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Matt Might Assistant Professor www.cs.utah.edu/~might might@cs.utah.edu

Dr. Might joined the school as an assistant professor in the fall of 2008. Before joining the School of Computing, he received his Ph.D. from Georgia Tech and then worked for two start-ups, Diagis and yaplet.com. Dr. Might’s research in the field of programming languages and compilers is focused on tackling the key challenges in modern software development: improving security and harnessing parallelism. Driven by the escalation of information security crisis, he is actively investigating and constructing software tools for programmers to use that can prove the absence of security flaws and find bugs in software systems; his work with Diagis involved commercializing such tools. In response to hardware manufacturers recent insistence on doubling cores instead of clock-speeds, he is also investigating software analyses and tools that can automatically parallelize sequential software across multiple processors and detect flaws in explicitly parallel software.

Publications Refereed Conference and Workshops M. Might and T. Prabhu. “Interprocedural dependence analysis of higher-order programs via stack reachability.” 2009 Workshop on Scheme and Functional Programming. (Scheme 2009). Boston, MA. August, 2009, pp. 75-85. M. Might and P. Manolios. “A posteriori soundness for non-deterministic abstract interpretations,” 10th International Conference on Verification, Model Checking and Abstract Interpretation (VMCAI 2009). Savannah, GA. January, 2009. pp. 260-274. C. Earl, M. Might and D. Van Horn. “Pushdown control-flow analysis of higherorder programs: Precise, polyvariant and polynomial-time,” 2010 Workshop on Scheme and Functional Programming. (Scheme 2010). Montreal, Quebec, Canada. August, 2010. D. Van Horn and M. Might. “Abstracting Abstract Machines,” Accepted to International Conference on Functional Programming 2010 (ICFP 2010). Baltimore, Maryland. September, 2010. pp. 51-62. M. Might. “Abstract interpreters for free,” Static Analysis Symposium 2010 (SAS 2010). Perpignan, France. September, 2010. pp. 407-421. M. Might, Y. Smaragdakis and D. Van Horn. “Resolving and exploiting the k-CFA paradox: Illuminating functional vs. object-oriented program analysis.” Programming Language Design and Implementation 2010 (PLDI 2010). Toronto, Canada. June, 2010. pp. 305-315.

66 >> 2009 & 2010 REPORT

M. Might. “Shape analysis in the absence of pointers and structure.” 11th International Conference on Verification, Model Checking and Abstract Interpretation (VMCAI 2010). Madrid, Spain. January, 2010. pp. 263-278.

Invited Talks & Presentation “Static analysis of modern software systems: Taming control-flow.” Brigham Young University. Provo, Utah. September 10 2009. “Control-flow analysis of higher-order programs.” NSF/ACM-sponsored Ph.D. Summer School on Theory and Practice of Language Implementation. Eugene, Oregon. July 23 2009. “Control-flow analysis of order k (k-CFA).” NSF/ACM-sponsored Ph.D. Summer School on Theory and Practice of Language Implementation. Eugene, Oregon. July 24 2009. “Efficient control-flow analysis and beyond.” NSF/ACM-sponsored Ph.D. Summer School on Theory and Practice of Language Implementation. Eugene, Oregon. July 27 2009. “Push-down control-flow analysis of higher-order programs.” International Conference on Functional Programming Program Committee Workshop. Portland, Oregon. 30 April 2009. “An Illustrated Guide to Hacking.” The Leonardo. Salt Lake City, Utah. December 7, 2010. “Static analysis in small steps.” Purdue University. Lafayette, Indiana. October 5, 2010.

Professional Participation • • • • • •

SAS 2010. PC Member. 14-16 September 2010. Perpignan, France PADTAD 2010. PC member. 13 July 2010 Oregon Ph.D. Summer School 2009. Lecturer. 23-31 July 2009 Scheme Workshop 2009. PC member. 22 August 2009 PADTAD 2009. PC member. 19-20 July 2009 ICFP 2009. PC member. 31 Aug - 2 Sep 2009

School of Computing 2009 & 2010 Report  

SoC 09 & 10 report

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