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batten undergraduate student handbook


2012 Edition Copyright 2012 Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy University of Virginia Published by the Office of Academic Programs 434.924.0049 Information in this handbook is subject to change. For the most up-to-date information, please refer to websites referenced throughout the book.

Editor Wendy Perry, wperry@virginia.edu Graphic Designer Anne Hilton, Anne Hilton Design Batten School Contributors Scott Adams, William Ashby, Maddie Bergner, Richard Bonnie, Brenda Boyd, Alex Boucher, Lynn Boyter, Jeanine Braithwaite, David Breneman, Kaitlin Brennan, Addie Bryant, Aaron Chafetz, James Childress, Eileen Chou, Kelly Connors, Benjamin Converse, Nate Daugherty, Jennifer Doleac, Colleen Farrell, Leora Friedberg, Chloe Gibbs, Harry Harding, Meg Harmon, Frederick Hitz, Howard Hoege, Charles Holt, Lara Jacobsen, Katy Lai, David Leblang, Molly Lipscomb, Christine Mahoney, Paul Martin, Guian McKee, Katharine Meyer, Cynthia Moore, Edgar Olsen, Amanda O’Malley, James Paradis, Eric Patashnik, Wendy Perry, Melissa Rickman, Margaret Foster Riley, Jill Rockwell, Christopher Ruhm, Raymond Scheppach, Melina Schoppa, Herman Schwartz, William Shobe, Kerra Thurston, Barkot Tesema, Sophie Trawalter, Craig Volden, Gerald Warburg, Andrew Wicks, James Wyckoff Additional Contributor Patricia Lampkin Photographers Dan Addison, Don Hamerman, Jamie Kay, Jack Looney, Wendy Perry Photograph of Frank Batten, Sr. courtesy of Denis Finley, The Virginian-Pilot Cover Photograph Don Hamerman Printed by Dazzle Printing


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Welcome from the Dean

3 About Batten 3 Frank Batten, Sr. 5 Administration 12 Directory of Administration 13 Faculty 15 Directory of Faculty 24 Facilities and Operations: Garrett Hall 25

Academics 25 Curriculum 30 Academic Rules and Regulations 35 Academic Advising and Course Registration 36 Student Records

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Student & Career Services 37 Office of Student Services 38 Office of Career Services 42 Office of Professional Development

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Student Life 43 Getting to Know U.Va. 44 Student Self-Governance 52 Organizations and Activities

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University Resources 55 Online

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welcome FROM THE DEAN

To members of the Class of 2014:

O

n behalf of all members of the Batten School family—faculty, staff, students, and alumni­—I want to welcome you warmly to the incoming undergraduate Class of 2014. You are part of our inaugural class of undergraduate majors, and we are delighted that you will be joining us this coming fall. This year, the Batten School will celebrate its fifth anniversary. Our founding donor, the late Frank Batten, Sr., a legendary publisher and civic leader here in Virginia, was eager to see the introduction of an undergraduate major in the school that bears his name. He wanted a selective program that would introduce some of U.Va.’s best undergraduates to the challenges and opportunities of civic leadership, in the hope that they would be actively engaged in public affairs throughout their lives, whatever careers they ultimately decided to pursue. Some may enter public service, while others may be civic leaders in business, non-profit organizations, or the professions. This vision echoes Thomas Jefferson’s ideal that, in a democracy, each citizen should become “a participator in the government of affairs not merely at an election, one day in the year, but every day.”

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To fulfill this mandate, our undergraduate program will offer outstanding introductory courses on public policy and civic leadership, as well as more advanced courses on the analysis of public policy, the daunting public policy challenges of the 21st century, the comparative history of public policy, and the normative dimensions of public policy. We will also offer a set of special topics courses that will provide a deeper introduction to key aspects of leadership and to important issues in public policy. Your course of study will culminate in a capstone project in your final year at the Batten School. Outside the classroom, we will also create a variety of co-curricular experiences that will broaden and deepen your understanding of public policy and civic leadership by engaging you in the world of public affairs beyond Grounds. These activities will include forums with leading scholars and practitioners, field trips, retreats, discussion groups, internships, and simulations. For example, we are already planning a forum on one of the most pressing issues in public policy-- the fiscal crisis facing both the national government and the states -- to be held during Homecoming Weekend

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in October. Each year, we also feature a dialogue with the winner of the Thomas Jefferson Medal in Citizen Leadership. As we plan these co-curricular activities, we invite your input on how our undergraduate major can become one of the most exciting and rewarding degree programs on Grounds. Each of the inaugural graduate classes has left a major imprint on our MPP program, and we know that you will do the same for the Batten School’s new BA in Public Policy and Leadership. As Mr. Batten once said, “The earlier in their careers that exceptional students begin to think of themselves as future public leaders who can promote a better society, the greater the likelihood that they will become such leaders.” That is the hope and expectation that all of us have for you. Again, welcome to the incoming Class of 2014! Sincerely,

Harry Harding Dean and Professor of Public Policy and Politics


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about batten Frank Batten, Sr. Media magnate and entrepreneur Frank Batten, Sr. (1927-2009) made the largest single gift in the history of the University of Virginia in 2007, dedicating $100 million to the creation of the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy. From its beginning, the newest school to be established at the University in more than 50 years has set out to to groom visionary leaders who will drive the policy process, build coalitions, and translate innovative ideas into action. Frank Batten, Sr., chair and CEO of Landmark Communications, Inc. in Norfolk, Virginia, was a long-time University of Virginia supporter and a graduate of the College of Arts and Sciences. In 1999, he gave $60 million to the University’s Darden School of Business to create the Batten Institute, which promotes entrepreneurial leadership in business. A forward-thinking philanthropist committed to supporting educational initiatives and serving the public good, Batten wanted his most recent gift to extend beyond business to all facets of civic life. Batten saw an urgent need for a new generation of leaders who could

affect transformational change. He emphasized leadership as one of the key skills required for success in the field of public policy. “Talented public leaders are needed from a range of professional backgrounds. It is critical to get younger people excited about the responsibilities and opportunities of public service in all its manifestations,” Batten said. “The earlier in their careers that exceptional students begin to think of themselves as future public leaders who can promote a better society, the greater the likelihood they will become such leaders.” Batten was born in Norfolk to one of the city’s leading families on his mother’s side. When he was one year old, his father died, and the family moved in with his uncle, Samuel Slover, publisher of Norfolk’s two

newspapers, the Virginian-Pilot and the Ledger-Dispatch. Batten was sent to school at Culver Military Academy in Indiana and served in the Merchant Marines just after World War II. Graduating from the University of Virginia in 1950, he went on to earn an M.B.A. from Harvard. During the summers of his student years, Batten interned as a reporter for the Ledger-Dispatch. He became publisher of the Virginian-Pilot

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and the Ledger-Dispatch in 1954, at age 27, then chairman of Landmark in 1967. Under Batten’s leadership, Landmark Communications Inc. grew to become one of the nation’s largest privately held media companies whose broad holdings in electronic and print media include The Weather Channel, the Virginian-Pilot in Norfolk and the Roanoke Times. Batten was known for his business acumen and is widely remembered for his most innovative business move, the 1982 launch of The Weather Channel, followed by its online counterpart, Weather.com. Meanwhile Batten also distinguished himself as a civic leader early in his career. In 1958, federal courts mandated the racial integration of Norfolk’s schools. In response, Virginia Governor James Lindsay Almond ordered the schools to close, a policy he dubbed “massive resistance.” Batten fired the editor of the LedgerDispatch for supporting Almond and backed Virginian-Pilot editor Lenoir Chambers, who spoke out against segregation in newspaper editorials. Batten organized community leaders to endorse a full-page advertisement calling for the schools to reopen. Norfolk’s schools reopened in February 1959, setting the community on a new social path. Chambers’ editorials won the 1960 Pulitzer Prize. Leadership, good citizenship, and public service were passions that propelled Batten for the rest of his life. His educational philanthropy alone is estimated at $250 million. Batten served on boards and held a variety of other leadership roles of the U.Va. Darden School Foundation, the College of William and Mary, Hollins University, Culver Educational Foundation, Access College Foundation, Harvard Business School Publishing Company, the Norfolk Academy, and the Mariners Museum. He presided over the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce in 1961 and chaired the 1964

drive of what is now the United Way. Virginia Governor Linwood Holton appointed Batten to a seat on the State Council of Higher Education. In 1962, Batten became the first rector of Old Dominion College, and under his leadership the campus broke from the College of William and Mary. Batten guided the school through its first eight years, during which time it achieved university status. He personally funded building projects and raised additional funding for the school until his death. Like his gift to create the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy at U.Va., his $32 million gift to Old Dominion University in 2003 was the largest in the institution’s history. Professionally, Batten took up where his uncle left off in growing the family’s media empire. After Slover’s death, he transformed the original company into Landmark Communications, which today, in addition to the Virginian-Pilot, owns newspapers in Roanoke and Greensboro, 50 smaller papers, and television stations in Nashville and Las Vegas. Batten recruited a cadre of pedigreed editors and began professionalizing the newspaper business. Always on the cutting edge, he moved into cable television early, launching Tele-Cable in 1964 in Virginia, West Virginia, and North Carolina. Tele-Cable grew to comprise 20 cable systems in fifteen states, and in 1995, Batten sold it to TCI Cable for $1 billion. Batten quickly rose to the forefront of his field. As head of Landmark, he wrote a platform for his empire that many media leaders have echoed since. “Newspapers live entirely on the bounty of the public,” Batten argued. “The ability of journalists to report and to comment is based upon a unique grant of freedom from the public. Thus our duty is clear: It is to serve the public with skill and character, and to exercise First Amendment freedoms with vigor and responsibility.” Batten served as a director of The Associated

Sources: Carol S. Wood, UVa Today, April 12, 2007 and September 10, 2009; Earl Swift, The Virginian Pilot, September 11, 2009; Michael Carlson, The Guardian, November 5, 2009.

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Press from 1975 to 1987, vice chairman from 1977 to 1981, and chairman from 1982 to 1987. He was also a director of the Newspaper Association of America. The crowning glory of Batten’s career is perhaps the best example of his entrepreneurial flair: the 24-hour Weather Channel. Data from his fledgling cable systems showed Batten that viewers were channel-surfing for up-to-date weather forecasts. It took Batten less than a year to put The Weather Channel on the air in 1982, despite the sea of skeptics. An artful strategist, Batten obtained a free-use agreement from the U.S. National Weather Service, located The Weather Channel in Atlanta, Georgia, already home to C.N.N., and negotiated a per-viewer fee from system operators. From 10 million households at its start to 100 million homes today, The Weather Channel boasts one of the widest reaches in the industry. Venturing into the internet media frontier, The Weather Channel also took advantage of its brand recognition to create a popular and profitable website, Weather.com. By 2007, the year of the Batten School’s founding, Frank Batten was worth some $2.3 billion. He ranked 190th on the Forbes list of the 400 richest Americans. The whole of Batten’s business and philanthropic activities were greater than the sum of its parts. Harry Harding, the first dean of the Batten School, described Frank Batten, Sr. as a true inspiration for the school and its students. In Harding’s words, Batten was “committed to the principle that our graduates should not only contribute solutions to the most challenging issues facing our society in a globalized world, but also become enlightened, ethical and effective participants in public life.”


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Administration

Harry Harding Dean and Professor of Public Policy and Politics hh7b@virginia.edu, 924-0812 Kerra Thurston Assistant to the Dean and Academic Programs Coordinator kaykay@virginia.edu, 924-0812 The Dean is responsible for defining the mission of the Batten School, developing and implementing the School’s strategic and annual plans, approving the School’s budget, and, together with the faculty, determining the School’s curriculum. The Dean makes the final recommendation to the Provost, the President, and the Board of Visitors about the appointment, reappointment and promotion of faculty. He represents the School at meetings with the President and the Provost, as well as at meetings with important external stakeholders.

Office of Academic Affairs David Breneman Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, University Professor, Newton and Rita Meyers Professor in Economics of Education and Public Policy breneman@virginia.edu, 924-0965 Wendy Perry Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar wperry@virginia.edu, 924-0049 Kerra Thurston Executive Assistant to the Dean and Academic Programs Coordinator kaykay@virginia.edu, 924-0812 Lynn Boyter Research Administrator lad@virginia.edu, 924-9848 The Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs directs the Master of Public Policy and Bachelor of Arts in Public Policy and Leadership programs and oversees the recruitment, appoint-

o ffice of the de a n Dean Harry Harding’s previous positions include faculty appointments at Swarthmore College (1970-71) and Stanford University (1971-83), Senior Fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program at the Brookings Institution (1983-94), Dean of the Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University (1995-2005), and Director of Research and Analysis at Eurasia Group, a political risk consulting and advisory firm headquartered in New York (2005-07). A specialist on Asia, his major publications include The India-China Relationship: What the United States Needs to Know (co-edited with Francine Frankel, 2004); A Fragile Relationship: The United States and China Since 1972 (1992), Sino-American Relations, 1945-1955: A Joint Reassessment of a Critical Debate (co-edited with Yuan Ming, 1989), China’s Second Revolution: Reform After Mao (1987), China’s Foreign Relations in the 1980s (editor, 1984), and Organizing China: The Problem of Bureaucracy, 1949-1976 (1981). Harding also serves as Vice Chairman of the Asia Foundation, a member of the Board of Governors of the Rajaratnam School of International Studies at Nanyang Technological University (Singapore), and a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Finnish Institute of International Affairs (Helsinki). He received his bachelor’s degree from Princeton University and his MA and PhD from Stanford University.

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Office of the Dean

Kerra Thurston serves as Executive Assistant to the Dean and Academic Programs Coordinator. In this capacity, she supports the faculty and academic administration. She also manages the dean’s schedule and assists the Director of Administrative Affairs in planning events hosted by the dean. Before coming to Batten, Thurston worked for eight years as a Tutoring Supervisor of underprivileged children for a non-profit organization based in a low-income neighborhood that was relocated to one of the area elementary schools. Thurston is a native of Louisa County, Virginia.

ment and promotion of Batten School faculty. He serves as Dean Harding’s general deputy, including serving as acting dean when Dean Harding is away from Grounds for more than a few days. Other duties include promoting faculty research, providing leadership on the development of new academic programs, and representing the Batten School at associate dean meetings. The Assistant Dean for Academic Programs collaborates with the Senior Associate Dean to facilitate the academic success of Batten students, and the professional success of Batten faculty. The Assistant Dean administers school policies, manages academic advising and course registration for all Batten students, offers individual counseling regarding the challenges

students may encounter, supports the Batten School faculty, coordinates course offerings, and regularly reports to Batten leadership on the quality of the student and faculty experiences. The Assistant Dean also serves as the Batten School Writing Coach. The Assistant Dean for Academic Programs maintains an open door policy and invites students to schedule an appointment or simply stop by the office at any time, for any reason. Specific management responsibilities include: • Academic advising and faculty mentoring • Course registration and scheduling • Degree auditing, degree conferral • Maintenance of all student academic records

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o ff i c e o f ac a d e m i c a ffa irs David Breneman, Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, University Professor, and Newton and Rita Meyers Professor in Economics of Education and Public Policy, served as Director of the Public Policy Program at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy from 2006 to 2009. Prior to that, he served as Dean of the Curry School of Education from 1995 to 2007. He was Visiting Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education from 1990 to 1995, where he taught graduate courses on the economics and financing of higher education, on liberal arts colleges, and on the college presidency. As a Visiting Fellow at The Brookings Institution he conducted research for a book, Liberal Arts Colleges: Thriving, Surviving, or Endangered?, published by Brookings in 1994. He was selected as the recipient of the 1999 Award for Outstanding Service from the Council for Independent Colleges for this work. From 1983 to 1989, he served as president of Kalamazoo College, a liberal arts college in Michigan. Prior to that, he was a Senior Fellow at Brookings from 1975 to 1983, specializing in the economics of higher education and public policy toward education. His most recent book (with co-authors) is Financing American Higher Education in the Era of Globalization (Harvard Education Press, 2012). He attended the University of Colorado at Boulder as an undergraduate, majoring in philosophy, and earned his PhD in economics from the University of California at Berkeley. Wendy Perry, Assistant Dean for Academic Programs, received her PhD in history from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with specializations in French history, the history of human rights, and African history. Her doctoral research project, Remembering Dreyfus: The Ligue des Droits de l’Homme and the Making of the Modern French Human Rights Movement, 1898-1944, was funded by a Chateaubriand Fellowship from the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and fellowships and grants from the Morehead Foundation, the Institute for Humane Studies, and the Institut Français de Washington. Having taught history in Paris, France and at UNC-Chapel Hill, Perry served as a Senior Academic Adviser in the College of Arts and Sciences at UNC-Chapel Hill, as Assistant Director of Career Services in the U.Va. Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and most recently as Director of Graduate and Postdoctoral Professional Development Programs in the U.Va. Office of the Vice President for Research before joining the Batten School in 2010. She spent this past summer in Morocco teaching a course in French on the history of human rights in Morocco for the U.Va. Study Abroad Program. Kerra Thurston serves as Executive Assistant to the Dean and Academic Programs Coordinator. In this capacity, she supports the faculty and academic administration. She also manages the dean’s schedule and assists the Director of Administrative Affairs in planning events hosted by the dean. Before coming to Batten, Thurston worked for eight years as a Tutoring Supervisor of underprivileged children for a non-profit organization based in a low-income neighborhood that was relocated to one of the area elementary schools. Thurston is a native of Louisa County, Virginia. Lynn Boyter provides assistance with research grant administration as the Batten School’s Research Administrator. In addition to her Batten work she is the Administrator for the University’s Institute of Law, Psychiatry & Public Policy, and is a consultant to a research project at Vanderbilt University’s Law School. Her previous work with UCLA, Columbia University, the University of Maryland, and Temple University supported administration of private foundation research projects. She received her bachelor’s from the University of Virginia.

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• Verification of student status/academic standing • Management of the teaching assistantship application process in consultation with the Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs • Management of the Stephanie Jean-Charles Fellowship • Communication with students and faculty on academic matters • Regular assessment of Batten curricula and the student experience; curriculum development • Representation of the Batten School on University-wide academic committees • Writing Coach workshops and one-on-one consultations with students • Other periodic teaching • Study abroad initiatives • Resource development (e.g. Batten Student Handbooks) The Academic Programs Coordinator and the Research Coordinator support the deans and the faculty in executing the Batten School’s teaching and research mission.

Office of Student and Career Services Jill Rockwell Assistant Dean of Student Services jill.rockwell@virginia.edu, 924-7950 Paul Martin Director of Professional Development psm4d@virginia.edu, 924-2933 James Paradis Student Services Coordinator james.paradis@virginia.edu, 982-2536 The Assistant Dean of Student Services oversees the Office of Student and Alumni Services and the Office of Career and Professional Development, working with an exceptionally talented team to enhance students’ personal, professional and co-curricular experiences at the Batten School. From start to finish, the collective mission of these offices is create a welcoming and safe environment for students by providing support for all of their personal, professional, and service-related


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interests and needs. We work hand-inhand with students to develop a solid foundation for their co-curricular life, providing advice and support services, connecting students with resources across Grounds, and facilitating relationships between students, faculty, staff and alumni. (See Student and Career Services for more information.)

Office of Admissions Howard Hoege Assistant Dean for Admissions and Strategic Initiatives hhh@virginia.edu, 243-4383 Meg Harmon Admissions Coordinator meh9t@virginia.edu, 982-2583 Katharine Meyer External Affairs Coordinator kem3e@virginia.edu, 982-6761 The Batten School admissions process is all about identifying and recruiting prospective students who are also prospective leaders in a wide range of public policy fields. The Office of Admissions believes a team approach focused on building relationships creates the best opportunity to attract the most dynamic and talented people to the Batten MPP programs. The team approach with a focus on relationships has the added benefit of being the purest and most credible way of exposing prospective students to the cohesive, team-oriented culture of the Batten School. Current Batten students are invited to support the admissions enterprise in the following ways: • Participate as student panelists

and speakers at any one of the several on-Grounds and offGrounds information sessions and events designed to engage prospective students about our

School. The Batten School Office of Admissions will typically invite individual students to participate in this capacity. • Attend a Batten School on-

o ffice of st ude nt a nd ca re e r s e rvice s Before joining the Batten School in 2008, Jill Rockwell, Assistant Dean of Student Services, spent nearly a decade working at Duke Law School, both in career advising and as the law school’s Dean of Students. Prior to these positions, she practiced employment law at the Chicago office of Littler Mendelson and served as the Director of Career Advising and co-director of publications at the University of Illinois College of Law. She earned her JD, cum laude, from the University of Illinois, and her BA in journalism and political science at Indiana University. A native of California, Paul Martin, Director of Professional Development, was a first-generation college graduate at the University of California-Irvine and went on to earn a PhD in political science from the University of Wisconsin where he specialized in the quantitative study of political behavior. Martin was an Assistant Professor of Politics at the University of Oklahoma and an APSA Congressional Fellow in the office of Congressman David R. Obey. He is a recipient of a Harvard University Goldsmith Award for research on how citizen participation responds to “bad news” about national conditions and a Dirksen Congressional Research Award for his study of how members of congress respond to district participation. Martin is active supporter of Access UVA, serves as a board member of Madison House and on the Jefferson Public Citizen Advisory Committee, and chaired the City of Charlottesville’s Community Development Block Grant Taskforce overseeing the disbursement of nearly $2M in annual city, state, and federal grants for community housing and social programs. James Paradis, Student Services Coordinator, is a graduate from the University of Virginia Class of 2008, where he was highly involved in the on-Grounds service community, holding leadership roles in Alpha Phi Omega and Alternative Spring Break. He has led service trips to India and the Gulf Coast and spent a year as an Americorps City Year volunteer, working with underprivileged youth in Washington, DC. He went on to attain his Master’s degree in Education Policy Studies from The George Washington University in 2011 while serving as the research intern at the Institute for Higher Education Policy.

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o ff i c e o f a d m i s s i o n s a n d s t r at eg i c i n i t i at i ve s Howard Hoege is the Batten School’s Assistant Dean for Admissions and Strategic Initiatives. A graduate of West Point, he served as an infantry officer in the first stage of his fourteen-year military career. He then took a law degree from the University of Virginia and entered the Army’s Judge Advocate General’s Corps. Hoege was a JAG officer in the United States and Iraq, serving as a trial counsel, a legal advisor in the field, a prosecutor, and a recruiter. After receiving his LLM degree in military law from the Judge Advocate General’s School here in Charlottesville, he taught criminal law for two years as a full-time member of the faculty there, while also teaching the law of war as a part-time lecturer at the U.Va. School of Law. After he left the service in 2008, Hoege served as a counsel to the Senate Armed Services Committee, investigating the role of private security contractors in Afghanistan. Meg Harmon, Admissions Coordinator, is a native of Crozet, Virginia. She graduated from Western Albemarle High School and from Longwood University with a BA in communications, with a concentration in organizational communications and public relations in May 2010. Harmon was a member of Alpha Lambda Delta, an honor society for first year students. She was also an active member of Lambda Pi Eta, the communication studies honor society of the National Communication Association. While at Longwood, Harmon completed a marketing internship with Longwood’s Division I Athletics program.

o ff i c e o f e x t e r n a l affa irs Gerry Warburg, Assistant Dean for External Affairs and Professor of Public Policy, teaches courses at the Batten School on Congress, US foreign policy and advocacy strategies. His research interests include the study of best practices by non-governmental organizations and the evolution of US nuclear non-proliferation policies. Warburg’s professional background encompasses a broad array of public service sectors. Most recently, he served as Executive Vice President of Cassidy & Associates, a leading government relations firm. Prior to that position, he worked as a legislative assistant for the US Senate and US House of Representatives under Senate Whip Alan Cranston and Representative Jonathan B. Bingham. His academic service includes time spent as a visiting professor at Georgetown University, the University of Pennsylvania, the Brookings Institution, and his alma maters of Stanford University and Hampshire College. Katharine Meyer, External Affairs Coordinator, joined the Batten Team full-time in July 2010 as Faculty Affairs Coordinator and assistant to the Associate Dean, and began her work in development and public affairs during the spring of 2012. Prior to her position in faculty affairs, she worked as an undergraduate in the Batten School career services office. She graduated from the University of Virginia in May 2010, earning her BA in government, and is currently enrolled in the MEd in Educational Research program at the Curry School of Education. She is particularly interested in gifted education, and has worked as a research assistant since 2009 on the AP Challenge Program, an initiative to encourage low-income and minority students from her hometown of Virginia Beach to enroll in Advanced Placement courses.

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Grounds or off-Grounds reception for prospective students and be accessible to engage prospective students in a more informal, dynamic way. The Office of Admissions will hold two or three of these receptions each fall. It views these receptions as “all hands on deck” and will encourage all current students to participate in this capacity. • Attend Batten on-Grounds admitted students’ events. Just because the Batten School has admitted a student does not mean that the person will attend! The Office of Admissions wants to make admitted students’ decisions about where to pursue their MPP an easy one! Again, the goal is to make sure that admitted students know as much about the program from the currently enrolled student perspective as possible – such unfiltered information is the most credible and in many regards the most powerful information they will receive. These admitted students events are another example of an “all hands on deck” event, and all current students will be encouraged to attend. • Answer prospective student questions about the coursework or the Batten experience. During the course of the year, the Office of Admissions receives several hundred emails from prospective students asking about different aspects of the Batten experience. Occasionally, it makes sense to put a prospective student directly in touch with a current student to offer a direct perspective on a particular question. Students willing to occasionally answer questions via email or phone call are encouraged to reach out to the Admissions Office so that we may refer prospective students every now and then. • Act as a Batten School ambassador! Never miss an opportunity to engage interesting, dynamic, talented, bright, compassionate people and ask them about


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themselves. What are their goals? Ambitions? If it seems like they might be interested in the Batten School, put them in touch with the Admissions team, and they can take things from there. In the end, the Office of Admissions wants to inspire students at the Batten School to truly think of themselves as stewards of the vision and culture of the Batten School. An important component of that is committing some time to thinking about who will follow you as students at the School. The energy and commitment and diversity of the student body does not “just happen.” Batten students are asked to consider giving their time in one or more of the ways above to help to sustain the high standards they have set for Batten School classes!

Financial Aid The Batten School offers several forms of financial aid to its graduate students. The availability and amounts of any particular form varies from yearto-year, so students interested in more information about financial aid are urged to schedule an appointment to talk to the Assistant Dean for Admissions. Some financial aid basics: • Accelerated Bachelor/MPP students are only eligible for financial aid from the Batten School during their second year at Batten, when the University recognizes them as full-time graduate students. • The financial aid application process begins in the Spring Term for the following academic year’s financial aid package. • All students interested in receiving financial aid of any kind must fill out both the FAFSA and the U.Va. financial aid form. Each of these forms and instructions are available on the U.Va. Student Financial Services web site: www. virginia.edu/financialaid/grad academic12-13.php. Contact the Assistant Dean for Admissions with all financial aid questions.

Office of External Affairs Gerry Warburg Assistant Dean for External Affairs and Professor of Public Policy gfw2f@virginia.edu, 243-1173 Katharine Meyer External Affairs Coordinator kem3e@virginia.edu, 982-6761 The Office of External Affairs works with the Batten team to help build the new School’s outreach. This takes the form of, coordinating public speakers and events, developing and updating website content, and leading devel-

opment efforts to build the School’s fellowships and research centers. External Affairs is a resource for students on issues related to communications, public relations, events on Grounds and in Washington or Richmond. The Assistant Dean works closely with Jill Rockwell on communications and Dean Harding on outreach. The Office engages with colleagues in other schools at the University about public events that can expand the Batten School’s reach and raise awareness of scholarship done by Batten students and faculty.

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Office of Business Services Bill Ashby Associate Dean for Management and Finance bashby@virginia.edu, 243-3155 Brenda Boyd Director of Budget and Finance bbb9q@virginia.edu, 982-6561 Lara Jacobsen Director of Administrative Affairs lo3k@virginia.edu, 243-3728 Scott Adams IT and Audio-Visual Services Manager sadams@virginia.edu, 243-3732 Cindy Moore Business Services Coordinator chm3b@virginia.edu, 982-2033 The Business Services team provides administrative, fiscal, operational, and

technological support to Batten School students, faculty, and staff. The Associate Dean of Management and Finance serves as the chief administrative officer for the School and primary liaison, after the dean, between the University and the School on non-academic matters. He coordinates with the Dean and Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs to ensure operational and management functions are aligned and optimized to meet or exceed School goals and initiatives. The Director of Budget and Finance is responsible for managing the financial operations of the school, the development of annual budget submissions and long-term budget planning and forecasting. She works closely with the Associate Dean for Management and

o ff i c e o f b u s i n es s s er vice s Bill Ashby is the Batten School’s Associate Dean for Management and Finance. He joined the senior leadership team in March 2012 and serves as the chief administrative officer and primary liaison, after the dean, between the University and the School on non-academic matters. He is the School’s chief financial officer, responsible for direction and oversight of financial support operations, directs the Batten School’s IT efforts, serves as chief personnel officer, and has responsibility for the operation of Garrett Hall. Bill has twenty years of professional administrative experience in higher education, ten of them at the University. He worked for five years at Cal Poly as CFO of a university auxiliary. At U.Va, he has served as an Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs, Associate Dean of Students, and Executive Director for Administration. Bill is a graduate of UC Berkeley, he holds an MBA from Cal Poly (San Luis Obispo, CA) and a PhD in education from the Curry School, where his dissertation examined branding in higher education. Bill and his family live in Charlottesville where he spends his weekends running between swim meets, lacrosse tournaments, and music recitals. He occasionally finds time to sneak in a round of golf. Brenda Boyd joined the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy last summer as the Director of Budget and Finance. Brenda has worked for the University for eighteen years and previous to coming to the Batten School, she served nine years as the Director of Budget and Financial Operations at the Curry School of Education. As the Director of Budget and Finance, Brenda is responsible for managing the financial operations of the school and works closely with the Dean on budgetary matters. She develops annual budget submissions as well as long-term planning and forecasting. Brenda ensures compliance with state, donor, and fund restrictions by monitoring school accounts and initiating adjustments if needed. She researches and makes recommendations on resource allocation decisions and she serves as the primary school contact on financial matters with administrative personnel in other University divisions. Brenda received a Bachelor’s in Business Administration from Mary Baldwin College and a Master of Education from the University of Virginia.

Continued on page 11

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Finance to determine financial implications, constraints, and related information on program proposals and by researching and making recommendations on resource allocation decisions. She is also responsible for ensuring the school is compliant with state, donor, and fund restrictions and serves as the primary contact on financial matters with administrative personnel in other University divisions. The Director and the Business Services Coordinator perform oversight of all cashiering activities, payment of invoices and reconciliation of school accounts as well as post-award grant activity and gift accounting. The Director of Administrative Affairs manages day-to-day logistics and operations for the Batten School, serving as its primary human resources manager and event planner. She supports both internal and public major events, working closely with Facilities Management and many vendors to ensure that all events are organized and successful. The Director oversees the maintenance of Garrett Hall, providing a clean, safe, and secure environment for all members of the Batten community and its visitors. She serves as the liaison to the University’s risk management and emergency preparedness offices. The Director works closely with the Associate Dean for Management and Finance on personnel actions and processing, reviews student wage hiring proposals, and enters stipends and goal pays for Teaching and Research Assistants. She also coordinates all major purchasing, working with Batten staff and central procurement, to ensure that the School adheres to applicable policies, procedures, and guidelines. The Director supervises a team of student office assistants who support her efforts. The Information Technology and Audio-Visual (IT/AV) Manager provisions all services for information and audio-visual technologies within the School. Working with the central IT organization and state vendors, he manages network communication, data management, and computing infrastructure, providing support for


a b o u t b a t t e n

the day-to-day needs for students, faculty, staff, and visitors to the School. Coordinating with the faculty and the Associate Dean of Management and Finance, he is responsible for initiating and developing the strategic vision in the use of technology and communication. Working with the staff and faculty, he is responsible for helping to adhere to data security policies and good computing practices of the University. In managing the technology infrastructure, he acts as the administrator over all servers, personal computing devices, and audiovisual equipment for the school. He supervises and trains student assistants to provide friendly, quality IT service for the students, staff, and faculty.

o ffice of busine ss se rvice s Continued from page 10 Lara Jacobsen in the Batten School’s Director of Administrative Affairs. She was recruited to open the School in September 2007 as its first staff member, bringing with her nearly two decades’ worth of management experience in health care and hospital administration. Most recently, she held positions as Secretary of the Board and Executive Assistant to the VP/CEO of the University of Utah Hospitals and Clinics and Executive Assistant to the VP/CEO of the University of Virginia Health System. Jacobsen attended the University of Utah, where her field of study was aerospace engineering. While a self-described “military brat” who grew up across the country and abroad in Japan, she has spent most of her life in Utah and is an avid skier. She was a licensed pilot at eighteen and a volunteer in the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City. Scott Adams, the IT and AV Manager, joined Batten in April of 2012. He has 13 years’ experience working with faculty, staff, and students as both an Instructional and Information Technology Director at the University of North Carolina, School of Information and Library Science. He has a history degree from Erskine College, a Masters of Divinity from Union Theological Seminary in Richmond, VA, and an MSLS from the School of Information and Library Science. Cindy Moore joined the Frank Batten School this summer as the Business Services Coordinator. Cindy has been an employee of the Curry School of Education for the past eight years. She began as a temp in the technology office where she progressed to IT support and then manager of the educational technology office. In this position she was responsible for managing the technology resources including the budget and accounts, Equipment Trust Funds, and equipment purchases for the school. Prior to coming to the University, Cindy managed the Fluvanna SPCA and served in the United States Air Force.

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DIRE C TOR Y O F AD M INISTRATION OFFICE OF THE DEAN Harry Harding

Dean, Professor of Public Policy and Politics

Garrett 200A

924.0812

hh7b@virginia.edu

Kerra Thurston

Executive Assistant to the Dean and Academic Programs Coordinator

Garrett 200

924.0812

kaykay@virginia.edu

OFFICE OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS david breneman

Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, University Professor, Professor of Education and public Policy

Garrett 200B

924-0965

breneman@virginia.edu

Wendy Perry

Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar

Garrett L052

924.0049

wperry@virginia.edu

kerra thurston

Executive Assistant to the Dean and Academic Programs Coordinator

Garrett 200

924-0812

kaykay@virginia.edu

Lynn Boyter

Research Administrator

1230 Cedars Ct., Suite B 924.9848

lad@virginia.edu

OFFICE OF STUDENT AND CAREER SERVICES Jill Rockwell

Assistant Dean of Student Services

Garrett L004A

924.7950

jill.rockwell@virginia.edu

Paul Martin

Director of Professional Development

Garrett L004B

924.2933

psm4d@virginia.edu

james paradis

Student Services Coordinator

Garrett L004

982.2536

james.paradis@virginia.edu

OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS AND STRATEGIC INITIATIVES Howard Hoege

Assistant Dean for Admissions and Strategic Initiatives

Garrett L020C

243.4383

hhh@virginia.edu

Meg Harmon

Admissions Coordinator

Garrett L020A

982.2583

meh9t@virginia.edu

Katharine Meyer

External Affairs Coordinator

Garrett L020D

982.6761

kem3e@virginia.edu

OFFICE OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS Gerry Warburg

Assistant Dean for External Affairs, Professor of Public Policy Garrett 107

243.1173

gfw2f@virginia.edu

Katharine Meyer

External Affairs Coordinator

Garrett L020D

982.6761

kem3e@virginia.edu

OFFICE OF BUSINESS SERVICES bill ashby

Associate Dean for Management and Finance

Garrett L031

243.3155

bashby@virginia.edu

brenda boyd

Director of Budget and Finance

Garrett L033

982-6561

bbb9q@virginia.edu

Lara Jacobsen

Director of Administrative Affairs

Garrett L032

243.3728

lo3k@virginia.edu

scott adams

IT & AV Manager

Garrett L030

243-3732

sadams@virginia.edu

cindy moore

Business Services Coordinator

Garrett L028

982-2033

chm3b@virginia.edu

All phone numbers are area code 434

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a b o u t

Faculty

b a t t e n

Richard Bonnie

• Professor of Law, Medicine, and Public Policy • Director of the Institute of Law, Psychiatry, and Public Policy Bonnie teaches and writes about criminal law, bioethics, and public policies relating to mental health, substance abuse, aging, and public health. Among many other positions, he has been Associate Director of the National Commission on Marijuana and Drug Abuse (1971 73); Secretary of the first National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse (1975 80); chair of Virginia’s State Human Rights Committee responsible for protecting rights of persons with mental disabilities (1979-85); chief advisor for the ABA Criminal Justice—Mental Health Standards Project (1981-88); and Chair of the Virginia Commission on Mental Health Law Reform (2006-2011). He has also served on the MacArthur Foundation Research Networks on Mental Health and the Law (1988-96) and Mandated Community Treatment (2000-2010) and is currently participating on the Foundation’s Research Network on Law and Neuroscience. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences in 1991 and has chaired many policy studies for the IOM and NRC on topics ranging from underage drinking and tobacco control to elder mistreatment. In 2007, Bonnie received the University of Virginia’s highest honor, the Thomas Jefferson Award. Bonnie earned his BA from The Johns Hopkins University and his LLB from the University of Virginia School of Law.

David Breneman

Jeanine Braithwaite

• Professor of Public Policy Braithwaite has been a Senior Economist at the World Bank, most recently in the Social Protection Group, Human Development Network, where she worked on social protection, disability, and poverty issues. She specializes in the study of medium-income Africa (South Africa, Botswana, Swaziland, and Mauritius), Turkey, and the former Soviet Union (FSU), and has provided policy advice to governments while on negotiating missions and staff visits. She has written many Bank reports, including poverty assessments for Turkey, Russia, Armenia, Moldova, Hungary, and Ukraine. In addition, she has operational experience in Bosnia, Kosovo, Cambodia, Colombia, Nicaragua, Mexico, Jamaica, and Turkmenistan. Braithwaite also worked for the International Monetary Fund and the US Census Bureau. Braithwaite speaks excellent Russian, adequate Spanish, survival Turkish and beginning Hungarian, and reads French. She teaches courses on development, the international financial institutions, macroeconomic policy, and public policy. She has also taught at Georgetown, George Mason, American, Maryland and Kalamazoo College. An alumna of the University of Virginia, she served as a Resident Assistant while enrolled and was both an Echols Scholar and a member of the Raven Society. She went on to earn her master’s degree in Russian area studies from Georgetown and her doctorate in economics at Duke University.

• Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs • University Professor • Newton and Rita Meyers Professor in Economics of Education and Public Policy Breneman served as Director of the Public Policy Program at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy from 2006 to 2009. Prior to that, he served as Dean of the Curry School of Education from 1995 to 2007. He was Visiting Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education from 1990 to 1995, where he taught graduate courses on the economics and financing of higher education, on liberal arts colleges, and on the college presidency. As a Visiting Fellow at The Brookings Institution he conducted research for a book, Liberal Arts Colleges: Thriving, Surviving, or Endangered?, published by Brookings in 1994. He was selected as the recipient of the 1999 Award for Outstanding Service from the Council for Independent Colleges for this work. From 1983 to 1989, he served as president of Kalamazoo College, a liberal arts college in Michigan. Prior to that, he was a Senior Fellow at Brookings from 1975 to 1983, specializing in the economics of higher education and public policy toward education. His most recent book (with co-authors) is Financing American Higher Education in the Era of Globalization (Harvard Education Press, 2012). He attended the University of Colorado at Boulder as an undergraduate, majoring in philosophy, and earned his PhD in economics from the University of California at Berkeley.

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James Childress

• University Professor • Professor of Religious Studies and Public Policy Childress has previously been the Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr., Professor of Christian Ethics at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown University (1975-79) and a Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago Divinity School and Princeton University. In 1990, he was named Professor of the Year in the Commonwealth of Virginia by the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education, and in 2002 he received the University of Virginia’s highest honor—the Thomas Jefferson Award. In spring 2010, he held the Maguire Chair in American History and Ethics at the Library of Congress. Childress is the author of numerous articles and several books in several areas of ethics, including Principles of Biomedical Ethics (with Tom Beauchamp), now in its 6th edition and translated into several languages. He was vice chair of the national Task Force on Organ Transplantation, and he also has served on the Board of Directors of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), the UNOS Ethics Committee, the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee, the Human Gene Therapy Subcommittee, the Biomedical Ethics Advisory Committee, and several Data and Safety Monitoring Boards for NIH clinical trials. He was a member of the presidentially-appointed National Bioethics Advisory Commission (1996-2001). He now chairs the Health Sciences Policy Board for the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science. His current research focuses on public bioethics, on public health ethics, and on just-war theory and practice. Childress received his BA from Guilford College, his BD from Yale Divinity School, and his MA and PhD from Yale University.

14

Eileen Chou

Benjamin Converse

• Assistant Professor of Public Policy

• Assistant Professor of Public Policy and

Chou received her PhD in management and organization from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, and holds an MS in social science from Caltech and a BA in psychology and economics from UCLA. Chou’s research focuses on the organizational, social, and psychological forces that shape individual and group behavior in organizational settings. She explores questions such as how the terms of contracts promote or inhibit cooperation among team members, whether and when hierarchy is an effective mechanism of social organization, how trust can be used as a strategic tactic, and whether or not it really is “lonely at the top.” Chou’s work has appeared in academic journals such as Psychological Science, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, American Economics Journal, Experimental Economics, and Organizational Psychological Review. Her research on prosocial behaviors has been selected to be featured in “the Best Paper Proceedings” by the Organizational Behavior division at the 2010 conference of the Academy of Management.

Psychology Converse studies social psychology and the psychology of judgment & decision making. He investigates basic psychological processes—motivation, social judgment, and inferences about others’ mental states—that have critical implications for management, leadership, and policy. Much of his work focuses on the question of how and when people can think beyond “the here and now.” For example, how do we balance our own selfish impulses with the good of the group? How do we forgo immediate temptations in favor of future goals? How do we get beyond our own psychological perspective to infer others’ thoughts, feelings, and opinions about the world? He is primarily interested in how these thought processes lead to decisions and behaviors that either promote or destroy stable social systems. His teaching experience ranges from undergraduate education in psychology to MBA and executive education in management, decision making, and negotiations. Converse’s work has been published in journals such as Psychological Science and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, as well as edited volumes such as the Handbook of Self-Regulation and discussed in popular press outlets such as Scientific American, US News and World Reports, The New York Times, and BBC News. Converse received his BA in psychological and brain sciences with high honors from Dartmouth College in 2004 and then spent a semester as an honorary visiting researcher in the Department of Psychology at the University of Birmingham (UK). Following this, he joined the Center for Decision Research at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, where he received his PhD from the Managerial and Organizational Behavior program.

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Dean, Professor of Public Policy and Politics

Garrett 200A

924.0812

hh7b@virginia.edu

David Breneman

Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, University Garrett 200B Professor, Professor of Education and Public Policy

924.0965

breneman@virginia.edu

Gerald Warburg

Assistant Dean for External Affairs, Professor of Public Policy Garrett 107

243.1173

gfw2f@virginia.edu

Richard Bonnie

Professor of Law, Medicine, and Public Policy; 580 Massie Road, 924.3209 Director of the Institute of Law, Psychiatry, and Public Policy Room WB 179D

rbonnie@virginia.edu

AJ Bostian Lecturer

Monroe 219 Garrett L050

924.7680 243.9976

ajbostian@virginia.edu

Jeanine Braithwaite

Professor of Public Policy

Garrett 106

243.1127

jdb6bc@virginia.edu

James Childress

University Professor, Gibson 438 924.6724 Professor of Religious Studies and Public Policy

childress@virginia.edu

eileen chou

Assistant Professor of Public Policy

eyc4m@virginia.edu

Garrett 111

982.4821

Benjamin Converse Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Psychology

Garrett 105 243.3730 Lab: Gilmer B055 and Garrett L002

converse@virginia.edu

jennifer doleac

Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics

Garrett 110

982.0195

jld4mr@virginia.edu

leora friedberg

Associate Professor of Economics and Public Policy

Monroe 257

924.3225

lfriedberg@virginia.edu

chloe gibbs

Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Education

Garrett 102

243.1128

crg3n@virginia.edu

Frederick Hitz

Adjunct Professor of Public Policy

Garrett L046

924.3192

fph7w@virginia.edu

Charles Holt

Professor of Economics and Public Policy

Monroe 234

924.7894

holt@virginia.edu

mark kleiman

Visiting Professor of Public Policy (fall 2012)

Garrett L038

243.9962

mk5ds@virginia.edu

David Leblang

Professor of Politics and Public Policy

Gibson S281

924.3192

leblang@virginia.edu

molly lipscomb

Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics

Garrett L038

982.1561

molly.lipscomb@virginia.edu

Christine Mahoney

Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Politics

Garrett 109

243.3727

c.mahoney@virginia.edu

Guian McKee Associate Professor of History and Public Policy

Garrett L044 & 2201 Old Ivy Road

243.8856

gam2n@virginia.edu

Edgar Olsen

Professor of Economics and Public Policy

Monroe 250

924.3443

eoo@virginia.edu

Eric Patashnik

Professor of Public Policy and Politics

Garrett 101

924.0903

ericpat@virginia.edu

margaret foster riley Professor of Law and Public Policy

580 Massie Road, Room WB347

924.4671

mf9c@virginia.edu

Christopher Ruhm

Professor of Public Policy and Economics

Garrett 204

243.3729

ruhm@virginia.edu

Raymond Scheppach

Professor of the Practice of Public Policy

Garrett 103

243.1126

ray.scheppach@virginia.edu

herman schwartz

Professor of Politics and Public Policy

Gibson S185

924.7818

schwartz@virginia.edu

William Shobe

Professor of Public Policy; Adjunct Professor of Economics; 2400 Old Ivy Road 982.5376 Director, Center for Economic & Policy Studies, Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service

b a t t e n

Harry Harding

a b o u t

D i r e c t o r y o f Fa c u lt y

shobe@virginia.edu

Sophie Trawalter Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Psychology

Garrett 108 Lab: Gilmer 218

243.3726

strawalter@virginia.edu

Craig Volden

Professor of Public Policy and Politics

Garrett 203

243.3725

volden@virginia.edu

andrew wicks

Professor of Business Administration and Public Policy

Darden School, FOB 286 243.8793

wicksa@virginia.edu

James Wyckoff

Professor of Education and Public Policy, Ruffner 258 924.0842 Director of the Center on Education Policy and Workforce Development

wyckoff@virginia.edu

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b a t t e n a b o u t 16

Jennifer Doleac

Leora Friedberg

Chloe Gibbs

• Assistant Professor of Public Policy and

• Associate Professor of Economics and Public

• Assistant Professor of Public Policy and

Economics Doleac earned her PhD in economics from Stanford University, and holds a BA in mathematics and economics (with highest honors) from Williams College. Between 2003 and 2006, she worked as a research assistant at the Brookings Institution and the Congressional Budget Office. She is an applied microeconomist with a particular interest in law and economics, including how the increasingly-widespread use of DNA databases affects criminal behavior. She has found that DNA databases lead to extremely cost-effective reductions in crime, a result with important public policy implications. In other work, she conducted a year-long field experiment to test the effect of a seller’s race in online markets, showing that black sellers receive fewer purchase offers and are less trusted than white sellers. Her study of racial discrimination has received a great deal of media attention.

Policy Friedberg earned her PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and her undergraduate degree from The Johns Hopkins University. Her research interests are public economics and labor economics. She previously worked as an assistant professor at the University of California at San Diego and as a visiting faculty member/scholar at MIT, the International Longevity Center—USA, The Urban Institute—Income and Benefits Policy Center, the Federal Reserve Bank of Saint Louis, and Harvard University.

Education Gibbs earned her PhD in public policy from the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago. She earned an MPP from the Ford School at the University of Michigan, and received her BA in government and international studies from Notre Dame. Her research interests include the economics of education and child and family policy, focusing on early childhood in particular. Her research is providing insights into what and how early childhood investments are most likely to improve the life chances of children from disadvantaged backgrounds. In her dissertation research, Gibbs uses innovative experimental and quasi-experimental methods to study the impact of full-day kindergarten. She is also conducting research on Head Start program impact, effects of a home visitation program for children and families, fade-out of early childhood program effects, and the interaction of early childhood experiences and later school quality.

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a b o u t

Frederick Hitz

Charles Holt

• Dean and Professor of Public Policy and

• Adjunct Professor of Public Policy

• Professor of Economics and Public Policy

Politics Harding’s previous positions include faculty appointments at Swarthmore College (1970-71) and Stanford University (1971-83), Senior Fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program at the Brookings Institution (1983-94), Dean of the Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University (1995-2005), and Director of Research and Analysis at Eurasia Group, a political risk consulting and advisory firm headquartered in New York (2005-07). A specialist on Asia, his major publications include The India-China Relationship: What the United States Needs to Know (coedited with Francine Frankel, 2004); A Fragile Relationship: The United States and China Since 1972 (1992), SinoAmerican Relations, 1945-1955: A Joint Reassessment of a Critical Debate (coedited with Yuan Ming, 1989), China’s Second Revolution: Reform After Mao (1987), China’s Foreign Relations in the 1980s (editor, 1984), and Organizing China: The Problem of Bureaucracy, 1949-1976 (1981). Harding also serves as Vice Chairman of the Asia Foundation, a member of the Board of Governors of the Rajaratnam School of International Studies at Nanyang Technological University (Singapore), and a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Finnish Institute of International Affairs (Helsinki). He received his bachelor’s degree from Princeton University and his MA and PhD from Stanford University.

Hitz’s prior academic appointments include lecturing at the University of Ife in Ibadan, Nigeria on a Ford Foundation project in 1965-66, and at Princeton University in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs from 1998-2006. He was also a Senior Faculty Fellow at Butler College, one of Princeton’s undergraduate colleges. Following his graduation from law school and teaching in Nigeria, Hitz entered the Career Training Program at the CIA in 1967 and served in the clandestine service in Africa. He returned to law practice in 1974 but re-entered government service in congressional liaison capacities with the State, Defense, and Energy Departments before resuming his career at CIA in 1978 as Legislative Counsel to the Director of Central Intelligence. He then served as Deputy Director of the Europe Division in the clandestine service. In 1990, Hitz was appointed the first statutory Inspector General of the CIA by President George H. W. Bush and served in that capacity until he retired from government service in 1998. Hitz graduated from Princeton University in 1961 with a degree in history, Phi Beta Kappa, and received his JD from Harvard Law School in 1964.

Holt is the director of the Experimental Economics Lab at the University of Virginia, and his publications include more than 100 articles in academic journals, focused on game theory, auctions, experimental economics, and the teaching of economics. He has written and edited several books on topics in experimental economics, and he was the founding co-editor of the journal Experimental Economics. He has previously served as President of the Economic Science Foundation and of the Southern Economic Association. He worked (with Jacob Goeree) on the design and testing of the hierarchical package bidding component of the US FCC 700 MHz auction held in early 2008. He also was a member of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) auction design team, whose recommendations have been implemented in a series of quarterly emissions permit auctions for 10 Northeast states. He received his PhD in economics from Carnegie Mellon University.

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b a t t e n

Harry Harding

17


b a t t e n a b o u t 18

David Leblang

Molly Lipscomb

Christine Mahoney

• Professor of Politics and Public Policy

• Assistant Professor of Public Policy and

• Assistant Professor of Public Policy and

A specialist in political economy, Leblang has served as a consultant to the International Monetary Fund, the Directorate of Finance and Economics of the European Commission, and the Department of Defense. He is co-author of Democratic Politics and Financial Markets: Pricing Politics (2006) and more than 25 journal articles in publications including The American Journal of Politics, International Organization, Economics and Politics, and the Journal of International Money and Finance. He has received research support from the National Science Foundation. Leblang has written on the politics of economic growth, the determinants of exchange rate policy, the causes of currency crises and the link between elections and economic expectations. At present he is working on two large projects. The first examines the causes and consequences of international migration and the second explores the implications of global commodity price volatility. In addition to his academic position, he is Director of the GAGE program at the Miller Center for Public Affairs and Chair of the Department of Politics. He received his PhD from Vanderbilt University.

Economics Lipscomb’s research focuses primarily on environmental issues in developing countries and adaptation to lack of health and sanitation services. She has analyzed the incentives to pollute near downstream borders in Brazil, the effectiveness of new environmental policies designed to enhance negotiation across local boundaries in Brazil, the impact of access to electricity on human development and poverty indicators in Brazil, and corporate changes in the production of highly polluting products in response to environmental enforcement in India. Lipscomb is also a principal investigator on several large randomized controlled trials including a project measuring the impact of different social network interventions in increasing willingness to pay for improved sanitation services in Senegal, a project testing the relative effectiveness of different types of leaders in increasing the willingness to pay for water treatment tablets in Uganda, and a project decomposing the components of personal savings through alternative loan types in Uganda. Lipscomb received her PhD from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2009 and has served as a consultant at the World Bank and a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania.

Politics Mahoney’s research focuses on global advocacy; she studies the strategies, tactics, argumentation, framing and coalition-building activities of activists seeking to change public policies by targeting multiple levels of governance. Her book Brussels vs. the Beltway: Advocacy in the United States and the European Union (Georgetown University Press, 2008) is the first large scale comparative study of lobbying in the US and the EU. She has also published in European Union Politics, the Journal of Public Policy, the Journal of European Public Policy, West European Politics, the Journal of Common Market Studies as well as a number of edited volumes. Her current book project looks at global advocacy on behalf of the displaced, studying how NGOs and governments at the local, national, and global levels attempt to fight for the rights of those who have been forced to flee their homelands due to ethnic and political violence. She is the co-chair of the European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR) Standing Group on Interest Groups and the Director of the 2011 ECPR Summer School on Global Advocacy. Mahoney was previously an assistant professor at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University and the Director of the Center for European Studies and the Maxwell EU Center. She received her PhD in political science from Pennsylvania State University.

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a b o u t

Ed Olsen

Eric Patashnik

• Associate Professor, Miller Center of Public

• Professor of Economics and Public Policy

• Professor of Public Policy and Politics

Affairs • Associate Professor of Public Policy McKee is a historian of social and urban policy. He is the author of The Problem of Jobs: Liberalism, Race, and Deindustrialization in Philadelphia, published in November 2008 by the University of Chicago Press. At the University of Virginia’s Miller Center of Public Affairs, McKee works with the Presidential Recordings Program, where he is the editor of three volumes of the Center’s series The Presidential Recordings of Lyndon B. Johnson (published by W.W. Norton and The University of Virginia Press). He is currently working on a history of the War on Poverty, tentatively entitled From the Grassroots to the White House: How Local Activists Transformed Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty, which will be published by The Johns Hopkins University Press. He is also beginning a new project on the development of hospitals and medical centers as a major urban economic sector in the decades after World War II. McKee has published articles in the Journal of Urban History, the Journal of Policy History, the Journal of Planning History, the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco’s Community Development Investment Center, and the Boston Globe. In April 2007, he delivered the keynote address at the conference “In the Shadow of the Great Society: American Politics, Culture and Society Since 1964,” hosted by the Rothermere American Institute and the American History Research Seminar at the University of Oxford. McKee received a PhD in American history from the University of California at Berkeley.

Olsen has served as chairman of the Economics Department and was heavily involved in the creation and development of the Batten School. He has been a postdoctoral fellow at Indiana University, an economist at the Rand Corporation, a project associate in the Institute for Research on Poverty, a visiting professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Wisconsin, and a visiting scholar at the US Department of Housing and Urban Development. Olsen’s teaching and research has focused on public policy issues, especially concerning the welfare system. Within this broad area, his research specialty is low-income housing policy. He has published papers on housing markets and policies in professional journals such as the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Journal of Public Economics, Regional Science and Urban Economics, and Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, and he wrote the chapter on empirical housing economics in the North-Holland Handbook of Urban Economics and the chapter on low-income housing programs in the National Bureau of Economic Research volume on meanstested transfers in the United States. He has testified on low-income housing policy before Congressional committees five times, has been an expert witness on the topic in two major class-action lawsuits, and has been a consultant to HUD during six administrations. Olsen served on the Board of Editors of the American Economic Review from 1985 through 1991. He was Vice President of the Southern Economic Association from 2003 to 2005 and served two terms on the Board of Trustees of the American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association. Olsen received his PhD in economics from Rice University.

Patashnik is also Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and has previously held faculty positions at Yale University and UCLA. Patashnik’s latest book is Living Legislation: Durability, Change, and the Politics of American Lawmaking, an edited volume with U.Va. professor Jeffrey Jenkins which examines legislative reform and the endurance of reforms. Previously, Reforms at Risk: What Happens After Major Policy Changes Are Enacted (Princeton University Press, 2008) received the 2009 Louis Brownlow Book Award given by the National Academy of Public Administration. His other books are Promoting the General Welfare: New Perspectives on Government Performance (co-editor with Alan S. Gerber, Brookings Institution Press, 2006), and Putting Trust in the US Budget: Federal Trust Funds and the Politics of Commitment (Cambridge University Press, 2000). His essays have appeared in Political Science Quarterly, Governance, Journal of Health Politics, Policy & Law, Social Service Review, and in many edited volumes. His current major research project, with Alan Gerber of Yale University, explores the politics of evidence-based medicine in the United States and is supported by grants from the Smith Richardson and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundations. Patashnik received both his MPP and PhD (political science) from the University of California at Berkeley.

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Guian McKee

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Margaret Foster Riley

Christopher Ruhm

Raymond Scheppach

• Professor of Law and Public Policy

• Professor of Public Policy and Economics

• Professor of the Practice of Public Policy

Riley is Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law where she teaches in the areas of Bioethics, Food and Drug Law, Health Law, Animal Law and Public Health Law. She also has a secondary appointment in the Department of Public Health Sciences at the University of Virginia School of Medicine. She is a graduate of Duke University and Columbia University Law School and was a litigation associate at Rogers & Wells in New York and Pepper Hamilton & Scheetz in Philadelphia prior to joining the faculty at Virginia in 1992. Her areas of interest include health institutions and reform, biomedical ethics and research, food and drug law, genomics, reproductive technologies, stem cell research, biotechnology, health disparities and chronic disease.

Ruhm is also a Research Associate in the Health Economics, Health Care Policy, and Children’s Programs of the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA). Prior to joining the University of Virginia, Ruhm was the Jefferson-Pilot Excellence Professor of Economics at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. During the 1996-97 academic year he served as Senior Economist on President Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisers, where his main responsibilities were in the areas of health policy, aging, and labor market issues. He has also held a faculty position at Boston University and a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at the Florence Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare at Brandeis University. Ruhm teaches and conducts research in the areas of health economics, labor economics, applied microeconomics, and quantitative methods. He is co-author of Turbulence in the American Workplace (published by Oxford University Press in 1990) and has written more than 90 articles which have been published as book chapters or in journals. He received the UNCG Research Excellence Award in May 2003. Ruhm is an associate editor of the Southern Economic Journal, Journal of Population Economics, International Journal of Information Security and Privacy and Southern Economic Journal on serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Labor Research and Economic Letters. He is a steering committee member of the Southeastern Health Economics Study Group, on the Board of Directors of the American Society of Health Economists and he was previously a Vice President of the Southern Economic Association. Ruhm earned a PhD in economics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1984.

Scheppach is the former executive director of the National Governors Association (NGA), serving from January 1983 – January 2011. As such, he is a specialist on the role of the states in the formulation and implementation of public policy, as well as on the full range of public policies (education, economic development, housing, job training, health and social services, transportation, and environmental protection) that are at least in part the responsibility of the states. He is now the Professor of the Practice of Public Policy for the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy at the University of Virginia, where he teaches courses on the role of the states in public policy and on government budgeting. Before joining the National Governors Association, Scheppach was first assistant director, and then deputy director, of the Congressional Budget Office, which gave him an understanding of a comparably broad range of issues at the federal level. He has authored or co-authored four books on economics, including the 1984 book New Directions in Economic Policy: An Agenda for the 1980s. He earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Maine, and holds a PhD in economics from the University of Connecticut.

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a b o u t

• Professor of Politics and Public Policy Schwartz earned his PhD and MA from Cornell University, and his BA from Swarthmore College (with distinction). His books include In the Dominions of Debt: Historical Perspectives on Dependent Development, States vs. Markets: The Emergence of a Global Economy, and most recently Subprime Nation: American Power, Global Finance and the Housing Bubble. His current research focuses on the political economy of collective action in an economy in which profitability largely flows from the definition of and control over intellectual property rights.

William Shobe

Sophie Trawalter

• Professor of Public Policy • Director, Center for Economic & Policy Studies at the Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service • Adjunct Professor of Economics Shobe’s current research includes allowance auction design, environmental federalism, and a new initiative to design and test early childhood literacy programs using direct in-home measurements of parent-child interactions. He is also working with a group of other U.Va. researchers on an initiative to make a wide variety of state education data more readily available for research on education program effectiveness. In 2007, he worked with Professor Charlie Holt and others on the research team that designed the carbon allowance auctions for the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative. In 2000, Shobe received a Fulbright Fellowship in environmental economics and policy. Before joining U.Va., Shobe served as Associate Director for Economic & Regulatory Analysis with the Virginia Department of Planning & Budget, where he coordinated state expenditure forecasts and the economic analysis of state regulations. While at the DPB, Shobe developed the Virginia Regulatory Town Hall web site, the recipient of numerous state and national awards. He also managed the design and implementation of the innovative Virginia NOx allowance auction. Prior to joining DPB, he taught economics at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Shobe serves on a number of state advisory boards including the Joint Advisory Board of Economists and the State Advisory Board on Air Pollution. He earned his PhD in economics from the University of Minnesota and a JD from Lewis & Clark Law School.

• Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Psychology Trawalter primarily studies intergroup relations, focusing on how intergroup interactions and diversity more generally affect people’s physiological responses, thoughts, and feelings. She is especially interested in how people develop competencies and learn to thrive in diverse environments. Ultimately, the aim of her work is to develop constructive strategies to cope with the challenges of diversity in organizations, public arenas, and private spaces. In time, such strategies may reduce intergroup tensions and improve outcomes for both historically stigmatized and non-stigmatized group members. In 2007, she received a National Service Research Award from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to study physiological stress and diversity at “Cells to Society (C2S): The Center on Social Disparities and Health” at the Institute of Policy Research, Northwestern University. Before joining the University of Virginia, she was an assistant professor of psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Trawalter received her BA in psychology and BS in mathematics from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, and her PhD in psychological and brain sciences from Dartmouth College.

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Herman Schwartz

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Craig Volden

Gerald Warburg

Andrew Wicks

• Professor of Public Policy and Politics

• Assistant Dean for External Affairs and

• Professor of Business Administration and

Volden studies the interaction among political institutions, including issues in legislative-executive behavior and in federalism. His research areas include American political institutions, positive political economy, legislative politics, state and local politics, research methods, and game theory. Before joining the Batten School, he taught at The Ohio State University, the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago, and Claremont Graduate University. His major work, Revolving Gridlock, coauthored with David Brady, explores the conditions under which members of Congress are able to overcome the constraints that frequently produce policy gridlock. He works extensively on issues of policy diffusion, assessing conditions under which effective policies spread across states and localities. His current project focuses on congressional leadership and the comparative legislative effectiveness of individual members of Congress. He earned his PhD in political economy from the Stanford University Graduate School of Business.

Professor of Public Policy Warburg teaches courses at the Batten School on Congress, US foreign policy and advocacy strategies. His research interests include the study of best practices by non-governmental organizations and the evolution of US nuclear non-proliferation policies. Warburg’s professional background encompasses a broad array of public service sectors. Most recently, he served as Executive Vice President of Cassidy & Associates, a leading government relations firm. Prior to that position, he worked as a legislative assistant for the US Senate and US House of Representatives under Senate Whip Alan Cranston and Representative Jonathan B. Bingham. His academic service includes time spent as a visiting professor at Georgetown University, the University of Pennsylvania, the Brookings Institution, and his alma maters of Stanford University and Hampshire College.

Public Policy Wicks is the Ruffin Professor of Business Administration at the Darden Graduate School of Business at U.Va. He is director of the Olsson Center for Ethics, director of the doctoral program, academic adviser for the Business Roundtable Institute for Corporate Ethics and an adjunct professor in the Religious Studies department at U.Va. Wicks is co-author of three books including Managing for Stakeholders: Survival, Reputation and Success, published in 2007 by Yale University Press; Business Ethics: A Managerial Approach, published in 2010 by Prentice Hall; and Stakeholder Theory: The State of the Art, published by Cambridge University Press in early 2010. He has published over 30 journal articles, and his work has appeared in a wide variety of journals in business ethics, management, and the humanities. His research interests include stakeholder responsibility, stakeholder theory, trust, health care ethics, total quality management and ethics and entrepreneurship. He works with MBA students, executives and corporations in the United States and abroad. Wicks is actively working with Ethics-LX, an entrepreneurial venture, to create a series of web-based simulations that incorporate ethics into the functional areas of business. He has received awards for both his research and teaching. Wicks joined the Darden faculty in 2002 after teaching for 10 years at the University of Washington Graduate Business School. He earned his BA from the University of Tennessee, and his MA and PhD at the University of Virginia.

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a b o u t b a t t e n

James Wyckoff

• Curry Memorial Professor of Education and Professor of Public Policy • Director of the Center for Education Policy and Workforce Competitiveness Wyckoff has published on a variety of topics in education policy, including issues of teacher labor markets, school resource allocation, and school choice. Currently, his research focuses on labor markets for teachers and the effects of public policy on the preparation, recruitment, and retention of teachers able to meaningfully improve outcomes for students. This research has been published in a variety of peer reviewed outlets and has received support from a number of foundations, the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Education. Wyckoff has served as president of the American Education Finance Association, and has served on: the policy council of the Association of Public Policy Analysis and Management, three National Research Council panels, the Scientific Review Panel of the US Department of Education, the editorial board of Education Finance and Policy and on several advisory panels. He received his BA from Denison University and a PhD in economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

ta k e yo u r p r o f e s s o r t o l u n c h ( o r an y o t h er meal )

Despite what they told you in ECON 201, there is such a thing as a free lunch. In an effort to promote student/faculty interactions and encourage collaboration and mentorship opportunities, the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy sponsors a ‘Take Your Professor to Lunch’ program for MPP students. Students have the opportunity to treat one member of the Batten School core faculty to a meal each semester at a cost up to $15 per person, including taxes and tip. Please note that the Batten School is unable to reimburse alcoholic beverages. Students are welcome and encouraged to take professors out with other Batten course-mates in a group setting, so long as the $15/ person limit is observed. Reimbursement When taking a professor out to a meal, make sure that you save an itemized receipt that reflects the total cost of the meal, including taxes and tip. Return the receipt to Kerra Thurston along with the names of everyone in attendance for reimbursement and you should receive a direct deposit for that amount within 7-10 business days.

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Facilities and Operations: Garrett Hall 24/7 access to Garrett Hall • The School operational hours are from 7:30 am to 6:00 pm. Students can enter Garrett Hall during nonoperational hours by using their Student ID Card at the swipe card readers which are located outside the building. • The swipe card readers are located at the front door handicap entrance and the basement door (facing McCormick Road). You must make sure that the handicap door • Students who are experiencing problems with accessing the building will need to visit the Director of Administrative Affairs to reactivate their card. If the Director is unavailable, please contact the Business Services Coordinator. • Non-Batten students are not permitted during after hours, unless accompanied by a Batten student. Students are held responsible for the actions of their guests.

Reserving Conference Rooms in the Lower Level at Garrett Hall • Reservations need to be scheduled through the Meeting Room Manager System or you can contact the Business Services Coordinator or the Business Office Student Workers. What you take in, you must take out. What you move in the room, you must move back.

tivity problems, computing problems, or are in need of media equipment, please call the IT Help Desk at 434260-0245, send a request for help at fbs.helpdesk@gmail.com or visit us in the in the administration wing on the lower level of Garrett Hall.

Keep Garrett Hall Clean • We must preserve the historic Great Hall. What you take in, you must take out. What you move in the room, you must move back. Please do not move the plants, sofas, and the lounge chairs around the room. • Please pick up after yourself. • Throw your trash away. • Use the recycling bins when possible. They are located in the Student Break Room in the Lower Level of Garrett. Please notify the Business Office if the bins are full. Please do not continue to stack the recyclables. • Wipe up the tables after you eat. • If water is spilled on the hardwood floor, carpet and/or furniture, please wipe the area until it is dry. If it is a significant spill, please contact the Business Office. • If anything other than water is spilled on the hardwood floor, carpet

Student Copy Center In order to use the Student Copier Center, each student will need to stop by the IT Helpdesk located in the administration wing of Garret Hall to have their laptop added to the UVA networking domain called eservices. This will allow students access to networked services, such as printing from their laptop to the copier center printers. The Student Copier Center is located on the lower level of Garrett Hall.

Information Technology Help Desk If you are experience network connec24

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• •

• •

and/or furniture, please try and soak up with paper towels and contact Business Office immediately. Wipe out the microwave after usage. Students are to label food stored in the refrigerator with their name and date. Any items left in the refrigerator after 3 weeks will be discarded. Please clean the refrigerator if you spill any food or liquid. Put books and magazines back where they belong. Please do not leave newspapers scattered.

Security and Emergency Contact Information • The Security and Emergency Contacts list will be posted in the Student Break Room, Student Lounge, Great Hall, and in the Commons Room. • The list will include Police, Fire Department, U.Va. Police, Facilities, the Deans, the Director of Administrative Affairs, the Assistant to the Dean, etc. • In the case of U.Va. declared crisis or disaster, there are Emergency Preparedness 36 hour kits located in the following areas: Annex – behind the Student Services front desk and in the Student Lounge 1st floor – Supply/Copy Room


a c a d e mics

academics Curriculum In fall 2012 the Batten School launches the Bachelor of Arts in Public Policy and Leadership. The Batten undergraduate program is a selective multidisciplinary, liberal arts degree focused on understanding how public policy decisions are made, how civic leaders in government, non-profit organizations, and the private sector contribute to collective problem solving. Although not a pre-professional degree, the Batten undergraduate program gives students an opportunity to develop their critical and analytical thinking, and their communication, leadership, and research skills.

Degree Information (Degree Offered) Bachelor of Arts in Public Policy and Leadership Open to current second-year U.Va. undergraduates and to transfer students, the public policy and leadership major is a multidisciplinary, liberal arts program focused on understanding how public policy decisions are made, how civic leaders in government, non-profit organizations, and the private sector contribute to collective problem solving.

Although not a pre-professional degree, the Batten undergraduate program gives students an opportunity to develop their critical and analytical thinking, and their communication, leadership, and research skills. It is an excellent choice for students who are still exploring their career options, or who seek a broad introduction to the identification and management of contemporary societal problems and to the challenges and opportunities of civic leadership. Recipients of the BA in Public Policy and Leadership are prepared for a wide range of graduate programs, including both professional degrees and doctoral programs, as well as for jobs related to public policy in the for-profit and public sectors. Students already committed to a career in public policy, and who are interested in a professional master’s degree in that field, are advised to consider applying to the Accelerated Bachelor/MPP Program. Admission Admission to the Batten School is competitive to ensure a well-rounded class and to limit class size. Typically

current U.Va. undergraduates apply for admission during the second year and will be admitted to the Batten School for their final two years. The program is also open to students transferring to the University in the third year. In special circumstances, a student may apply for admission to the Batten School undergraduate degree program during their first year and complete the program over the course of their second and third year of study, thus graduating early. In such cases, the student must still fulfill the requirement of having completed 60 credits prior to entry to the Batten School. Students must first be admitted to the University of Virginia, either as first-year students or through a transfer process. The Batten School will only consider applications for the fall semester of a student’s third-year, regardless of when they transfer into the University. A student is not eligible to transfer into the Batten School for the undergraduate degree program during the spring of their third year or at any point in their fourth year. The BA application process requires components of the following supporting

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documents: • Completed application form • All college transcripts • 1-2 letters of recommendation • Personal essay • CV/Resume of activities • Standardized test scores Applicants must present strong academic credentials and show that they will have earned at least 60 undergraduate credits before the start of their third year. They must also demonstrate that they are on track to finish their College of Arts and Sciences competency and area requirements, which the Batten School also requires.

Curricular Requirements To earn a BA in Public Policy and Leadership, a student must present 120 credits of approved course work, which completes the competency requirements, area requirements, major requirements, and elective requirements. No fewer than 96 of the 120 required credits must be passed on a graded (A-B-C-D) basis. All courses taken to fulfill competency requirements, area requirements, and major/ minor requirements must be taken on a graded (A-B-C-D) basis. A candidate must have earned a grade point average of at least 2.000 on all graded courses taken in the Batten School or elsewhere in the University and offered for the degree. No fewer than 60 credit hours must be taken at the University of Virginia. 26

The Batten major curriculum consists of fourteen required Batten School courses, thirteen 3-credit courses and a 1-credit research and writing lab: • Three core courses on the foundations of public policy and leadership. These courses introduce students to the basic models, concepts, and frameworks of civic leadership and to the theories and substance of public policy. • Introduction to Public Policy • Introduction to Civic Leadership • Public Policy Challenges of the 21st Century • Two core courses on the economic analysis of public policy. Students learn to analyze the rationales for government interventions in markets, the advantages and disadvantages of different tools of policy action, and the costs and benefits of policy decisions. • Choice and Consequences: The Economics of Public Policy • Research Methods and Data Analysis of Public Policy • Four core courses on the political, psychological, ethical, and historical context of public policy and leadership. Economic policy analysis can identify the most efficient means of achieving collective objectives, but the behavior of individuals and groups is shaped not only by material interests but also by powerful contextual factors, and policy action is dependent on leadership skills in identifying viable solutions and advocating to receptive audiences. These core courses provide insights into how cognitive biases, moral values, political culture

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and institutions, and inherited policy commitments shape and constrain problem solving and leadership in civic life. • Institutional and Political Context of Public Policy • Value and Bias in Public Policy • Comparative Policy History • Ethical Dimensions of Civic Life • Three special topics courses, which offer students the opportunity to study in depth specific public policy and leadership topics. The Batten School will offer topics courses on specific policy topics and leadership skills each year of the program. These courses will vary by year, but will include topics such as: • Anti-Terrorism and the Role of Intelligence • Introduction to Development Policy • Political Leadership in American History • International Financial Institutions • Leading and Managing Diverse Groups Pending approval by the Assistant Dean for Academic Programs, students may take up to 6 credits (two courses) offered in other departments toward the special topics requirement. Courses must be 3000-level or higher and must address issues related to public policy and leadership. • Two core professional skills courses: a research and writing lab and a capstone experience • Research and writing lab (one credit) • Several capstone seminars will be


In sum, students take 40 credit hours at the Batten School: 30 credits of core coursework (10 courses), 9 credits of special topics courses (3 courses), and a 1-credit research and writing lab.

b at t e n s c h o o l a c a d e m i c c a l e n d a r Fall semester 2012 Orientation

Monday, August 27

Courses begin Tuesday, August 28 Add/Drop/Withdrawal* Add deadline: September 11 Drop w/o penalty deadline: September 12 Drop with W deadline: October 23

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held each year. These seminars will involve group projects in which students produce a comprehensive report analyzing a policy problem, available policy options, and the teams’ recommended solutions.

Reading Days Saturday – Tuesday, October 6-9 Family Weekend

Friday – Sunday, October 26-28

Thanksgiving recess

Wednesday – Sunday, November 21-25

Competency Requirements

Courses end

Friday, December 7

These requirements provide the foundation for successful study in the liberal arts, for meeting subsequent challenges in the work place, and for serving effectively as an educated member of society: • Composition: Every liberal arts graduate is expected to have the ability to write clearly, succinctly, and in a logical manner. • Foreign Language: Language is not simply a means to communicate, but also an avenue for insights into other cultures. Many students also discover that learning a second language improves their understanding of English and broadens their awareness of an increasingly diverse America.

Reading Day Sunday, December 9 Examinations

Monday, December 10 – Tuesday, December 18 (No exams on Thursday, December 13, or Sunday, December 16)

Reading Days Thursday, December 13; Sunday, December 16

spring semester 2013 Courses begin

Monday, January 14

Add/Drop/Withdrawal* TBD Spring recess Saturday, March 9 – Sunday, March 17 Courses end Tuesday, April 30 Reading Day

Wednesday, May 1

Examinations Thursday, May 2 – Friday, May 10 (No exams on Sunday, May 5, or Wednesday, May 8)

Area Requirements

Reading Days Sunday, May 5; Wednesday, May 8

All liberal arts students are expected to have the background and breadth for further learning in a variety of disciplines. In completing these requirements, students explore a wide range of disciplines, points of view, and modes of inquiry. In addition, they investigate unfamiliar areas and thus can make more informed judgments about their major and elective courses. Students are encouraged to design programs of study that offer the maximum range of intellectual opportunities. The area requirements are therefore organized to provide experience with a broad array of intellectual approaches rather than prescribe a specific body of content: 1. Social Sciences allow students to explore techniques of analysis and modes of reasoning for studying a wide range of social, economic, and political relations.

Final Exercises Sunday, May 19 *Dates may vary by school.

2. Humanities improve students’ understanding of the achievements and potential of literature and the arts, whether verbal, visual, or musical. They may also address basic questions concerning values and ethics. 3. Natural Sciences and Mathematics improve students’ comprehension of the fundamental principles of natural phenomena and of scientific methods as a way of describing and understanding the world. 4. Non-Western Perspectives broaden students’ exposure to other cultures and to the ways those cultures perceive their environment or organize their society. 5. Historical Studies introduce

students to the historical forces that have shaped and changed the nature of human societies and methods that are required to study such forces as well as encourages students to think about cause and effect and the continuity and change over time.

Competency Requirements Following matriculation, all competency and area requirements must be completed at the University of Virginia and must be taken on a graded basis. AP credits from secondary school and transfer credits awarded before U.Va. matriculation may count as area require-

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ments, with the exception of the second writing requirement. Dual-enrollment credit may not be used to meet first writing or foreign language requirements. Test scores cited in this section are from the SAT II Subject Tests re-centered in April 1995.

First Writing Requirement Students may meet the first writing requirement in one of five ways: • By successfully completing the twosemester Introduction to Academic Argument (ENWR 1505 + 1506). • By successfully completing the twosemester ESL version of Introduction to Academic Argument (ENWR 1559 in the fall, followed by spring ENWR 1508).Note that this path is for students who are still developing their skills in English as a second language; students required to fulfill the first writing requirement in the ESL path will be identified by the Admissions Office, the Summer Transition Program, or the Professional and Academic Writing Program. • By successfully completing Accelerated Introduction to Academic Argument (ENWR 110). • By successfully completing the twosemester Pavilion Writers sequence (ENWR 2150 followed by 2160). • By exemption. Although instructors (especially in ENWR 1505/1506 and 1559/1508) will offer guidance on questions of mechanical correctness where needed, students are assumed to be competent in the basics of English grammar before entering U.Va. Instead of offering grammar drills, these courses help students identify and frame academic questions, support and extend conceptual arguments, and develop a range of prose styles. Students must meet the first writing requirement during their first year at U.Va. A note for transfer students: The goals of first-year writing courses at other universities vary widely. Therefore, although transfer course credit may be granted, exemption from U.Va.’s first writing requirement is *not* automatically given to students who have completed a writing or composition course

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if a problem arises… Students are expected to take the following proactive steps if a problem arises affecting their academic performance: 1) If the problem involves difficulty with course material, speak directly with the course instructor. This is very important. The student may also wish to meet with the teaching assistant during office hours, consult with the Batten School Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar, or look into U.Va. Tutoring Services, www.virginia.edu/tutoring/. The student may choose to do all of the above. 2) If the problem is of a personal nature, inform the Assistant Dean of Student Services, Jill Rockwell, or Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar, Wendy Perry, who will provide support and make referrals as needed. 3) If the problem involves a grievance with a member of the faculty, the student must discuss the problem with the faculty member before seeking any other recourse. If no resolution is reached, or if discussion is impossible, consult with the Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

elsewhere. Transfer students whose test scores do not exempt them from U.Va.’s first writing requirement may submit a portfolio to the writing program for review. The deadline for review of fall placement portfolios is usually August 1, with students missing this deadline being eligible to submit portfolios for the spring semester by the middle of October. Questions should be directed to Professor Jon D’errico in the Department of English (924-7072). Students may earn exemption in two ways: Automatic exemption. Students are automatically exempt from the first writing requirement if at least one of the following statements is true: 1. The student is an Echols Scholar. 2. The student scored 700 or above on the writing portion of the SAT exam. 3. The student scored a 5 on the AP English language subject test. 4. The student scored a 5 or above on the IB (higher A 1) exam. Portfolio exemption. Students who are not automatically exempt, may be able to earn an exemption from the first writing requirement through portfolio review. A good candidate for portfolio review will have: 1. Experience writing argument papers at the college level.

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2. A score of 660 or above on the writing portion of the SAT exam. 3. A score of 4 or better on the AP English literature subject test. 4. A score of 4 or better on the AP English language subject test.

Second Writing Requirement All students, except Echols Scholars, must complete a second writing requirement (typically a 3-credit course that is writing intensive) with a grade of C- or better by the end of their sixth semester. • The Batten BA curriculum satisfies the second writing requirement for Batten BA candidates.

Foreign Language Requirement Students can meet the Foreign Language Requirement by successfully completing one of the following courses of action: • Earn exemption by placing beyond the 2020 level by examination • Take 14 credits, or four semesters of a language in the proper sequence • After placement, complete the remaining courses in the sequence up to the fourth semester (usually 2020) Placement in a language sequence is by SAT II Subject Test score and departmental recommendation. Students who achieve the following SAT II Subject Test scores are exempt from this requirement: 660 or above in French; 650 or above in German, Italian, Latin, or Spanish; 640 or


Area Requirements All undergraduate students except Echols Scholars are required to fulfill Area Requirements by earning the proper number of credits from courses taken in each of five different academic subject areas. The courses must be taken on the graded basis.

Humanities (6 credits) Student must pass at least one course worth 3 credits or more from two of the following groups of departments and programs: Literature: • Classics (CLAS) • Comparative Literature (CPLT) • East Asian Language and Cultures (EALC) • East Asian Studies (EAST) • English (except ENWR 1505/1506, 1510, 2510, 2520, 2700, 2820, 3700, 3710, 3720, 3800, and ENSP 1600 and 1700) and Foreign Literature [East Asian Languages, Literatures and Cultures (except CHIN 1010/1020, 2060, JAPN 1010-2020, KOR 10102020, and TBTN 1010-2020), French, German, Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures (except ARAB 2250, 2260, 3230/5230,

and 3240/5240), Slavic Languages and Literatures, and Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese courses in translation, and all foreign language courses above the 2020 level (except PORT 2120, which satisfies the foreign language requirement)]. • Middle Eastern Studies (MESA) • Media Studies (MDST) 3000 • South Asian Studies (SAST – EXCEPT SAST 2700) • South Asian Literature in Translation (SATR)

• Economics (ECON) 3710, 3720 and 4720 • Psychology (PSYC) 2220 3210 and 4200 (as of fall 2008) Students are strongly encouraged to include courses in mathematics, the physical sciences and the biological sciences. For this requirement, statistics, mathematics and the above three economics courses are considered to come from one department. This means a student cannot satisfy this requirement with just these courses.

Fine Arts: • Anthropology (ANTH) 2370 • Art History (ARTH) • Studio Art (ARTS; not ARTS 2070) • Drama (DRAM) • Music (MUSI ONLY) o (MUBN, MUEN AND MUPF courses do NOT fill this requirement) • Media Studies (MDST) 2000, 3050, 3100 • Architectural History (AR H) 1000, 1010, 1020, 1700, 2400, 3102, 3701, 3201 and 3203 • Architecture (ARCH) 1010 (only 3-6 credit courses are accepted)

Exceptions include: • Astronomy (ASTR) 1000T • Biology (BIOL) 1000T • Chemistry (CHEM) 1000T • Environmental Science (EVSC) 1000T and 2030 • Mathematics (MATH) 1000T and 1030 • Physics (PHYS) 1000T Courses designated as 1000T are equivalencies as determined by the College of Arts & Sciences. These courses are considered elective credit and do not satisfy this requirement.

Moral, Philosophical, and Religious Perspectives: • The Batten BA core course Ethical Dimensions of Civic Life satisfies the moral, philosophical, and religious perspective area requirement for Batten BA candidates.

Social Sciences (6 credits) Students must pass at least one course worth 3 credits or more from two social science fields. • The Batten BA curriculum satisfies the social sciences area requirement for Batten BA candidates.

Natural Science and Mathematics: (12 credits) Students must pass 12 hours of natural science and/or mathematics courses from at least two departments. Courses that count toward this requirement may be chosen from: • The Departments of Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Sciences Mathematics, Physics and Statistics

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above in Chinese or Japanese; or 560 or above in Hebrew. Students must follow the department’s recommendations in the completion of the foreign language requirement. Once placement occurs, the foreign language requirement is fulfilled by the completion of each course in sequence (no skipping). Credit for introductory language courses is disallowed if it duplicates foreign language credits offered for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences. Students may be exempted from foreign languages not taught in the College of Arts and Sciences upon certification by a faculty member or outside examiner designated by the dean of the College. Students may also meet the foreign language requirement by completing, or gaining exemption from, the fourth semester of American Sign Language.

Historical Studies (3 credits) Students must pass at least one course worth 3 credits or more in historical studies. • The Batten BA core course Comparative Policy History satisfies the Historical Studies area requirement for Batten BA candidates.

Non-Western Perspectives (3 Credits) Students must pass at least one course worth 3 or more credits which the faculty recognizes as dealing substantially with a culture other than Western culture. Classes that meet this requirement change each semester. Classes that meet this requirement change each semester. Qualifying courses can be found in the SIS Course Catalog. Courses taken to fulfill the Non-Western Perspectives Area Requirement may count also toward fulfilling one other Area Requirement.

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Major/Minor in the College of Arts & Sciences Batten BA candidates may earn one major and/or one minor in the College of Arts and Sciences. The student must obtain prior admission from the chair or director of undergraduate programs of the College program or department in which the student seeks the major or minor. Courses may not be doublecounted toward the fulfillment of major/ minor requirements. In pursuing the above, the student will not receive two degrees from the University. The student receives a BA in Public Policy and Leadership from the Batten School. The College major and/ or minor designation appears as degree information on the official transcript. This information does not appear on the diploma. Students are responsible for completing the major or minor form (available in the College departments) and for obtaining the signature of the chair or director of the undergraduate programs. Students must submit completed forms to the Batten School Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar, who verifies the satisfactory completion of requirements after the student applies to graduate. Batten undergraduates majoring and/ or minoring in the College are required only to satisfy the area requirements of the Batten School.

Dean’s List

Phi Beta Kappa

Full-time candidates for the Bachelor of Arts in Public Policy and Leadership who demonstrate academic excellence while taking a minimum of 15 credits of graded coursework are eligible for the Dean’s List of Distinguished Students at the end of each semester. Courses taken on a CR/NC basis are not counted toward the 15-credit minimum. A current minimum grade point average of 3.700 is necessary to be eligible for the dean’s list. Any student receiving an F, NC, or NG during the semester is not eligible for the dean’s list. The notation “Dean’s List” is posted normally within several weeks after the conclusion of the semester.

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts in Public Policy and Leadership are eligible for consideration for membership in the Phi Beta Kappa Society, the nation’s oldest and most prestigious undergraduate academic honors organization. Students are elected to Phi Beta Kappa for their stellar academic performance in the liberal arts. Undergraduate members of Phi Beta Kappa are chosen from the top 12 percent of the fourth-year class and the top 4 percent of the thirdyear class. Students must have earned at least 60 hours at the University of Virginia to be eligible. Students chosen for Phi Beta Kappa not only have earned a high grade point average but have also consistently demonstrated scholarship in the liberal arts. As a rule, students elected will have: (1) carried a full load of 15 credit hours per semester, (2) demonstrated proficiency in challenging advancedlevel courses, and (3) chosen courses that reflect a scholarly commitment to the liberal arts in general (including a balance of courses in sciences and/or mathematics and the humanities and/ or social sciences). In sum, the students who are elected choose programs that have breadth, depth, and rigor. Extracurricular activities are not taken into account. The Batten School Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar coordinates selection annually with the Phi Beta Kappa local chapter. A note for Echols Scholars: The Batten School honors the College of Arts and Sciences policy of waiving competency/area requirements for Echols Scholars. Please be aware, however, that Phi Beta Kappa requires them. Interested students are advised to consult the website of the local Phi Beta Kappa chapter for information, http://college. artsandsciences.virginia.edu/phi_beta_ kappa, and to contact the Batten School Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar with questions.

Commencement Honors Undergraduate students who have demonstrated high academic achievement in pursuit of the BA are eligible for commencement honors. Diplomas inscribed “with distinction” are awarded to graduates who have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.400 to 3.599. Diplomas inscribed “with high distinction” are awarded to graduates who have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.600 to 3.799. Diplomas inscribed “with highest distinction” are awarded to graduates who have earned a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.800.

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General Considerations Application of Batten School Policies Policies and procedures apply to all students enrolled in the Batten School, as stipulated below, and are subject to change. Petitions for exception should be addressed to the Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Policies and procedures governing enrollment in a degree program or course at the Batten School also apply to students from other schools who are enrolled in Batten programs and courses.

Application of Other School and University Policies All students enrolled in the Batten School’s undergraduate program are responsible for complying with the policies of the University of Virginia, presented in the Undergraduate Record and available online at records. ureg.virginia.edu/. All students enrolled in the Batten School’s graduate programs are responsible for complying with the policies of the University of Virginia, presented in the Graduate Record and available online at www.records.ureg. virginia.edu/. The Graduate Record and the Undergraduate Record contain information on policies that apply to all University students, regulations governing undergraduate, graduate and dual-degree programs, the Honor System, tuition, fees, and financial aid.

Academic Policies and Requirements Course Enrollment Students are required to register for a minimum of 12 credit hours per semester for full-time student status. The maximum course load of 17 credit hours may only be exceeded upon

approval of the Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar.

Course Registration Students should register during preregistration to avoid problems with tuition bills and financial aid. Registration is not complete until all fees have been paid or satisfactory arrangements have been made with Student Financial Services.

Academic Advising The Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar is responsible for the academic advising of Batten School students. The Assistant Dean meets with students regularly to monitor curricular progress, and administers school policies with regard to student retention, progression, suspension, and graduation status.

Attendance Given the intensive nature of Batten curricula, students are expected to attend all scheduled class meetings. When necessary, excuses for absence from class are arranged between the student and the instructor of the course. It is the responsibility of the student to discuss numerous absences with the instructor and the Assistant Dean of Student Services. If necessary, the Assistant Dean may ask the Department of Student Health to evaluate the effect of any illness on a student’s attendance and academic performance. Poor attendance may be taken into account by the instructor in any manner for grading purposes. The instructor will bring cases of excessive absence to the attention of the Assistant Dean of Student Services. In the event that the student falls behind in course work for any reason, it is the responsibility of the student to make up the work in a manner that is approved by the instructor.

Original Work Students are required to submit their own work in all courses, properly citing the words and ideas belonging to others in all assignments, in accordance with instructor guidelines and the University of Virginia Honor System. Failure to do so may result in disciplinary action. Work that has been submitted as an assignment for one course may not be submitted as an assignment for another course without the explicit approval of the instructor.

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Academic Rules and Regulations

Final Examinations Final examinations are to be given only at the time announced by the University Registrar. Under no circumstances should class time be used for the administration of final examinations. An instructor may, however, give the examination on a “take home” basis during the examination period. A student who wishes to request the postponement of an examination under rare, extenuating circumstances beyond his or her control must contact the instructor no later than one week before classes end. Absence from a final examination for any course offered in the Batten School may be excused only by the Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar, and then only when accompanied by evidence of arrangement with the instructor for a deferred examination, to be taken within ten days after the regular examination. An emergency that justifies extension of this period will be considered only when supported by satisfactory documentation submitted immediately after the period of emergency. After the ten-day period, or its extension if granted by the Assistant Dean for Academic Programs, the temporary grade of IN (incomplete) will officially become a grade of F unless the deferred examination has been completed. Absences are excused only for sickness on the day of the examination or for other providential

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cause acceptable to the Assistant Dean for Academic Programs. An excused absence may be absolved by taking a special examination at a time mutually acceptable to the instructor and the student. Special examinations are not granted for reasons other than those stated above. Unexcused absence from an examination incurs an automatic failure in the course with a grade of F.

Grades The academic performance of a student in each course taken for a grade is recorded as one of the following grades: A+, A, A-; B+, B, B-; C+, C, C-; D+, D, D-; F. All courses intended to fulfill degree requirements must be taken for a grade.

Incomplete and Missing Grades The symbol IN (incomplete) is used when additional course work or examination is required to fulfill the obligations of a given course. A student may not request an incomplete in an attempt to raise his or her grade. An IN is not a valid final grade and becomes an F 30 days after the grading deadline (200 days for graduate students), unless the student requests an extension from the course instructor prior to the end of the course, and secures approval. The time allowed to complete course requirements is

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determined between the student and the instructor, but may not exceed one semester beyond the term in which the student took the course. Students must enter into a written agreement with the instructor, specifying the remaining requirements and timeline. If the student fails to fulfill the agreement, the grade automatically becomes an F unless changed by the instructor. Grade changes from IN to a final grade cannot be made more than one semester following the end of the course.

Grade Changes Error in calculation or transcription is the only acceptable reason for a grade change. Grades cannot be changed after a degree is conferred, or more than one semester following the end of the course, whichever comes first. Instructors may change grades electronically for winter term and spring semester through December 31 of that year, and for summer sessions and fall semester through May 31 of the following year. After this point, instructors must submit a grade change form to the Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar, who will seek approval from the Dean.

Grade Appeals A student who wishes to appeal a grade must first attempt to resolve the issue with the instructor of the

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course. The appeal must be submitted to the instructor in writing within 30 days of grade posting. If no resolution is reached, the student may submit a written appeal to the Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

Academic Standing At the end of each semester the Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar checks the overall records of all Batten students to see if they are in Good Standing and making satisfactory progress toward their degree. This review ensures that students are informed of academic problems in a timely way. The Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar then counsel the student and applies any academic sanctions imposed at the discretion of the Dean. Bachelor of Arts in Public Policy and Leadership • Batten BA candidates are considered to be in Good Standing at the end of a semester if, in that semester, they have: • Completed at least 12 credits of course work; • Earned a minimum GPA of 2.000; • Have no more than one grade below C minus. • To enroll for a seventh semester, students must have earned at least 84 semester hours (includes approved summer, transfer, AP, IB and dual enrollment credits). • Academic Warning • Students who fail to earn Good Standing will be placed on Academic Warning. Students on Academic Warning will be required to meet regularly with the Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar beginning no later than the add period of the ensuing semester. They are also strongly urged to devote more time to their academic work and are referred to academic support services. • Students on Academic Warning who withdraw or take a leave of absence are eligible to apply for readmission. They return on Academic Warning and must attain


Degree Completion Bachelor of Arts in Public Policy and Leadership All work for the Bachelor of Arts in Public Policy and Leadership must be completed within eight semesters of matriculation and with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.000. In serious medical or extenuating personal circumstances and upon approval of a petition to the Dean of the Batten School, a student may be permitted to enroll as a full-time student in a ninth semester. The student must be registered in the Batten School during the semester in which he or she is an applicant for a degree.

grades G All courses intended to fulfill Batten degree requirements must be taken

for a grade (not a symbol). G Grades and symbols used to record academic progress are listed in the

following official grading system table for the University. G Grade point averages are calculated by totaling the number of grade

points earned, then dividing that total by the number of credits carried toward the G.P.A. G Each school determines its own grading system. Students are graded according to the grading system of the school in which the class is taught.

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Good Standing by the end of the next semester or face Suspension by virtue of two consecutive semesters on Academic Warning. • Suspension • Students are subject to Suspension after two consecutive semesters on Academic Warning, or if they fail to earn at least nine grade points in a semester. • If this is a first Suspension, then one full fall term and one full spring term must elapse before a student may return to the Batten School. The Dean will consider a student’s application for readmission when s/he can document overcoming the difficulties that led to the Suspension. Students under Suspension forfeit commitments of financial aid. Suspended students may not apply hours from other institutions toward their U.Va. degree. • A second Suspension is regarded as permanent, and the student may not return to the University of Virginia. • When warranted, the Dean is authorized to hold a Suspension in abeyance and permit the student who would otherwise be suspended to continue under specific conditions. After the semester has concluded, the student’s academic standing will be evaluated and the appropriate academic discipline, if required, will be imposed.

Grade Grade Points Incl. in GPA Credits Earned (7) A+ 4.000 Y Y A 4.000 Y Y A- 3.700 Y Y B+ 3.300 Y Y B 3.000 Y Y B- 2.700 Y Y C+ 2.300 Y Y C 2.000 Y Y C- 1.700 Y Y D+ 1.300 Y Y D 1.000 Y Y D- 0.700 Y Y F 0.000 Y N

Symbol Definition CR (2) Credit N Y (2) NC No credit N N W Withdrawal N N (3)(4)(5) WP Withdraw passing N N WF (3)(4)(5) Withdraw failing N N WD Administrative withdrawal N N Y S (3) Satisfactory N (3) U Unsatisfactory N N AU Audit N N IN Incomplete N N IV Invalid grade N N NG (6) No grade N N NR Non-Resident N N YR (1)(3)(5) Year-long course N N (1) Not valid in the School of Nursing. (2) Commerce School courses (COMM) may not be taken on CR/NC basis. (3) Not valid in the School of Commerce. (4) Not valid in the College of Arts and Sciences. (5) Not valid in the School of Architecture. (6) Included in the G.P.A. for undergraduate schools (7) In the School of Law, an A+ carries 4.300 grade points.

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Degree Application To receive a degree, students must comply with the procedures administered by the Batten School Registrar. The application process for May graduation begins in October, with the final deadline to file a May BA degree application falling in December, before the winter break (in early February for MPP degree candidates). The application deadline for August graduation falls in June, and for January graduation the deadline falls in September. Students who miss a deadline may apply for the subsequent graduation and must register for the semester in which it occurs.

Withdrawal, Leave, and Readmission Voluntary Withdrawal A student enrolled in any Batten degree program may withdraw from the University before the conclusion of a semester for personal reasons (e.g. financial, medical, family) under the following conditions: 1. Students under the age of 18 must give notice to their parents or legal guardians of their intention to withdraw. Evidence of this

notice must be provided at the time of withdrawal. 2. Applications for withdrawal must be made in writing to the Assistant Dean of Student Services and must be approved by the Dean. 3. Failure to comply with the above regulations will subject a student to suspension from the University by the Vice President for Student Affairs. Any student who withdraws without having obtained permission is recorded as having been suspended with a grade of F recorded for each course. 4. Students who withdraw from the University voluntarily will have the notation “Withdrawal Date: MM/DD/YYYY” recorded on their permanent academic record. Students who withdraw will receive grade of W (withdrawal) in their courses.

Involuntary Medical Withdrawal Students who are withdrawn from the University by the Department of Student Health for reasons of health will receive a grade of W (withdrawal) for each course in which the student was registered.

Leave of Absence Requests for a leave of absence must be submitted in writing to the Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar, and the time requested may not exceed one calendar year. Due to the sequencing and progression of the Batten School curricula, permission to take a leave of absence is subject to dean’s review and is granted only in rare circumstances.

Readmission Students who do not enroll at the Batten School for a semester or longer must be formally readmitted, regardless of whether they withdrew from the School or were granted an approved leave of absence. Applications for readmission must be submitted to the Assistant Dean of Student Services by August 1 for the fall semester and by November 1 for the spring semester, and will be subject to dean’s review. Applications must consist of a letter addressing the student’s readiness to return to full-time study, particularly if he or she faced serious difficulties (e.g. financial, medical, personal) during the most recent enrollment. Approval from the Department of Student Health and the Office of the Dean of Students is required in all cases involving health.

Other Important Considerations Disability Accommodation Students with disabilities may contact the Learning Needs and Evaluation Center (LNEC) to arrange accommodations. The LNEC coordinates disability accommodations, which may include alternate text formats for course material, peer note-taking, extended time for tests, sign language and other interpreting, and housing arrangements. Initial evaluation of academic difficulties is also available as needed to students who pay Student Health fees. Students with disabilities must submit appropriate documentation to the LNEC in support 34

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of a request for accommodations. All accommodation requests must be submitted in a timely manner, usually at or before the beginning of each semester. For requests involving on-Grounds housing, appropriate deadlines within the Housing Office should also be met.

Student Email Email is a mechanism for official communication within the University of Virginia. The University has the right to expect that such communications will be received and read by students in a timely fashion. Official email communications are intended only to meet the academic and administrative needs of the campus community. Official University email accounts are available for all enrolled students. The email address for a student is: computingID@virginia.edu. This account must be activated by the student before the University can correspond via the official email account. When students

use non Virginia.edu email accounts, it is their responsibility to make sure their U.Va. mail is forwarded to that account.

Financial Aid BA candidates should address questions regarding financial aid to the U.Va. Office of Student Financial Services.

Academic Advising and Course Registration Academic Advising The Batten School Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar, Wendy Perry, manages academic advising for Batten students. Students meet with her at least once each year to discuss academic requirements and progress toward the degree. The Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar processes all College of Arts and Sciences second major and minor declarations and verifies completion of these requirements for the degree (see also Academics—Curriculum and Academic Rules and Regulations).

Course Registration The Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar manages all course registration for the Batten School. Students may contact the Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and Registrar at anytime for assistance.

She maintains all student academic records, manages the electronic degree audit, and verifies the completion of academic requirements for degree conferral. In addition, she monitors all student progress every semester

and counsels students individually as needed. Students are invited to schedule an appointment or simply stop by the office at any time, for any reason.

t h e b at t e n b a t r a n s c r i p t Official Transcript Batten BA students can request an official transcript from the University Registrar in three different ways: online, by mail, or in person. Visit www.virginia.edu/registrar/transcript.html for details. There is no fee for official transcripts. Unofficial Transcript Students can generate an unofficial transcript on their own. Log into the Student Information System (SIS) Student Services Center and select “Unofficial Transcript” in the drop down menu box on the left. Please note that second majors/minors appear on the academic transcript but not on the diploma.

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Student Records The Batten School Assistant Dean for Academic Programs, Wendy Perry, maintains all Batten student records.

FERPA and Privacy of Academic Records Pursuant to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 as amended, 20.U.S.C. 1232g (hereinafter the “Act”) and the Rules of the U.S. Department of Education, 34 C.F.R. Part 99 (hereinafter the “Rules”), the University of Virginia has formulated and adopted policy and procedures to protect the privacy rights of past and present students. Copies of this document shall be made available to students and parents of students upon request.

Student Rights Students are considered to be “in attendance” once they have enrolled for courses for their initial term of enrollment. Students attending, or who have attended, the University (hereinafter “students”) are given certain rights under the Act and Rules. Student rights under the Act and Rules may be summarized as follows: • To inspect and review the content of the education records. The University shall comply with a request for access to records within a reasonable period of time, not to exceed 45 days after it has received the request; • To obtain copies of education records upon payment of 15 cents per page, where the failure to provide copies would effectively prevent the student from exercising the right to inspect and review the education records; • To receive a response from the University to reasonable requests for explanations of those records; • To obtain an opportunity for a hearing to challenge the content of those records; 36

• To receive confidential treatment by the University of their education records. Except for directory information, neither such records, nor personally identifiable information contained therein shall be released without student permission to anyone other than those parties specifically authorized by the Act; • To refuse to permit the release of their directory information; • To file complaints with the Family Policy Compliance Office (FPCO) of the Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University to comply with the requirements of the Act and Rules: Family Policy Compliance Office, United States Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue S.W., Washington, DC 20202-4605; • To exercise all rights on the student’s own behalf, regardless of the student’s status as a dependent upon parents. Parents of dependent students may, however,

obtain access to the student’s records if the student is regarded as a dependent for federal income tax purposes, once the Office of the University Registrar has contacted the student and he or she is aware of the request. The parent must present evidence that the student has been claimed as a dependent on their most recent federal tax returns. Note: A student may exercise all rights granted under the Act and Rules without regard to possible status as his/her parents’ dependent. For more information www.virginia.edu/registrar/privacyact. html

a c a d e m i c r e c o r d a cc e s s The University of Virginia only releases educational records in compliance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). The intent of this Act is to protect the rights of students and to ensure the privacy and accuracy of the educational records. The quickest and easiest way to obtain grades at the University of Virginia is for the student to do so by accessing SIS (the Student Information System). Students have 24-hour access to their academic information through SIS. The student also may order an official transcript at www.virginia.edu/registrar/ transcript.html. The University urges parents and students to communicate about academic record matters. In the Commonwealth of Virginia the educational records of a taxdependent student are available to her or his parents in compliance with Section 23-9.2:3 of the Virginia Code, as allowed within the guidelines of FERPA. Dependency information is collected at the beginning of each academic year. As a last resort, the University has created a process for parents to obtain the most recent semester grades for their student. Please contact UREG (Office of the University Registrar) for more information about this option. You may send inquiries to ureg@virginia.edu.

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s t u d e n t &

With You from Start to Finish From start to finish, the Office of Student Services is here to create a welcoming and safe environment for students by providing support for students’ personal, professional, and service-related issues. We help develop a foundation for co-curricular life at Batten by providing support services, connecting students with resources across Grounds, and facilitating relationships between students, faculty, staff and alumni. The Office of Student Services is the place to go when you need answers, help, suggestions, and support. Need advice about your post-graduate life? Want to propose a new student organization? Curious about ways in which you can get involved in the Charlottesville community? Just need to talk? We’re always here to listen and are happy to point you in the right direction. The many services the office provides include: • Welcoming new students and facilitating their transition to the Batten School

• Arranging orientation and commencement activities • With student members of the Honor Council, educating students about the Honor Code and other related school policies • Promoting students’ health and wellness during their Batten education and beyond • Hosting the annual MPP leadership retreat • Providing advice and support for the Batten Councils and VPR, and other students seeking to start new organizations; providing logistical support for student events with respect to fundraising, promotions, and event planning • Hosting Community Town Hall meetings for students to share their thoughts with Batten senior leadership • Referring students to appropriate On-Grounds resources, such as Counseling and Psychological Services The Office of Student Services is excited to work with our under-

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Office of Student Services

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student&career services graduate population in exploring and developing ideas for similar programming and events for our newest BA cohort. If you are interested in serving on a leadership-related undergraduate steering committee, please contact the Office of Student Affairs!

Putting Policy into Practice Our graduates’ Batten School experiences have led them to challenging positions that literally span the globe. Whether pursuing a fellowship in Cambodia or for-profit consultancies in our nation’s largest cities, our graduates are ever-mindful of the School’s founding purpose--to educate ethical and enlightened leaders who are prepared to serve as thoughtful change-agents in whatever position they pursue. To help students and graduates achieve this goal, the Office of Career Services and Professional Development staff connects students, alumni, and employers through a variety of educational and networking events,

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s e rvic e s c a r e e r & s t u d e n t

Office of Career Services both on-Grounds in Charlottesville and Washington, DC. Situated only two hours from Washington, DC, the Batten School’s proximity to our nation’s capital provides students with ample opportunities to cultivate relationships with policymakers at the highest level. Students are encouraged to take advantage of the Batten School’s off-site networking “bus trips,” with recent trips featuring meetings with representatives from the US Department of State, the Gates Foundation, Chemonics International, and the US Department of Housing and Urban Development.

At Your Service From on-Grounds interviews to resume and cover letter workshops, the Office of Career Services and Professional Development is here to help you throughout your entire career path— from landing your internship and first full-time positions to making career changes long after you have graduated. In addition to weekly programming, Career and Professional Development staff maintain a true “open door policy,” advising students one-on-one about their short- and long-term career goals. Through videotaped mock interviews and personality assessments, students receive valuable insight into their

S e lf- A s s e s s m e n t s The Batten School provides career planning and personality self-assessment services at no charge for interested students. The following two assessments are offered: G Meyers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Form Q (more complex than the basic Form M) www.myersbriggs.org/ G Strong Interest Inventory (SII) www.hollandcodes.com/strong-interest-inventory.html Assessments are taken online at any computer and last from 45 minutes to an hour each. After completing an assessment, the student will schedule an appointment to receive the results. If interested, please contact Wendy Perry, Assistant Dean for Academic Programs and School Registrar.

Business Cards f o r B at t e n S t u d e n t s Students often ask if they “need” business cards. It is entirely up to each student to decide. On the one hand, no one will get—or lose—a job simply because she or he did or did not hand out a business card. The cards one collects—and the follow-up emails and calls one makes—are much more important. On the other hand, it is commonplace to trade cards, particularly in Washington, DC, whether on the Hill or at a cocktail party. To the extent that a student’s own cards facilitate this exchange, they are a worthwhile purchase—a relatively easy, cost-effective way of networking. Students interested in purchasing their own “Frank Batten School” business cards may do so online through the University Bookstore website at http://uvabookstores.com/site_info_businesscards.asp.

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strengths and areas for growth. Even in a time of economic downturn, our students have enjoyed an incredible record of employment, with one of the highest “employed-atgraduation” rates among the University Schools. Their full-time positions are as varied as our graduates themselves, including positions as Presidential Management Fellows, Fulbright Scholars, federal practice consultants, analysts at federal agencies, managers at nonprofits, and international teaching and service fellows. Beyond the immediate career services of the Batten School, our students have full access to the University Career Services’ offerings. In addition to a rigorous OGI (“On-Grounds Interviewing”) program, the UCS maintains an international directory of UVa alumni who stand willing and ready to serve as mentors to students seeking policybased internships and full-time positions. The Batten School collaborates with UCS in hosting multiple largescale career fairs, including a diversitybased fair in Charlottesville in the fall, a public sector fair held each spring in Washington, DC, and the Charlottesville-based “Building Public Servants” conference in March.

Job Search Nuts-andbolts While there is no “right” or “wrong” way to find an internship or job, the essential elements of your search will typically include self-assessment, initial networking, a resume or CV, cover letters or online applications, interview(s), and finally, reference checks. To help start you on the right foot, students are encouraged to utilize the “Strong Interest Inventory,” an online assessment that generates researched-backed, individualized reports about applying your strengths and interest areas in future careers. Assistant Dean Rockwell is certified to use and analyze the Strong, and she looks forward to working with you on these helpful self-assessments.


third year undergraduate September 14 Explore private sector opportunities for public service at McIntire’s Commerce Career Day September 27-28

CIA interviewing at Batten for Internships

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Pu b l i c Po l i cy Ca r e er T ime line : Cha rt Your Excit ing Path

October 15 Deadline for CIA’s summer 2013 internship programs Practice networking and explore internships at Diversity Career Fair

Early February USC Spring Job and Internship Fair (watch for confirmation) February (TBA) DC-based Government and Nonprofit Career Expo (jointly sponsored with Georgetown) February-April Apply for “Hill” internships (based on earlier established connections) March

Meet with public policy leaders during Building Public Servants

May –August

Possible internships / study abroad

Beyond your personal exploration, throughout the fall and spring, the Career Services Office will conduct various workshops and programs to guide you through the other myriad steps of your internship and job searches. You are likewise invited and encouraged to participate in related programming sponsored by the University Career Services office, which is located on the main floor of Scott Stadium. (This is also where many of your On-Grounds interviews will take place.) In the meantime, in this handbook we have provided you with various career-related handouts that will hopefully assist you in this important process.

ing your tenure at the Batten School; related programming throughout the year will allow you to prepare for—and succeed in—all of them!

Interviewing 101

Informational Interviews

Of the many pieces of the internship and job-search puzzle, the interview is perhaps the most challenging—in large part, because it is the most personal, offering students the greatest chance to develop and share their personal and professional “story.” Whether you are interested in a videotaped mock interview, an informational interview with a Batten alum, or you’d like to practice a “case interview,” the Career Services Office is your one-stop show. Below are several of the different types of interviews you might encounter dur-

The objective of this interview is to ask for “AIR” – advice, information, and referrals that will help you learn more about a particular employer and/ or field of employment. While students often report feeling hesitant about initiating an informational interview, they uniformly praise the ultimate experience these interviews provide. Not only are students more comfortable in practicing their interview skills before they meet with a “real” employer, but the interviewer is often more willing to provide candid information in this

Mock Interviews If you’re feeling unsure or uncomfortable about your interviewing skills, a videotaped mock interview might be right for you. Career Services staff will be happy to conduct a “mock interview” with you, during which you will dress and prepare as if you were involved in a “real” interview. Interviews usually last for 15-20 minutes, after which you can watch your recording and debrief with your advisor about what did, or didn’t work well.

type of setting. If you are interested in an informational interview, the Career Services Office will be happy to work with you to identify potential interviewers.

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April 25-26 Network at the UVa/Batten-sponsored Women in Leadership Conference

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November (TBA) Deadline for US State Department’s summer 2013 internship programs

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October 24

Screening or Initial Phone Interviews Screening interviews, which take place on the phone or over the internet, are an increasingly useful tool for employers, given that they are extremely cost effective. They typically last from 10 minutes to an hour, and they provide students with a great opportunity to make a first impression. Interview experts suggest that you prepare for screening interviews like an open book exam—organizing all of your materials in advance and keeping them handy throughout the process. Because the interviewer cannot see your body language, be sure to maintain an especially positive, upbeat tone throughout the process. End the interview by reiterating your interest in the position and asking about next steps. (Note that while typically considered the “easiest” type of interview, given their informality, phone interviews are sometimes unanticipated—and unscheduled, with students answering a recruiter’s call, only to find themselves at the start of an unforeseen

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interview!)

Behavioral Interviews

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Behavioral interviews have gained popularity in recent years and are the most typical style Batten students will encounter. Behavioral interviews usually begin with the phrase, “tell me about a time when. . . ” Your answers, based on past behavior, will ideally shed predictive light on your future behavior, giving employers important insight into your skills, experience, work ethic, etc. The Office of Career Services maintains lists of sample behavioral questions that will help you prepare for this type of interview.

Case-based Interviews Traditionally associated with private consulting firms, the “case-based interviews” focus less on your personal attributes and more on your confidence, communication, organization, and analytical abilities. During these problem-solving interviews, you will

Yo u r R e s u m é : A 3 0 - S e c o n d S n a p s h o t All Batten students share one common element: they are achievers and have a demonstrable history of academic distinction. In addition to your record of employment, most of you have excelled in other areas as well—languages, leadership, music, athletics, and public service to name a few. The resume you create gives you an opportunity to paint a self-portrait containing these and other accomplishments. The result hopefully will be impressive enough to motivate a complete stranger to want to meet you - and hire you! In creating a resume describing a life full of success, you will need to show some restraint and avoid the tendency to develop an overly autobiographical portrait. Remember: Your resume should be easy enough to skim so that the reader will be able to do a “30-second” glance at your resume and get a quick “picture” of you based on your qualifications. Thus, anything in your past that is not particularly relevant to this goal, even though you are proud of it (e.g., MVP in third-grade soccer), can be left for the interview. Since your resume is your first opportunity to make a favorable impression on a prospective employer, great care must be taken in its preparation. Not only will an employer scrutinize your resume for particular accomplishments, but also for qualities common to successful policymakers, such

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as analytical abilities, writing skills, and attention to detail. Your resume should also be visually attractive and very user-friendly. If one assumes the reader will spend no more than 30 seconds on the initial scan of your resume, the relevant highlights of your life must be easily discernible. Again, with the 30-second rule in mind, absent considerable work experience, a resume should not, if at all possible, exceed one page. When stripped to its singular purpose, your resume is a simple sales tool. Before you begin its drafting, you will therefore need to consider how to best sell your credentials. Perhaps you have worked four jobs concurrently to pay for your education. Or maybe your work experience is not as impressive as the fact that you have gained invaluable experience studying abroad. Or maybe your academic accomplishments should be elaborated upon to demonstrate your strength in quantitative skills and writing. Whatever the case, your resume will ultimately set the tone for your future interviews—so make it a good one! To help get you started, be sure to stop by the Office of Career Services. Batten staff will help you develop and craft “your story,” and they will provide you with helpful resume templates that are tailored to each of the Batten School’s academic programs.


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A “group interview” can mean different things—it can either involve groups of interviewers, groups of interviewees, or both! In the first, most straightforward, instance, you might find yourself in a room with three or more people asking you questions. Direct your answer to the person who asked the question, but try to maintain eye contact with all group members. When you find yourself as one of several interviewees, things become more challenging. In these settings, which often take place as a means of screening a large number of candidates (as part of the Presidential Management Fellowship process, for example), interviewees are often given a problem to solve collectively and will be asked to present the group’s decision to the interviewer(s). Throughout the process, interviewers will carefully track the group dynamic, watching for skills like leadership, communication, and teamwork. Given their unique nature, you typically will be warned ahead of time if you are going to participate with a group of other interviewees.

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Group Interviews

resumé action words – use them!

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be given some sort of fact-pattern or exercise to demonstrate your creative and analytical abilities. These questions could relate to the employer’s line of work, or they could involve a completely unrelated “estimation exercise.” Given their unique nature, you typically will be informed ahead of time if your interview will be a case interview. While you should prepare for all types of interviews, case interviews require both preparation and practice; there are several good resources in the Career Services Library that can assist you in this process.

stress interview is to test your confidence and professionalism and to see how you hold up to pressure. (Fortunately, thus far, no Batten student has ever reported encountering this type of interview!)

Stress Interviews Exceedingly rare, as the name suggests, in a “stress interview” an employer’s questions are designed less to glean information than to see how you will respond. Whether the question is off-topic or odd, or the interviewer continually interrupts or antagonizes you, the objective of a 2 0 12 B a t t e n U n d e r g r a d u a t e S t u d e n t H a n d b o o k

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Office of Professional Development Office of Professional Development We encourage you to take advantage of the opportunities offered through our Professional Development office: 1-credit short-courses, workshops, and site visits. Short courses are designed to allow students to go deeper into material than a simple workshop would allow. These courses meet for 14 contact hours (1/3 of the normal semester), and typically involve an experiential learning environment. Courses are available at the graduate and undergraduate level. Workshops are geared toward developing your career planning skills (resumes, cover letters, interviewing, salary negotiations), workplace skills (public speaking, how to make better presentations, how to make better slides for presentations), and technical skills (improving your use of Excel, Stata, and improving your visual display of data). The school offers site visits with potential employers, usually on Fridays. Look to the calendar for visits to employers in DC and Richmond. The office also works with faculty to embed professional development opportunities into the classroom and offers policy skills workshops on topics that don’t always fit in a traditional classroom setting. Paul Martin, the Director of Professional Development, also serves as the instructor for the summer internship program.

The Offices of Student Services and Professional Development coordinate a wide array of public service opportunities for undergrad and graduate students.

ties.” We ask students to embrace the Charlottesville community today and build their skills for their future communities. Each year the school holds a large-scale Batten Builds day of service, along with other volunteer opportunities throughout the year. We’ve helped finish low-income housing projects for Habitat for Humanity and for the Albemarle Housing Improvement Program, helped maintain and clean up trails and parks for the City of Charlottesville, installed vegetable gardens in local elementary schools, played “Marathon BINGO” with residents at a nursing facility, prepared meals at the Ronald McDonald House, aided with site refurbishment and beautification at the local SPCA, helped repair a horse farm (after the Grand Derecho of 2012) at a center that does equine-assisted psychotherapy for children with cognitive and emotional difficulties, and we’ve even helped restore historical replica river boats for the Lewis & Clark Exploratory Center.

Batten Builds The Batten School was founded with a charge to train leaders prepared for “public life in their communi-

Grant-writing Students in Professor Christine Mahoney’s Political Institutions & Process course partnered with Char-

Engaged in the Community

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lottesville-area nonprofits and the City of Charlottesville to apply for grants on behalf of their partner organizations. Students applying for a grant on behalf of Offender Aid and Restoration of Charlottesville-Albemarle won a $20,000 grant from the Seay Foundation to support OAR’s Coming Home to Work program that helps ex-offenders build critical job skills and job history. Special Relationship with Madison House The Batten School proudly boasts having three (of the current seven) students currently serving on the Board of Directors of Madison House. Paul Martin also serves as a board member, helping to coordinate Madison House’s programs subcommittee. Philanthropy: Private Initiatives for the Public Good Through a special gift from the Once Upon A Time Foundation, the Batten School offers a unique classroom experience that allows students to work together as a grant-giving body. Taught by Paul Martin, the class gave gifts that totaled $100,000 to nonprofits in the Charlottesville community.


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student life Getting to Know UVA U.Va. is a vigorous, modern institution, animated by the forward-looking spirit of its founder, Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson’s powerful conviction—the idea that the university exists to train young people for public affairs and the belief that the liberal arts constitute the foundation for any education—continues to inspire its students and faculty and guide the development of its programs. Jefferson was a man of many talents, and he expressed them fully in founding the University in 1819; he outlined the institution’s purpose, designed its buildings, supervised construction, and planned its curriculum. He also directed the recruitment of its initial faculty. When classes began in 1825, with 68 students and a faculty of eight, the U.Va. embodied dramatic new ideas in American higher education. In an era when colleges trained scholars for the clergy and academia, Jefferson dedicated his University to the education of citizens in practical affairs and public service. The innovative curriculum permitted the student a broader range of study than was available at other colleges and universities of the day,

and Jefferson implemented novel ideas concerning student self-government and religious freedom. To read more about the University’s history, please see: www.virginia.edu/ uvatours/shorthistory.

U.Va. by the Numbers

economic circumstance. • First-year students entering in fall 2011 who qualified for loan-free support under AccessUVa: 230 • Transfer students entering in fall 2011 and spring 2012 who qualified for loan-free support under AccessUVa: 107

Students

Undergraduate Student Profile

Enrollment, Fall 2011 (on Grounds) Undergraduate: 14,591 Graduate and Professional: 6,515 Total on Grounds: 21,106 AccessUVa: This financial aid program was created by the University to limit undergraduate student debt and keep higher education affordable for all admitted students, regardless of

• Students come from 49 states and 119 foreign countries. • Virginia residents make up 69 percent of the undergraduate student body. • 55 percent of undergraduates are women. • Student-to-faculty ratio is 15.9 to 1.

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Graduation Rates • The six-year graduation rate for students who entered in fall 2005 is 93.8 percent. • The six-year graduation rate for African-American students who entered in fall 2005 is 84.9 percent. • For 15 consecutive years, U.Va.’s graduation rate for African-Americans has been the highest among all public higher education institutions in the country.

University Library, 2010 Collections Books: 5.1 million Manuscripts and archives: 19 million Journal and newspaper subscriptions: over 120,000 Films and videos: 90,000 Services Questions about library resources: 162,640

Land and Facilities • 3,398 acres of land in Charlottesville and elsewhere • 540 buildings or major facilities with a replacement value of more than $3.19 billion in 2008-09

University Budget, 2011-2012 University (all divisions): $2.5 billion Academic Division: $1.3 billion Medical Center: $1.1 billion U.Va.’s College at Wise: $34.3 million

Bond Ratings The University is one of only two public universities (the other is the University of Texas system) with top bond ratings from all three national debt-rating agencies: • Standard and Poor’s (AAA) • Fitch Ratings (AAA) • Moody’s Investors Service (Aaa)

Student Self-Governance Student life is as individual as each of the students at the University of Virginia. With academics as its central hub, student life encompasses spaces where students spend their time after class, and activities where they develop new interests, make friends, and learn new skills. From the residence hall to the playing field, from music to community service—students can find hundreds of ways to get involved, enjoy themselves, stay healthy, serve others, confront issues, strengthen values, and achieve personal goals. Throughout the experience of living and learning at U.Va., students discover many avenues for carrying classroom learning into the practical, experiential realm. Choices are everywhere, and sometimes learning how to balance all the choices is part of the growth process. The philosophy of student selfgovernance lies at the heart of U.Va. student life. Students have freedom to govern themselves. The primary student governing bodies—the Honor Committee, University Judiciary Committee, and Student Council—are run by the students. Faculty and administrators provide support and guidance, but decisions remain the responsibility of student leaders. Jefferson envisioned education as the foundation for developing citizenleaders. That vision remains true today as students experience living and learning in this unique community, ultimately going on to become leaders in their communities and society at large.

A Defining Value

By Patricia M. Lampkin Vice President and Chief Student Affairs Officer Student life at the University of Virginia is built on six core values: • Academic rigor • Honor and integrity • Student self-governance • Public service • Diversity 44

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Patricia Lampkin Vice President and Cheif Student Affairs Officer • Health and wellness These values guide our work with students. Together they create an environment that is focused on academics but balanced with opportunities for leadership, service, self-discovery, and fulfillment of individual talents. From leadership positions in student organizations to service experiences in the local and global communities, students find opportunities that complement their classroom experiences. Self-governance means that students have significant freedom to develop their talents and make decisions that matter to University life. With that freedom comes high expectations of responsibility. Students are expected to hold themselves and their peers to high standards inside and outside the classroom, and to engage ethically in their local, national and international communities. Preparing students for global citizenship relies on the high expectations and levels of responsibility that come from student self-governance, a combination that makes the U.Va. undergraduate experience unique. Within the framework of student self-governance, students have the latitude to be creative, assume ownership, develop leadership, take risks, and learn from their mistakes. At the same time, the University provides support and guidance. At the broad, systemic level, student self-governance means that students own the Honor System and the University Judiciary Committee. Students derive authority to run these systems directly from the University’s Board


The Honor System Initiated in 1842, the Honor System at the University of Virginia originated as an effort to ease tensions between the faculty and the student body. Today, however, the central purpose of the Honor System is to preserve and protect a Community of Trust in which students can enjoy the freedom to develop their intellectual and personal potential.

The 27-member Honor Committee is ultimately responsible for the maintenance and administration of the Honor System. The committee comprises five elected representatives from the College of Arts and Sciences and two elected representatives from each of the other 10 University schools. Committee members administer Honor investigations and trials, disseminate information to new students, and establish special programs and policies for the Honor System from year to year. To carry out these tasks, the Committee relies on more than 100 support officers, drawn from the student body, each year. Honor educators are trained to promote understanding of the system among members of the University community when questions or concerns arise regarding the Honor System. Honor advisers are trained to provide confidential emotional support and impartial information about the process to students under investigation. Honor counsel are trained to investigate alleged honor offenses and to assist with the presentation of facts and arguments at trial. Under the University’s Honor System, an Honor offense is defined as a significant act of lying, cheating,

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Jefferson believed that the preservation of freedom and democracy depended on the active participation of an educated citizenry. Today, students learn to become educated citizens by experiencing student self-governance while they are part of this community. We believe they leave the Grounds well-prepared to assume positions of responsibility and leadership within larger society. Many alumni say that the opportunities afforded by student selfgovernance were some of the most rewarding and significant aspects of their education. As new generations of students come and go, we believe that student self-governance continues to add unparalleled value to the U.Va. experience.

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of Visitors. Students elect their own leaders, and those student leaders are responsible for operating these governing bodies on a day-to-day basis, for initiating policy revisions and other changes, and for making all decisions about disciplinary actions. Unlike other institutions that employ administrative oversight, U.Va. truly grants ownership of these systems to the students. A huge responsibility to delegate to students, yes — but also a tremendous educational opportunity that has proven over time to be effective and of great value. Students also assume responsibility for running the numerous student organizations on Grounds — CIOs (contracted independent organizations) as they are popularly known. Again, students learn much ­— everything from planning and organizing programs, to negotiating conflict and managing funds — as they take on duties of leading and participating in an organization. At the individual level, student self-governance reflects the philosophy that students are responsible for their own actions. They have great freedom and latitude in making decisions about how to conduct themselves on a day-to-day basis. Most students come here already functioning at a high level, and they thrive on this freedom. A few may flounder, but over time learn from their mistakes and also grow within this community. Students also learn from and are influenced in positive ways by their fellow students, either through informal interactions or through formal peer support programs. Within the framework of student self-governance, students still receive considerable support and guidance. Members of the University community, especially those of us whose daily responsibilities revolve around students, provide mentoring, seek out students who may need additional support, and continually work to ensure the overall safety and wellbeing of the community. We rely on students, too, to help in all of these areas and to demonstrate leadership within the community at large.

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or stealing, where the student knew (or a reasonable University of Virginia student should have known) that such an act was or could have been considered an Honor offense. Three criteria determine whether an Honor offense has occurred. • Act: Was an act of lying, cheating, or stealing committed? • Knowledge: Did the student know, or should a reasonable University of Virginia student have known, that the act in question was or could have been considered lying, cheating, or stealing? (Ignorance of the scope of the Honor System is not considered a defense.) • Significance: Would open toleration of the act in question be inconsistent with the Community of Trust? If a student’s peers find him or her guilty of committing an Honor offense, the consequence is permanent dismissal from the University. A student who is convicted of an Honor offense following graduation will generally have her or his degree revoked by the General Faculty. Dismissed students may receive assistance from the vice president and chief student affairs officer as they apply to transfer to another institution. A student who has committed a dishonorable act and wishes to make amends may file a “conscientious 46

retraction,” which, if both valid and complete, operates to exonerate the student as to the act in question. A valid conscientious retraction must, among other things, be made before the student has reason to believe the act in question has come under suspicion by anyone, and must otherwise conform to the bylaws of the Honor Committee. Assistant Dean Jill Rockwell serves as the Batten School’s representative to Honor’s Faculty Advisory Committee, and Nate Daugherty and Melina Schoppa are the Honor Committee’s student representatives. For details and further information about the Honor System, see the Honor Committee’s website or call 434.924.7602. For more information www.virginia.edu/honor

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Standards of Conduct The University’s Standards of Conduct cover all student behavior other than lying, cheating, and stealing. The student-run University Judiciary Committee administers the Standards of Conduct. Generally, prohibited conduct for which a student is subject to discipline is defined as: 1. Physical or sexual assault of any person on University-owned or

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leased property, at any Universitysanctioned function, at the permanent or temporary local residence of a University student, faculty member, employee, or visitor, or in the city of Charlottesville or Albemarle County. Conduct that intentionally or recklessly threatens the health or safety of any person on University-owned or leased property, at a Universitysanctioned function, at the permanent or temporary local residence of a University student, faculty member, employee, or visitor, or in the city of Charlottesville or Albemarle County. Unauthorized entry into or occupation of University facilities that are locked, closed to student activities or otherwise restricted as to use. Intentional disruption or obstruction of teaching, research, administration, disciplinary procedures, other University activities, or activities authorized to take place on University property. Unlawfully blocking or impeding normal pedestrian or vehicular traffic on or adjacent to University property. Violation of University policies or regulations referenced in The Record, including policies concerning residence halls and the use of University facilities.


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The Honor System has been a part of the University of Virginia’s identity for 170 years. Each U.VA. student signs a pledge to uphold a “community of trust.” The System tries to foster an atmosphere in which professors can rely on students to take tests without proctors, and vendors can trust that a student who is short on cash will pay them back. The System allows us to leave our computers in the library and our homework unattended. Honor as an ideal, however, is much more Nate Daugherty than the tangible benefits that accompany the Honor System. It means holding each of our fellow students to the highest standard of integrity. It means treating our peers with reverence and respect. Finally, it means having the utmost regard for the intellectual and physical property of those we encounter. In exchange for membership in the “community of trust,” students promise not to lie, cheat, or steal. The Honor System’s founders also asked that students not tolerate dishonorable acts by their peers. Today, the Melina Schoppa Honor Committee’s investigators, counselors, and elected members depend on students and faculty to report suspected academic dishonesty. The Honor Committee’s responsibility is to dismiss from the University any student who is caught violating this trust. The values of Honor extend beyond the University community as well. U.Va. students enter the world with an ethical outlook that continues to serve them well beyond their graduation date. This is particularly significant for students in the Batten School. Trust and honorable behavior are fundamental when we interact with policymakers, stakeholders, or constituents. The tradition of Honor at U.Va. officially began in 1842, but our rules have adjusted to changing times and norms. To further our goal to be contemporary and relevant, last year the committee conducted a survey of student opinions and practices. With that data, and information we’ll learn from similar efforts in the future, we’ll strive to make sure the Honor System is not simply seen as a sanction for wrongdoing, but also a useful way to add value to your time at U.Va., and to your degree when you leave the University. As Honor continues to evolve, we would like to invite new Batten students to participate in this dialogue. This year, the Honor Committee is making a concerted push to increase engagement of the whole U.Va. community. Notable among our efforts is the Honor Beyond Grounds initiative. Throughout the year, the committee will bring notable Virginia alumni to discuss how the Honor System is relevant to their personal and professional lives. We hope you’ll be able to see the challenges and advantages that come from a history steeped in Honor.

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7. Alteration, fabrication, or misuse of, or obtaining unauthorized access to University identification cards, other documents, or computer files or systems. 8. Disorderly conduct on Universityowned or leased property or at a University-sanctioned function. Disorderly conduct is defined to include, but is not limited to, acts that breach the peace, are lewd, indecent, or obscene, and that are not constitutionally protected speech. 9. Substantial damage to Universityowned or leased property or to any property in the city of Charlottesville or Albemarle County or to property of a University student, employee, faculty member, or visitor, occurring on University-owned or leased property or at the permanent or temporary local residence of any student, faculty member, employee, or visitor. 10. Any violation of federal, state, or local law, if such directly affects the University’s pursuit of its proper educational purposes and only to the extent such violations are not covered by other Standards of Conduct and only where a specific provision of a statute or ordinance is charged in the complaint. 11. Intentional, reckless, or negligent conduct that obstructs the operations of the Honor or Judiciary Committee, or conduct that violates their rules of confidentiality. 12. Failure to comply with directions of University officials acting under provisions 1-11 set above. This shall include failure to give identity in situations concerning alleged violations of sections 1-11. Should a trial panel determine that an accused student is guilty of the offense(s) alleged, the Judiciary Committee may impose any sanction(s), ranging from admonition up to expulsion from the University. Any violation of the University Standards of Conduct motivated by the age, color, disability, national or ethnic origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy), sexual

Sincerely, Nate Daugherty • npd8x@virginia.edu Melina Schoppa • mns4v@virginia.edu Batten Representatives, Honor Committee

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Colleeen Farrell • caf5gb@virginia.edu Batten School Representative, University Judiciary Committee

Melissa Rickman • mar7vd@virginia.edu Batten School Representative, University Judiciary Committee

Barkot Tesema • bjt4m@virginia.edu Batten School Representative, Student Council

orientation, or veteran status of the victim will be deemed an aggravating circumstance, and will result in a more serious sanction up to, and including, expulsion from the University. Except for cases appealed directly to the Judicial Review Board, University Judiciary Committee decisions are automatically subject to review by the vice president and chief student affairs officer. The vice president may affirm the Judiciary Committee’s decision or, if s/he believes the decision is not in the best interest of the University, s/ he may: (a) remand the decision to the Judiciary Committee for review, reconsideration or retrial with an explanation of why the vice president believes the case warrants further action by the committee; or (b) refer the decision directly to the University Judicial Review Board, or its successor body.

believed to pose a threat to himself or herself, to the health or safety of other members of the University, to University property, or to the educational process, pending a hearing on an underlying offense charged under the Standards of Conduct. Interim Suspension is also authorized where a student has engaged in violation(s) of the Standards of Conduct and/or federal, state, local or international law, such that the official could reasonably conclude that the student is not fit to be a part of the community of responsibility and trust that is the University. Any student so suspended who thereafter enters upon those areas of the Grounds denied the student by the terms of the suspension, other than with the permission of or at the request of University officials or of a duly authorized hearing body for purposes of a hearing, is subject to further discipline by the University as well as possible arrest and criminal prosecution.

Cases Involving Psychiatric Issues

Interim Suspension An official of the University may temporarily suspend a student reasonably

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The University has established two separate procedures to deal with allegations of misconduct for certain student cases involving psychiatric and psychological issues: Procedure for Psychological Hearings on Honor Offenses, and Procedure for Student Disciplinary Cases Involving Psychological Issues. The Procedure for Student Disciplinary Cases Involving Psychological Issues is available to address appropriate cases before the University Judiciary Committee and relevant issues arising in the context of Interim Suspension. The dean of students may also invoke the Procedures for Student Disciplinary Cases Involving Psychological Issues whether or not judicial charges are filed or pending when there is good cause to believe that, based upon a student’s conduct or behavior, a student’s presence at the University poses a significant risk. In any such instance, the dean of


The Judiciary Committee The University Judiciary Committee was established to “promote the principles of civility and self-discipline that are appropriate to the conduct of an academic community.” The UJC is responsible for investigating and reviewing complaints of student misconduct, as defined by the 12 Standards of Conduct adopted by the University’s Board of Visitors. All students are expected to abide by these standards. Any individual or group may file complaints with the UJC according to the committee’s statute of limitations. All complaints are heard by a panel of judges elected from the student body. Should the accused student be found guilty, the panel may choose to administer a variety of sanctions, ranging from oral admonition to expulsion. The First-Year Judiciary Committee, a subcommittee of the UJC composed of first-year students, has jurisdiction over violations committed by firstyears in first-year living areas. Students interested in becoming involved with the University Judiciary Committee will find opportunities to participate as a first-year judge, support officer, or elected representative and judge. Assistant Dean Jill Rockwell serves on the UJC’s Judicial Review Board. For more information www.virginia.edu/ujc

Student Council is the governing organization for the student body at the University of Virginia. The purpose of Student Council is to provide a medium for students to participate in discussing issues and drafting policies that affect the student body, while offering several services to the University community to address these issues. The president and the executive board oversee the Council. The representative body, a council representing every University school, handles legislative matters. All of these positions are elected by the student body on a yearly basis. Student Council committees are a rewarding way to serve the U.Va. community. The variety of the committees means that students can choose to work on any issue they are passionate about. Students also can develop leadership skills by serving as committee chairs. Student Council also allocates more than $600,000 to student groups through its appropriations process. The appropriations committee reviews all funding requests, and the representative body hears any appeals after funds have been allocated. When classes are in session, Student Council meets every Tuesday at 6 p.m. in the South Meeting Room of Newcomb Hall. Council meetings, which are open to the public, are covered by the student newspaper, The Cavalier Daily (www.cavalierdaily.com). For more information www.uvastudentcouncil.com

Policies of Note Parental Notification Policy: Alcohol and Other Drugs The University strives to educate all students regarding the dangers associated with substance abuse and the improper or illegal use of alcohol or other drugs. In addition, the University intervenes to engage students who may commit alcohol or drug-related infractions or who demonstrate a pat-

tern of substance abuse. In furtherance of its effort to engage students and their families regarding these issues, the University has adopted this Parental Notification Policy pertaining to the illegal or improper use of alcohol or other drugs. Whenever the Office of the Dean of Students becomes aware that a University of Virginia student has been arrested for an alcohol- or drugrelated violation, and the student is a dependent (for federal tax purposes), the Office of the Dean of Students will notify that student’s parent(s) or guardian(s). Violations that trigger notifications under this paragraph include, but are not limited to, driving under the influence, public drunkenness, underage possession of alcohol, and unauthorized possession of controlled substances (illegal drugs). Furthermore, whenever the Office of the Dean of Students becomes aware that a University of Virginia student has engaged in a pattern of behavior or a severe incident involving the use of alcohol and/or drugs, and the student is a dependent (for federal tax purposes), the Office of the Dean of Students will notify that student’s parent(s) or guardian(s). Violations that trigger notifications under this paragraph include, but are not limited to, frequent or severe episodes of drug use, drunkenness, and/or binge drinking. The University will make notifications under this policy unless the University, family or other circumstances make such notifications incompatible with the student’s best interests. The University relies on the professional judgment of its faculty and administrators when assessing each student’s situation. Students whose family or other circumstances make notification under this policy inappropriate will be referred immediately to the University’s professional counseling resources. When making a notification under this policy, time and circumstances permitting, a professional staff member in the Office of the Dean of Students ordinarily will encourage the student to make the initial call to his or her

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For more information: http://scs.student.virginia.edu/~judic/ soc.php

Student Council

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students may request that the Office of the Vice President and Chief Student Affairs Officer require that the student undergo a mental health assessment as one of the conditions for the student’s return or continued enrollment at the University. Contact the Office of the Dean of Students (924.7429 or odos@ virginia.edu) for full information on these procedures.

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v i r g i n i a l a w s c o n c e r n i n g a lc o h o l Students should be aware of the following Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control laws: Age of the Alcohol Consumer Persons who are 21 years of age may buy, drink, and possess beer, wine, and distilled spirits (hard liquor). The penalty if caught with possession of alcohol under the age of 21 is a fine of at least $500 and/or performance of a minimum of 50 hours of community service and suspension of an individual’s driver’s license for at least six months. Breaking this law constitutes a Class 1 Misdemeanor.* Drinking in Public It is illegal for any individual to drink or offer a drink of alcohol to another individual in a public place (excluding areas licensed for on-premise alcohol consumption). Under Virginia State Law, a person can be fined up to $250 if caught drinking alcoholic beverages in public. Constitutes a Class 4 Misdemeanor.

alcohol. Violators may be arrested and confined to jail until sober or transported to a detoxification center. Individuals can also receive a fine of not more than $250. Constitutes a Class 4 Misdemeanor. The Sale of Alcohol Alcohol may be sold by individuals or groups only if they hold an Alcoholic Beverage Control license. The sale of alcohol includes receiving money for drinks, sign-up collections, admission charges, collections of donations, or the sale of items such as cups or T-shirts that entitle the buyer to free drinks. Serving Alcohol to Anyone Under 21 The penalty for providing, giving, or assisting in providing alcohol to persons under age 21 is mandatory suspension of an individual’s driver’s license for one year. Penalties may also include a fine of up to $2,500 and up to one year in jail. A person in his or her own home may provide alcoholic beverages to his or her family members under 21, but guests provided alcohol must be of legal age unless they are accompanied by their parent, guardian, or spouse 21 or older. Constitutes a Class 1 Misdemeanor.

False IDs to Purchase Alcohol Persons who are under the age of 21 years who use or attempt to use any altered, fictitious, facsimile, or simulated license or identification card of another person to establish false identification or false age to consume, purchase, or attempt to consume or purchase an alcoholic beverage shall be guilty of a Class 1 Misdemeanor. The penalty is a mandatory minimum fine of $500 Underage Drinking and Driving or mandatory minimum of 50 hours This “zero tolerance” law provides of community service and license that underage drinking and driving suspension for at least six months. (0.02% or higher BAC) is punishable Creating or selling false IDs can result as a Class 1 Misdemeanor. The in fines up to $2,500 and up to a penalty for those found guilty one-year jail sentence. Possession includes forfeiture of the license of a fake ID (even without use) is to operate a motor vehicle for a a Class 2 Misdemeanor and can period of one year from the date of result in a $1,000 fine and up to six conviction and either a mandatory months in jail. Knowingly providing minimum fine of $500 or 50 hours of an underage person with the use of community service. your own ID also constitutes a Class 1 Misdemeanor. * A Class 1 Misdemeanor is the most Publicly Intoxicated serious misdemeanor that can be Public intoxication is appearing committed before becoming a felony. in public under the influence of 50

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parent(s) or guardian(s). The staff member then will follow-up with a call directly to the student’s parent(s) or guardian(s). A notification under this policy will be in addition to the intervention and education programs already offered to students when such infractions are brought to the University’s attention. Intervention may include one or more of the following: substance abuse assessment by a trained clinician; psychological assessment by a trained clinician; substance abuse counseling; enrollment in educational programs; and/or sanctions imposed for violations of the University’s Standards of Conduct. A notification under this policy is authorized by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, 20 U.S.C. 1232g (“FERPA”), which permits the disclosure of information from education records to parents of dependent students. The University reserves the right in its sole discretion to notify parents of alcohol- or drug-related incidents falling outside this policy to the extent permitted by FERPA or other applicable law. For more information www.virginia.edu/case/policy/ parental.html

Parental Notification Policy: Mental Health In accordance with Virginia state law, Va. Code §23-9.2:3.C, the University of Virginia will notify a parent of any dependent student who receives mental health treatment at the University’s Department of Student Health/ Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) when there exists a substantial likelihood that, as a result of mental illness, the student will, in the near future, (a) cause serious physical harm to himself or others as evidenced by recent behavior or any other relevant information or (b) suffer serious harm due to his lack of capacity to protect himself from harm or to provide for his basic human needs. CAPS will inform the Dean of Students whenever notification is


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required in these instances. The Dean of Students or his/her designee will then notify the parent. The notification will typically include, at minimum, (a) a description of the student’s behaviors that merit the notification, and (b) the specific actions the University is taking to address the risks posed by the student’s behaviors. Parental notification may be withheld in these instances if the student’s treating physician or treating clinical psychologist determines, in the exercise of his/her professional judgment, that notification would be reasonably likely to cause substantial harm to the student or another person.

Sexual Misconduct The University of Virginia is a community of trust, in which students, faculty, and staff must be able to engage in their work free from fear of sexual violence, harassment, exploitation, and other forms of sexual misconduct. Sexual misconduct violates University policy and federal civil rights law and may also be subject to criminal prosecution. Creating a safe environment is the responsibility of all members of the University community. The University is committed to fostering a community

that promotes prompt reporting of all types of sexual misconduct and timely and fair resolution of sexual misconduct complaints, in compliance with Title IX, due process, the First Amendment to the federal Constitution, and other applicable law. The following information is broadly available to students as part of the University’s efforts to ensure that they are aware of the resources available to them in the event of sexual misconduct: Your health, safety, and well-being are the University’s primary concern. If you or someone you know may be the victim of any form of sexual misconduct, you are strongly urged to seek immediate assistance. Assistance can be obtained 24 hours a day, seven days a week, from: • Police (U.Va., Charlottesville, Albemarle County) • 911 • Sexual Assault Resource Agency (SARA) •·434.977.7273 • Shelter for Help in Emergency (SHE) • 434.293.8509 • U.Va. Medical Center Emergency Department • 434.924.2231 During business hours (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday), you are also strongly urged to contact the

Dean of Students, who is the designated Title IX coordinator for purposes of the University’s sexual misconduct policy (by telephone, at 434.924.7429 or 434.924.7133, by e-mail at DeanofStudents@virginia.edu, or in person at the Office of the Dean of Students, Peabody Hall, Second Floor), as soon as reasonably possible to report any sexual misconduct you believe may have occurred. In addition, Sexual and Domestic Violence Services in the University’s Women’s Center offers guidance and support in collaboration with the Dean of Students (by telephone, at 434.982.2774, or by e-mail at sdvs@ virginia.edu). For a link to the University’s current policy governing sexual misconduct by a student, and for extensive information about the many forms of sexual misconduct, what to do immediately following a sexual assault, and the numerous resources available at the University and in the local community, please consult the University’s Sexual Violence Education & Resources website. For more information www.virginia.edu/sexualviolence

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Organizations and Activities Batten Council Aaron Chafetz, President Katy Lai, Treasurer Maddie Bergner, Secretary The Batten Student Council represents the needs and interests of Batten School students. It helps to enrich their academic experience by encouraging student leadership and professional development activities. Elected officers and representatives from each class work together to manage funds, plan special events and promote community outreach. Some officers serve as liaisons to Student Council, the Honor Committee, and the University Judiciary Committee. The representatives keep Batten students informed of University-wide policies while voicing the collective opinions of the Batten student body, as determined by discussion among the elected Council members. The Council also provides opportunities for interaction among students, faculty, and alumni to foster a strong culture and close-knit Batten community. In its first five years, the Batten School had an exclusively graduate student body. Moving forward, Batten Council is excited to mentor the inaugural BA Class of Public Policy and Leadership to create a parallel representative branch of Council for Batten undergraduate students.

Batten Club Seed Fund Batten is a new and growing school. As students interested in complex policy and problem-solving, the Council encourages students to engage and implement clubs that are in the spirit of Batten’s motto: “Policy is Everywhere. Lead from Anywhere.” The Council has set aside a budget to allow students to put their ideas into motion by starting up new clubs and organizations. To submit a proposal, please include the mission statement of your club, a detailed timeline of events, budget, and how you hope to engage 52

t o t h e cl a s s o f 2 0 1 4 On behalf of the Batten School student body, it is my great pleasure to welcome you, the inaugural BA of Public Policy and Leadership Class of 2014, to the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy. This school has much to offer you and plenty of opportunities for you to contribute. Just this year, the Batten School made it onto the US News and World Report list of top public affairs graduate schools in the nation. This ranking is attributed firstly to our great Aaron Chafetz faculty and staff, who bend over backwards for students’ needs, both in and out of the classroom. The second reason for our school’s ranking is the student body. When you enter the Batten School this fall, you will be joining the MPP graduate student body. Our MPP students come from a variety of backgrounds from foreign affairs and bio-medical engineering majors to teachers and Peace Corps volunteers. This diversity benefits our school, helping to bring a vast array of ideas and perspectives on policy issues to fruition in the classroom. What you cannot see from the outside is the family aspect of this small school. It will not take you long to recognize what a tight-knit community Batten creates. Together, you and your classmates will endure both the challenges and achievements of your work in the new undergraduate program. These experiences will draw you closer together and create friendships that last a lifetime. I encourage you to make the most of your time at the Batten School. You should embrace all of the opportunities available to you, and, at the same time, take initiative as the inaugural BA class to create an undergraduate community of excellence worthy of the stellar reputation of our School. I look forward to working with you this year and wish you the best of luck as you begin your experience at the Batten School. Sincerely, Aaron Chafetz • ahc4d@virginia.edu President, Batten Council

Batten students and faculty. For more information, please contact Katy Lai, Batten Council Treasurer.

Special Events Amanda O’Malley, Special Events Chair The Special Events Chair is in charge of student event planning for the Batten School. Planning ranges from traditional events, competitions

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between the classes, to events planned at the discretion of the chair. Every year there are several events planned for each class, including movie nights, regular lunches, and dinners on the Corner to encourage bonding among the individual classes. Spring Speaker Each year the Special Events Chair puts together a committee to invite a


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distinguished guest to speak in the spring. These talks are open to the entire University community and are an exciting opportunity for the Batten School to share its mission. Past speakers include the late Ted Sorensen, speechwriter and Special Counsel to President John F. Kennedy; Gretchen Wallace, author and founder of the NGO Global Grassroots; and former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, who shared lessons she learned as a leader in all levels of society, from the private and nonprofit sectors to state and federal government. In April 2012, the Batten School hosted House Majority Leader Eric Cantor who talked about the work he has done in Congress and the importance of compromising to fight gridlock in Congress.

Community Engagement and Outreach Kaitlin Brennan, Community Engagement Chair Community engagement at Batten takes a variety of forms, from sponsoring events with other departments and organizations on Grounds to arranging volunteer and community service activities. Council hopes to form service partnerships with community organizations, uniting Batten students’

Kaitlin Brennan • khb9m@virginia.edu

Maddie Bergner • mjb7cm@virginia.edu

Amanda O’Malley • ago2a@virginia.edu

knowledge of public policy issues with real volunteer experience in those fields. These partnerships will enhance students’ learning experiences, foster civic responsibility, and strengthen ties to the community. One of the biggest priorities for this committee is strengthening alumni relations. To keep the alumni network alive and active, the Batten Council writes and publishes two Alumni Newsletters each year. Included in the newsletters is information on recent Batten events, spotlights on new faculty, and updates from alumni. As a relatively new school to the University of Virginia, the Batten School offers students an easily accessible alumni network. Events are planned throughout the year for students to network with alumni. Last year, orientation included a panel of Batten alumni who talked about their experiences at Batten and offered advice for incoming students about what to expect from the next two years. The Office of Professional Development hosted trips for students to Washington, DC and Richmond to meet University alumni working at organizations such as Morehard & Associates and the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission, the Virginia General Assembly’s oversight agency. Alumni are also eager to come

back to Charlottesville and visit Batten students, faculty, and staff at special events, such as Homecomings and the “Back 2 Batten” series (see also About Batten—Professional Development). The creation of the new Batten Student Life blog (http://battenstudentlife. wordpress.com/) by the Class of 2012 is the newest effort to link current students and alumni. The blog features Batten news, student events and activities, research and opinion pieces, and alumni updates. Council hopes to see the blog grow this year with the inclusion of weekly columns on various topics and faculty participation.

Addie Bryant • amb4yd@virginia.edu

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Katy Lai • pl4p@virginia.edu

Other Batten School Student Organizations and Activities Virginia Policy Review Addie Bryant, Editor-in-Chief The Virginia Policy Review (VPR) is the public policy journal at the University of Virginia Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy. VPR is published mid-November and midApril. The graduate student review staff considers submissions on international, domestic, and regional public policy issues throughout the academic year. Founded by the first MPP class of

Kelly Connors • kec3r@virginia.edu

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the Batten School, its primary purpose is to connect different disciplines across the University community through public policy. VPR accepts submissions from faculty and students. There are many ways to get involved with this organization. The graduate student staff is selected every spring. Executive Board positions include: Executive Editor, Managing Editor, Copy Editor, Senior Domestic Editor, and Senior International Editor. The staff also has associate editors who assist the Board. This past spring VPR held its first public policy forum on energy policy. Five experts were invited to speak about a variety of related topics including the energy policy landscape, the conflict of uranium mining, nuclear energy, unconventional oil and innovation in the energy sector. These experts spoke about the effects of public policy on these different subtopics of energy and engaged students about their thoughts on the subject. Remarks from

the event were printed in the spring issue of VPR. VPR hopes to play a greater role in facilitating conversations about policy on Grounds with more events such as the public policy forum. Students and faculty with ideas or interest in submitting articles to VPR are encouraged to contact the Editor-in-Chief or visit our website at www.virginiapolicyreview. com.

UN Young Professionals Association Kelly Connors, Chair The United Nations Young Professionals Association is a new student organization at Batten that is open to other students at the University and young professionals in the community. The group is involved with the national UN Young Professionals Association and holds networking events, fundraises for the UN Foundation, and hosts speakers in international diplomacy.

The group is associated with the local chapter of the UN and the International Relations Organization (IRO) at U.Va. The student organization is a forum for students to discuss matters of international diplomacy and interact with peers both in Charlottesville and in Washington, DC who have similar interests. For more information and to sign up to become a member, please visit: http://pages.shanti.virginia.edu/ UN-YP/.

i mp o r ta n t n o t e o n s c h o o l - r e l at e d f i n a n c e s Please note that rules and regulations governing school-related finances are strict and vary depending on the funding source. Whether the funds come from the State of Virginia, an endowment account, student activities fees, or independent student fundraising has huge implications on how the funds can be spent. For this reason, students must check with Batten Council and Batten School administration before engaging in any school-related financial transaction. The Batten Council manages funding for Batten student event programs. • Batten Council activities: Always ask the Batten Council Treasurer before spending money on a Batten Council event. This ensures that there will be no multiple expenditures, that the request fits both the purpose and budget of the Batten Council, and that the expenditure complies with all relevant rules and regulations. Once a purchase is authorized, save all receipts, invoices, or web confirmation pages if a transaction is made online. Compile a list of the names of all attendees (required). Submit this information to the Batten Council Treasurer. Timeframe: All non-travel related reimbursement requests must be submitted immediately to the Batten Council Treasurer, who must submit them to the Assistant Dean of Student Services within 5

days of spending for processing. Turnaround for these reimbursements is 3-4 weeks. • Good causes/philanthropy, political activities, fundraising: Absolutely no University funds (State of Virginia, endowment account, or student activities fees) may be used for these purposes! Examples include fees associated with activities promoting research for a particular cause, fundraising to support international relief efforts, food/rental costs for events surrounding a political campaign, and so on. Students wishing to engage in these activities are advised to consult with Batten Council about less restrictive funding opportunities and procedures through its U.Va. Fund or CIO accounts. • Intramural-Recreational Sports: IM-REC fees must be paid with a University account (PTAO). Please see the Assistant Dean of Student Services Jill Rockwell for instructions.

Questions? Please contact Katy Lai, Batten Council Treasurer, or Jill Rockwell, Assistant Dean of Student Services

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a b u no ivu et rsi b attyt er ne s o u rc e s

university resources Online For needs unmet by the resources below, students may consult Batten administrators for referral to other resources across Grounds. DEAN OF STUDENTS virginia.edu/deanofstudents

LIBRARIES library.virginia.edu

DINING virginia.edu/dining

PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION virginia.edu/parking

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS virginia.edu/emergency virginia.edu/uvaalerts

SAFETY virginia.edu/uvapolice

HEALTH AND WELLNESS virginia.edu/studenthealth HOUSING virginia.edu/housing/grad.php uvastudentcouncil.com/offgrounds INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY itc.virginia.edu INTRAMURAL RECREATIONAL SPORTS virginia.edu/ims

STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICES virginia.edu/financialaid STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS virginia.edu/newcomb/involvement/ organizations.html UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORES uvabookstores.com UNIVERSITY CAREER SERVICES career.virginia.edu UNIVERSITY REGISTRAR virginia.edu/registrar

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We fondly hope that the instruction which may flow from this institution, kindly cherished, by advancing the minds of our youth with the growing science of the times, and elevating the views of our citizens generally to the practice of the social duties and the functions of self-government, may ensure to our country the reputation, the safety and prosperity, and all the other blessings which experience proves to result from the cultivation and improvement of the general mind. – Thomas Jefferson – University of Virginia Board of Visitors Minutes, 1821


Garrett Hall 235 McCormick Road P.O. Box 400893 Charlottesville, VA 22904-4893 434.924.0812 www.batten.virginia.edu

Batten Undergraduate Handbook 2012  

Resources for Batten undergraduate students

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