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Julie and Elinor Ihlenfeldt with a portrait of Clara Hertel Slaymaker.

Supporting future teachers IHLENFELDTS CONTINUE TO SUPPORT SCHOLARSHIP HONORING CLARA SLAYMAKER

JULIE IHLENFELDT AND HER MOTHER, ELINOR, AREN’T educators

themselves, but they are supporters of teachers and teaching. That’s why they have continued to support a scholarship set up by Dale Ihlenfeldt, Elinor’s husband and Julie’s father. In fact, Julie has included it in her estate plans. The scholarship is named for Clara Hertel Slaymaker, Julie’s maternal grandmother, who was a teacher. Clara Slaymaker graduated from Milwaukee Normal School in 1915, a predecessor institution of UWM, according to Elinor Ihlenfeldt, and lived close to the university. “She lived in a house just a few blocks from here, just the other side of Locust,” says Julie Ihlenfeldt, who is a pharmacist. Her mother, Elinor, studied psychology before retiring to raise her children. “Both of my grandmothers were teachers, and one of my grandfathers,” she adds. So when Julie Ihlenfeldt discovered her late father had set up a scholarship, she and the family decided to continue it, even though her father hadn’t left any specific instructions about the scholarship, and Julie wasn't even aware of it. “I just did it. He didn’t like to establish things with his name

on it so he established it in his wife’s mother’s name, partly in her honor and in honor of other teachers in the family.” Her father thought education scholarships were important, and that’s why he originally set up the scholarship, according to Julie Ihlenfeldt. “He never pushed it on us, though.” "Clara Hertel Slaymaker taught in the Beloit schools until she retired when she got married,” says Elinor Ihlenfeldt. “She stopped working when they were married. That’s what they did back then.” While only one of Julie’s siblings is a teacher – a nursing professor at Front Range Community College in Colorado – she says, “We have been lucky enough to afford an education. Everybody isn’t that lucky. It’s nice to know that we are able to help somebody become a teacher who hasn’t been that fortunate.” With so many single-parent families or both parents working, teachers often have to take on multiple roles educating and guiding children, says Julie Ihlenfeldt. “Teachers today have one of the most challenging jobs there is,” she adds. “We are lucky to have been offered the opportunity to help support future teachers through scholarships.” SPRING 2019 EDLINE 29

Profile for University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

School of Education | EdLine | 2019  

EdLine is the annual publication for alumni and other supporters of the UWM School of Education. Each issue highlights the work of faculty,...

School of Education | EdLine | 2019  

EdLine is the annual publication for alumni and other supporters of the UWM School of Education. Each issue highlights the work of faculty,...