin’ soon.

fella,

pa’11 be

There ‘II be a liars contest, where all the three wise men will at least lie truthfully. And maybe the adminis tra tjon. Or the coordination department.

and wine cellars and three-team rugger. And the winter Olympics.

I LIKE there’,

Jean-Claude.

Will he be Because

No, but the Four Seasons and the Vanilla Fudge.

will,

faction-in

Could I sell brownies? We’re

having cheese

purchase -is

fondue.

I make good brownies.

diamonds

are the

is especially the

value,

guaranteed.

inspection

of

the

cut,

If you’re our

heart

of our business,

important

to coior

thinking

outstanding

us. Your and

clarity

diamonds,

your

start

collection-today!

recipe.

Who was that?

Pack your bags, pa, we’re to Groundhog. What

goin’

fer?

So’s you can enter the Ugly Man contest. And what about you, ma?

I’m gonna sell my brownies. Again?

151 KING

ST. W.

satis-

of your

Sorry, I have to go now.

They’re my own special ( poof ) Hello pa.

diamond

complete

KITCHENER

with

stone an


I-Music IRLEMS? ;it

the

by Martin

Clicm~eurs’

exotic

Plum Tree Too Gift boutique 18 Albert

St. Wloo

or the small parent

shoppe

4 Erb St.

Waterloo Fairview

at East.

Square Mall

3 Chanteurs

de Paris sing, dance and eveything

daily

Together, Country the Fish (Phonodisc).

Bright

COMPLETE

Suburban

is a unconcerned .\nother New York intolerence culture”.

chine,

SHOW at 325

jbr

a truly

Joe

mr.

and

mrs.

sht~,

Chevron staff

and

Clean

versatile

by Jim Klinck

Release Electric

Country Joe and the Fish is one of the more politically aware of the groups playing this style of music. Their music reflects this concern and makes “Together” one of the better voices of people that are concerned. and soul, certainly The opening cut. Rock isn’t representative of this attitude. It can only be taken as a parody of the talking ‘soul’ groups.

LAST

been writing songs since the age of eight. He received training at the conservatory in Paris in singing. comedy, and dance when he was twelve. The other members of the troupe have had similar training, and among them can play piano, guitar, trumpet, bass. saxophone, flute and drums. The Chanteurs started two years ago and tour North America every winter. They spend the spring on a French tour and the summer at a seventeenth-century chateau in Chartres. Here “in the shadow of the famous cathedral.” they have plenty of time and freedom to work. It is also a rendezvous for artists and musicians, including friends from Montreal and Vancouver. When asked about comparisons of himself to Maurice Chevalier, he modestly confessed he admires the famous performer’s work. They are personal friends. and Varel and Bailly have ivritten two songs for Chelralier. The! have also written a sketch tar Marcel Marceau. whom Bailly describes as ) *the world’s greatest mimic.” Concerning the arts theater stage, he declared, “I love it. It is the typical illustration of show business. ” He feels that it is especially important for the artists as well as the audience to establish the intimate contact this type of stage promotes. He compared it to the joy of working in a roman amphitheater in France. Saturday night the Chanteurs de Paris went on to the similar stage at Stratford, before heading north to Sault Ste. Marie.

ecords

Odeon theatre-

NORMANLEARPRODUCTION

excellent

mock battle. A word from Mr. Bailly, and the masks were lowered: all wore the same masks beneath. In contrast to this type of piece, the gaiety of the performance was maintained by songs like La Flute et le Saxo-a love story between a flute and a saxophone. The saxophone in a large orchestra fell in love with a snake charmer’s flute. Naturally, he runs off from the orchestra, but upon finding his beloved, is swallowed by the snake! All ends happily when the saxophone is playing a celestial solo in heaven. The skit was narrated vocally with the saxophone and flute solos being delivered from backstage -a further example of the versatile effects employed. Familiar numbers were done in Franch: Getting to Know You (Pour se Connaitre), Dis Done from Irma la Deuce, and a vocalization of Music to Watch Girls By. The performance closed with a long piece, ln the Streets of Paris. The scene is a Paris street with representative characters (a chef, a lover, a tourist) wandering through. Each one gives an ironic reply to a question concerning his profession. Unfortunately, this scene is not on par with the earlier mimicry. It tends to be too unbelievable and too unsophisticated for a group of such high calibre. On the whole however, the quality of the show overshadowed any faults it might have had, and the audience responded enthusiastically all evening. Charly Bailly codirects the Chanteurs with Andre Varel and has

--.-.-~ -

Bail&

-Open

collage

Friday evening in the arts theater the Chanteurs de Paris presented a festival of merriment. Traditional barriers collapsed as the theater united both performers and audience in the celebration. The performance began when the performing Charly Bailly, director of the company, burst upon the stage. After introducing himself with a Chevalier-like accent, he dashed across to the piano, and seven slim young Frenchmen in cream-coloured bellbottom suits joined him in an explosion of light and song. One was immediately struck by the vocal and almost organic unity of their performance. The effect was overpowering and drew the audience right down into their midst. The entire house seemed to stay there right through to the last number, occasionally joining in clapping when prompted by the Chanteurs. Their first song, “Reveille-toi et Chante”, burst open like a bottle of French champagne, that continued to fizz all evening. However, the gaiety was slowed down with professional timing for numbers like ‘Try and Homage to a Great Man. This latter was an unexpected tribute to that master of fantasy, Walt Disney-a fitting respect from a group that contributes a great deal to lightening our hearts. Les Masques was also in a serious vein: this excellent piece of mime was performed in three masks-representing pessimists, cowards, and hoodlums. Each role took his stand-in French-and suddenly all six participants were jostling in an incidental-motion

-

Ahrens

Chevron staff

Ma-

subtle cut at the futility of todays suburbanites. of the bitter songs is directed at it is the epitome of city. “because and bigot 1-y that pervades .\merican

The Harlem song is described by the group as about the “product of 400 years of racism.” The group is also very stron instrumentally. The organ. drums and guitars are skillfully blended to provide solid backing f’or the thought provoking lyrics. Stereo--fair Instrumentation-very good Vocals-good Lyrics-excellent

an oath, the Prunes (Warner)

The ‘Prunes t should have quit while they were still ahead with Mass in F. Minor. This repeat of the electric guitar version of a church service does little more than keep all the Anglicans from feeling left out. Our Father, Our King is particularly well converted to the modern style, but then so were all the songs on the ‘Mass’ album.

It is very easy to become bored while listening to this album. Except for occasional snatches of solo playing, where the talent the group has shines through, it is quite monotonous. /t is to be hoped that the group soon gets off the religious kick and goes to some original style of music. If not, don’t be surprised to hear an electronic, musical version of a Bar Mitzvah. Another drawback to the album, is that neither side is much more than 12 minutes long. Stereo--good Instrumentation-good Originality-poor * Friday,

January

24, 7969 (9.-39)

&5

- $


EN your face over my crumpled

appeare

life

at first I understood only the poverty

of what I have.

Then its particular on woods, became

light

on rivers,

on the sea,

my beginning

in which

in the coloured

I had not yet had my beginning.

I am so frightened, of the unexpected

I am so frightened, sunrise

finishing,

of revelations and tears and the excitement I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

fight it, my love is this fear,

I nourish love3

--Colours,

10

it who can nourish

slipshod

by

finishing.

Yevgen

686 The

y Yevfushenko

CHEVRON

watchman,

nothing,

world


lgraphy by Dave ~017 staff

Friday,

January

24, 7969 (9:39)

687

I 1


NM. scouts interested in Warrior captain Ronnie Robinson, captain of the University of Waterloo hockey warriors has been under the watchful eye of several NHL scouts this season. Jim Gregory of the Maple Leafs and Les Maddox of the Boston Bruins thought very highly of Robinson’s performances in the Xmas collegiate tournament held at Troy, N.Y., during the Xmas holidays. Robinson broke the record for assists by collecting 11 in three games, he was also selected as the all-star centerman. The Warrior captain was invited by Wren Blair of the Minnesota North Stars to attend training camp.

Warrior trainer is scout for Boston Ian Young, trainer of the Warrior hockey team, scouts hockey players for the Boston Bruin organization. Young was the finest amateur goaltender in North America in 1966-7. Turk Broda, former star goalie with the Toronto Maple Leafs said “Young is the finest amateur goaltender I have seen since Dennis Riggin starred with the Hamilton Red Wings.” The Scottish imigrant starred with Oshawa Generals of the OHA Jr. A series. He was named allstar goaltender two years repeatedly. In his final season he was selected the most valuable player in Jr. A. The Scotsman’s career ended when he was struck by a puck fired off the stick of Mickey Redmond flush on the eye. Redmond now stars with the

essmen

Montreal Canadiens. If this injury hadn’t occurred Ian Young would be now toiling in the NHL big-time with the Boston Bruins.

Ex- Warriors .lr A league

Dave Farago and Jim McMaster, both former players of the University of Waterloo hockey team, are setting a torrid scoring pace for the Guelph Imperials of the Western Jr. A. league. In 18 games thus far, McMaster has collected 26 points on 5 goals and 21 assists. Farago has tallied 28 points on 21 goals and 7 assists. Farago was on a hockey scholarship at Dartmouth University last year. In a mere 25 games he fired a fantastic 55 goals and collected 39 assists for 94 points. MeMaster played with the Memorial Cup champion Niagara Falls Flyers and was selected as the Flyers number one draft choice.

niWat ski club holds 84miversity ski day On Friday Jan. 31 the University of Waterloo ski club is holding a ski day at Mansfield. In addition to Waterloo, eight other universities have been invited to participate. Mansfield is opening up the area just for the students who have full rights to the whole area including the lodge. A gala bash will be taking place all day and most of the night. By the way the party is strictly BYOB. Other events planned are an inter-university ski race for both the men’s and women’s teams.

c

incite

by Ross Taylor Chevron staff

Today the University of Waterloo chessmen will be moving into the campus center to take part in the eastern intercollegiate chess tournament. Ten other teams from universities in Ontario and Quebec are expected to be present for the three-day competition. This is the culmination of a great deal of time and effort on the part of the chessmen. Because of the nature of their activities a shroud of secrecy was thrown around the team. Weight training was pawned off as regular pub nights. By lifting glasses and bottles the team built up the high degree of coordination and muscle tone needed to shift their kings and queeens about the campus center. The key to successful chess is a subtle mating

nyphillis by bou is Silcox Chevron staff

In keeping with tradition weather on February 1 should be crappy, wet, sloppy, snowy guk. And thats just what we want, for two reasons. If the groundhog arises Sunday morn and sees his shadow, we’ve had it, brother. That means the worst of winter is yet to come. So we want everybody to suggest to their own personal deity in charge of weather that “guk” prevail. Hence the dear Groundhog will not see his umbras and spring is on the way. Honest. Also, its the time of the year when people flock away from their diligent studies to try and kill eitller themselves, or someone

setting on fire

epi

lo%-STUDENT DISCOUNT

The buses will leave for Mansfield at 7:30 am from the campus center. The cost is a mere $6 which will include the tow ticket, the bus fare and the party.

WATERLOO

166 KING W.

Tickets will be on sale from 12: 30 to 4 pm every weekday the campus center and at the xinv7.11 luage rProm -1 5 to ..^^ ci: 3u pm.._

KITCHENER

Everyone is invited to help get this year’s club rolling. Its bound to be a fantastic time.

B-ball Athenas 64-21

over

For RENT or SALE

_

AT ONTAR

LOWEST PRICES

York

The Waterloo basketball Athenas remain undefeated in league play as they downed York 64-21 here on Tuesday night. The Waterloo girls led all the way combining accurate shooting and fast breaks to score 24 field goals and 16 free throws.

1

The home team had a 35-8 lead at the half and scored 29 points in the last half for the win. Pat Bland scored 16 points to lead the Athenas to the win. Bev Stueck followed with 13 and Charlotte Shaule with 12. The best York effort was Harriet Handler with 11 points. The home team returns to action this weekend as Waterloo sponsers a women’s sports day involving basketball, volleyball and badminton. Teams from Windsor, McMaster, Lutheran and Guelph will join Waterloo in the competition. The basketball Athenas meet Windsor at 2 pm and McMaster at 5 pm on Friday. Both games will be in the recreation center gym.

Then,treat yourself to a chat with Dr. Howard Petch,Vice President (Academic) Mondays,4-6 p.m. Campus Centre (Pub Area)

ScheMdel Statiomry

of mental concentration and digital dexterity. All players were required to attend every lecture during the past months. By attempting to follow their professors trains of thought the high degree of mental concentration needed could be achieved. Digital dexterity is achieved through long hard hours of finger exercise such as telephone dialing, counting marbles and squeezing fruit. This is the largest intercollegiate tournament in Canada. The Toronto-McGill rivalry will continue at Waterloo. These two teams will probably finish first and second with perhaps Carleton in third place, while Waterloo has a good chance of copping fourth place laurels. There will be 48 simultaneous games taking place in rooms 207,211 and 217. Spectators are welcome but silence is requested. This probably-means that the Warriors band and the cheerleaders will not be in attendance.

else, under the auspices of the winter Olympics. The Lettermen Club, are again running the whole masochistic show, this year in conjunction with Groundhog week. Events start at 11 am next Saturday, so get up early, (10: 59) and come over with your perversions. The usual events are being rerun this year. They include the world famous pushball, broomball, the annual chariot race that makes Goddard’s “Weekend” mild, and snowshoe racing for people with webbed feet. (transplants allowed). FREE coffee and donuts are being provided for those of you who can’t face food before sunset, and there are a real herd of authentic trophies to be won. Teams are restricted to a 2/3 male, l/3 female ratio, so you

better

9

etter

I- better

743-8248

light! sight! marks!

For A// Your School Supplies

Schencfel’s

ow to keep ooking like a

near can warm up before and during the events. Renison has also organized a toboggan race down Ecumenical Hill onto the Flats of Faith. All events will take place in the Laurel Lake area, (like on it if, but not only if, its frozen). This all brings us to the problem of personal hygiene, and prevention of colds. Dr. Reesor has not told the Chevron to pass on these helpful hints. Eat several non-Outspan oranges or otherwise saturate your body with Vitamin C. Keep dry, if you can. Do not drink alcoholic beverages a week prior to the events. Do not rub noses or otherwise indicate affection for an infected person.

t&tnited PHONE

cum

efnic

SQUARE

and

<

r

q

Choose your skiwear from our handsome assortment of parkas, sweaters, and stretchpants and you’1 I look so great people will think you’re at least an intermediate. And if you really want to be an intermediate let us show you Head’s brand-new 260 ($150), and 160 (for $130). The skis that turn so easily they turn hackers into skiers in no time at all.

38 Queen St. S.

Kitchener

743-2638


BR0 ‘/LED

King & Weber

,

Students interested in investigating prospects of prof’essional training in public accounting, leading to qualification as a CHAIZTERED ACCOUNTANT, are invited to discuss career opportunities. Clarkson, Gordon representatives will be on cam~)us

JANUARY 27th Interview appointments may be made through the office of the Student Placement Office. If this time is inconvenient, please contact us directly. Phone 744-I 111

Clarkson,

Gordon

CHARTERED

& Co.

ACCOUNTANTS

Halifax Saint John Quebec Montreal Ottawa Kitchener London Windsor Toronto Hamilton Port Arthur Fort William Winnipeg Regina Calgary Edmonton Vancouver Victoria

ERATION of STUDENTS University Notice

General

of Wuterloo is Hereby

Given

Of a

Meeting

of the Federation of Students, University of Waterloo, a corporation under the laws of the Province of Ontario, for the consideration of By-Law number 15, relating to the establishment of a Board of Education, to be held on Monday, January 27, 1969 at 8:00 pm in Room 201 of the Engineering Lecture Building. The by-law has been approved in principle Copies of the by-law off ice.

formulated by the Board and by the Students’ Council. are available in the Federation

Johr 1 Bergsma President

-Melanie

Beaumont,

the

Chevron

Dare Crichton of the Wavriovs sets the ball as the Warriors defeated the U~uYc’~~si~~~~of Towsto Varsity Blues 79-63 in a badly-plaJ*ed highschoolish game marred b-r a lot of’ silly f?urIs.

It’s spikes

and

The Warrior track team prepped for the incipient indoor track season on two fronts Saturday. ‘At Guelph, two four-man teams ran in a lo-mile road relay. The team of Paul Pearson, John Kneen. Kip Sumner and Dave Northey finished four seconds behind Guelph’s winning entry. Pete Olver ran a strong leg for the second Warrior team. At York University. poor condi-

UCk

arriors

sprints

tions and a hazardous unbanked cement track led to misfortune for both Larry Dixon and Brent McFarlane as they lost footing and took spills which cost them wins in the 220 and 440. Bruce IValker defeated a weak field to easily win the 880 in a walk. Dennis McGann of the Warriors. presently on a work term, won the long jump at the Canadian junior championships at Xinnipeg with

tie last-place

Captain Ronnie Robinson’s goal at the 15:4i mark of the third period gave the University of Waterloo Warriors a ‘i-7 tie against the last place Guelph Gryphons in Guelph Wednesday night. The .Warrior captain also set up right-winger Kenny Laidlaw for two more goals. Orest ” Rum” Romashyna fired two goals and rookie defenceman Dick Oudekerk triggered the other marker. The Gryphons were paced by Fireheller with two, Weatherhill, Cousineau, Borecky, Litt and Trom fired singletons. Waterloo looked as though they were going to run the Gryphons right out of Guelph in the first period as they built up an early 4-l lead. A defensive lapse enabled the Gryphons to come out on top after the second period with a 6-5 lead. Despite a great comeback effort the Warriors only managed to put two

niloo bridgesports by Wayne Smith Chevron

staff

A Waterloo team consisting of Gus German, Rodney Wilton. Gord Chapman and Wayne Smith won the intercollegiate team-offour championship by half a board with a score of 28.5. The intercollegiate pairs championship was tied for by G. Calnek and H. Mueller ( Waterloo) with M. Kleinplatz and

time

fans

a long leap of 22 feet. 2 inches. For those who hadn’t noticed. Bob Finlay. former \\‘arrior standout. set a Canadian record a week ago at the Boston KofC games with a dazzling 8:33.ti secondplace finish to George Young of Arizona in the f’eature 2-mile. Saturday. the Warriors travel to Ann Arbor. ;Llich. for their first real test indoors.

uelp

pucks past the outstanding Guelph goaltender. Jim Horton, to gain a i-7 tie. Kenny Laidlaw. the 5’10” 185-pound rightwinget was undoubtedly the best Warrior player on the ice. Laidlaw collected two goals and one assist in this encounter. The powerful rightwinger led many Warrior rushes and whistled numerous shots at the Gryphon net. Rookie defenceman Dick Oudekerk played his usual standout game and collected two points on one goal and one assist. Orest “Rum” Romashyna and Ronnie Robinson also stood out in the evening match. Despite the strong offence by the IVarriors. the defence was no where near up to par. Coach Duke Hayes and his hockey If’arriors journey to Windsor tomorrow morning to play the Lancers.

cop champions

S. Caplan ( McGill ). The Waterloo bridge club hosted this annual event in the campus center last weekend. Nine universities were represented with a total of 22 teams playing. This is the largest intercollegiate tournament ever held in this area. The teams were: McGill (2). McMaster (1). Guelph (2). CVestclrn (4).

Queen‘s (3). Brock (2). Acadia ( 1). Toronto (3) and W’aterloo (4). One of the McGill teams were defending the team chatnpionship that they won last year in Toronto. The next tournament will be held in Hart House at the I’niversit? of Toronto and the \\‘atcrloo team will be there to defend.


DANCE PHASE Ill

our door to

ANYWHERE IN THEWORLD

Guelph

PANNUVS STEELBAND

Sat.

$1.25 Jan. 25

FOOD

SERVICES

Bar Included

e search for a new administrative head it seems appropriate to survey the condition in which we find ourselves. This I intend to do by pointing first of all to certain general features which have been observed in North American universities. This exercise requires noting ideas and values that motivate various groups in the modern university, asking about the distribution of power in the organization, how various groups are controlled, what the sources of prestige are, how observed organizational features mesh together, and what the consequences of these forces are for the organization and for related publics. Clark Kerr, formerly head of the University of California, has suggested that traditionally academics have organized themselves around such values as “preserving truth, creating new knowledge, and serving the needs of men through truth and knowledge,” (Clarke Kerr, The Uses of the University). These values have become beacons that have frequently been extinguished, but they have had a powerful integrating influence on traditional academic organizations. In these organizations academics banded together more or less as free and equal participants in a collegiate system of joint decision making. The sociologist Burton Clark (Burton R. Clark, “Faculty Organization and Authority, ” in Terry F. Eunsford (Ed.) The Study of Academic Administration) has discussed the multi-faceted organizational picture of the American university and college. He indicates that no longer predominantly collegial, nor yet systematically and thoroughly bureaucratic, the system of academic controls is hard to characterize. Though obviously not of one pattern, there is a central “professional” feain a way that is ture in academic life, but, says Clark, “professional critically different from the authority of professional men in other organizations such as the business corporation, the government agency, and the hospital.” In the structure of authority Clark observes many diverse forces: status derived from formal assignments of power, and status derived from standing in one’s discipline, the importance of the work performed for the subject matter beyond the boundaries of the organization, and the work performed for the enhancement of the organization, finally the traditional sentiments of free inquiry, all these are part of the structure of academic authority. There exist various divisions of interest and value on the college and there are the humanists and the scientists, university campuses: there is the generalist and the specialist, there is the teacher and there is the researcher. The hallmark of the modern professor is his specialization, his involvement in expert and limited knowledge, his autonomy of decision-making in his area of specialization. Clark says: “Academic man is a special kind of professional man... To be innovative, to be critical of established ways, these are the commitments of the academy and the impulses of scientific and scholarly roles that press for unusual autonomy.” These specialists do not really live in a “community of scholars.” In all but the very small organizations there is little interaction between faculty members-“interaction is down, commonality of interest is down, commonality of sentiments is down.” Thereby there grow up, of necessity, external controls by specialists in administration, a formal system of authority, a bureaucratic system of co-ordination. Clark now proceeds to ask how the organization and authority of the faculty accomodate to these trends toward composite structure, a multiplicity of subcultures, intense professionalism, and bureaucratic coordination. He sees three accomodative trends: segmentation, a federated professionalism, and the growth of individual power centers. Segmentation refers to the fact that with increasing size, complexity, and specialization faculties will be unable to operate effectively as cornmon governmental bodies; decision-making will be more and more segmented, increasingly moved to the departments and. their subdivisions. Professionaiization within large-scale organization represents many problems of control and co-ordination. Where, as in hospitals, one professional group dominates others there is likely to be internal integration of interests and activity. But where, as in the modern university, dozens of professionalized specialist groups of approximately equal standing compete for power, prestige, and resources, there will be splits and shifting alliances, and thus low over-all integration. lndividualization implies that in such situations of segmented clusters of experts, individuals and groups will tend to gain power and influence at the expense of laymen and of the general administrator. Intense specialization makes an academic into a king in his sector. In many instances this personal authority becomes greatly enhanced by money; the professor has become research and consulting entrepreneur. Once only presidents raised money, and although there is usually some regulation that bids academics make their appeals for funds only through some university administrator, this is seldom enforceable. Such differentials in the access to support and power add to the segmentation already in existence through specialization. But personal authority of academics over the administrative personnel stems in more general manner from the current nature of competitiveness of the academic job market. “The academic’s favorable position in the market enhances the professor’s position on the campus,” To what extent is Clark’s analysis applicable to the situation at this university at this time ? To the degree that it is we cannot speak of an academic “community.” And to the degree that we here have segmentation, professionalization, and individualization these conditions must surely be taken into account in efforts at filling the post of university president. I for one find it impossible to deny that Burton Clark’s analysis is in fact largely applicable to us at the University of Waterloo. I therefore think that we would do well to consider these aspects when asking - what kind of a president we want to see head the University. 4

690 ‘1

The CHEVRON

,*:

SERVICE to

and

from

Toronto Airport

PHONE 578-0110 AIRPORTPASSENGER CHARTERED

- PARCEL COACH

AIR

EXPRESS

-

0

If you

liked

AS YOU LIKE Don’t miss

IT

TWELFTH NIGHT

Lishman Coach 41 FAIRWAY

Psst

RD.

University Drama Company performs this very funny play Jan. 23 - 25 at 8: 30 p.m. you hurry,

lf you

can get a ticket at the box office General: Students:

IS NOW

$1.25 75~

IN PROGRESS

MEN’S WEAR DEPT. Shirts andSport Reg. to $9.50

KEITHMOOR

KORATRON

SHETLAND

Shirts

$4.99

$25.96$19~99 slacks Reg. Slacks

Skif

Reg. to $15.95

h

and

$9*99

swvw&fs

University and Weber


by Jim Harding

AS STUDENTS in English Canada we have a particular dilemma that must be faced before any effective reform strategies can be developed. The dilemma relates to our economic status as a U.S. satellite, with our own form of colonial mentality. What complicates our task is the power of the North American market place (work, wages, consumption) which encircles the bulk of the population, and makes any political relationship between students and, say, workers, exceptionally difficult. Further complication stems from the “utopian radicalism” developing among some students. More often than not, we’ deceive ourselves (and thus ensure continued isolation and powerlessness) by identifying with Third World revolutionaries ( Mao, Castro, Che) ; developing both identity and ideology from them while having no organizational base to work from for our own national liberation, in our own way.

The long

haul

We have often gone astray, for instance bay seeing ourselves as a vanguard :or the dispossessed. Now we are beginning to understand our the multiver3wn oppression-within sity-and have begun concrete action for reform in our situations. But there is an even longer haul ahead. To break out of a narrow reformism, and see our projects in an international light, with our own national liberation as our focus (side by side with French Canada’s)-this is the present challenge. We are at a stage where we can no longer do without intellectual clarification of our common situation. So far we have no examples of papers that have served to focus debate among varying radical groups on different campuses across the country. Thus we have not Been a conscious student movement. Now we are at the point of development. mainly because of an upsurge of unrest on 3ur campuses. where we need a cross-reqional and inter-campus understanding specific to English Canada.

waking

rhetoric

Before a student is willing to work In and off campus for radical change he jr she must break from the images and

-hetoric that justify the satellite political economy in which we live. This rupture usually comes from firstland experience that so contradicts the official rhetoric that a critical thought pro:ess begins. Poverty, class structure, our compli:ity in Vietnam, the integration of educaZion into the corporate society, the an)maly of a mass society; all these have ed to a student radicalism. But criticism does not, in itself, consti;ute a revolutionary analysis. A person nust him or herself be changed for real understanding to occur. Criticism alone :an remain academic.

Toward

awareness

The roots of a revolutionary are both existential and historical. We have to realize that without struggle we as persons have no real freedoms. Freedom is not passive. It is not formal. It is communal: people with similar problems gaining control over the cor,jitions that create their problems. Freedom is liberating oneself, rhrough communal action, from the power> and

control of another. It is winning self-determina tion. Do English Canadians want their freedom? Do students? There is no abstract answer to this. Do those of us here want a real personal freedom-in our universities and later in other institutions? To get it we must struggle for it. And, as we do this we will find that our freedoms and those of the population at large are interdependent. To not be repressed in our fight to overcome oppression, we need allies. And vice versa.

Corporate

oppression

What is our oppression? It is so obvious it is often missed. It is rooted in our dependency. No human can grow, continually, as a wholesome being, while in a dependent status. Our school experience may have already so intimidated us that we cannot remember the taste of freedom. Our university experience may have covered our wounds with status needs. But in each of us, because we are active beings, is the need to find social structures that allow us to live in community; living creatively, not exploitatively. We must have the real say and the final say, in what we become as humans. In authoritarian institutions, existing in a satellite, in a world of violence and exploitation, we have neither. And they will not be given to us. We cannot be free in this communal sense: free to live with and love our fellow man. unafraid to encounter others. while our lives are dominated by the market place. The oppression of others. say in Vietnam or Columbia. resulting from blatant imperialism is complemented by our own oppression within the corporate society. Idealogies. profits and power must be replaced with human relationships, shared resources and participation. It cannot happen in any vacuum. It is a revolutionary goal demanding revolutionary struggle.

evolutionary

re

Our struggle. as students, must be based in the universities. Control over the education that affects us is no small issue. Knowledge is increasingly created and used to exploit and kill more efficiently, and our work for real controls over education is revolutionary because of this. Corporate capitalism and imperialism will indeed suffer a blow if we can take charge of our education and redirect it for

humanis tic ends. To be revolutionary. “student must not be reduced to a token pation in the universities. Bissell

of the University

power” partici-

of Toronto

and

Hare of the University of British Columbia are spreading the myth that student activism has and can help update present universities. Present universities are an appendage to the market place. We cannot accept such institutions. We cannot allow ourselves to be narrowed to such an institutional perspective. Though in our lives we may not see any harmony between new humanistic universities and a new society that no longer exploits and oppresses, our continuous ’ struggle to relate democratization of universities to the struggle for national liberation may be the basis for this harmony in the future. To ensure that our perspective remains international, student radicals must become a catalytic force for broad social change in Canada. Many of us whose radicalism was rooted in the anti-nuclear movement have mistakenly lost sight of

“The

students

hanged the Dean in effigyGeorge, that is the Dean!”

NATO and NORAD as key issues. The role of NATO in the neo-fascist regime in Greece; the danger of the Liberals withdrawing troops from Europe only to further integrate Canada “defense” ; the complicity

dian government

into continental of the Cana-

in oppressing

the Viet-

namese-these issues have to be linked to university ones. The Canadian military has already made their link with the university with their research. Students must resist and oppose militarism on and off campus.

Which

label?

What of our approaches‘? Here is where our dilemma is most pressing. On the one hand we have some students calling for .‘reformism”, whatever that means. On the other hand we have those calling for “revolution”. In the final analysis reforms are given so that the authority relations of an institution remain stable. No change in institutional arrangement occurs from piecemeal reforms.

CJltimaCely volution”

analysis

most

talk

of “Re-

turns out to be a poor metaphor-

an identity and ideology one else’s revolution.

rooted

in some-

No identification? This identification by student radicals ( in all capitalist societies) with Third World revolutionaries is both inevitable in our era, and unfortunate. Support and sympathy are one thing. Identification in another. To identify with the Third World brings with it the danger that strategic models (e.g. “the cultural revolution”. “guerilla war”) not appropriate to our situation will be superimposed into institutional crises here. A kind of apolitical and romantic version of radicalism is on the increase in all industrial societies. The *‘repressive tolerance” ( Marcuse I of our societv ( that turns dissent into myth) plus the fact that more and more youth are left hanging-without positive identification with this society-underlies this trend. Only if it leads to study of world problems and serves as an existential chall-

enge to students

No, by

to engage

sary struggles in our it have a good effect.

Organbe

own

in the ncces situation

cal

for reform

The answer is not to debate ref’orm 01 revolution in the abstract. The answer i: to organize for needed reform-in sc~hools in universities. in the cities. in the jail: and mental hospitals. and in political in stitutions-without ever stopping. ‘1 re volutionary commitment is a lilt>-long one There is no point in time when the “neces sary change” will take plaoe. I7ltimately all action f’or institutional reform must be pushed to a r~~cognitior of and opposition to (‘anada’s satellite political economy. To just get the institutional reform: (aside from longer range changes in the economy i revolutionary tactics will bt required. More realize the need to struggle to gel real control over our education 1abolitior of grades, etc. ) More realize how the constraints or faculty make them conservative if no’

reactionary. Not enough

yet realize the relationshil between the multiversity in Canada ant our satellite economy. Revolutionary tat

tics. of some form, will be required once students want real reforms to take place. The inhuman role of our “fatherland’ (U.S.) in the Third World and our compli city in it: the domination of our lives by the market place and the reduction o human beings to *‘things” that results: ant our complete lack of control over our edu cation-this should be enough to motivate us to act. And act we must-deliberately. not hap hazardly . Our real weapon is intelligence-critica thought applied to our own activity. Thi can give us a self-determination that cal evolve into the movement of people nec>dec to combat the giant corporations whici have nothing whatsoever in common wit’ a peaceful. free and fulfilling life. Jim Harding, a graduate university of Saskatchewan, sent/y a teaching assistant Fraser university.

Friday,

January

24, 7969 (9:39)

of the is preat Simon

69 7

1


Al AdIington

Brenda

operations vicepresident

personnel department

bookstore

Conditioned

He’s treated all right.

That’s and.

it.

Lorraine

Jack Admas

Smith

Dolly

me

Arthur

Devison

my husb-

Polluted

(Mr.

Charlie)

bookstore

waist

FOUND One

ladles

Phone

wrist

Scott One

watch

744

candrdate

wers

name

Found food services

or

the Chevron

lounge

term

of office

begins and

of the

May

ends

Marl

on

‘60

at

$275

Lost

dance

dally or

III

clutch,

Phone

Two

April

room colleges

muffler

Good

offrce Call

to

be

twrn

to

wrth

English

pose

nude

17

and

home

very

or

from

call

trcket

sales

started

at

7.09,

continue

be received

board

with

for

50 744-1528

by

PEECE

coffeehouse

featurtng

John

Stewart.

et,

of

January

Greb-

wtth

admrsston.

coffeehouse

coffeeshop.

9pm-

PEP-RALLY

31.

free

DRAWBRIDGE

center

publications

Friday,

Conrad

Two

hedroonr

/b:~~:

ftrrrlrshed

Krtcherrer

parkrny

$1

15

all

To

the

polrtrcal

‘rear

for

cause

representatrve

sunrnter

Larry

Next

Burke

thing

he’l

He’s

be

respon-

HIRE The

fac-

rn

krtchen

student

Joan

sable

double

student

wrth

marrted

3541

LOST

FOR

Phone

apartment for

Ext

gone

and

serrous after

Electrrc

coup

Moose

d’etats.

church

Music

wakes,

the

Phone

Wade Strrpper.

sports

1 and

Old

ask

events,

weddrngs

selectron

the

576-012

ment

for

orgres.

services

tunes

quret

744-7296

4 pm

Oaken

for

and of

favorrte

Bucketshot

the

Moose

Manage-

Agency

tion

is made

Chevron

by

and

center

ketball

after

live

campus

pub,

$1,

HOPPE.

recrea-

student

RADIO

E1313,

Phrlrp

co-op.

A-l

dining

Cap

club,

electton

of

offt-

CAT

of

lecture,

cinema center

lecture,

work

of

lounge,

drscussron,

chrrst,

Groundhog

hall,

LIARS

hall,

free,

Stu-

Don

Crawford,

free,

1 30

JONES, pm

on

the

hall,

center

campus

Students

major

cheese

fondue

&

to

FUNNY

foyers.

the

center

next

Forum,

restrictions on who may

electton on

of

annual

officers

agenda,

center

COPPERPENNY,

free,

WARRIORS

and Crty

3

15pm

VIN,

campus

apply.

dtscussrng campus

any center

topics music

Groundhog BONSPIEL.

$2

vs

fun

toronto

BLUES,

to

England

Hotel

Chrtstran

for

dtnrng

room.

center

wtth

pub,

discussron of lounge,

presents Glenbttar

Interest

to

the

club,

‘“Graduate students who wish to apply for the position of Don in the Villages for the Academic year 7969-70 shouid obtain an application form from the Village office, and must submit it to the Warden of Residences prior to the end of February 1969. Applications received after March 1st cannot be considered for ap-

and

presenting

and

Get

study

hog

and

It. hall,

Mat

to

chrtsttantty.

Waterloo seagram

the

Strtch

rn

Mayfreld

rnctudtng

Unwon. turtle

$2

bar, a body,

races

TRADITIONAL Gardens,

Tyme

and

PUSSYFOOTING, Guelph,

$2

50

srngle.

$5

9pm next

the

presents

daylrght-and

hole-bunches-of-stuff after

at

8 30

IIT

dark the

THE

VANILLA

recreation

center.

TRADITIONAL PUSSYFOOTING at 9 in Para.

thetr

EL107,

MARLINS,

wrth

the

GROUNDHOG

pro-

relative

center

noon

dose

Gardens,

and

an

CAP ANIMAL

AU

VIN

at

DANCE

IO

after

rn 10

the

pub

In

the

for

free

grubshack cinema campus

WALT

BAROQUE 1 1 am

of

Ideas

UN-

3 30pm campus

4pm

9pm

games

couple.

10pm

drscusston,

MAYFIELD free,

(concert-dance),

with

SATURDAY $1,

PUSSY-

1 30pm

GAMBOL-dance

-semrformal the

lpm Groundhog

group.

l -2pm EngSocB

curlrng

session.

FELLOWSHIP

fessors

free,

a body.

Paradise DANCE

free,

the

vs

FUDGE

fields FELLOWSHIP

$1

8 30pm

grubshack.

8.30pm MOCCASIN

AU

hall,

CONTEST,

CHILD

gym.

THURSDAY

general

8pm. Christian

pub,

QU4DRA-SWING

palace,

In CLUB,

great

hall.

-WILD

CoPperpenny,grubshack, 9:3opm

WINE,

center MAN

--WARRIORS

Hap-

campus

THE hall,

palace,

Groundhoq CAP

year

9pm

NEW

hall,

-GROUNDHOG

great

Ice

THING

TUESDAY meetmg,

grubshack, $1,

WHAT’S great

Groundhog

1.30pm

Groundhog

center

A

presents

Waterloo VIN,

Way

free,

campus

campus

AU

RUGGER

In

Groundhog

prevrews

Groundhog of

all

crnema

Groundhog

$l., 10pm Warrtors

Groundhog House,

crnerna

UGLY

Ice

Groundhog

pm

CAP

great

SEASONS 8 30pm

center

center

campus

center

Federatron

ELECTION,

pened

-TOM

CONTEST,

3 45

Bash, campus

campus

ION,

campus

8pm presents

prestdentral

8pm

presents

great

Vrn.

FOUR $2/$3.

Boarding

au

Groundhog

FELLOWSHIP and

9 15am Federation

engrneerrng

center,

Beer Hoople’s

center

HOOPLE’S center

the

on

Baroque Major

campus

5.1Opm

person

MEETING,

Groundhog’s

council.

Smrle

retreat

Groundhog

AMATEUR cers.

GROUNDHOG

meeting,

EL201

pub,

The

8pm

Groundhog

presents

concert

WEDNESDAY bas-

25~.

9pm

campus

wtth

cents,

MAJOR

campus

3 45pm

loom

Groundhog RES

grubshack

a la

nrght

to

HOUSE,

free,

FRIDAY

Western-Waterloo

band,

for

(pub

1 Opm.

Chrrstran ready

hall,

Groundhog NiRVANA

75

VIN.

campus

3 45pm

the

parnt-rn. AU

dances

BOAR,DING dance,

1 am SOCQUE

gym,

game,

great

staff

free, at

body

great

of editor

hail,

Groundhog

campus

1 30pm Groundhog

musrc).

and

HONEYPOT,

free,

NAVEL

CAP

Groundhog

no

69

bedroom

unrversrty

91

743-5726 cookrng

ctnema hall,

great

9pm

dents,

are

r,r

f:on~

578-6474

One

bath-

weekly Share

unrversrty

SMILE.

Groundhog’s

MISSING

GENERAL

There

t:21’

iIt hiock

4990

central month

post

prrvate

$9 call

student

pnvtleges

Columbta

great THE

room,

by the

one

room

to

1 19

women’s

ratified

or

beds, or

home

board close

at

center

nauseum

NOVA

and

beds, single

stirdellts 011e

576 term

apartment,

ilities at 127 University Avenue. Phone 5784607or 742-6165

6

help

wrllrng

srngle facrlrtres. for

Vacant

MONDAY

the

578.

students

Waterloo

Groundhog FASS

ad

Get

choice

page

744-7706* ,197Mayfield

kitchen Road

room.

condr-

SUNDAY

The

per

for parkrrrg

Phone

editor

is salaried.

noon,

roonrs

bathroom

30, 1970.

must

of the than

40~

private

week.

bedroom,

Room

The

office

Furnrshe~i

744

HOUSING-WANTED

Accommodatron

SATURDAY

not later

Ron

tern

and

center

the

home

rooms $10

Blythwood

TODAY

applications

rn my

srngle

room to

after

female Must

Phone

- AVAILABLE

graduates

food

WANTED project

film

per

a

at

church

576-3349

1 unrnhtbrted

of

1, 1969

The position

All

tvprng

HOUSING

at

576-4389

delivered

.New

do

Waterloo Double

$43.

campus

Corvarr

film

The

front

Paula

recorder

and

seconds

2736

745-2682 tron

EDITOR,

up 1 lth

1 lth

742-9834

tape

Globe

of

laces

January

January

Phone

45

Summer

Wil

Ans-

SALE Cassette

for

r,tres

and-

qualrfred

wrth

dance

on

up

1073

five-foot-ten well

boot

at

boot

complex

Golemba

brown

servrces

brown

for the position

presrdent.

Ron

one

Ed

TYPING

for

the

Phys

Waterloo

extremely to

FOR

rn

7013

one-half-rnches,

are invited

staff

I know Charlie’s aunt; how’s that.

Who’s Mr. Charlie? is

Applications

it.

May Bell

Geiger

registrar’s off ice

I think the system

Taylor

personnel coordinator

staff

center GIBBONS,

free,

THE

KNACK

great

hall,

campus

and free, center

3pm

How

to

SUNDAY

1 30pm Ground-

Come

next to

the

amusement

people’s from

campus noon

ttll

center FIREWORKS

8 30

THE CAMPUS CENTER BOARD is reviewing all submissions by campus groups for SPACE ALLOCATIONS of a permanent nature in the campus center. The review committee must have all submissions with detailed requirements by 5pm Monday 3 February at the campus @enter office. information Further center office.

available

from

the

campus

at


Grad bd gets $2QQQ, now just WhlY, John, why? Regarding last week’s Chevron masthead: “No- news is good news except when you don’t have enough. Monday’s council meeting was a myth,” I only wish this was true as Bergsma’s crew managed to give grad ball $2000 (count them ). This grant was given in a recorded vote in which there was a definite split between the radical and so-called responsible members of student council. To me $2000 is no myth and a grant, of money like this is definitely news. One of Bergsma’s election statements was, “Students at large must understand the basis for decision making.” I would like him to explain why grad ball should get $2000 for a big-name band and speaker, when the money could be put to better use. Of course I don’t really expect a revelant answer as Bergsma rarely says anything at council meetings or is available for comment in $is office. It is too bad the highest office in the Federation of Students is held by a person who not only doesn’t lead but is incapable of leadership. Jn my opinion the election of Bergsma as president of the Federation of Students has been a serious setback to student causes at Waterloo and has seriously damaged the unity and strength of the federation. PALJL DIJBE Renison representative on student council

alk over your future with the Bell em

DS-TO-BE-IN: ENGINEERING

(EIectricaI,

TS & SCIENCE

Cd,

Mechanical)

(MALE)

Ask at your Placement Office for informative booklets and arrange for an interview now!

With seven refutations Kilimnik \ecfures Levitt

Yaw

shop

operated

by

Students

Leather

ssortment

of

ES - in school

colours

all only)

It was my intention when this debate on the Wobblies (Industrial Workers of the World) began. to clarify for the general reader of this paper. the several analytical and factual errors in Cyril Levitt’s article of December 13. Most of this readership had no reason to delve into the historical background of this movement as I had. so I felt compelled to share with them the facts that had come to my attention, during the course of researching a paper on the IWW. This reply to Levitt’s letter will be limited to several crucial and objective points. First, I am solely responsible for any errors or omissions in anything that I do, and they cannot be attributed to the economics department. Second, as to the Chevron being a radical bulletin, the readers of this paper have been fed a steady diet of Marcus, Marx, Hayden, Saxe, Levitt, Rand, Ginsberg, etc. over the past few months. One must only look at the space devoted to these articles, and the editorial policy of the Chevron in past editions. Third, I do understand the radical student movement and that is why I both oppose and fear it. Fourth, I don’t have to check with Prof. Leo Johnson as I know where the library is, and I also know that the early Christians were subject to repressions, but unlike the Wobblies it gave them strength. Fifth. you talk of “the Great White Father in Washington” and violence of the early mining camps, while what is relevant to this discussion is modern mixed capitalism. with its social security measures, built-in-stabilizers, etc. Sixth, the last hundred years of capitalism have been characterized by generally rising real wages, and capital accumulation. but the point here in dispute is the period of the last few years. nising GNP corFriday,

rected for rising prices is but one indicator of rising prosperity. Another sign is that of rising manufacturing wages, statistically modified for rising consumer price indices. The following figures showing the growth of real wages for various countries during the period 1963 to 1968 were compiled from the Bull&n of babor Statistics: ’ )international Lnbor Organization. Geneva, 1968). Real wages in the manufacturing sector grew 12 percent for Canada; 8 for the [ISA: 9 for Japan; 9 for Italy: and 34 percent for Formosa. These figures have been corrected for inflation. Thus the real welfare of workers is increasing, as similar conditions charactcrize the Western world at this time. Seventh. although I could write much more here. if Levitt is still puzzled, I would be glad to personally explain to him any of these analysis. statistics. etc. t’o~ obviously we are unfortunatel>functioning in two different intellectual worlds. and further tiebate in the Chevron will not ser\*e to narrow this gulf. ROBERT KILIMKIK economics 3 Jacques praises Iuuds br illianf

sports, reporting

I am’ taking this opportunity to thank you for your prompt action on my letter of Tuesday last. The pennant-winning idea of combining girl’s volleyball and men’s grappling just tickled me pink! Mr. Taylor is obviously of All-American calibre. The hockey stories are also taking shape as league leaders. I think your team is finally gelling under the coaching of your new sports editor, Vacant. Keep up the Stirling display. ,JACQUES O’BRlEN art& 4

oes her no spuce

bankipog in parking

I&y rr~~~i~~ 1st

I read with horror Mr. Hamilton’s tale of Curly and the goon squad, and I wonder how many (pardon my language) st,udents can afford the expense. we wives of staff members can’t. If it cost me $24 to retrieve my car I would become dangerous; especially in view of the fact that it’s already costing my husband three dollars a month to climb two snowbanks twice a day. The fresh air and exercise are free. However, I never park illegally, I’m one of those frustrated women you’ve seen in the past touring lot Bl for the best part of an hour, trying to park where my husband won’t get a ticket.

NO more. I never go to that place for more than a quick pickup. I cash my personal cheque, drawn on that branch, in another bank (with a chequing account you pay for every withdrawal anyway) and make all my deposits by mail. The morale of the parkers around there must be something historical. BEVERLEY SAWYER a reader Cdister Dean

Jar?uary

misinterprets Cross’s ambitions

24, 1969 (9:39)

693


WAY OUT-Theology and social change was sponsored January 12, 13 and 74 by the Waterloo Student Christian Movement. An (attempt to induce free discussion and criticism of traditionat church ritual and doctrine, it experimented with unstru-i:tured group sessions and impromptu guest speakers. In this article, the author explains why he felt Way Out failed both ideologically and structurally.

66 R

ELIGION is a form of mass escapism”. The SCM’s recent a &conference was a valid example of this writing upon the wall. Participants escaped from the restrictions of an organized conference, the logic of related discussion and the reality of human intentions. The conference was planned to be unstructured, and in this regard it was successful. The problems which were supposed to be discussed usually were, except although clouded by meaningless and frequent digressions.

Church

role

must

change

The theme topic centered on the irrelevence of institutional churches in relation to the societies of today: should not the church be the motivator of change rather than a maintainer of the status quo? Included in the initial talks was an attempt to find the motivation of basic human beliefs, emotions and reactions. impromptu speakers revaled concern for the de-humanization of man and most of all, in today’s social and political revolution. The purpose of the conference was to provide a new direction to those involved through political theology-in effect, a way out. Supposedly, a new awareness was to inform those who were not sure, where they stand. But where they stood for the three day duration of this excursion is very much in doubt. For the most part, the dialogue diverged into a meaningless attack on various social and political institutions. Every recent news headline was fully investigated then eventually discarded for more useless opinions.

roved to be the ignorance of most of the participants on theology and therefore their inabiKcy to relate social and political changes to it. Those familiar with theology were pither unable, or had no desire to direct the dis$94 The CHEVRON

.

cussion along the lines of the numerous handouts and pamphlets. Tactics, according to the much ignored schedule, were to be discussed on the final day. Again the lack of religious understanding reduced the discourse to an unrelated, disorganized debate; ranging from personal associations and their political preferences to the civil rights movements.

Control

was missed

Here it was necessary, if any success was to be claimed, for conference to control its divergent tendencies. Here there should have been some concrete suggestions and plans for the future. Here, they failed. The talk broke up as the dialogue became as irrelevent as the institutions they were attacking. Political theology was defined as a critical corrective, meaning that within a religious framework, solutions to present problems might be found. This idea considering theology as a social science-had never occured to most of us. Perhaps we were right in the assumption that theology has no relevence to society and is basically an individual concept. However, some feel religion can be related to modern society. They suggest religions have become too individualistic, and that there is a need to reassess the relationship between man and god. One line of discussion suggested the church use its traditional “love” to liberate the oppressed. This &vould involve a basic change in the scope and direction of the church, discouraging the reproductive nature of established institutions. In the case of the church, it would perhaps be necessary to eliminate it. With the unique topics and framework, the Way Out conference had the opportunity to discuss some very interesting and thought-provoking concepts-concepts long institutionalized and seldom criticized. It was indeed unfortunate that more of the participants were not aware of what should have been discussed. They were usually so far from the topic that

they were not only not aware of what, but also why it should be discussed. With the purpose self-defeated, there was little hope tactics would evolve.

Lost

in tangents

Speakers tended to relate personal relationships and experiences. They wanted to define political leanings, recent movements and the success of violence. It seems to me history has proven that, for the most part, whatever is instigated by violence tends to be violent throughout its existence. Surely these arm-chair revolutionaries, the majority of whom have led sheltered lives free of any major social or political upheaval, could decide on some future goals. Surely they could introduce some ideals without commenting on the inevitability and indeed, the benefits of some upcoming massive revolution which will cure all the ills of society and right the many wrongs. It was suggested that tactics can only be discussed in terms of goals, but Way Out had neither tactics nor goals. In a note of moderation, Phil Eastman of the Physics department suggested that if one man converted another, and he the same, one every year, the entire population of the world would be converted to the ideals of the first in thirty three years. This did not appeal to the impetuous idealism of others.

Fishbowl

had

no water

rigid framework perhaps may have been more effective in communicating ideas. A conference of this dimension could be compared to the Conciliar Movement of pre-Renaissance Europe. There was an attempt then to change the existing church structure, but unlike the unsuccessful conciliarists, those taking part in Way Out discussions were not being threatened by exterior force. There was no need to have a supporessor since the talks never materialized into organized and related dialogue.

God’s

not dead-we

are?

The organizers wanted everyone to do his (or her) own thing. Everyone seemed to do just that. The problem arises when their own things do not coincide with the purpose of the conference. Theology is relevent to social and political change-if you follow some religious ideals. For those who do not share a similar belief, perhaps theology can be a means to an end, for theology relates to human existanee in that it forms a rationale for human intention. The participants who bothered to relate their discussions to political theology generally felt that it was possible to work through religion to attain a style of life never yet experienced. For them, theology was relevent in today’s society, and for others, the conference provided an opportunity to express their personal views on recent and historical events. TO this observer, the conference was irrelevent and produced little in the way of useful dialog or sound proposals for the future.

structure of the conference was sometimes refreshing. It included small workshop groups, formal lectures, films and what was referred to as a “fishbowl” -a group of “resouce people” surrounded by interested individuals. But it never materialized, whether __I_through lack of the former or the latter component is still not certain. Pictur above is pfX?SddC?lat A conference of this type requires that Peter arrian de/b a pomicothe participants have some background cum socio-economic-theological knowledge of either the issues or the value aationak3tion of ritual in method of approach. Because this was not the case, a more religious practices. The


nor miscalculation? the senate and board of governors show that the proportions of mathites and grads have grown so that they each get one more seat. The distribution of the math seats within the faculty between the regular and co-op sections means that regular math gets the extra seat. Belfry on the other hand claims to have got his figures from the coordination department which hardly seems reasonable when you’re talking about registration figures for all faculties. Have our “responsible” leaders found some new channels of communication with the administration? The best that math and grad students can hope for is this question being raised at Monday’s council meeting by some irresponsible radical council member who -doesn’t responsibly toe the don’t-question-our-savior-John line. On February 19 students in these and other constituencies should elect representatives who will make sure the executive will be responsible to them and the students they represent. Bergsma’s and his executive’s mistakes are proving far too costly.

There are some errors you can orgive your leaders for. Nobody s perfect Yet we wonder how long he students of this university are villing to tolerate the incompeence of the Bergsma regime. It is bad enough to be unfamiliar with the way our student union operates but it is another to deny Iroper representation to a considarable number of federation memjers by sheer carelessness. But that is what is about to hapIen. Every year at this time calculaions are made to determine the listribution of student council ieats for the coming term of office. This year they were done ‘or the executive by student-actilities chairman Jim Belfry on the orders of president John Bergsma. But Belfry seems to have blown .t and gypped his own constitlency, mathematics, and another, graduate studies, of a member each for the 1969-70 term. Belfry has announced that the distribution will be the same as last year. But calculations done with close attention to the federation bylaws and the official enrolment report of the registrar to

Best man -not

power -wins as its chairman-a position which is always a powerful one. Johnson was chosen over Nick Kouwen, grad rep on student council and avid supporter of federation president John Bergsma. This development is not an earth-shattering one but it does indicate a positive approach by the students involved and bodes well for the future of student involvement in the decisionmaking which affects their lives. The best man was chosen for the job, regardless of his “professional” role and regardless of political debts that might be owing to his opponent. We can only hope that such a broadminded attitude can carry over into faculty and administration-dominated areas. Unfortunately this would mean a lot of people having to change the conceptions they hold so dear.

Those people who fear student power and positively shake at the thought of student control of any part of their education or their university should consider recent events in the newly-formed campus center board. The independent board which governs the running of the campus center was set up after the student takeover of the building in November. It has a student majority and unlike other committees in the university which have had student participation, it does not report to administration authorities who can disregard its recommendations. Yet despite this triumph for student power, the membership (which also includes faculty and administration -representation) elected history prof Leo Johnson WY

-

Y et another a oar,

ive us your yearning great we

will

freedom

to breathe

your

tired,

your

huddled

masses,

to paraphrase

another

free...or

Americantake

anything,

and

filled

sports

anytime, pages,

from

anyone

for

the

cause

of peace,

Blow

in her ear and they’ll

follow

us everywhere!

Write in Winnie-theEnee-meenee-mienee-moe, catch a president by the toe, if he’s radical let him go, enee-meenee-mienee-moe. But who’s moe this time? John Bergsma isn’t-he’s not making anybody happy. This council is still giving money to the radicals and sponsoring radical projects. They’ve even given money to off-campus political causes, such as the Peterborough Examiner strike and the grape boycott-in direct contradiction to their original platform plank against going off campus. Yet Bergsma can’t expect the radical vote either, not after supporting such worthwhile ventures as a $2000 subsidy for grad ball revellers to enjoy a big-name American band. That step moves against a council policy of userpay in social activities in effect for over two years. It’s even hard to see why John has bothered to run again. He obviously doesn’t find the job enjoyable; he isn’t motivated to do anything with the supposed fulltime post; he’s discovered he’s totally unsure of even his own personal philosophy; and he’s no longer needed to save the federation. So why bother? * * * Ron Golemba is the only new name on the ballot-too new unfortunately. His platform seems to be a quickie paste-up job of election promises picked to gather the most possible votes-a method of running that hasn’t been seen on this campus for many years. His platform of letting graduate

students separate from the federation clearly shows his weaknesses. Unaware as he is of the history of trying to keep the grads and undergrads together or of the problems separation would cause, he seems to have latched onto this platform plank as a sure votegetter. Golemba badly needs experience somewhere else in the federation before he can be considered qualified to be president. * * * Larry Burko should have stopped running for president while people were still laughing-now he’s turned serious, he’s not so funny. The only candidate with a concrete platform, Burko makes it clear that being leader to him means reflecting the exact wishes of the people. He talks of changing with the campus. But who then will lead us into change while Burko is reflecting majority alienation and powerlessness? Who will lead us to power? And Burko should talk to Bergsma, or Iler, or Ireland, if he thinks he can improve communications with the administration. The price they charge for talking to you is complete agreement with what they say. The only thing they’ll agree with Burko on is the fact he runs good dances. * * e Rub-a-dub-dub, Three men in a tub; the butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker; but unfortunately . no president.

THE a3 a Canadian

University

Press member

The Chevron is published ‘tuesdays and fridaYs by the publications board of the Federation of Students, University of Waterloo. Content is independent of the publications board, the student council and the university administration. Offices in the campus center, phone (519) 7444111, local 3443 (news), 3444 (ads), 3445 (editor), night-line 744-01 II, telex 0295-748. Publications board chairman: Gerry Wootton 11,000 copies

editor-in-chief: Stewart Saxe managing editor: Bob Verdun news editor: Ken Fraser features editor: Alex Smith photo editor: Gary Robins editorial associate: Steve Ireland sports editor: vacant Spreading this issue: Jim Bowman, circulation and other capitalist trivia; Roddy Hickman, schmaltz coordinator; Kevin Peterson, you’re lucky you’re in Ottawa (or is it Calgary?); Disruptive Influence, acting jock editor; Dave X Stephenson, Wayne Bradley, Jim Dunlop, Rich Lloyd, Dave Thompson, Jim Detenbeck, Dave Bull, our new star photographeress Melanie Beaumont, Martin Ahrens, Brenda Wilson, Jim Klinck, Maudie Silcox, Muskrat Ashman, Kathy Dorschner, Louis Silcox, Ross Taylor, Donna McCollum, Peter Wilkinson, Peter Hopkings, Peter Miller, Dave Enouy, Wayne Smith, Bill Brown, Lorna Eaton, Jane Schneider, Phil Elsworthy, ken fryer, Sydney Nestel, Jim Allen, Bruce Timmons, Jim Keron, Jerry Cook (Village elections bureau), Paul Spittal, Pat Stuckless, Carol Marx, special masthead mention to MathTHoc for sticking up for US, Jim & Roddy want you should know Annie is a mother, and finally a contest-a lifetime subscription to the Cord WUCly for the winner-just give the Cord a new name . . -must be suited to the environment at Waterloo Lutheran Highschool and Seminary.

Friday,

January

24# 6969 (9:39)

695 ..L

1 _


Our

economic

create who

men

fit

cooperate

want

to

Our

system

whose

consume

men

who

men

whose

who

must

do what

influenced,

can

be

needs

independent willing

is expected fit into friction,

of

the social who can

machrne be guided

force, leaders,

and

who

can

directed

without

any

aim

except

to

â&#x20AC;&#x153;make

It IS not

been

mous

order

but

transformed

that

hrs

consent,

that

to

the

In

overt

anony-

other

be adaptable, to

though

His It were, his

in

illuwith

such

from

manipulation. as

the

is done

even

or behind

words, modern

nourish

be extracted

obtained,

it has it has

the

everything

consent

be

of persuasion

is obliged

sion

that

from

of force

to

led

has

even

suggestion.

man

back,

nor

authority

and

subtle

authority

in strength,

authority

be

goodâ&#x20AC;?.

that

disappeared, lost

can

men

without

one

who

to

them,

without

the

him

by

consent behind

hrs

consciousness.

----Erich

20

anticipat-

men

nevertheless

who will without

who

more.

men

he easily

and

are

and

standardised,

needs

free

who

men men

create

are

system

fee/

but

needs;

more

can

Our

must

its

smoothly;

tastes

ed.

IS

system

who

696 The CHEVRON

From

m

1968-69_v9,n39_Chevron  

to the board of gover- for mercy from any demoralizing The external-relations board Monday unanimously decided to support retention of the C...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you