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Set-up of the guide

Master of Science Chemical Engineering

Programme guide 2011 – 2012

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Set-up of the guide

Since the contents in this programme guide had to be delivered early, the information in this guide is based on a combination of what was known at date of publication and the information that can be expected within the academic year. Although this guide has been composed with care, the editors cannot be held responsible for inaccuracies or incompleteness of the contents. Therefore, no rights can be derived from the contents of this programme guide.

Editors Carmen Edelijn Floris Weijland Louis van der Ham Marijke Stehouwer Ben Betlem Edition September 2011 Circulation: 150 Made available by Faculty of Science and Technology University of Twente De Horst PO box 217 7500 AE Enschede

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Set-up of the guide

WELCOME Welcome at the University of Twente and more specifically at the graduate programme dedicated to the MSc in Chemical Engineering (ChE). The objective of our graduate programme is to educate chemical engineers for careers in industry, academia and government, and to advance research in Chemical Engineering. This year a new ground-breaking programme starts: the Erasmus Mundus Master on Membrane Engineering. Six European universities join in this master, amongst which the UT‟s programme in Chemical Engineering. Students visit three of four European universities. This programme is also open for Dutch students and a limited number of scholarships are available. The education in the master is strongly related to the research activities of the faculty. This is expressed in the courses and especially during the final year of the master when the student fulfils his assignment in one of 15 Chemical Engineering research groups. The standard graduation programme has two tracks: Process Technology (PT) and Molecules & Materials (M&M). The research in the process technology is accommodated by a cluster of groups dedicated to sustainable energy. The M&M track is closely related to the research institutes Mesa+ and Mira. Mesa+ is one of the largest nanotechnology research institutes in the world. Their research areas are nano-fabrication, molecular science, organic and inorganic material science. The M&M-group studying biomaterials, participates in the Mira institute where all research activities in the biomedical and technical medicine fields are brought together. From experience, we learned that students require two varieties of information most:  information that they can base their choices on, for the near future, for example: what are the interesting graduation research groups or electives?,  information about the procedures and regulations, for example: what are the procedures for the master exam and for obtaining a master assignment?, what are the “rules for distinction”?, or the “rules concerning insufficients”?. The list of contents is the best guide about the subjects discussed. The procedures and regulations are defined principally in the attached Program and Exam Regulations (“OER”). In several chapters of the guide this is elaborated and explained further. Yearly, the Chemical Engineering programme issues new information, guidelines and rules. For instance the rules concerning admission to exams became more strict. This study guide describes all basic information necessary for the master student, but it often refers to websites for the most recent information about the curriculum or electives. Be aware, this booklet is not a regulation; no rights can be derived from its text. I hope this guide will be helpful in selecting an appropriate curriculum and in finding your way during the course of your study. On behalf of the lecturers and other staff members of the Chemical Engineering school, I wish you a pleasant and successful participation in our graduate program. Ben Betlem, Programme director.

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Set-up of the guide

SET-UP OF THE GUIDE Educational infrastructure All organisational matters, regulations and services that are of interest for ChE Master‟s students are regulated at different hierarchical levels. To understand the regulations within the ChE programme, it is important to understand the educational infrastructure at the UT. Hierarchical Institute Academic institute Faculties Research groups Study programmes Modules/ Tracks Courses

MSc ChE- specifics UT TNW Various groups MSc ChE M&M (former CTM), PT Various courses

Each of these levels requires its own facilities and services, organizational infrastructure and quality assurance. Parts and chapters in this guide are also structured according to this hierarchy, starting at UT-level and ending at the specific courses

Synchronical or referential use This guide is meant for students that have either just started or are already following the ChE Master‟s programme. Students that have just started with a ChE master can use this guide to obtain information about the organization, regulations and facilities on the different hierarchical levels mentioned above. The relevance of the information will depend on the student‟s background. For all students, this guide is useful in helping to compose a tailored Master‟s curriculum, since choices will have to be made. This will be elaborated on in chapter 11. Choices have to be made for several aspects of the Master: - Which Master track one chooses to follow (chapter 11) - The Research group where one does research for the Master Assignment (chapter 9) - Which courses one takes for the Master track (paragraph 11.6) o A description of every course can be found in chapter 14

Websites (up-to-date information and language) Many topics in this guide refer to a website, which contains up-to-date information. This represents the digital environment of the UT, which can be considered as the main method of communication at the UT. In general, this guide refers to websites in English. Only when no English site was available (at moment of publishing), references are made to websites in Dutch. In general, all websites at the University of Twente contain a link (often in the top right corner of the page) that changes the information into English or Dutch. For Dutch students; note that Dutch information is often still more extensive and accessible than English information. Further internationalization of all communication services is still in progress.

Abbreviations At the University of Twente, abbreviations are frequently used, often as stand-alone terms without recalling their original full meaning. So, by introducing abbreviations that relate to the English terms, but differ from the Dutch abbreviations, considerable miscommunications could occur. For instance, in English the faculty of the programme is called Faculty of “Science and Technology” while most times the abbreviation “TNW” will be used, corresponding to the Dutch “Faculteit Technische Natuurwetenschappen”. To prevent miscommunications, this guide will provide commonly used abbreviations of most terms in brackets behind the original word(s).

Telephone on campus All landlines on campus, can be contacted with the numbers +31 53-489 followed by four digits. The last four digits are commonly used to indicate the office number on campus. From landlines on campus, only the last four digits have to be dialled.

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Table of contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS WELCOME ........................................................................................................................................................ 3 SET-UP OF THE GUIDE ...................................................................................................................................... 4 EDUCATIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE ................................................................................................................................. 4 SYNCHRONICAL OR REFERENTIAL USE ............................................................................................................................ 4 WEBSITES (UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION AND LANGUAGE) ................................................................................................. 4 ABBREVIATIONS ....................................................................................................................................................... 4 TELEPHONE ON CAMPUS ............................................................................................................................................ 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS ........................................................................................................................................ 5 WHAT IS CHEMICAL ENGINEERING? ................................................................................................................. 8 MOLECULES AND MATERIALS (M&M)......................................................................................................................... 8 PROCESS TECHNOLOGY (PT) ...................................................................................................................................... 8 ERASMUS MUNDUS MASTER IN MEMBRANE ENGINEERING ............................................................................................. 9 TWENTE GRADUATE SCHOOL.................................................................................................................................... 10 STUDY START-UP ............................................................................................................................................ 11 ADMISSION AND ENROLMENT TO THE PROGRAMME ...................................................................................................... 11 COMPOSITION OF A PERSONALISED MASTER’S CURRICULUM ........................................................................................... 11 CHOOSE A MASTER’S TRACK AND RESEARCH GROUP ...................................................................................................... 11 PLAN A SET OF COURSES .......................................................................................................................................... 11 ENROLMENT FOR COURSES....................................................................................................................................... 11 ROUTE’14 ........................................................................................................................................................... 11 1. GENERAL STUDY INFORMATION................................................................................................................. 14 1.1 TIME SCOPE AND WORKLOAD OF THE PROGRAMME ................................................................................................. 14 1.2 SCHEDULE OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR....................................................................................................................... 14 1.3 COURSE SCHEDULES .......................................................................................................................................... 14 1.4 COURSE INFORMATION AND CONTENTS (OSIRIS)..................................................................................................... 14 1.5 OVERVIEW OF LECTURE HOURS............................................................................................................................ 14 1.6 STUDY LOCATIONS ............................................................................................................................................ 14 1.7 EDUCATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS ........................................................................................................................ 15 1.8 BLACKBOARD ................................................................................................................................................... 16 1.9 ACCESS TO THE INTERNET, UT-WEB APPLICATIONS AND EMAIL. ................................................................................ 16 1.10 TEACHING METHODS FOR CONTACT HOURS.......................................................................................................... 16 1.11 STUDY METHODS FOR SELF-STUDY ..................................................................................................................... 16 1.12 STUDY MATERIAL ............................................................................................................................................ 16 1.13 CONVOCATION (PRESENTATION OF THE DIPLOMA) ................................................................................................ 17 1.14 CHANGE OF PERSONAL CONTACT INFORMATION ................................................................................................... 17 1.15 BLUE&RED DESK (STUDENT SERVICES)............................................................................................................... 17 1.16 TELEPHONE, EMAIL AND NETWORK ON THE CAMPUS.............................................................................................. 17 2. EXAMINATION AND OTHER UT POLICIES .................................................................................................... 20 2.1 RIGHTS AND DUTIES – STUDENT’S CHARTER AND OER............................................................................................. 20 2.2 TYPES OF EXAMINATION..................................................................................................................................... 20 2.3 ABSENCE ........................................................................................................................................................ 20 2.4 EXAMINATIONS ................................................................................................................................................ 20 2.5 REGISTRATION, WITHDRAWAL AND SCHEDULES FOR EXAMS....................................................................................... 21 2.6 NOTIFICATION AND AVAILABILITY OF EXAMINATION MARKS (OSIRIS) ........................................................................... 21 2.7 RIGHT OF PERUSAL AND EVALUATION OF TAKEN EXAMS ............................................................................................ 22 2.8 PROCEDURES DURING EXAMINATION SESSIONS ....................................................................................................... 22 2.9 PROCEDURES REGARDING ASSIGNMENTS AND PAPERS .............................................................................................. 22 2.10 EXTRA AND SPECIAL POSSIBILITIES FOR EXAMINATION............................................................................................. 22

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Table of contents 3. SAFETY AND HEALTH .................................................................................................................................. 24 3.1 SAFETY ........................................................................................................................................................... 24 3.2 HEALTH .......................................................................................................................................................... 24 4. SPECIAL ARRANGEMENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY ........................................................................................... 26 4.1 DUTCH STUDENT GRANTS (STUDIEFINANCIERING, TEMPOBEURS EN PRESTATIEBEURS)..................................................... 26 4.2 TOP-CLASS SPORT ............................................................................................................................................. 26 4.3 STUDYING WITH A DISABILITY .............................................................................................................................. 26 4.4 INDIVIDUAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR STUDENT ACTIVISM .............................................................................................. 26 5.1 COMPUTER FACILITIES ....................................................................................................................................... 28 5.2 LOCKERS ......................................................................................................................................................... 28 5.3 STUDENT CARD AND CHIP CARD ........................................................................................................................... 28 5.4 COPY AND PRINT .............................................................................................................................................. 28 5.5 BOOKS, LECTURE NOTES AND OTHER STUDY MATERIALS............................................................................................ 28 5.6 UNIVERSITY LIBRARY ......................................................................................................................................... 28 5.7 CANTEEN/EDU-CAFÉ ......................................................................................................................................... 29 5.8 NOTEBOOK SERVICE CENTRE ............................................................................................................................... 29 5.9 ENGLISH COURSES ............................................................................................................................................ 29 6. ACADEMIC AND PERSONAL SUPPORT ........................................................................................................ 32 6.1 STUDENT ADVISOR ............................................................................................................................................ 32 6.2 STUDENT SUPPORT AT UT LEVEL .......................................................................................................................... 32 6.3 INFORMATION DESK FOR STUDENT COUNSELLING (S&OB)........................................................................................ 32 6.4 OFFICE OF STUDENT PSYCHOLOGISTS .................................................................................................................... 32 6.5 HEALTH CARE .................................................................................................................................................. 32 6.6 COMMITTEE FOR (FINANCIAL) GRADUATION SUPPORT (CVA) .................................................................................... 33 6.7 INFOTHEEK BASTILLE FOR PRACTICAL INFORMATION ................................................................................................ 33 6.8 STUDENT UNION .............................................................................................................................................. 33 6.9 INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS................................................................................................................................. 33 7. PROGRAMME INFRASTRUCTURE ................................................................................................................ 36 7.1 FACULTY TNW ................................................................................................................................................ 36 7.2 COMMITTEES AND BOARDS OF THE STUDY PROGRAMME .......................................................................................... 36 7.3 UNIVERSITY COUNCIL ........................................................................................................................................ 36 7.4 FACULTY COUNCIL ............................................................................................................................................ 36 7.5 PROGRAMME COMMITTEE (OLC-ST) .................................................................................................................. 36 7.6 BOARD OF EXAMINERS ...................................................................................................................................... 37 7.7 WORKING GROUP FOR PROGRAMME QUALITY (OKC-ST) ......................................................................................... 38 7.8 STUDENT INFLUENCE ON STUDY PROGRAMME ........................................................................................................ 38 8. ORGANISATION WITHIN THE CHE PROGRAMME ........................................................................................ 40 8.1 PROGRAMME DIRECTOR .................................................................................................................................... 40 8.2 TRACK COORDINATORS...................................................................................................................................... 40 8.3 STUDENT ADVISOR ........................................................................................................................................... 40 8.4 COORDINATOR INTERNATIONALIZATION ................................................................................................................ 40 8.5 INTERNSHIP COORDINATOR ................................................................................................................................ 41 8.6 SECRETARY ...................................................................................................................................................... 41 8.7 STUDENTS AND EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION (S&OA-TNW) ................................................................................. 41 8.8 SCIENTIFIC STAFF .............................................................................................................................................. 41 8.9 STUDY ASSOCIATION C.T.S.G ALEMBIC ................................................................................................................ 42 8.10 TEACHING ASSISTANTS (STUDENTASSISTENTSCHAP) ............................................................................................... 42 9. RESEARCH INSTITUTES AND GROUPS ......................................................................................................... 44 9.1 INSTITUTES ...................................................................................................................................................... 44 9.2 RESEARCH GROUPS ........................................................................................................................................... 45 1 BIOMATERIALS SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (BST) ................................................................................................ 46

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Table of contents 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

BIOMEDICAL CHEMISTRY (BMC) ...................................................................................................................... 47 BIOMOLECULAR NANO TECHNOLOGY (BNT) ....................................................................................................... 48 CATALYTIC SYSTEMS AND MICRO DEVICES .......................................................................................................... 49 INORGANIC MATERIALS SCIENCE (IMS) ............................................................................................................. 52 MATERIALS SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY OF POLYMERS (MTP)................................................................................ 53 MEMBRANE TECHNOLOGY GROUP (MTG) ......................................................................................................... 54 MOLECULAR NANOFABRICATION (MNF) ............................................................................................................ 55 PHOTO-CATALYTIC FUEL SYNTHESIS (PCS) ......................................................................................................... 56 SOFT MATTER, FLUIDICS AND INTERFACES (SFI) ............................................................................................... 58 THERMO-CHEMICAL CONVERSION OF BIOMASS (TCCB) .................................................................................... 59

10. ENTRY REQUIREMENTS – ADMISSION & ENROLMENT .............................................................................. 62 10.1 GENERAL CHE-ADMISSION............................................................................................................................... 62 10.2 FLEXIBLE CHE-ADMISSION OF BACHELOR STUDENTS.............................................................................................. 62 10.3 ENROLMENT FOR THE MASTER PROGRAMME ....................................................................................................... 62 10.4 TUITION FEES................................................................................................................................................. 62 11. STRUCTURE OF THE MASTER’S PROGRAMME .......................................................................................... 64 11.1 MASTER TRACKS............................................................................................................................................. 64 11.2 MASTER’S CURRICULUM .................................................................................................................................. 65 PROGRAMME FOR HBO STUDENTS ............................................................................................................................ 66 11.3 PROCEDURE OF COMPOSITION OF COURSE ........................................................................................................... 66 11.4 TWO GRADES FOR THE MASTER’S ASSIGNMENT .................................................................................................... 67 11.5 “5”-REGULATION ........................................................................................................................................... 68 11.6 COURSES ...................................................................................................................................................... 68 11.8 SCHEDULE FOR PT-TRACK ................................................................................................................................ 71 12. STRUCTURE OF INTERNSHIP ..................................................................................................................... 74 12.1 INTERNSHIP SET-UP ......................................................................................................................................... 74 12.2 CHECKLIST FOR PROCEDURES REGARDING THE CHE-INTERNSHIP ............................................................................... 74 13. THE MASTER’S ASSIGNMENT .................................................................................................................... 78 13.1 OBJECTIVES AND REQUIREMENTS ....................................................................................................................... 78 13.2 CHOICE AND START OF THE MASTER’S ASSIGNMENT .............................................................................................. 79 13.3 PROGRESS AND COACHING ............................................................................................................................... 79 13.4 COMPLETION OF ASSIGNMENT .......................................................................................................................... 80 13.5 SIGN OUT AT CSA AND IBG, AND STOP GRANTS ................................................................................................... 82 13.6 CREDIT POINTS DURING MASTERS ASSIGNMENT .................................................................................................... 82 13.7 CHECKLIST FOR PROCEDURES ............................................................................................................................ 82 14. COURSE INFORMATION ............................................................................................................................ 86 APPENDIX 1 – MAP OF THE UNIVERSITY ....................................................................................................... 112 APPENDIX 2 – ORGANISATIONAL CHART TNW FACULTY .............................................................................. 113 APPENDIX 3 – STAFF CONTACT INFORMATION ............................................................................................ 114 APPENDIX 4 – OER-TNW ............................................................................................................................... 116 APPENDIX 5 – OER CHE ................................................................................................................................ 131 APPENDIX 6 – BOARD OF EXAMINERS’ RULES .............................................................................................. 145 APPENDIX 7 – MASTER’S ASSIGNMENT FORMS............................................................................................ 152 7.1 GRADUATE CONTRACT ..................................................................................................................................... 153 7.2 COLLOQUIUM FORM ....................................................................................................................................... 156 APPENDIX 8 – LINKS TO WEBSITES ............................................................................................................... 158

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What is chemical engineering?

WHAT IS CHEMICAL ENGINEERING? Chemical Engineering is a broad discipline involving a lot more than just chemistry. Chemical Engineers are creative problem solvers who use their scientific and technical expertise to develop innovative chemical processes, materials and products for a wide variety of applications. Studying „Chemical Engineering‟ at the University of Twente (UT) offers you an excellent opportunity to further develop your knowledge and skills in a first-rate research and educational environment. You will be at the forefront of the research and development of innovative chemical processes, novel materials and new products. You will become acquainted with designing safe and sustainable production processes, as well as the development of new materials for application in, for instance, health care, space travel, water purification, fuel cells or IT. Working in such an environment requires expertise in chemistry, physics, mathematics and equipment engineering and competencies such as project management skills and familiarity with the economic/environmental aspects of process/product development. The UT‟s Chemical Engineering Master‟s degree programme concentrates on these very themes. This Chemical Engineering Master‟s programme is divided into two tracks:  Molecules & Materials (former Chemistry and Technology of Materials)  Process Technology There is another master programme that the UT participates in, named Erasmus Mundus. The information about this master can be found below.

Molecules and Materials (M&M) In this track the focus is on design, preparation, processing, application and analysis of novel materials with high tech properties. This includes materials chemistry of polymers with defined molecular and mesoscopic structures, inorganic and organometallic polymers and the engineering and analysis of polymer surfaces and interfaces. Biocompatible and biodegradable polymers are investigated in tissue engineering as scaffolds for blood vessels and bone, and polymeric nanoparticles with surface-attached functionalities are studied as carriers for targeted drug or gene delivery. Also environmentally safe biodegradable polymers, various aspects of rubber technology and engineering of polymers with excellent properties at high temperatures are investigated. In the area of inorganic materials, topics are studied such as metal/ceramic composites with special electrical properties, thin film technology and controlled preparation of (nano-sized) particles for porous membranes for liquid filtration, gas separation and catalysis. (Bio)molecular technology is developed in the controlled preparation of large, molecularly defined, organic assemblies (2D and 3D, for instance DNA, proteins) by reversible interactions between the constituents with the aim to study such nanoparticles at the individual level, to manipulate their shape and functions, and to communicate with such assemblies.

Process Technology (PT) In this track the focus is on the design of processes that function optimally in their technological, economical, environmental and social aspects. This requires integration of transport phenomena, chemical reactor design, separation technology, plant design, process development, process control and economic and social sciences. Several research themes are studied, like multiphase and other novel reactors, reactive separation processes and development and design of specific processes that find direct applications in the chemical or process industry, like melt polycondensation processes. In separation technology, various processes that use solid or liquid separating agents are studied including membrane technology, adsorptive separations of gas- and liquid mixtures, extraction, absorption technology, and separation processes based on ion exchange materials. Novel membranes are developed for selective gas separation, sub-micron filtration processes, affinity separation for selective protein recovery, and facilitated oxygen transport. Other research themes include study of photo-catalytic fuel systems, catalytic processes and catalytic materials, biomass conversion processes, optimization and modelling of processes.

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What is chemical engineering?

Erasmus Mundus Master in Membrane Engineering Our master Chemical Engineering starts in 2011 with a ground-breaking Joint Master Course: Erasmus Mundus Master in Membrane Engineering (EM3E). This programme offers an advanced education in the field of Membrane Science and Engineering at the interface of materials science and process technology and focused on several application areas such as water and energy. EM3E is offered by a consortium of 6 universities from 5 different countries:      

University of Twente (Netherlands), University of Lisboa (Portugal), University of Zaragoza (Spain), Institute of Chemical Technology Prague (Czech Republic), University Paul Sabatier (Toulouse, France) University Montpellier 2 (France).

Université Montpellier 2 holds the coordination. All partners join the European Research Network of Excellence: NanoMemPro. It is expected that the number of students that will enroll yearly is about 25: 15 from European countries and 10 from non-EU countries. For European students, a limited number of scholarships of 10 k€/year are available. The MSc programme of two years consists of 4 semesters of 30 EC each. The student will visit 3 or 4 different universities from 3 or 4 different countries. The scientific programme will be completed by compulsory courses on:  Safety, security, health and environmental regulations,  Quality assurance and laboratory practice,  International and European labour law,  Intellectual capital management,  Valorisation, marketing and entrepreneurship.

For more information: http://www.em3e.eu/. Especially tabs: Poster and Flyer.

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What is chemical engineering?

Twente Graduate School The Twente Graduate School (TGS) offers a growing number of high-quality educational research programs that are centered around key research subjects of the research institutes of the University of Twente such as Nanotechnology, Sustainable Energy or Technology Assessment. The programs are led by world-class research professors. The progress of graduate research students is closely monitored. The graduate research programs must meet a set of quality criteria to guarantee the high level of our degrees. A Graduate Research Programme consists of a coherent set of integrated Master and Doctorate courses that covers a period of, at most, six years. These programs are aimed at students with an interest in scientific research, so that they are able to start focusing on their PhD-thesis during their MSc. All programmes focus on an important research topic. They include a substantial amount of advanced post-master courses (30 EC), and a selection of general subjects such as Science Communication, Philosophy or Entrepreneurship etc. The TGS has advanced research programs on the following topics: - Behavioral Research - Telematics and Information Technology - Innovation and Governance Studies - Energy and Resources - Nanotechnology - Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine If you obtained your Bachelorâ€&#x;s degree with excellent results, wish to pursue a career in research and would like to start your scientific career while obtaining your Masterâ€&#x;s degree, you might be able to join one of the Twente Graduate Research Programmes. For an up-to-date overview of Graduate Research Programmes and more information about the Twente Graduate School, visit our website: http://www.universiteittwente.nl/education/tgs/. On this website you will the specific requirements for admission to a programme. For direct information you can contact the Twente Graduate School Office in the Horst Building, room Horstring Z106, phone + 31 53 489 5210, email tgs@utwente.nl

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What is chemical engineering?

STUDY START-UP Prior to starting the Master‟s programme, a number of steps have to be taken by the (future) Master‟s student. The list below can be regarded as a first indication. More extensive information can be found in chapter 10 of this guide.

Admission and enrolment to the programme The admission requirements to start a Master‟s programme are presented in chapter 10 of this guide and enrolments are centrally organised at CSA. Additionally, this chapter explains the terms and fees and possibilities of finance for enrolment.

Composition of a personalised Master’s curriculum The Master‟s programme of Chemical Engineering at the University of Twente (UT) is characterized by its specialization and depth in a particular part of the global research area. This allows the Master‟s student to create a personalized Master‟s curriculum. To ensure the quality of the programme, the composition of this curriculum has to comply with a number of programme rules, which will be explained in paragraph 11.3. This requires a number of steps to be taken by a future student before and at the start of the programme.

Choose a Master’s track and research group Prior to or shortly after starting a Master‟s programme, students are advised to sort out their interests and abilities in order to determine a fitting Master‟s track. At that point you can select one of the UT‟s research groups at which you will do your Master‟s assignment. Chapter 11 provides information about the Master‟s tracks in the programme. Chapter 9 gives a description of the available research groups.

Plan a set of courses The professor of the chosen research group can be consulted to plan the courses you want to take within the Master‟s track. This set has to consist of five or six compulsory courses and a number of elective courses, which has to comply with some general rules and some specific demands of the professor of the chosen research group. The schedules for the Master‟s programme consist of the compulsory courses and the courses that are primarily intended as elective courses for ChE students.

Enrolment for courses Enrolment for the Master‟s courses needs to be completed via Blackboard at least 6 weeks prior to the start of the course (except for those beginning at the start of the year) so that lecturers are able to prepare their courses for the expected number of students.

RoUTe’14 RoUTe „14 is the project that the University of Twente launched in 2008 in order to develop a new vision regarding education, research, valorisation and the campus. To date, it has resulted in the following vision: ”The University of Twente is a young, entrepreneurial research university, leading in the area of new technology and its significance to people and society. We devote ourselves to the true technologies of the future: ICT, bio- and nanotechnology. In certain areas, we are absolutely worldclass. But we do more than this. What makes Twente unique is that we interrelate these areas.” So far, educational reforms mainly influence the BSc tracks. Since the end terms of the BSc-diploma remain the same, this has no implications for the Master tracks. Furthermore, a new corporate style has been developed for the University of Twente to demonstrate that we are on a new road.

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What is Chemical Engineering?

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What is Chemical Engineering?

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General Programme Information

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1. General Programme Information

1. GENERAL STUDY INFORMATION 1.1 Time scope and workload of the programme The Master‟s programme ChE is a full-time English programme of two years: M1 and M2. The workload per year consists of 60 European Credits (EC). One EC equals 28 hours of study time for the average student, which corresponds to 1680 study hours per year. The workload for most courses is 5 EC (140 hours for the average student), which includes lectures, tutorials, project work, reports and assignments, self study, examination, etc. Although the official language of the Master‟s programme is English, courses may be given in Dutch if only Dutch-speaking students participate. This will always be discussed with the students.

1.2 Schedule of the academic year ChE operates on a semester basis, in which an academic year of 40 weeks is divided into two semesters. Each semester comprises of two blocks (quarters). One quarter consists of eight weeks of classes and two weeks of examinations. Most courses cover one quarter; other courses cover a complete semester.

1.3 Course schedules The curriculum of Master‟s courses differs per student as will be explained in the next paragraph. The locations, times and days that all courses will be taught, can be found in the course schedules, also called semester schedules. These schedules also show the closing dates for exam registration and dates for examinations and re-sit opportunities. The locations of the campus buildings can be found in paragraph 1.6 and on the map of the campus in Appendix 1 of this guide. The schedules can be found on the UT website: http://www.utwente.nl/so/student/onderwijs/roosters/. This site contains up-to-date versions of all schedules. Note: Not all elective courses are represented in the schedules. When the course is not represented on the schedules, the schedules for this course can be retrieved via the appointed contact of this course or the Blackboard site of the course. Since schedules may change, it is recommended to check the educational announcements regularly, see paragraph 1.7.

1.4 Course information and contents (Osiris) Besides this programme guide, the content of a course, its objectives, teaching methods, teachers and literature are provided by the Twente Course Information System, called Osiris (http://www.utwente.nl/so/osiris/). Osiris is also the site where students register for exams. Information on exams, like the date or location, can also be found at the Osiris website. Furthermore, Osiris is considered to be the main information source for everything to do with education at the UT. Please note: The unique course code for each course makes searching on Osiris much easier.

1.5 Overview of lecture hours Lectures, tutorials and lab courses usually cover standard lecture hours, which are represented below: 1: 8.45-9.30 6: 13.45-14.30 11: 18.45-19.30 2: 9.45-10.30 7: 14.45-15.30 12: 19.45-20.30 3: 10.45-11.30 8: 15.45-16.30 13: 20.45-21.30 4: 11.45-12.30 9: 16.45-17.30 14: 21.45-22.30 5: 12.45-13.30 (Lunch) 10: 17.45-18.30 (Dinner)

1.6 Study locations The study activities of the Master‟s programme and offices of the lecturers can be located in several UT buildings on campus. The home basis for ChE, though, has shifted from Langezijds to the Horst building (no. 20-28 on the campus map in Appendix 1). The offices of many lecturers of the ChE programme can be found in the “Meander” or in “Carré”. In Appendix 3, a list of ChE staff members with their offices, telephone numbers and email addresses can be found. Moreover, contact information of all UT personnel is listed in a central address book, which can be accessed through the internet: http://webapps.utwente.nl/telefoongids/nl/telgidsservlet. Since lecturers are often away from their office, email is the general medium for making appointments. The Educational Affairs Office of the faculty of TNW (S&OA-TNW) is also located in the Horst: Horstring Z-204. 14


1. General Programme Information

Abbreviations of the buildings are: Name Abbreviations Capitool CA Carre CR Citadel CI Cubicus CU Hogekamp HO Langezijds LA Meander ME Ravelijn RA Spiegel SP Sportcentrum SC Temp TE Vrijhof VR Waaier WA Zilverling ZI

Horst: Horstring Horsttoren Noordhorst Oosthorst Westhorst Zuidhorst Horstkelder Hal-B

HR HT NH OH WH ZH ZC HB

For a map of the University see Appendix I.

1.7 Educational announcements Important general announcements for the Masterâ€&#x;s programme (the so-called educational announcements) are published in three ways: announcements at Osiris and the student portal (http://my.utwente.nl) and at notice boards in the Horst. These can be considered as the most recent announcements. Making it a habit to regularly check these announcements is strongly recommended. Potential changes to the schedules are also published through these media.

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1. General Programme Information

1.8 Blackboard Each Master‟s course requires enrolment through Blackboard. Blackboard provides course-specific information on a Blackboard-page for that concerning course. Blackboard is a digital learning environment, which covers news, general course information, the schedule of activities, email addresses, etc. Blackboard can be found at blackboard.utwente.nl. Access to Blackboard requires an internet connection and a Blackboard account (student number + password). Account information will be automatically sent to students‟ home addresses after admission to one of the study programmes at the UT, for more information see next paragraph. At the main page of Blackboard, user manuals can be found. Note: For taking the final exam of a course, registration using a different medium, called Osiris, is required. The regulations regarding examination are included in chapter two.

1.9 Access to the internet, UT-Web applications and Email. Once your enrolment to the UT is processed, you will get a student account with an email address, your own specific student number and a password. This student number and password can be used for almost all web applications of the UT. All web applications for UT-students, including Blackboard, can be accessed through the Student Portal of the University, called My University. (http://my.utwente.nl). All lecturers and staff members have an email address too, which is listed in Appendix 3, or can be found through http://webapps.utwente.nl/telefoongids/nl/telgidsservlet.

1.10 Teaching methods for contact hours The schedule, the programme guide and course information on Osiris indicate how each course is taught. There are different teaching methods at the faculty: lectures (HC), tutorials (WC), practical courses, projects and assignments. Lectures are sessions during which a lecturer presents an explanation of and/or additional information on the subject matter for a group of students. These lectures generally last two academic hours of 45 minutes, with a 15-minute break in between. A more intensive type of education is provided in tutorials. Tutorials usually take up the same amount of time, but are more interactive. During tutorials, small groups of students work on applying the subject matter, often by doing small assignments. Tutorials are supervised by a lecturer and intended for assimilation of the subject matter. Individual problems/questions can also be discussed. Generally, attendance at the lectures and tutorials is not compulsory, although it is highly relevant for a good understanding of the subject matter. It is therefore strongly recommended to include these lectures and tutorials in your time schedule and to attend as many as possible. Some courses are taught on a project basis, in which a specific case has to be solved. Within a small group of students, tasks have to be independently divided and planned and the required information and knowledge have to be listed and acquired. Sometimes, such a project has to be concluded with an official presentation of the project‟s results. The project will then be presented to fellow students, supervisors and interested parties of your study programme. Practical courses (or laboratory courses) are sessions in which the individual student or small groups of students learn to perform specific actions or exercises. They last at least an entire morning or afternoon. Usually, the practical work is reported in a laboratory journal completed with a discussion.

1.11 Study methods for self-study In the Master‟s programme, it is expected that you can determine your own effective study method. Lecturers often explicitly advise a way in which that course can be studied most effectively during the first hours of the course. It is also wise to discuss the best way in which you can prepare for the final exam with the lecturer. When you have doubts about your study method, talk to fellow students, your mentor or the study advisor (Marijke Stehouwer for Dutch students, Rik Akse for international students). You can also check out the website “Vragenlijst Studiemethoden” (http://vsm.cs.utwente.nl, in Dutch).

1.12 Study material Courses are supported by different types of study materials, e.g. lecture notes (course material), books, hand-outs and PowerPoint presentations of the lectures. These are either available at the Unionshop located in the Bastille, Study association C.T.S.G. Alembic, general book stores or Blackboard. See paragraph 5.5 for more information.

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1. General Programme Information

1.13 Convocation (presentation of the diploma) In general, students receive their Master‟s diploma immediately upon completion of their MSc assignment. Application for the Master‟s degree is required in ample time once all demands for graduation are met, except for the final Master‟s assignment. The application form can be found on the S&OA website http://www.utwente.nl/tnw/organisatie/organisatie/SenO/onderwijszaken/formulieren/chemical_enginee ring/ See Appendix 6 for an example. The form can also be used to arrange the closing MSc assignment colloquium. As a result of this form, the Board of Examiners will decide whether students can graduate for their Master‟s exam. After graduation, the enrolment in the ChE programme is terminated. In special circumstances this may not be desirable. In that case, it is also possible to arrange the colloquium without applying for the Master‟s exam. Further information about the procedure of the Master‟s assignment and colloquium can be found in chapter 13.

1.14 Change of personal contact information Experience has taught us that students regularly move house and/or change telephone number. However, students often forget to communicate their new contact information to the official bodies with risk of missing important information. So, students are strongly advised to pass on the new contact information to Central Student Administration (CSA), Dienst Uitvoering Onderwijs (DUO), study association and other communities they have joined, this can be done through the Student Services website http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentservices/en/.

1.15 Blue&Red Desk (Student Services) Central student administration (CSA), also referred to as Student Services, is a service that controls all administration of UT students, including enrolments. All changes to contact information after your enrolment have to be communicated to this service, see paragraph 1.14. Students can turn to CSA for several courses of events: a change to another study programme, enrolment for a second programme, (temporarily) quitting of a programme, potential refunds of tuition fees (paragraph 11.5), regulations for enrolment as extraneous, validity of (foreign) diplomas, and questions concerning student cards. For specific questions about the Dutch study grants system (studiefinanciering) you can turn to the regional office of the DUO (http://www.duo.nl/) or to the Information desk of the student counsellors, also referred to as “the red desk”. For information, forms and changes in addresses, the website of student services is of interest (http://www.utwente.nl/so/en/).

1.16 Telephone, email and network on the campus All over the campus, landlines can be used freely to call other telephone numbers on campus. In this case only the four digit extension should be dialled. If an outside line or mobile phone is used the phone number starts with 053-489 followed by the extension. So if the internal phone number is 1234, the official phone number is 053-4891234. In general, all persons associated to the university have an email address that ends with “@xxx.utwente.nl”, with xxx showing their relation to the university. All computers on campus are part of the university network and have IP-addresses that start with “130.89”. One of the advantages is that, in this way, special rights can be assigned to all computers on campus, such as licenses for scientific articles. Computers connected to the wireless network of the campus, are automatically assigned a campus IP-address. Connecting to the wireless network is only possible with help of a valid account, see paragraph 1.9.

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1. General Programme Information

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1. General Programme Information

Examination and other UT policies

19


2. Examination and Other UT Policies

2. EXAMINATION AND OTHER UT POLICIES 2.1 Rights and duties – Student’s Charter and OER The regulations for examination, like passing, failing etc., are stated in the Student‟s charter. This charter contains specific regulations for the complete UT as an institute (only available digitally), for the faculty and for the programme. This charter describes all rights and duties for UT-students. The combination of the rights and duties for Master‟s students at the Faculty TNW is embedded in the Education and Examination Regulation (OER) and for ChE students concerns the MSc OER-TNW with a programme-specific supplement OER-ChE. The rules of the board of examiners contains different rules and regulations for ChE students. The complete student‟s charter is available at S&OATNW, the programme-specific parts are published in appendices 4, 5 and 6 and these hierarchically arranged regulations are available at the following websites: UT: http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/regelingen/studentenstatuut/ TNW+ChE: http://www.utwente.nl/che/education/regulations/

2.2 Types of examination There are different types of examinations. The most common method is a (written) examination at the end of each quarter. In principle, the lecturer of each course will provide the necessary course-specific information concerning examination. Furthermore, study associations provide useful information, for instance in the form of providing old exams which can help to test yourself. For former exams of the ChE programme, please check the website of the study association Alembic (http://alembic.tnw.utwente.nl/content/tentamenbank in Dutch). Besides written exams, students are tested based on assignments, papers and their contributions to group work and oral presentations.

2.3 Absence When it is not possible to attend a compulsory practical course, compulsory tutorial or an exam, due to illness or circumstances beyond your control, this may have consequences. It is therefore essential to inform your lecturer or supervisor as soon as possible. When an exam is missed beyond the student‟s control and the student is severely disadvantaged by this, the Board of Examiners may decide to permit the student to take an extra exam at a later time. In this case, the Board of Examiners will consult the student advisor. (Nevertheless, a special treatment is not always required since it is generally possible to join the next exam session.) A long-term illness or other personal circumstances may hinder your study progress. In this case, contact your student advisor Marijke Stehouwer (m.a.stehouwer@tnw.utwente.nl), who may be able to prevent disadvantageous consequences for your Dutch Government grant (studiefinanciering). In some exceptional cases of illness and circumstances (in your family) - or in a broader sense: situations beyond your control - you may be financially compensated by emergency funds, medicalsocial funds or university funds. For such cases, contact the information desk for student counselling (“red desk” located at the Bastille), preferably after consulting with the student advisor of your study programme.

2.4 Examinations For most courses, a quarter (or semester) is concluded with an exam. For all courses there are two exam sessions per year: one in the two week exam period directly following the lectures and one in the two week exam period of the following quarter. Consult the schedules, Osiris, myuniversity or the lecturer for the dates of exams. When you take the same exam more than once, the highest grade applies. In order to take a written exam, students have to register. This is compulsory in order to divide the available space that is suited for examination, which is a service that is centrally arranged for all study programmes at the UT. You can find the closing dates for exam registration in the semester schedules. Exam registration is arranged by Osiris (http://www.utwente.nl/so/osiris/). After the registration period closes you can find exam locations on my.utwente.nl

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2. Examination and Other UT Policies An exception to the two possibilities to finish an exam per year is formed by courses that are taught on a project or practical basis. Generally, these types of courses can be completed only once a year. Students are recommended to use that opportunity.

2.5 Registration, withdrawal and schedules for exams If you want to register for or withdraw from an examination, registration via Osiris (http://www.utwente.nl/so/osiris/) is required. Use your personal codes (student number and email password) as discussed paragraph 1.9 to login to this web application. Osiris can also be used to request an examination schedule for the entire year or for an overview of examinations for which you have already registered. Registration for examinations by Osiris is compulsory and independent from course enrolment. You are able to register for each examination separately until 10 office days before the first Monday of the examination period. These closing dates are also represented in the semester schedules. Registration after the closing dates is not possible. Being registered in time means having the right to participate (provided that the student meets the requested demands for that course). For these students, sufficient seating will be arranged in the examination room and sufficient copies of the exam will be available. In extraordinary circumstances, extra examination possibilities may be offered, see paragraph 2.10. Advice: Each examination is entered into Osiris well in advance to allow you to register for it. If something goes wrong, inform your Educational Affairs Office (S&OA) as soon as possible, either by email or by telephone so they can take action if possible. Once the registration period has ended, S&OA will not be able to help you. For more information see paragraph 8.6. The examination schedule may change after you have registered, e.g. an examination may be moved to a different location. Before the examination, consult the educational announcements on my.utwente.nl, Blackboard or the examination schedule available on Osiris for any changes. Please also withdraw in time from an examination to prevent unnecessary work for teachers and SO&A, you can withdraw by sending a mail to tentamenbureau-tnw@utwente.nl.

2.6 Notification and availability of examination marks (Osiris) After an exam the result should be known after a maximum of 20 working days. The results of written exams will be available on Osiris after this period. Also, lecturers occasionally place a list of grades by student number on Blackboard directly after all exams have been marked. Once the Educational Affairs Office (S&OA) has processed the grades, you can retrieve all your grades from Osiris. Login with your personal codes (student number and email password) as discussed in paragraph 1.10. The procedure in which the grades are communicated is as follows:  S&OA (course administration) supplies a list of participants in an examination to the lecturer, this list is based on Osiris data of enrolment;  After the exam, the lecturer writes the grades on this list, and signs it for approval;  S&OA archives the approved list;  S&OA registers the grades in Osiris;  In conformity with the CER students can view their grades using Osiris;  If a student suspects that a grade has not been registered correctly, he or she can contact S&OA in order to verify said grade using the approved list;  The student can receive an authorized verification of obtained grades from „Student Services‟;  With the diploma students receive an authorized diploma supplement, the grade list is part of this supplement. The list that has been signed by the lecturer counts as “proof” as mentioned in the WHW act, art. 7.11 paragraph 1, that the student can revert to. The grade lists in Osiris can also be used as valid proof. For oral exams and individual assignments (internships, bachelor assignments, etc.) the lecturer writes the student a grade-slip. A copy of this grade-slip is sent to BOZ, who make sure that the grade is registered according to the procedure described above.

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2. Examination and Other UT Policies

2.7 Right of perusal and evaluation of taken exams Upon request, graded work plus the examination criteria that were used to mark it may be reviewed (right of perusal) over a period of six months after grade notification (art. 23 in OER-TNW). An appeal against the individual examiner order can be lodged at the Board of Examiners and an appeal against the Board of Examiners order at the Board of Appeal for Examination (art. 7.61, Dutch law). With a perusal request, a subsequent evaluation of the studentâ€&#x;s exam with the examiner can be requested. When the examiner decides that the nature of the work allows it, students are allowed to make copies of the exam and graded work. The examiner sees to it that written examinations are kept archived for at least two years after the examination date. In some cases, a lecturer organises a general exam evaluation. It is recommended to make use of your right for inspection in case you did not pass your exam while you have put sufficient time in taking the course and revision. In this way, you will obtain a better idea of the course demands and of the gaps in your knowledge.

2.8 Procedures during examination sessions At each examination session, one supervisor is present that can clarify any issues during the exams. If the supervisor requests so, you must be able to identify yourself with a student ID card. During examinations, no contact with other students is allowed. You are expected not to disturb your fellow students and therefore you should be on time for the examination session. During the first half an hour after the start of the examination session, latecomers will be allowed to participate. After that time they will not be allowed in. Due to this rule, students cannot leave the exam within this first half hour. The examination session ends at the set time, also for latecomers. At the end of your exam, every paper that you hand in must include a name and student number. If present, the attendance list should be signed. In case of fraud, the exam will be termed invalid. The Board of Examiners may decide on further penalties like expelling the student from that exam for up to one year or even exclusion from the study programme.

2.9 Procedures regarding assignments and papers A number of courses will be taught on project basis and concluded with an assignment or paper. Using these assignments and papers, students demonstrate to what extent they have become acquainted with the subject matter and are able to apply it to more complex cases. For these types of examinations, copying (parts) of work from others and presenting it as your own, is as severe as fraud during written exams. Consequently, the same type of penalties may be taken as for other cases of exam fraud. To detect plagiarism, lecturers may use specially designed software.

2.10 Extra and special possibilities for examination For the courses with scheduled written exams, in general, there are no possibilities for individual exams (oral or written). Only in highly exceptional cases his rule can this rule be deviated from and deviation is only possible after consultation with the study advisor and the Board of Examiners. For physically or sensory disabled students, the facilities will be arranged to take the exams in a way that is suited for their specific disability. If necessary, the Board of Examiners will consult experts on this matter. Students with dyslexia can turn to S&OA. When students have a medical certificate for dyslexia, it may, for instance, be possible to arrange extra time in a separate room for a written exam.

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3. Safety and Health

Safety and Health

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3. Safety and Health

3. SAFETY AND HEALTH (1)

The personnel department provides information about safety and health. The major topics and regulations around safety concerning students are discussed in the paragraphs below.

3.1 Safety In case of emergencies, it is essential to react effectively. Therefore, all students are expected to be familiar with:  The central alarm number of the UT: (+31 53-489) 2222. In case of any emergency, the first thing to do is call this number. (The central Dutch / European alarm number is 112. However, on campus you should use 2222)  The information on the “in-case-of-emergency” signs in the UT buildings  All emergency exits and escape routes. A frequent and critical check of the latter two is therefore necessary. Safety regulations concerning practical courses (with lasers, chemicals, electricity, etc.) will be provided at the beginning of these practical courses. Different practical courses may have different regulations concerning protection of humans and equipment.

3.2 Health The highest health risk for students concerns computer work during which repetitive movements in a static pose are inevitable. An increasing number of students suffer from repetitive strain injury (RSI) which comprises of complaints to upper back, fingers, hands and wrists. All students are well advised to gather information about the risks and ways of prevention of RSI. Information can be found at the (2) (3) website of the Personnel Department (and at the site of the RSI association , information on both sites is in Dutch and English). A correct posture and micro breaks are essential. The UT now has licenses for two break exercise reminder software programs, which can be downloaded from the website of the Personnel (2) Department: - Workrave (micro breaks, rest periods, daily limit and exercises) - Twitch (micro breaks). The use of a laptop support and separate keyboard is stimulated by the University.

(1) http://www.utwente.nl/pao/info_voor/medewerkers/arbo (Dutch) (2) http://www.utwente.nl/hr/info_voor/medewerkers/arbo/VGM/Gezondheid/rsi_beeldschermwerk /Medewerkers/ (3) http://www.rsi-vereniging.nl/ 24


4. Special arrangements at the university

Special Arrangements at the University

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4. Special arrangements at the university

4. SPECIAL ARRANGEMENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY 4.1 Dutch student grants (studiefinanciering, tempobeurs en prestatiebeurs) The regulations around Dutch study grants: „studiefinanciering‟, managed by the national Dutch grant fund the “Dienst Uitvoering Onderwijs” (DUO), is often complex and liable to changes. Personalised information for the (specific) regulations that account for each situation can be requested at the Information desk of the student counsellors or DUO can be contacted directly. (http://ocwduo.nl/, phone: 050 599 77 55) These regulations alter per situation and year that you first received „studiefinanciering‟. Do not automatically rely on stories of fellow students or more senior students and sort out your specific case. Also HBO-students are recommended to gather thorough information.

4.1.1 “Langstudeer regeling” The reforms of the Dutch government include a fine of €3000,- per year for students who pay the statutory tuition fees (often Dutch or EU students) and who incur more than 1 year of study delay. More information (for Dutch students) can be found on the red desk student counselling website: http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/omstandigheden/langstuderen/

4.2 Top-class sport The combination of following a study programme on academic level and commitment to top-class sports or cultural activities can be difficult. Postponing one of the two, however, is generally not an option. Therefore, the UT has created special policies for top-class athletes. More info on this topic can be found on http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/studievertraging/ondersteuning/ (in Dutch).

4.3 Studying with a disability Following a study programme can be difficult to combine with a disability. Therefore, the UT offers several facilities to enable the combination. More information can be found on:  http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/studievertraging/handicap/ (in Dutch)  http://www.handicap-studie.nl  The red desk (student counsellors) in the „Bastille‟

4.4 Individual arrangements for student activism The UT encourages extra-curricular activities to allow students to develop themselves in a broader sense. To prevent or compensate possible study delay, students may be eligible for special adjustments in the study programme if their activities match the following conditions:  The activity is in favour of the university and/or the student‟s personal development. In general, committees and organisational work for a student body on campus (society or study programme) meet this requirement.  A study plan is provided to the student advisor. This plan has to prove the study delay that will be caused by the specific activity or position. Also, this plan has to show which programme adjustments are possible in order to minimise the delay.  The study plan has to be discussed with the student advisor two quarters prior to the expected study delay. It is recommended to consult your student advisor well before any expected study delay. The following adjustments are optional:  Alternative and/or supplementary assignments;  Exemption of compulsory attendance;  Shifting of the date of exam/ extra possibilities for (oral) examination. Whether or not you are eligible for special treatment on grounds of the conditions above will be considered by the board of the study programme. When you disagree with a decision that was made, you can turn to the student advisor for mediation. Optional adjustments have to meet the following preconditions:  The educational level of the courses must be maintained  The work load of the course stays intact  No excessive efforts are demanded from the teaching staff. 26


5.Study facilities 

Study Facilities

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5.Study facilities

5.1 Computer facilities During the study programme and in the future, computers are part of the general requirements. Computer facilities in the Horst building are available. However, students taking part in a practical course at that location have a higher priority. Furthermore, a personal laptop computer is recommended for the Master‟s programme (not compulsory).

5.2 Lockers In the Horst, many lockers are available for students. Keys for one of these lockers (€ 30 deposit) can be arranged at the financial administration of the faculty CTW (Horst N258).

5.3 Student card and chip card At admission to a study programme at the UT (after you had your digital photo taken at the Student Services desk in the Vrijhof between 12:30 and 16.00), all students receive a student card (also often referred to as “collegekaart”). The student card serves as proof of enrolment and as general identification card at the UT, also at examination sessions. Also, the card contains information that guarantees its functioning as library card, Union card (representing the automatic membership of the Student Union upon enrolment) and Xtra-card, formally known as the Student Union Activity Card (SUAC), when use of campus facilities (sports and culture) was indicated at terms of (re-)enrolment. In case of transfer or termination of study programmes within the academic year, the card has to be replaced or returned. In case of loss, Student Services (Vrijhof, 239B) can be contacted for a new card, but first enquire whether your card was found at a canteen, reception or S&OA-TNW. On most Dutch bank cards a chip is present for electronic pre-paid payments for printing, vending machines and meals in the canteens. If your bank card does not have a chip, one can be requested free from your bank. The pre-paid payment system is called „chipknip‟ and charging stations are located throughout the University. You can also buy pre-paid cards at the canteens. If you still have an old university chip-card, the residue on the chip cards can be retrieved at special machines located at the Bastille.

5.4 Copy and print In all educational buildings, printers and copy machines are available for making black/white copies and prints (generally €0.04 per page). Payment has to be completed with the chip card, see previous paragraph. Printers can be accessed by the regular computer facilities (log on with student account) or in the Horst, two printers (central hall and Oosthorst) can be installed on laptops. Check the manual of the notebook service centre at http://nsc.ctw.utwente.nl > Handleiding(en) (Dutch) Besides these self-service printers and copy machines, a number of Xerox service points (e.g. Carré), the Union Shop (Bastille) and a digital service desk are available for extended copy facilities. Check the site of the Facility Department for further information, office hours and prices: http://www.utwente.nl/fb and search for “Kopieer en reprofaciliteiten” (Dutch). Alternatively, there are printing offices in Enschede and Hengelo for large orders. Additionally, the ITBE service offers use of a number of scanners in the computer facilities at the central library (free of charge).

5.5 Books, lecture notes and other study materials Books for study purposes can be obtained at reduced prices from the study association Alembic, th located on the 5 floor of the Horsttoren. (http://alembic.tnw.utwente.nl) The book committee of Alembic sends a quarterly email that notifies members of the final date for book ordering at the Integral Book Ordering System. For more information, contact Alembic (email: bestuur@alembic.utwente.nl, phone 2866, paragraph 8.8). Alternatively, books can be ordered at the Campus Book store, internet or regular book stores. Lecture notes (course material) for all study programmes are available at the Union Shop in the Bastille, which also sells general office accessories. The website (http://www.unionshop.nl) provides more information for availability of lecture notes. Handouts are generally provided by lecturers of the concerning course and are usually accessible through Blackboard.

5.6 University library The University Library is part of the Library and Archive. The library serves two purposes:

28


5.Study facilities 

Information services: books and magazines on a great number of research areas are available in different ways: on-line, hard copy, loaning, only on inspection.  Study facilities: the library offers several study facilities: study areas, private study rooms, study rooms for groups and computer facilities. With a valid student card, students are entitled to use all library facilities including signing out of books of the full university collection. Information about lending or ordering publications outside the regular university collection can be requested at the library information counters. The on-line catalogue of the university library, comprising the full collection of the university, can be accessed through the internet (http://www.utwente.nl/ub). Furthermore, other catalogues, online databases and search engines can be found at this site. Most magazine volumes of recent years and even some books can be digitally accessed all over the campus. Further digitalising is in progress. At the moment, the University collection is spread over a number of faculty libraries and one central library. In time, all faculty libraries will be transferred to the central library. The collection concerning ChE is located in the central library in the Vrijhof. Opening hours Library: Mon. to Fri: 8.30 – 22.00 Sat. 9.00 – 16.30, Sun. 9:00 – 16:30 (The Library is closed on holidays) Contact: Phone: (053 – 489) 2777 Email: InfoUB@utwente.nl

5.7 Canteen/Edu-café Many university buildings have their own canteen. In the Horst, the canteen is located in the central hall, which is part of the Educafé. Outside lunch time, this café is meant for self study and group meetings. The canteen is opened from 9.00h to 15.00h, except for holidays in which alternative opening hours may be adopted. Orders in advance (coffee, lunch, etc.) can be requested daily at the canteen (tel. 2386).

5.8 Notebook service centre For the most recent information about laptop discounts, contact information, manuals for printer and scanner installation the website of the Notebook Service Centre can be consulted http://www.utwente.nl/icts/nsc/. The Notebook Service Centre is located in the Horstring W-122 and is open from Monday to Friday between 8.30h−17.00h. This centre can also be contacted for services and repairs. The phone number of this centre is 5577.

5.9 English courses Because the Master of Chemical Engineering is in English, it is useful to speak, read, write and understand English well. TCP language centre offers different kind of courses for students to learn English properly. For more information about the English courses, registration, dates and times you have to go to the internet site of TCP language Centre, http://www.utwente.nl/so/tcp/. Keep in mind these courses are not for free!

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5.Study facilities

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6. Academic and personal support

Academic and Personal Support

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6. Academic and personal support

6. ACADEMIC AND PERSONAL SUPPORT 6.1 Student advisor The student advisor can be consulted for all issues that concern your study programme and studying in general. She can help to evaluate your study methods, draw up an effective study plan, consider the situation you are in, and may help to switch or combine different study programmes. She can help arrange special treatments by discussions with the concerning lecturers and the programme director. The student advisor of Chemical Engineering is Marijke Stehouwer for Dutch students and Rik Akse for international students. (email: m.a.stehouwer@tnw.utwente.nl or h.a.akse@utwente.nl)

6.2 Student support at UT level The various services for general study support, offered by the university, can be found at the Student Counselling Desk, which is an actual information desk, called the “Red Desk” located in the Bastille, floor 2 (http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/en/). The three main services are described in the following paragraphs. These services concern the Information desk for student counselling, the office of student psychologists and the committee for (financial) graduation support (CvA).

6.3 Information desk for student counselling (S&OB) The information desk for student counselling can be consulted for:  Affairs concerning the grant system for Dutch students: studiefinanciering, prestatiebeurs, etc.;  Switch from HBO (university of applied science, BSc programmes) to university;  Extension of „studiefinanciering‟ due to disabilities;  Financial arrangements of the UT, like: RAVIS (for international students), etc.  Possibilities for enrolment other than as student;  Procedures of protest (DUO, Higher Education Appeals Board)  Taxes and social laws (like applications for social security benefit, work permits)  Personal problems  Change of study programme or study track The student counsellors have office hours for which an appointment can be made at the Red Desk, located at the Bastille, floor 2 (http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/en/)

6.4 Office of student psychologists At the student psychologists office, all students who need to talk about something are welcome. All matters such as study or personal problems, problems in relationships with parents, friends or fellow students can be discussed. No registration or referral is required to consult a psychologist. So, an appointment can be made on your own. Besides individual consults, also group activities are organised. This concerns self management training, personal support group, graduation support, therapy group. Both Dutch and English groups are available. All consultations that you have at the psychologists are confidential and free of charge. Further information can be found at the website. http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/en/

6.5 Health care The University of Twente offers students a general medical service at the University Campus. These services are provided by a dentist, a physiotherapist and a doctor, who is a general practitioner. The doctor and the dentist are located at the back of the ACASA building, number 58 “de Sleutel”. The location of the physiotherapist differs per day (http://www.fysiotherapie-enschede.nl/) See appendix 1 for locations General: http://www.studentunion.utwente.nl/students/ut-guide/healthcare.html General practitioner: http://www.campushuisarts.nl/en/

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6. Academic and personal support

6.6 Committee for (financial) graduation support (CvA) On behalf of the executive board (CvB), the committee for graduation support (CvA) considers the applications for financial support. Application forms can be (digitally) requested at the “Red Desk”. The rules and regulations for graduation support are discussed in the Student‟s Charter and can also be found on the red desk website: http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/en These regulations concern:  Regulation Graduation Support: either recognised for special circumstances or agreed terms for committee functions in the period of acknowledged right for at least the basic grant of „studiefinanciering‟ (only for Dutch students).  Support Athletes: personalised study counselling inclusive or exclusive of financial support for athletes at national, international or Olympic level (top-class sports).  Supplementary „studiefinanciering‟ Transferees: in case of delay caused by changing between study programmes.  Supplementary reimbursement insufficient educational feasibility.  Encouragement Activism for students not entitled to grants (STAN): in case of extracurricular student activities by Dutch students that are not entitled to studiefinanciering.  Graduation Support for International Students (RAVIS): in case of delay caused by illness and death of partner or family in the first degree or by agreed terms of student activities for foreign Bachelor‟s- or Master‟s students.

6.7 Infotheek Bastille for practical information The Information desk of student advisors and Office of student psychologists together run a special small “library”, called the “Infotheek Bastille” (across room 233 in the Bastille). This Infotheek contains a lot of practical information: following academic or HBO study programmes (in foreign countries), studying with disabilities, taxes and social laws. Also, you find information about different study programmes and professions and you can look at video tapes concerning study skills. The Infotheek is opened from Monday to Friday from 8.30 to 17.00.

6.8 Student Union The Student Union supports students on a different level by creating an environment in which students can relax and further develop their competencies during their university years. About 90 student organisations are affiliated with the Student Union. These organisations can be divided into five sectors: culture, social, sports, study, and other. Every sector, apart from 'other', has its own board of representatives and provides information about the embedded societies. The Student Union provides information about all sports and cultural activities, but also provides centrally arranged student services, like a site for student rooms. For more information see the website: http://www.studentunion.utwente.nl/en

6.9 International Students A lot of facilities are available for international students at the University of Twente, for example housing and ESN Twente (a student network which organizes activities for international students in particular. The University of Twente also offers a lot of support to International Students by means of counsellors, the Student Service desk, and language courses. The contact person for students of MSc tracks the contact person is Rik Akse (h.a.akse@utwente.nl). The University of Twente‟s International Office (http://www.utwente.nl/internationalstudents/) also provides extensive information and support for our international students. Their „Living and studying at UT‟-handbook (can be downloaded from the site in .pdf) is very useful.

33


6. Academic and personal support

34


7. Programme infrastructure

Programme Infrastructure

35


7. Programme infrastructure

7. PROGRAMME INFRASTRUCTURE 7.1 Faculty TNW The study programmes of the UT are the responsibility of one of their faculties. Each faculty has a dean as chairman. The ChE programme is part of the Faculty of Science and Technology (TNW). The Dean of TNW is Prof. dr. ir. G. van der Steenhoven. The executive director is Mr. M.M. van Aken. An organisational chart of TNW can be found in Appendix 2. The (management) staff of the ChE programme will be discussed in the next chapter.

Faculty TNW The Faculty Science and Technology comprises of several Bachelor and Master programmes. Bachelors (Dutch): - Advanced Technology - Biomedische Technologie - Scheikundige Technologie - Technische Geneeskunde - Technische Natuurkunde

(AT) (taught in English) (BMT) (ST) (TG) (TN)

Master‟s programmes (English): - Applied Physics - Biomedical Engineering - Chemical Engineering - Nanotechnology - Technical Medicine

(APH) (BME) (ChE) (NT) (TM)

7.2 Committees and boards of the study programme Several committees are essential for the functioning of the study programme. Within the faculty TNW, these are in descending order:  University Council University level  The Faculty Council per faculty  Programme Committee per programme (ST+ChE)  Board of Examiners per programme (ST+ChE) These committees are discussed in the following paragraphs.

7.3 University Council The University Council (UR) consists of nine elected staff representatives and nine elected student representatives. The Executive Board requires the approval of the UR for a number of issues, including the strategic plan and administrative agenda for the years to come. Its responsibilities are:  the establishment or termination of programme courses,  regulations concerning the rights of students,  policy concerning the quality of education. For more information see: http://www.utwente.nl/uraad/ (in Dutch)

7.4 Faculty Council The Faculty Council (Faculteitsraad) of TNW consists of an equal number of staff representatives and students and advises the Dean on all management aspects (finances, personnel, education and research) and is the highest participation body within the faculty. The Faculty Council must approve changes in several subjects, such as reorganisation and the Student‟s Charter. The difference with the Programme Committee, next paragraph, is that the latter can only influence matters concerning education and that this is bound to the right of advice. The Faculty Council, however, operates at a higher level of abstraction. For more information see: http://www.utwente.nl/tnw/fr/ (in Dutch)

7.5 Programme Committee (OLC-ST) The Programme Committee (Opleidingscommissie) consists of (an equal number of) students and staff members/lecturers, and is appointed by the dean. This committee advises the programme 36


7. Programme infrastructure director concerning the regulations for examination, the study programme and the execution of it. Legally, this committee has the right to advise (at request or unsolicited) the Programme Director and the Dean. These advices are binding for the concerning persons unless they have well-grounded reasons to do otherwise. This is the official way in which students can influence the study programme. At the moment, the Programme Committee consists of the following members: Staff members  Dr. W. Verboom  Dr. K. Seshan  Dr. ir. J.E. ten Elshof  Prof. dr.ir. R.G.H. Lammertink Students  F.M.D. Weijland  L.M.J. Sprakel  F.T. de Groot  M.A. Sikkink Advisors  Dr.ir. B.H.L. Betlem  Drs. H.J. van den Hengel  M.A. Stehouwer, MA For more information: http://www.utwente.nl/st/organisatie/olc_st/ (in Dutch)

7.6 Board of Examiners The Board of Examiners consists of staff members, including at least two professors, and appointed by the dean. The board has substantive authority for all matters concerning examination and holds responsibility for a proper course of affairs during examinations, lays down the relevant regulations, and may provide guidelines and instructions to the examiners. The Board‟s tasks include arranging for the admission of students, the assessment of proposals for a flexible programme, the evaluation of requests for exemption from certain units of study (examinations, practical courses, etc.), and assuring the overall quality of the study programmes. If you want to contact the Board of Examiners it is useful to consult your study advisor and/or the secretary of the Board of Examiners first. The ChE Board of the Examiners comprises the following members: Staff members  Prof. dr. ir. L. Lefferts (chairman)  Dr.ir. L. Winnubst (secretary)  Dr. H.J.M. Bouwmeester  Dr. W. Verboom  Prof. dr. Ir. J. Huskens (vice-chairman)  Dr.ir. D.W.F. Brilman Advisors  M.A. Stehouwer, MA  Dr.ir. B.H.L. Betlem

37


7. Programme infrastructure

7.7 Working group for programme quality (OKC-ST) For the quality of a study programme, the opinions of students regarding the organization and content of the curriculum are of the utmost importance. To systematically monitor these opinions, ChE utilises a structured quarter-based evaluation system with the working group for Programme Quality as central part. The committee consists of students and lecturers and is responsible for the course and track evaluation of the Master‟s programme. Each quarter, the committee introduces online course evaluation forms for the compulsory courses. At the end of each year a discussion with a student panel is scheduled. The course-specific information will be presented to the teachers afterwards, so they can propose changes. The course evaluation forms, panel discussion, comments of the lecturer, “grades” (graduation percentages) and results and measures of previous years are processed by the OKC to finally result in an evaluation report, including recommendations. This report is presented to the students and handed to the Programme Committee, who advises the Programme Director after deliberation. At the moment, the OKC-ST consists of the following people: Staff Members  Henk. van den Hengel (chairman)  Marijke Stehouwer (study advisor)  Louis Winnubst  Martin van der Hoef  Miriam Girones Students  Rick Driessen  Mariël Elshof  Kristianne Tempelman  Lydwien Mathijssen  Iris Smal  Janneke Veerbeek For more information: http://www.tnw.utwente.nl/che/organisation/

7.8 Student influence on study programme Besides students in the Programme Committee, Faculty Council and the Committee for Programme Quality, all students are of importance to monitor and improve the quality of education. All suggestions and comments concerning the study programme and other related educational affairs are welcome! You can directly address the lecturers, your mentor, the student advisor, programme coordinator and/or programme director. Moreover, the ChE programme has a structural system of evaluation, based on course evaluation forms and group interviews. Like the other committees, this system can only exist because of student‟s contributions.

38


8. Organisation within the ChE Programme

Organisation within the ChE Programme

39


8. Organisation within the ChE Programme

8. ORGANISATION WITHIN THE ChE PROGRAMME 8.1 Programme Director Within the Faculty each study programme has its own organisation with a programme director in charge. For ChE this is Ben Betlem. He bears the final responsibility for the curriculum and admission requirements of study programme. This concerns the overall policies, regulations and performance in the programme, but also the daily management. The Programme Director forms the board of the study programme and plays an important role in the development of new courses and monitoring and improving of the existing tracks and courses. Name: Dr.ir. B.H.L. Betlem (Ben) email: b.h.l.betlem@utwente.nl Phone: +31 53 489 3043 Room: Horsttoren 607

8.2 Track Coordinators Each of the tracks that comprise the Master of ChE has their own coordinator. Their contact information is shown below: Process Technology Master: Louis van der Ham Email: a.g.j.vanderham@utwente.nl Phone: 053 489 5430 Room: Meander 218 Molecules & Materials: Rob Lammertink Email: r.g.h.lammertink@utwente.nl Phone: 053 489 2063 Room: Meander 314

8.3 Student Advisor The student advisor can guide students during study problems that they might encounter. At ChE, this is Marijke Stehouwer. Besides discussion of programme-related problems, students can talk to her about experiences with studying, planning, complaints, educational and examination regulations, legal position and possible other suggestions concerning the personal programme. The student advisor is the person of trust for students. Name: email: Tel: Room:

M.A. Stehouwer (Marijke) m.a.stehouwer@utwente.nl +31 53 489 2678 Horsttoren 707

8.4 Coordinator Internationalization Students can consult coordinator internationalization about following courses abroad. Information is available about:  Associated foreign universities;  Existing international (exchange) programs like the Socrates/Erasmus exchange  programs of the European Union;  Support for encountering foreign courses in your Master‟s curriculum;  Organisation of staying abroad;  Admission of EC‟s and grades that are acquired abroad. The coordinator internationalization is also the study advisor for foreign students of ChE Name: Ing. H.A. Akse (Rik) email: h.a.akse@utwente.nl Phone: +31 53 489 2886 Room: Horsttoren 615

40


8. Organisation within the ChE Programme

8.5 Internship Coordinator The Masterâ€&#x;s programme includes an internship during which the student is located at a company, research institute or university. International internships are optional. Arrangements for internships have to be made with the internship coordinator, Betty Folkers. The regulations regarding internships are discussed in chapter 12. Name: E-mail: Phone: Room:

ing. A. Folkers (Betty) stage@tnw.utwente.nl 053-489 2772 Horsttoren 609

8.6 Secretary The secretary provides the first contact to the educational staff. At ChE, this is Bartie Bruggink-De Braal. The secretariat is opened from Monday till Wednesday from 8:30 hours till 17:15 hours. Name: Mrs. B.A. Bruggink-De Braal (Bartie) email: b.a.bruggink-debraal@utwente.nl Phone: +31 53 489 2082 Room: Horsttoren 605

8.7 Students and Education Administration (S&OA-TNW) S&OA-TNW was previously known as BOZ-TNW. For all affairs regarding the direct organisation within the study programme, like discrepancies in schedules, your grades registration or course admissions. At the office of S&OA of the faculty TNW Nienke Oesterholt is the staff member who is in charge of the ChE study programme. To make things easier, most of the (information) forms required are available on the internet (http://www.tnw.utwente.nl/organisatie/organisatie/SenO/, in Dutch). Name: email: Phone: Room:

Ms. Nienke Oesterholt boz-ct@utwente.nl +31 53-489 3000 / 2925 Horstring Z 204

S&OA is the service of students and education, more information on www.utwente.nl/diensten/so/en.

8.8 Scientific staff The education within the study programme is the responsibility of the scientific staff, which includes primarily professors, academic lecturers, research members, educational members and PhD candidates (AIOs). Besides providing lectures, these lecturers also contribute in research projects. A list of all mentors, lecturers and professors is included in Appendix 3.

41


8. Organisation within the ChE Programme

8.9 Study association C.T.S.G Alembic C.T.S.G. Alembic is the study association of Chemical Engineering. The association is the oldest of the University of Twente and has about 180 members. Alembic attends to the study interests of all Chemical Engineering students by getting involved in the continuous development of the educational programme and by taking action when students report problems. Alembic also provides help through supporting services, such as maintaining an exam- and summary database and selling textbooks at low prices. There are also other (fun) activities organized by Alembic withand by members. Most of these activities have an educational value, such as excursions, lectures, symposia and study. Other activities are of a more relaxing nature, such as social drinks, festivities and galas: The ideal way of interacting with fellow students, reports of which can be found in the bimonthly “the Cat”. All Chemical Engineering students and employees of the University of Twente can become a member of Alembic for € 7.00 per year. If you are already a member of another study association membership is reduced to € 4.25 per year. If you have questions visit the Alembic-room (Horsttoren, floor 5, room 511). Opening hours are from 9.00 to 17.00. email: bestuur@alembic.utwente.nl Phone: 053-4892866 http://www.alembic.utwente.nl

8.10 Teaching assistants (studentassistentschap) Many activities at the faculty and the UT in general are taken care of by students. Also for small jobs concerning education and research, students are frequently needed. For instance, student assistance at practical courses or tutorials during a quarter or semester for half a day or more in the week is part of the daily routine at the UT. When interested, students can contact study association Alembic. Alternatively, it is possible to turn to lecturers of courses for which you have achieved high grades. Payments are centrally organised at the personnel department (PA&O) of the UT. The administrative system for payments registration is called UT-Flex. More about this can be found at the website of PA&O: http://www.utwente.nl/pao/info_over/utflex/ (in Dutch). The site refers to the web application of UT-flex, which also lists more general types of jobs available for students.

42


8. Organisation within the ChE Programme

Research Institutes and Groups

43


9. Research Institutes and Groups

9. RESEARCH INSTITUTES and GROUPS This chapter describes the research institutes and groups, their interests and major research themes. First the 3 research institutes that are related to the Chemical Engineering programme will be discussed. The next paragraph will discuss the individual research groups that cooperate intensively with the research institutes.

9.1 Institutes MIRA MIRA is the institute of the University of Twente where all research activities in the (bio) medical field are assembled. MIRA projects contribute to improving the quality of life of human beings, by restoring body performance whenever there is a need to, because of loss of function through diseases, accidents or age-related deterioration of human functioning. In the multidisciplinary research of MIRA eleven different groups of the University participate by combining their technical expertise with the know-how and day-to-day experiences of (bio-) medical practice. Depending on the problem, MIRA's research may focus on various issues from (early) diagnostics through medical intervention, cure, care and more rehabilitation related activities. Through a long history of biomedical research in the University of Twente, MIRA is recognised worldwide as a leading institute in this multidisciplinary field of science where engineering concepts and methods are employed to solve and understand medical and biological problems. http://www.utwente.nl/mira/ IMPACT IMPACT is a research institute that initiates and coordinates research on Energy and Resources through building multidisciplinary teams around ambitious projects and delivering state of the art technological solutions. In the Energy and Resources domain, the institute focuses on:  Sustainable energy generation;  Reduction of energy demand and consumption by optimization of products, processes and methods;  New materials based on renewable resources;  Reduction of environmental footprint of processes and products IMPACT stimulates the collaboration with national and international research foundations, R&D departments of advanced and innovative industries, technological institutes and users in academia and society. With 30 research departments facilitating 300 staff (amongst whom ca. 200 PhD‟s) the institute becomes a multidisciplinary community that fosters innovative, distinctive and efficient solutions, which are of high importance for industry and society. http://www.impact.utwente.nl/ Please note: as of the end of 2011, the IMPACT institute will no longer exist. The groups that are now affiliated with IMPACT will still be active but in a different structure. Contact details for the groups in this programme guide will remain the same. MESA+ MESA+ is one of the largest nanotechnology research institutes in the world, delivering competitive and successful high quality research. It uses a unique structure, which unites scientific disciplines, and builds fruitful international cooperation to excel in science and education. MESA+ has created a perfect environment for start-ups in the micro- and nano-industry to establish and to mature. MESA+, Institute for Nanotechnology, is part of the University of Twente, having intensive cooperation with various research groups within the University. The institute employs 475 people of whom 275 are PhD students or postdocs. With its NanoLab facilities the institute holds 1250 m2 of clean room space and state-of-the-art research equipment. MESA+ has an integral turnover of 45 million euro per year of which 60% is acquired in competition from external sources. The structure within MESA+ supports and facilitates the researchers and actively stimulates cooperation. MESA+ combines the disciplines of physics, electrical engineering, chemistry and mathematics. Internationally appealing research is achieved through this multidisciplinary approach. It is strengthening its international academic and industrial network by fruitful cooperation programs.

44


9. Research Institutes and Groups MESA+ has been the breeding place for more than 35 high-tech start-ups to date. A targeted program for cooperation with small and medium-sized enterprises is specially set up for start-ups. Start-ups and MESA+ work intensively together to promote transfer of knowledge. http://www.utwente.nl/mesaplus/

9.2 Research groups This paragraph sequentially discusses the Chemical Engineering research groups. For each group the related Master track and research institute are indicated: 1. Biomaterials Science and Technology (BST) MESA+

M&M

MIRA

2. Biomedical Chemistry (BMC)

M&M

MIRA

3. Biomolecular Nano Technology (BNT)

M&M

MESA+

M&M / PT

IMPACT MESA+

5. Inorganic Materials Science (IMS)

M&M

MESA+

6. Materials Science and Technology of Polymers (MTP)

M&M

MESA+

7. Membrane Technnology Group (MTG)

M&M / PT

MIRA

8. Molecular Nanofabrication (MnF)

M&M

MESA+

9. Photo-catalytic Fuel Synthesis (PCS)

PT

IMPACT

10. Soft matter, fluidics and interfaces (SFI)

M&M

MESA+

11. Thermo-Chemical Conversion of Biomass (TCCB)

PT

IMPACT

/

4. 4.1 Catalytic Processes and Materials group (CPM) 4.2 Mesoscale Chemical Systems (MCS)

45


9. Research Institutes and Groups

1

Biomaterials Science and Technology (BST) Internet site: Chair: Secretariat: e-mail: Phone: Room:

http://www.utwente.nl/tnw/bst/ prof. dr. Dirk W. Grijpma Karin G. Hendriks bst@tnw.utwente.nl +31 53 489 2968 Zuidhorst 246

The group conducts research on (resorbable) polymeric materials and structures for use in medical devices and in delivery of relevant biologically active compounds, (bio)artificial organs, cell-material interactions and tissue engineering. From our work on flexible resorbable materials, already one spinoff company has been created. Current research topics include:  Preparation of resorbable polymers for medical applications by ring opening polymerization and radical photo-polymerization  Composite resorbable materials for fracture reconstruction in maxillofacial surgery.  Development of designed advanced microstructures by stereolithography  Engineering musculoskeletal and cardiovascular tissues in bioreactors using designed anisotropic scaffold architectures prepared from biologically active materials  Membranes for artificial and (bio)artificial kidney devices and tissue eengineering scaffolds  Membranes for bioseparations and membrane chromatography. Bachelor- and Master research assignments can be performed within these areas. Depending on the background and interest of the student, multidisciplinary projects with other research groups within the MIRA and MESA+ institutes can be defined.

Scientific Staff Technical Staff

3 2

Computer designed tissue engineering scaffold built by stereolithography using a degradable polymeric resin (A). MicroCT analysis shows that the built structure precisely matches the design (B). SEM images show the layer-bylayer nature of the building process (C). The scaffolds show excellent cell adhesion and proliferation (D).

Post-docs PhD-students

5 8

Mixed matrix membranes (MMM) for selective adsorption and removal of toxins from blood. In this concept, adsorptive particles are incorporated into a highly porous membrane combining filtration and adsorption in one ste

46


9. Research Institutes and Groups

2

Biomedical Chemistry (BMC) Internet site: Chair: Secretariat e-mail: Phone: Room:

http://pbm.tnw.utwente.nl/ Prof. dr. J.F.J. Engbersen Karin Hendriks bmc@tnw.utwente.nl +31 53 489 2968 Zuidhorst 246

Short description of research activities: The research within the department of Biomedical Chemistry (including part of the former Polymer and Biomaterials group, PBM) is focused on the development of smart (=bioresponsive) multifunctionalized biodegradable materials for advanced drug and gene delivery (targeting therapeutics), and other biomedical applications like in tissue engineering, vaccination and wound dressing. The targeted delivery of pharmaceuticals to an intended site of action in the body is one of the most important issues for the next generation of therapeutics. Polymeric nanoparticles with surface-attached groups that specifically interact with certain receptors/cell types can function as carriers for targeted drug or gene delivery. In gene therapy, DNA or RNA is delivered to target cells in which it induces or suppresses the production of specific proteins that are intimately related with the disease. An ideal gene delivery system should be capable to act as a synthetic virus, displaying high specificity for the target cells, protecting the polynucleotide from undesired interactions and degradation, and enhancing cell binding and intracellular delivery into the cytoplasm and (for DNA) into the nucleus. In our research tailor-made biodegradable and non-toxic polymers with desirable functional groups and properties are developed for innovative nanoparticles for drug and gene delivery and materials for other biomedical applications in which bioresponsive properties are eminent. The structural and physicochemical properties of the developed polymeric materials are closely correlated to their biological properties and targeting capabilities. These investigations form the basis for the development of efficient systems for treatment of (genetic) diseases like cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, etc., and materials for e.g. chronic wound healing, vaccination and tissue regeneration. Possible BSC and MSC projects involve: 

Development of biodegradable polymeric nanocarriers for controlled delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

Functionalized poly(amido amine)s for targeted delivery of small interfering RNAs

Multilayered nanocapsules for drug delivery applications

PEGylated cationic carriers for cancer targeting gene therapy

Ultrathin functional multilayers for tissue engineering

Bioresponsive hydrogels for controlled delivery of growth factors for tissue regeneration

In situ forming hydrogels for controlled drug delivery and tissue engineering

47


9. Research Institutes and Groups

Example of a rationally designed multifunctional polymer, p(ABOL/2AMPBA), as is developed in the BMC group for targeting delivery of a therapeutic gene into the cells. The polymer in the upper left border is positively charged due to the presence of protonated nitrogen atoms in the chain (green) and forms self-assembled nanoparticles with (negatively charged) DNA or RNA. These nanoparticles have the right dimensions and surface charge to be taken up by the cells The butanol groups (blue) and the phenylboronic acid groups (pink) have additional functions. They can associate together to give the nanoparticle more stability. Moreover the butanol groups promote the delivery of the therapeutic gene inside the plasma of the cell. The boronic acid groups help in binding of therapeutic payload (particularly siRNA) and can bind sugar molecules as are present on the cells. Furthermore the polymer chain contains disulfide groups (yellow). These groups are stable outside the cells but once the polymeric nanoparticle is taken up by the cells, the disulfide bond is cleaved. This results in break down of the polymer and release of the therapeutic nucleotides inside the cells.

3

Biomolecular Nano Technology (BNT) Internet site: Chair: Secretariat e-mail: Phone: Room:

http://www.utwente.nl/tnw/bnt/ Prof.dr. J.J.L.M. Cornelissen Izabel Can-Katalanc / Nicole Haitjema bnt@tnw.utwente.nl +31 53 489 2980 Carre 4.223

The BNT group (founded early 2009) aims to study the fundamental and applied aspects of naostructures constructed from biomolecular building blocks. In these investigations principles from (macro) molecular and supramolecular chemistry are applied in combination with molecular biology approaches. In this emerging field we now employ the building blocks from protein cages to from nanometer-sized reactors on one hand and use their highly symmetric properties as scaffolds for functional materials on the other. Recent investigations furthermore include the formation of liquid crystalline systems inspired by natural materials. Techniques used in our laboratory range from synthetic chemistry and protein engineering to physical characterization using state-of-the-art facilities in the MESA+ constellation. Potential BSc or MSc projects can involve themes such as: - (macro)molecular synthesis - Protein isolation, derivatization and assembly - (bio)catalysis in nanometer confinement - fabrication and assembly of novel organic and inorganic nano-particles

Scientific Staff Technical Staff

3 3

Post-docs PhD-students

1 8 48


9. Research Institutes and Groups

4

Catalytic Systems and Micro Devices

Biofeedstocks

(Bio)catalytic micro devices & nanostructures

Bio oil Liquid phase processing

Selective oxidation

Excited & integrated microreactors

New concepts

Mass transfer

Liquid phase Tools L-S interface

Analytical separation

Micro process analytical technology

Mesoscale Chemical Systems

Catalytic Processes & Materials

The research area of the Catalytic Processes and Micro Devices program focuses on high precision sustainable chemical conversion. High precision, i.e. high conversion and selectivity, is achieved via catalytic as well as alternative sustainable activation methods, e.g. using a plasma generated by electrical fields in a microreactor. An important approach is to control reaction conditions, i.e. concentrations of reactants / products, temperature, pressure, but also concentrations of intermediate (surface-) species, very precisely, and where possible, in a feed-back mode. This requires analytical techniques and special (micro) devices to perform in-situ sensing and monitoring of reaction progress and product quality. The program contains two research chairs, Catalytic Processes and Materials, and Mesoscale Chemical Systems. The interaction between CPM and MCS is shown in the graph below:

Integrated spectroscopy

49


9. Research Institutes and Groups

Group picture Catalytic Systems and Micro Devices

4.1

Catalytic Processes and Materials (CPM) Internet site: Chair: Secretariat e-mail: Phone: Room:

http://cpm.tnw.utwente.nl/ Prof. dr. ir. L. Lefferts Sabine Hartmann cpm@utwente.nl +31 53 489 3033 Meander 358

CPM applies fundamental knowledge on molecular diffusion and reactions in/on heterogeneous catalysts for exploration of new catalytic materials, catalytic devices and processes of relevance for industry and society. The drive towards processes is reflected in CPMâ€&#x;s connection to process technology, while preparation and design of micro and nano-structured catalytic materials and devices, e.g. carbon-nano-fiber supports and microreactors, is reflected in the participation in MESA+. Selective oxidation is a typical example of the need for high-precision catalysis, because usually oxidations have low yields caused by consecutive conversion to undesired side-products. CPM focuses on unconventional methods to achieve selectivity. An example is partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas over yttrium-stabilized zirconia at high temperature, which proceeds via a surfaceredox mechanism in which reduction and oxidation of the catalyst is confined to the surface layer of the oxide. Detailed insight in the properties of the zirconia surface is now used for industrially relevant processes like dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene, using CO2 as a soft oxidant. Soft oxidants like CO2 and H2O are studied in a number of projects, and in future also in the liquid phase. Very promising is the oxidative cracking of alkanes to olefins over Li-MgO catalysts. Here, a surfaceinitiated radical chain mechanism is active in the gas phase. The initial activation of C-H bonds occurs + at the O-radical ions present in Li O ion-pairs. Catalyst activity was improved by creating a larger surface area via sol-gel procedures. Micro-plasma reactors were developed, allowing for the first time to monitor radical reactions on the catalyst surface. Concentration management in liquid phase heterogeneous catalysis is motivated by the idea that mass transfer in liquids is slow, which affects reaction rates and selectivity. Innovative highly-porous micro-structured supports, based on carbon-nano-fibers (CNF) attached to monoliths, metal foams (see figure) and microchannels are a solution to this problem. Analysis tools like Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) IR were developed to study the interaction of reactants, intermediates and products with catalyst surfaces in liquids (see figure). A key step in this research was the development of stable thin catalyst layers on the ATR crystals. In addition, a transient reactor for pulse and step-change experiments in liquid phase was developed, allowing detection of multiple components during operation.

50


9. Research Institutes and Groups

a

100 m m

NH4+(aq) NO2-(aq)

NOx-

NH2OH(aq)

NOx-

Pt / Pd

NH4+ O

HNO NO

NH2 NH 2

Pt

Pd

NH4+ O

NH4+ O

NH4+ O

Pt / Pd

Al2O3

ZnSe IRE Infrared light out

Infrared light in

SEM micrograph of CNFs-Ni foam

A new topic is catalysis for sustainable processes for fuels and chemicals from renewable feedstocks. This involves catalytic routes to syngas or H2, or direct conversion of solid biomass to liquid fuel precursors via so called Catalytic Flash Pyrolysis. It was found that on Pt acetic acid, a key constituent in flash-pyrolysis oil, decomposes to H2, CO, CO2 and a carbonaceous residue which deactivates the Pt surface. This residue can be gasified with water to form additional H 2 and CO2 and re-activate the Pt. In the conversion of biomass to a liquid bio-oil, the main challenges for applications relate to the energy density of the bio-oil, its acidity and its stability. Use of a catalyst during pyrolysis overcomes these problems. This is a rather new area of significant societal relevance and CPM has been in the forefront of developments. Scientific Staff Technical Staff

4.2

3.5 5

Post-docs PhD-students

4 14

Mesoscale Chemical Systems group (MCS) Internet site: Chair: Secretariat e-mail: Phone: Room:

http://www.utwente.nl/tnw/mcs Prof. dr. J.G.E. Gardeniers Jacqueline Emmerich mcs@tnw.utwente.nl +31 53 489 2099 Meander 152

Chemistry in confinement In physics and chemistry the mesoscopic scale is the length scale at which one can reasonably discuss material properties or phenomena without having to discuss individual atom behaviour. Applied research at this scale is covered by the fields of microreaction technology, microfluidics and nanotechnology. The research approach of MCS, a member of the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, is to exploit downscaling to enhance conversion and selectivity of chemical reactions and product purification, and to improve chemical analysis on very small sample volumes. MCS develops micro devices with volumes of 1 nanoliter to 1 milliliter of a liquid solution or a gas, or of liquid-liquid and liquid-gas combinations.

Left: Typical microreactor chip with parallel reaction loops; right: micro-plasma reactor for the study of radical interactions with catalytic surfaces (in collaboration with CPM) 51


9. Research Institutes and Groups

An important research goal is to exploit alternative activation mechanisms for chemical process control and process intensification. This deals with the study of microfluidic systems with inner dimensions in the range 5 to 500 Îźm, containing materials fabricated by nanotechnology (e.g. nanofibers) and integrated features by which controlled stimuli (electrical fields, ultrasound) can be applied in order to activate and control chemical reactions. Applications of this research can be found in miniaturized reaction screening of catalysts and process conditions to create more efficient and more selective, and therewith more sustainable and "greener" process routes for production, and in the development and understanding of new concepts for chemical process intensification and distributed small-scale chemical production. In the analytical chemistry field research is performed on small-scale chromatography methods and integrated spectroscopic techniques. Liquid chromatography "on a chip" has clear advantages over conventional LC, because the extreme ordering and symmetry that can be obtained in an artificial column packing leads to very fast and efficient separations. Even higher performance is obtained when structures of sub-micron dimensions are used, e.g. using "nanoimprinting" methods. But separations at this small scale require special (integrated) injection and detection concepts, e.g. verylow-dead-volume interfaces with mass spectrometry. Related to this is the development of microfluidic NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance), where at the moment we are able to achieve the same sensitivity and spectral resolution as in state-of-the-art conventional high-resolution NMR, but for a 1000 times smaller sample volume, i.e. in 600 nanoliter. This is very relevant for medical and biological studies where only tiny amounts of body fluids are available, but also for pharmaceutical industry in the early stages of drug development, or in organic chemistry to study reaction mechanisms and kinetics. Scientific Staff Technical Staff

5

2 1

Post-docs PhD-students

5 10

Inorganic Materials Science (IMS) Internet site: Chair: Secretariat e-mail: Phone: Room:

http://www.utwente.nl/tnw/ims/ Prof. dr. ing. A.J.H.M. Rijnders / prof. dr. ing. D.H.A. Blank Marion Bollaan ims@tnw.utwente.nl +31 53 489 2860 CarrĂŠ 3241

The research in the group is focused on establishing a fundamental understanding of the relationship between composition, structure and solid-state physical and chemical properties of inorganic materials, especially oxides. Insights into these relationships enable us to design new materials with improved and yet unknown properties that are of interest for fundamental studies as well as for industrial applications. With the possibility to design and construct artificial materials on demand, new opportunities become available for novel device concepts. The research of the group is strongly + embedded in the research orientation on nano-materials and fabrication of MESA , and cooperates + with several research groups in MESA . Growth of advanced functional materials by chemical and physical techniques are a core expertise of the group. Oxide nanoparticles, functional nanowires and 2-dimensional nanosheets are made by chemical and electrochemical synthesis routes, and deposited into thin films and micro/nanopatterns using soft lithographic approaches. Thin film growth studies by pulsed laser deposition are a major activity within the group. Especially complex materials, in particular oxides, are being investigated. These belong to different functional material; classes, like ferroelectrics, ferromagnetics and multiferroics, piezoâ€&#x;s, high-K dielectrics, transparent conducting oxides, porous oxides non-linear optical materials, ion conductors, and superconducting and related materials. Research field is in particular focussed on materials with modified properties by doping or by artificial layered structures and superstructures. The IMS group works at the international forefront of materials science research on complex metal oxides and hybrids, and provides an environment where young researchers and students are stimulated to excel in this field.

52


9. Research Institutes and Groups Applications are found in, e.g., nano-electronics and spintronics, optical systems, fuel and solar cells, fluidics, bio-nano sensors. Scientific Staff Technical Staff

5 4

Post-docs PhD-students

6 18

Above: Micropatterned ZnO nanowires on silicon. Zinc oxide nanowires are grown selectively on a square array of micropatterned hydrophilic areas on an otherwise hydrophobic substrate.

6

Materials Science and Technology of Polymers (MTP) Internet site: Chair: Secretariat e-mail: Phone: Room:

http://mtp.tnw.utwente.nl/ prof. dr. G.J. Vancso Geneviève Rietveld mtp@tnw.utwente.nl +31 53 489 2974 Carré 4241

The (MTP) group studies a range of topics, which revolve around macromolecular nanotechnology and materials chemistry of nanostructured (macro)molecular materials. MTP‟s mission is to discover and establish new approaches, devise and construct tools, and synthesize materials platforms that enable studies of macromolecular structure, behavior and function from the nanometer length scale, bottom up, ultimately in a direct one-to-one control of the molecular objects. This knowledge is utilized to obtain advanced functional macromolecular materials and devices with enhanced or novel properties and functions in targeted applications. MTP‟s current research is dominated by “upstream” generic projects from the nanometer range, across the length scales, aiming at controlled macromolecular synthesis, in combination with nanoscale manipulation and fabrication of complex polymeric architectures (bottom up and top down), their utilization in stimulus responsive architectures, and in devices such as molecular motors, sensors, and actuators. Nanostructured polymers and thin polymer films obtained by MTP are also used in biomedical engineering. Our work brings techniques like Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and single molecule photonics to understand, fabricate, characterize and study functional polymer platforms and supramolecular polymeric materials. Structure-property (morphology) studies of high-value added, nanostructured polymeric materials complement our work encompassing some direct application-oriented projects, which aim at nanocomposites, polymer surfaces and interfaces, coatings, and (molecular) adhesives and nanostructured foams (spin-off Aerotech BV). This “downstream” research component helps us to keep in touch with industries, it has significant relevance for valorization of the results of our generic 53


9. Research Institutes and Groups research projects, it is crucial for educating future engineers, and it helps our students and graduates to find industrial employment upon graduation. Spin-offs, patents and direct industrial contacts facilitate utilization. Specific tools and techniques, which are necessary to perform our work, are also under development in the group with a strong focus on scanning probe techniques such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), in combination with optical near field techniques, and single optical emitters. In recent years we further strengthened our activities in macromolecular bio-nanotechnology, including research on sensing platforms, surface engineering for controlled cell and protein adsorption (antibiofouling), vesicles, polymer-cell interactions, and polymersomes (as nanoreactors). The MTP group is embedded in the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology and enjoys collaborations with numerous leading international groups and institutes.

Scientific Staff Technical Staff

7

3 1

Post-docs PhD-students

1 7

Membrane Technology Group (MTG) Internet site: Chair: Secretariat e-mail: Phone: Room:

http://www.utwente.nl/tnw/mtg Dr. Kitty Nijmeijer Greet Kamminga mst@tnw.utwente.nl +31 53 489 2950 Meander 326

The Membrane Technology Group (MTG) focuses on the multi-disciplinary topic of membrane science and technology for the separation of molecular mixtures. We aim at designing membrane morphology and structure on a molecular level to control mass transport phenomena in macroscopic applications. We consider our expertise as a multidisciplinary knowledge chain ranging from molecule to process. We distinguish three application clusters, i.e. Energy, Water and Life Sciences.

Energy The research on Energy is dedicated to the molecular design and synthesis of polymer membranes for energy applications. Examples are CO2 capture, olefin/paraffin separation, biorefinery applications, 54


9. Research Institutes and Groups fuel cells and the generation of electricity from the mixing of sea and river water (Salinity Gradient Energy or „Blue Energyâ€&#x;). Relevant materials science oriented aspects are control of structureproperties relationships, separation of multi-component mixtures (binary, ternary systems, effect of impurities), interaction of the feed components with the membrane (e.g. plasticization) and performance evaluation. Important process technological research aspects are e.g. improvement of hydrodynamics, membrane and spacer design, separation of complex mixtures, concentration polarization and fouling.

Water Within the application area Water, research addresses the development of membranes and the application of membrane technology for water treatment. In particular it investigates the relation between membrane properties, hydrodynamic conditions and fouling behavior. Research topics include mPIV, microfluidic filtration, fouling control, membrane bioreactors and biofouling. Life Sciences Within the application cluster Life Sciences, we focus on the design of porous systems to separate complex multicomponent mixtures in pharmaceutical, food, beverage and diagnostics applications. Important subjects are tuning the material properties and structure (e.g. pore morphology and porosity), the development of functional materials (e.g. affinity separations of biomolecules) and the creation of new and/or improved processes (e.g. faster processes, higher yields, less fouling, etc.). Other aspects related to process design and industrial implementation, such as scale-up of novel membrane fabrication methods are investigated.

Scientific Staff Technical Staff

8

6 3

Post-docs PhD-students

2 13

Molecular Nanofabrication (MnF) Internet site: Chair: Secretariat e-mail: Phone: Room:

http://www.utwente.nl/tnw/mnf/ Prof.dr.ir. J. Huskens Izabel Can-Katalanc / Nicole Haitjema mnf@tnw.utwente.nl +31 53 489 2980 Carre 4.223

The research in the MnF group is focused at fundamental and applied studies of assemblies and patterning. The group investigates the possibilities to build molecularly defined, organic and hybrid assemblies in two or three dimensions via non-covalent interactions between the constituents. Key aspects are: multivalency, materials assembly, protein assembly, surface patterning, chemistry in microfluidic channels, macrocyclic ligands for heavy metal ions, and combinations thereof. Applications lie in areas such as: sensing, materials, (nano)electronics, biomolecule arrays and assays, and tissue engineering. Potential BSc or MSc projects can involve themes such as: - host-guest recognition at interfaces - protein assembly at interfaces - patterning of self-assembled monolayers - chemical improvements of soft and imprint lithography - chemistry in microfluidic systems - ligand synthesis and testing for heavy metal ion complexation

55


9. Research Institutes and Groups Scientific Staff Technical Staff

9

5 3

Post-docs PhD-students

Photo-catalytic Fuel Synthesis Internet site: Chair: Secretariat e-mail: Phone: Room:

6 14

(PCS)

http://www.utwente.nl/tnw/pcs Prof. Dr. G. Mul Vacancy pcs@tnw.utwente.nl +31 53 489 3890 Meander 226/229

The research program of the group focuses on the development of energy efficient light induced catalytic processes. Disciplines include i) material science to synthesize (nano)-structured inorganic materials, ii) in situ infrared and Raman spectroscopy, and iii) photoreaction engineering. Analysis of the surface composition and surface chemistry during photocatalytic reactions by the mentioned spectroscopies is the core activity of the photocatalytic synthesis group. Information thus acquired provides design rules for optimization of the surface structure and composition of the catalysts, as well as the process conditions required for reactor design. The latter is also and integral part of the research activities, focusing on optimization of the illumination of catalytic sites and transient operation. Research projects - Solar Fuels This project evaluates photocatalytic performance of various oxides supported in silica scaffolds in converting CO2 and H2O to hydrogen and hydrocarbons, making use of a setup containing multiple top illuminated batch reactors and automated micro-GC sampling. Aspects of the research include catalyst synthesis and characterization, mechanistic studies using in situ infrared spectroscopy, and optimization of process variables.

56


9. Research Institutes and Groups - Process intensification by using structured reactors and optical fibers One of the challenges in making photocatalysis attractive, is improving light and mass transfer. Engineering of the introduction of light in a monolith reactor (see picture) by the use of optical fibers, or using transparent monolith modules, is a possible improvement. While film flow operation has been evaluated, Taylor (bubble) flow, with even better mass transfer characteristics, is the next step to be investigated. A fully operative system is available to conduct the work.

Picture of a monolith (left) and the optical fiber bundle entering the reactor (right) - Process intensification by nano-illumination This a proof of concept project investigating local luminescence for the activation of catalyst sites in intensified milli-photoreactors. Initial experimentation will consider the synthesis of several nanoilluminescent structures including zinc oxide nanorods and GaN nanoparticles in close proximity to the photo catalyst TiO2. These structures will be implemented in a millireactor. Benefits of nanoillumination will be demonstrated by comparing catalyst performance stimulated by external illumination, with generation of local luminescence in the milli-reactor.

(A) Conventional external photocatalytic illumination, (B) proposed nanoscale illumination concept - In situ spectroscopy of nano-alloy promoted photocatalysts The project aims to evaluate the promoting effect of well defined nanoalloy particles on the activity of photocatalysts. Bimetallic nanoalloy-particles will be synthesized through liquid phase and gas phase methodologies, varying composition and particle sizes. The activity of will be characterized by (time resolved) ATR Infrared spectroscopy, allowing the analysis of reactant adsorption / product desorption, and formation of surface adsorbed products upon illumination with narrow band LED light of specific wavelength. Furthermore transient spectroscopic experiments provide for discrimination between light induced and thermal reaction steps. We target synthetic application of photocatalysis, i.e. oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions.

Home made ATR cells. Left: LED illuminated flow cell (ATR crystal needed for recording spectra in liquid phase reactions), Right: channel structure allowing liquid transients.

57


9. Research Institutes and Groups Staff

10

Scientific staff

2

Post Docs

1

Technical staff

1

PhD-students

3

Soft matter, Fluidics and Interfaces (SFI) Internet site: Chair: Secretariat e-mail: Phone: Room:

http://www.utwente.nl/tnw/sfi prof. dr. ir. R.G.H. Lammertink Greet Kamminga m.i.kamminga@utwente.nl +31 53 489 2950 Meander 326

The chair of Soft matter, Fluidics and Interfaces is addressing interfacial phenomena that are relevant for (micro)fluidic processes. Such phenomena include multiphase flow, phase contacting, interface geometry, wetting, and separations, mostly related to mass/heat transport control. Careful interfacial design and fabrication will allow manipulating (multiphase) flow on a (sub)micrometer level. Fabrication of well-defined structures is foreseen as a crucial aspect, in order to study the fundamentals of interfacial phenomena. Here, computational tools will assist in proof-of-concept analysis and in specific structure design.

Current research topics include: Structured membranes production The aim of this study is to design a continuous process to prepare flat and tubular membranes by phase separation microfabrication technique. In the design of the process, the process equipment and parameters will be investigated. Furthermore, the influence of micron structure on the transport properties is studied.

Electrowetting on superhydrophobic surfaces (Joint project with PCF) The general goal of this project is to explore the benefits of combining porous materials and surfaces with switchable wettability (achieved by electrowetting) in compound microfluidic systems.

58


9. Research Institutes and Groups Fluid dynamics in membrane microreactors Within this research we aim to explore new concepts for gas-liquid reactions inside microreactors using fluid dynamic simulations to aid in the design. The study of catalytic systems that are of interest for the porous microreactors will also be analyzed.

Porous ceramic membrane microreactors The goal of this research is to fabricate porous ceramic microreactors via simple replication processes. The new multiphase contacting in these microreactors is studied for relevant (photo)catalytic gas-liquid systems.

Meander reactor This project aims to demonstrate the idea of achieving high reaction selectivity by combining repetitive mixing, conversion and separation functionalities inside the micro-reactor. Such an approach requires carefull integration of contacting, mixing, reaction, and separation within a microfluidic format.

A

B

11

B

Microreactors with work-up functionality (joint project with MCS) The aim of this project is to investigate on-chip integration of a liquidliquid extraction step in-line with a chemical reaction. The approach will be to generate a well-defined emulsion in order to enhance mass transfer of reactants and/or products between two immiscible liquid phases. These liquid phases need to be separated further downstream.

Thermo-Chemical Conversion of Biomass (TCCB) Internet site: Chair: Secretariat e-mail: Phone: Room:

http://tccb.tnw.utwente.nl/ Prof.dr. S.R.A. Kersten Yvonne Bruggert – ter Huurne tccb@tnw.utwente.nl (+31 53 489- ) 2879 Meander 217

59


9. Research Institutes and Groups The research is mainly focused on new conversion processes for lignocellulosic biomass (2 generation biomass) into energy and fuels. This includes primary conversion technologies (dry- and wet gasification and liquefaction) as well as the processing/upgrading of these primary products (biomassgas or biomass-oil) into commercial end products, for which one can think of electricity, transportation (bio-)fuels, hydrogen (for fuel cells), methane (SNG), methanol, and other chemicals. CO2 capture and storage is a second focus area of the research group. In this field we are working on the fundamentals of new CO 2 absorption systems (e.g. for flue gas applications) as well as on temporary CO2 storage. Where possible, we will work on the integrating aspects of CO2 capture and re-use in relation to biomass conversion (like in algae production processes).

nd

rd

and 3

Examples of projects are: (a) fast pyrolysis to produce bio-oil from dry biomass, b) catalytic reforming of pyrolysis oil towards hydrogen and syngas, (c) hydrogen production via the steam-iron process with pyrolysis oil as reducing agent, (d) supercritical gasification of wet biomass streams, (e) production of biodiesel by deoxygenation and cracking of biomass, (f) New CO2 capture processes (g) Sustainable Energy production using algae (closed nutrient loops and CO 2 management).

Scientific Staff Technical Staff

6 4

Post-docs PhD-students

5 10

60


10. Entry Requirements – Admission & Enrolment

Entry Requirements – Admission and Enrolment 61


10. Entry Requirements – Admission & Enrolment

10. ENTRY REQUIREMENTS – ADMISSION & ENROLMENT 10.1 General ChE-Admission The ChE Master‟s programme is programme that follows the Dutch Bachelor‟s programme “Scheikundige Technologie” (ST). Students with the following background are, without further notice, admitted to the programme: - ST Bachelor‟s degree of the University of Twente, Eindhoven or Delft; - A degree appointed by the Executive Board (CvB), whether or not distributed in the Netherlands, that is equal to the ST Bachelor‟s degree. - A degree from the Bachelor education of Chemical Engineering of Dutch Universities of Applied Sciences (hogescholen), supplemented by a pre-master programme and homologation courses appointed by the programme director. - A degree of another educational institute, appointed by the programme director as being an adequate preparation programme, possibly with additional demands, that have to be fulfilled prior to starting the programme, or other demands that have to be fulfilled during the Master programme. - A statement of the programme director, stating that adequate education is proven in a different manner. - Non-Dutch speaking students have to demonstrate that they have mastered the English language, orally and in writing.

10.2 Flexible ChE-Admission of Bachelor students The programme director can, if the possibility exists, decide that a student, who is registered in the „Scheikundige Technologie‟ Bachelor programme at the University Twente, be allowed to follow courses in the Master‟s programme, prior to finishing the Bachelor programme. This is only possible if the student meets certain demands: The student has completed the first year successfully and has completed at least 90 EC after the first year. A student following courses in the programme under these regulations does not have the rights to start the internship or Master‟s assignment.

10.3 Enrolment for the Master programme Formal registration for a Master‟s programme at the University of Twente must be submitted to CSA. S&OA will inform CSA on whether enrolling students meet the requirements for the specific Master‟s programme, which is based on the decisions of the programme director. On application for the Bachelor‟s exam, S&OA-TNW asks Bachelor‟s students with which Master‟s programme the student wishes to continue. S&OA communicates this to CSA. For every year at the university, students have to renew their enrolment. In due time before the start of the new academic year, CSA will contact you by email or regular mail. Enrolments are based on the provisions of the Higher Education and Research Act (WHW) and must be completed before the first of September. Only after a student meets all obligations for enrolment, including payment of tuition fees, enrolment will be completed. On the enrolment forms of the UT, students can indicate whether they want to enrol for a second study. This is only useful when a degree or exam of this second study programme is desired. Extra courses at other programmes can be taken by any Master‟s student. In that case, the study results will be registered to the student‟s “first” study programme. CSA will communicate enrolments with IBG (only of interest for Dutch students). Note that the pre-Master‟s programmes concern a different programme for which a separate enrolment is required! More information for admission and enrolment can be found at the following website: http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentservices/en/enrolment/

10.4 Tuition fees An overview of the tuition fees of Twente University can be found here: http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentservices/en/money_matters/tuition_fee/ Other financial regulations account for enrolment for second study programmes: consult CSA or DUO. See also: http://www.graduate.utwente.nl/finance/ for possible exemptions, scholarships, refunds and conditions for payment.

62


11. Structure of the Master’s Programme

Structure of the Masterâ€&#x;s Programme

63


11. Structure of the Master’s Programme

11. STRUCTURE OF THE MASTER’S PROGRAMME 11.1 Master tracks The Master’s programme Chemical Engineering (ChE) takes two years (120 EC) of normal study. The programme ChE comprises three main Master’s tracks in which students can specialize.  Molecules & Materials (M&M, successor of CTM)  Process Technology (PT)

11.1.1 Molecules and Materials (M&M) In this track the focus is on design, preparation, processing, application and analysis of novel materials with high tech properties. This includes materials chemistry of polymers with defined molecular and mesoscopic structures, inorganic and organic metallic polymers and the engineering and analysis of polymer surfaces and interfaces. Biocompatible and biodegradable polymers are investigated in tissue engineering as scaffolds for blood vessels and bone, and polymeric nanoparticles with surfaceattached functionalities are studied as carriers for targeted drug or gene delivery. Also environmentally safe biodegradable polymers and engineering polymers with excellent properties up to high temperatures are investigated. In the area of inorganic materials topics are studied like metal/ceramic composites with special electrical properties, thin film technology and controlled preparation of (nano-sized) particles for porous membranes for liquid filtration, gas separation and catalysis. (Bio)molecular technology is developed in the controlled preparation of large, molecularly defined, organic assemblies (2D and 3D, for instance DNA and proteins) via reversible interactions between the constituents with the aim to study such nanoparticles at the individual level, to manipulate their shape and functions, and to communicate with such assemblies. Track coordinator: Rob Lammertink Email: r.g.h.lammertink@utwente.nl Phone: 053 489 2063 Room: Meander 314

11.1.2 Process Technology (PT) In this track the focus is on the design of processes that function optimally in their technological, economical, environmental and social aspects. This requires integration of transport phenomena, chemical reactor design, separation technology, plant design, process development, process control and economic and social sciences. Several research themes are studied, like multiphase and other novel reactors, reactive separation processes and development and design of specific processes that find direct applications in the chemical or process industry. In the separation technology, various processes that use solid or liquid separating agents are studied including membrane technology, adsorptive separations of gas and liquid mixtures, extraction, absorption technology, and separation processes based on ion exchange materials. Novel membranes are developed for selective gas separation, affinity separation for selective protein recovery, and facilitated oxygen transport. Other research themes include study of (photo) catalytic processes and catalytic materials, biomass conversion processes, optimization and modelling of processes. Track coordinator: Louis van der Ham Email: a.g.j.vanderham@utwente.nl Phone: 053 489 5430 Room: Meander 218

64


11. Structure of the Master’s Programme

11.2 Master’s curriculum The total Master programme consists out of at least 120 EC. The Master tracks Process Technology and Molecules & Materials have a general setup. See figure below.

5 Compulsory Courses (25 EC)

4 Compulsory Courses (20 EC)

Compulsory Project (10 EC)

Compulsory Project (10 EC)

Elective Courses (20 EC)

Elective Courses (25 EC)

Internship (20 EC)

Internship (20 EC)

Master Assignment (45 EC)

Master Assignment (45 EC)

Track: Molecules & Materials Track: Molecules & Materials

Track: Process Technology

11.2.1 Molecules & Materials (M&M, successor of CTM) As shown in the figure above, the track is divided in different blocks. For this track each block consists of the following courses: Compulsory courses:  AMM – Characterization (193700010) 5 EC  AMM – Molecular and biomolecular chemistry and technology (193700020) 5 EC  AMM – Organic materials science (193700030) 5 EC  AMM – Inorganic materials science (193700040) 5 EC  AMM – Applications (193700060) 5 EC Compulsory project:  AMM Project Organic Materials (193700050) 5 EC  AMM Project Inorganic Materials & Molecular S&T (193700070) 5 EC Elective courses:  15 EC selected in close consult between chairman of the Master assignment committee and the student.  Additional courses to make a master program of 120 EC total. Maximum of 5 EC nontechnical courses are allowed to facilitate the international study tour. For more information about the courses see paragraph 11.6 and chapter 14.

11.2.2 Process Technology (PT) Compulsory courses:  Chemical reaction engineering *  Thermodynamics & flow sheeting  Multiphase reaction technology *  Process equipment design Compulsory project:  Process plant design

(193715020) (193735010) (193720020) (193750030)

5 EC 5 EC 5 EC 5 EC

(193790010)

10 EC 65


11. Structure of the Master’s Programme Elective courses:  15 EC selected in close consult between chairman of the Master assignment committee and the student.  Additional courses to make a master program of 120 EC total. Maximum of 5 EC nontechnical courses are allowed to facilitate the international study tour. *

“Process equipment design” & “Thermodynamics & flow sheeting” are compulsory prior knowledge for “Process Plant Design”

Programme for HBO students Before HBO students with a certificate in ”Chemie” or “Chemische Technologie” can participate in the Master of Chemical Engineering, they have to do a pre-master. The pre-master is a course of 25 European Credits (EC) and is formally done as a Bachelor student. When this pre-Master is finished successfully, you can start with your Master. For the Master tracks M&M and PT are different compulsory courses before you can start the track. See the list below. Besides the pre-Master, there is another exception made for the HBO student. This deals with the internship. Because HBO student did already an internship they are not allowed to do another one. Instead of this they have to do a homologation programme of 20 EC. The elective courses for this programme are also listed below. Courses Code

Name

19151200 19151202

1

Calculus A

1

Quarter

EC

1

4

Pre-M

Pre-M

1

3

Pre-M

Pre-M

Lineaire Algebra A

1

1

3

Pre-M

Pre-M

19151208

Lineaire Algebra B

1

2

2

Pre-M

Pre-M

19135537

Voortgezette Materiaalkunde

2

5

Pre-M

19135001

Evenwichten II

2

3

Pre-M

19135539

Chemie en Technologie van Organische Materialen

3

5

Pre-M

19133531

Chemie en technologie van Anorganische Materialen

3

5

Homol.

19130008

Inleiding Materialen

19137009

inleiding fysische transport verschijnselen

19137020

Fysische transportverschijnselen excl. practicum

19131513 19134015

19151206

Calculus B

HBO M&M PT

Pre-M 2

4

Pre-M

3+4

4

Pre-M

Sustainable Process Technology

3

5

Homol.

Evenwichten

1

5

Homol.

Homol.

4

5

Homol.

Homol.

2

Homol.

Homol.

Homol.

2

201100114

Katalyse en Reactiekinetiek

19139950

academisch informatie verwerven

19134020

Fysica van Atomen en Moleculen

1

4

19138506

Scheidingsmethoden excl. practicum

1

3.5

1

2

Homol.

Instead of these four courses an alternative programme is possible. This exists of Calculus I (191521000, K1), Lineaire Algebra (1521200, K2) and Calculus II (1521100,K3) of 4 EC each. For all courses the Maple practical work is excluded. An alternative is course is Interfaces and Catalysis (193902810, K2, 5 EC)

11.3 Procedure of composition of course To compose a suitable Master‟s curriculum by choosing a set of courses, the following topics are important: 66


11. Structure of the Master’s Programme -

-

What do you want? This will result in the specialisation of the Master‟s programme: track and research group. This choice does not have to be made before you start the programme, but helps you to create a planning. How do you want to plan your programme? The study programme concludes with a Master‟s assignment. So, the internship in the Master‟s programme is important when planning a programme, because this is hard to shift. The checklist on the next page represents the formalities regarding planning of the curriculum:

Checklist planning Master curriculum Quarter Planning Bachelor phase  Orientation Master tracks  Master information meeting Before start programme  Master track choice  Research group choice (advised)  Planning of courses st 1 quarter  Orientation on internships nd 2 quarter  Selection and planning of internship th 4 quarter  Orientation Master‟s assignment At least 1 month before  Selection and planning Master start Master‟s assignment assignment At least 1 month before  Planning date for Master graduation assignment colloquium th 8 quarter  Graduation

Relevant information

Paragraph 11.2 Chapter 9

Chapter 13 Chapter 13 Appendix 6 Appendix 6

If you have made your final choice on for your Master track contact the track coordinator.  M&M-track Rob Lammertink Email: r.g.h.lammertink@utwente.nl Phone: 053 489 2063  PT-track Louis van der Ham Email: a.g.j.vanderham@utwente.nl Phone: 053 489 5430 Once you have chosen a research group for your Master‟s assignment contact the research group as soon as possible to discuss which courses are relevant in order to start your Master‟s assignment.

11.4 Two grades for the Master’s assignment The Master‟s assignment will be separated into two parts. Objectives can be set in the following manner. 1. Execution of ChE research During the Master‟s assignment students learn how to work independently on a rather complex and extensive research project, which meets scientific criteria. This research can be split into multiple stages:  Problem analysis: understanding a certain research field, recognizing problems and formulating research questions and approaches  Execution: the theoretical and experimental approach and execution  Result analysis: analyzing the results and their relevance 2. Written report of research 3. Oral presentation of research 4. General aspects of the assignment The assignment has to be carried out with a large degree of independence. The student is primarily responsible for progress, planning and discussion with supervising lecturers. The first grade will be given on the execution of the research (1), the second grade will be based on the other three objectives (2-4).  Execution of research (25 EC)  Report, presentation, and general aspects (20 EC)

67


11. Structure of the Master’s Programme

11.5 “5”-regulation The Board of Examiners of ChE has decided that students who start their Chemical Engineering Masters after September 2007 have to pass all courses with a 6 or higher. This means one 5 is not allowed anymore.

11.6 Courses The courses are listed below per Master track and research group. Some elective courses can also be selected from other tracks. For more information see „Master‟s Curriculum‟ paragraph, always check the course information in Osiris for the most up to date and correct information.

C X ? n.s.

Legend compulsory track elective not scheduled not known not scheduled EC‟s

Lecturer

Quarter

193760000

C.S. Supra-molecular Chemistry and Techn.

Verboom (SMCT)

X

5

n.s.

193760030

Molecule spectrometry

Velders

X

5

4

193775000

C.S. Molecular Nanofabrication

Huskens e.o. (MnF)

X

5

4

193700020

AMM – Molecular and biomolecular chemistry and technology

Huskens (coord.)

C

5

1

193775020

Physical organic chemistry

Jonkheijm

X

5

4

193700080

C.S. Biomolecular NanoTechnology

Cornelissen (BNT)

X

5

n.s.

193770000

C.S. Inorganic Materials Science

Blank e.o. (IMS)

X

5

n.s.

193700040

AMM – Inorganic materials science

Rijnders (coord.)

C

5

3

193770030

Lab Course Advanced Materials

Ten Elshof

X

5

n.s.

193700070

AMM Project Molecular S&T

Koster (coord.)

C

5

4

Ten Elshof

X

5

1

Blank / Koster

X

5

3

193770090 191335310

Materials

Chemistry of Inorganic Materials Nanostructures Introduction to inorganic materials / Homologation - Inorganic materials

& and

PT

M&M-groups

Inorganic

M&M

Course code

193770060

Corrosion and corrosion resistance

Boukamp

X

5

3

193770070

Imperfections

Koster

X

5

1

193730070

C.S. MTP: Macromolecular Nanotechnology

Vancso e.o. (MTP)

X

5

4

193700010

AMM – Characterization

Schön (coord.)

C

5

1

193700030

AMM – Organic materials science

Vancso (coord.)

C

5

2

Chemistry & technology of organic mat. II / Homologation - Organic materials

Vancso, Feijen, Engbersen

X

5

?

193730040

Polymers & material science pract.

Hempenius

X

5

1

193700050

AMM Project Organic Materials

Hempenius (coord.)

C

5

3

193730060

Polymer Physics

Vancso

X

5

n.s.

193740000

C.S. Polymer Chemistry and Biomaterials

Engbersen e.o.. (PBM)

X

5

4

193740020

Biomedical Materials Engineering I

Dijkstra (coord.)

X

5

1

193740030

Biomedical Materials Engineering II

Poot (coord.)

X

5

3

193740040

Organic Chemistry of Polymers

Feijen

X

3.6

n.s.

193740050

Biochemistry

Poot

X

3

4

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11. Structure of the Master’s Programme

Controlled drug and gene delivery

Engbersen

X

5

2

193799500

Literature Essay Minor Subject

Ten Elshof

X

5

n.s.

Course * code

M&M / PT groups

Lecturer

193735000

C.S. Membrane Technology

Nijmeijer e.o. (MTG)

193735010

Thermodynamics and Flowsheeting

Van der Ham

193700060

AMM – Applications

Lammertink (coord.)

193735030

Chemical Product Development

Nijmeijer (MST)

193750010

Advanced Molecular Separations

193750030

X

X

5

4

C

5

2

5

4

X

5

n.s.

Benes

X

5

1-2

Process Equipment Design

Van der Ham (coord.)

C

5

3

193735060

Colloids and Interfaces

Lammertink

X

X

5

1

193735040

Biomedical membrane applications

Stamatialis

X

5

2

193735050

Membrane technology practical work

Stamatialis

X

X

5

4

193737000

C.S. Inorganic Membranes

Nijmeijer e.o. (IM)

X

X

5

n.s.

193737010

Advanced Ceramics

Winnubst

X

5

n.s.

193737020

Biomaterials, mat. for hard tissue replacements

Winnubst

X

5

3

193737030

Defects and Impurities

Bouwmeester

X

5

3-4

193765000

C.S. Catalytic Processes and Materials

Lefferts e.o. (CPM)

X

X

5

n.s.

193765020

Catalysis for Sustainable Technologies

Seshan

X

X

5

2

193765030

Catalysis in the Process Industry

Lefferts

X

X

5

4

195740060

Hydrogen Technology (SET)

Seshan

X

4

4

193780000

C.S. Mesoscale Chemical Systems

Gardeniers e.o. (MCS)

X

X

5

n.s.

193799700

Contract research

X

X

5

n.s.

Course code

PT-groups

Lecturer

Quarter

193740010

Quarter

n.s.

EC‟s

5

EC‟s

X

PT

Engbersen e.o. (BMC)

PT

C.S. Biomedical Chemistry

M&M

193742000

193715020

Chemical Reaction Engineering

Brilman

C

5

1-2

191141700

Transport Phenomena

Van der Meer (CTW)

X

5

1

193720020

Multiphase Reaction Technology

Kersten

C

5

3-4

193720040

Intro. to Computational Fluid Dynamics

Lammertink

X

5

2

193720050

Theory of Phase Equilibria

Van der Hoef

X

5

1

193785000

C.S. Thermo-Chemical Conv. of Biomass

Kersten e.o. (TCCB)

X

5

n.s.

193790010

Process Plant Design

Van de Berg, Van der Ham

C

10

3-4

195740030

Energy from Biomass (SET)

Bramer, Kersten

X

4

2

194110140

Cost, Management and Engineering

Kroon

X

3

2

C

M&M X

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11. Structure of the Master’s Programme

11.7 Schedule for M&M track First year (M1)

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

AMM Characterization (19370001), 5 EC

AMM Structure & Properties Organic Materials (19370003), 5 EC

AMM Structure & properties Inorganic materials (19370004), 5 EC

AMM Applications (19370006), 5 EC

AMM Molecular and Biomolecular CT (19370002), 5 EC

Controlled dug and gene delivery (19374001), 5 EC

AMM Project Organic Materials (19370005), 5 EC

AMM Project Inorganic Materials & Molecular S&T (19370007), 5 EC

Colloids and Interfaces (19373506), 5 EC

Biomedical membrane applications (19373504), 5 EC

Physical organic chemistry* (19377502), 5 EC

Physical organic chemistry* (19377502), 5 EC

Biomaterials, mat. For hard tissue replacements (19373702), 5 EC

Polymer Physics (19373006), 5 EC

Biomedical Materials Engineering I (19374002), 5 EC

Corrosion and corrosion resistance (19377006), 5 EC

Molecule Spectrometry (19376003), 5 EC

* Physical Organic Chemistry will be scheduled either in Q3 or Q4

Not Scheduled CS MNF (19377500), 5 EC

CS SMCT (19376000), 5 EC

CS PBM / BMC (19374x00), 5 EC

Master, compulsory with prior knowledge Master, compulsory elective

CS MTP (19373000), 5 EC

CS IMS (19377000), 5 EC

Second year (M2) Q1

internship (19379900) 20 EC

Q2

Q3

Q4

Master Assignment (19370009 and 19370010) 45 EC

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11. Structure of the Master’s Programme

11.8 Schedule for PT-Track First year (M1) Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

chemical reaction engineering (19371502), 5 EC process plant design (19379001), 10 EC Colloids and Interfaces (19373506), 5 EC

thermodynamics en flowsheeting (19373501), 5 EC

Transport Phenomena (19114170), 5 EC

Energy from Biomass (19574003), 4 EC

Advanced Molecular Separations (19375001), 5 EC

multiphase reaction technology (19372002), 5 EC process equipment design (19375003), 5 EC elective

Hydrogen Technology (19574006), 4 EC

Catalysis in the Process Industry (19376503), 5 EC

Intr. Comp. Fluid Dynamics (19372004), 5 EC C.S. Membrane Technology (19373500), 5 EC Cost, Management & Engineering (19411014), 3 EC

Not Scheduled Theory in Phase Equilibria (19372005), 5 EC

Master, compulsory with prior knowledge

CS Catalytic Proc. and Mat. (19376500), 5 EC

Master, compulsory elective

Chemical Product Dev. (19373503), 5 ec

Second year (M2) Q1

internship (19379900) 20 EC

Q2

Q3

Q4

Master Assignment (19379914 and 19379915) 45 EC

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11. Structure of the Master’s Programme

72


12. Structure of Internship

Structure of Internship

73


12. Structure of Internship

12. STRUCTURE OF INTERNSHIP 12.1 Internship set-up The internship (19379900) is a compulsory part of both Master‟s tracks, with exclusion of the tracks by HBO-continuants. The internship covers 13 weeks (20 EC) during which the student is stationed at a company, research institute or university. The objective of the internship is to obtain experience in the future working field by performing a relevant assignment at an external organisation. In this way a student can also find out whether or not a certain field or type of company is interesting for a future study or career. During this assignment, gained knowledge and skills at the study programme can be applied in an actual working environment. Two supervisors are assigned: o A mentor: a daily supervisor of the organisation that provides the internship o An UT-supervisor: member of the scientific staff of the programme. Students are assessed in terms of their daily work and scientific level of research, which shows from the internship thesis. All internships are coordinated by the internship coordinator. Only when all obligations of the Bachelor‟s programme are fulfilled, students are allowed to start an internship. Orientation for internships has to start half a year prior to national internships and a year prior to international internships. This time is required for actual arrangement of the internship, accommodation and all formalities. Application for the internship has to be submitted to the new Student Mobility System (https://webapps.utwente.nl/srs/en/srsservlet, in Dutch). At this site, all necessary forms can be found. At Blackboard, the site of the international office and the UT internship site, all relevant information and every required form for internships is available at course code and name: “193799000 Internship ChE” (for Blackboard – please note: under „Organizations‟ not „courses‟). International Office: http://www.utwente.nl/internationaloffice/ UT Internship website: http://www.utwente.nl/stage/ Blackboard comprises:  Many links to companies and several of useful organisations concerning arrangements and finances of internships;  Summaries and reports of several internships by ChE students, mostly performed in foreign countries. Possible intern posts in the Netherlands are: AkzoNobel, Dow, DSM, Shell and Unilever. Make an early appointment with the internship coordinator to discuss all possibilities and procedures concerning internships. A checklist of the procedure from start to end to organise the internship is represented at in following paragraph. Internship coordinator: Name: ing. A. Folkers (Betty) E-mail: stage@tnw.utwente.nl Phone: 053-489 2772 Room: HT 609

12.2 Checklist for procedures regarding the ChE-internship At least 3 months prior to the internship: 1. Student fills in the Application Form through the Student Mobility System (SMS): https://webapps.utwente.nl/srs/nl/srsservlet 2. Student makes appointment with internship coordinator 3. Student chooses out of three options for finding an appropriate internship: a. Help from Internship coordinator b. Internship via lecturer/professor c. Internship personally arranged by student. 4. Internship coordinator and student agree on actions to be taken and keep each other informed. 5. Student checks possibilities for grants and other information at the site of the International Office, http://www.utwente.nl/internationaloffice/, http://www.nuffic.nl/nederlandse-studenten/ and the UT Internship site http://www.utwente.nl/stage Intern post is found: 1. Student submits Assignment Form through the Student Mobility System (SMS) 74


12. Structure of Internship 2. Internship mentor confirms suitability of internship and informs internship coordinator in writing (email is sufficient). 3. Student arranges insurances 4. Student submits: forms for grants available at the site of the International Office. For the “Twente Mobility Fund” a signature of the internship coordinator is required. 5. Dutch students can temporarily turn in their “OV-kaart” at the IBG and request refund from IBG. 6. Student arranges possible housing and trip. At intern post: 1. Student announces presence by submitting Notification Form as soon as possible and within maximally two weeks via SMS: https://webapps.utwente.nl/srs/nl/srsservlet 2. Internship coordinator files all data and sends a copy to S&OA. After the internship: 1. Student takes following actions: a. Finishing of intern thesis within 3 months after the internship b. Submit intern thesis to mentor, internship coordinator and UT-supervisor c. Submitting to the internship coordinator i. “Supervisor Evaluation” form (filled out by the mentor) ii. Student‟s evaluation form d. When applicable, submitting of report for TMF-grants. 2. Mentor takes following actions: a. Evaluation of thesis and sending of the mentor‟s judgement form to internship coordinator. 3. Internship coordinator takes following actions: a. Arrangement overall evaluation of the internship in an concluding conversation with the student b. Filing of data and arrangements for completion of the internship (email to provider of the internship)

75


13. The master’s Assignment

76


13. The master’s Assignment

The Master‟s Assignment

77


13. The master’s Assignment

13. THE MASTER’S ASSIGNMENT The Master‟s assignment is the final part of both Master tracks. The student performs individual scientific research under supervision of a member from the chosen research group in this assignment, which is completed with a Master‟s thesis and a defence.

13.1 Objectives and requirements Objectives During the assignment, students have to independently perform a relatively complex and large research project, which meets certain scientific criteria. The learning objectives of the MSc.-assignment are extensively defined in the ChE OER. The student are able to: 1. Perform Chemical Engineering research at MSc level: - Formulate a research problem statement based on a global problem in a specialisation of the Chemical Technology (problem analysis), - Define the theoretical and experimental research plan and has the skills to execute the experimental work (planning and execution), - Analyse and interpret research results and draw conclusions (result analysis), - Have a scientific approach and possesses intellectual skills, (handle complexity) 2. Co-operate and communicate with specialists in the chosen track and other stakeholders: - Can write an English report of the research, - Can give an oral presentation and discussion of the research. 3. Integrate insights in the chemical and the social context into his or her scientific work. 4. Work independently: The assignment should be done with a high degree of independence, creativity, dedication, pace, commitment and in co-operation with the “problem owner” and with co-workers. The students are responsible for the progress, planning, and consultation with their supervisors.

Requirements The student has to show and develop a sufficient level of:  Scientific work, including showing considerations of the “how and why” of the research  Creativity, including making links and using of know-how from former studies and literature  Working speed and methodology  Progress of personal research contribution  Oral and written expression skills to clear report executed work. You have to show you are considering the “how and why” of the research, and to be able to match aspects with your preceding education and information that is already known about the subject in literature. During the assignment you need to show more and more personal contribution, and a clear report on the research being done, orally and written. At the end of the assignment, founded conclusions of the research results and useful recommendations for further research have to be formulated.

78


13. The master’s Assignment

13.2 Choice and start of the Master’s assignment Choice Students are recommended to timely enquire about the possible assignments in the research group that they have selected to perform their Master‟s assignment. This may be well before the actual planned start of the assignment, preferably at the beginning of the programme. The assignment should be performed at a research group that is associated to the ChE programme.

Starting requirements Before start of the assignment, a student should fulfil the following requirements:  In possession of a Bachelor‟s degree  Internship has been completed successfully  All Master‟s courses have been completed (some exceptions may be possible, see application form).

Supervisor(s) and Master assignment committee After choosing a research group for your Master‟s assignment you will decide on the topic of your assignment. Based on this topic you will be assigned a mentor, who will be your daily supervisor during the assignment. Together with this mentor you can select useful courses in your programme as well. The mentor will stay in touch with you during your complete ChE programme. At least one month before you start your Master‟s assignment you must submit an application to the Board of Examiners. Previous students have experienced that the preparation takes quite some time, so you should start the procedure approximately three months before the start of your assignment. You can find the forms for this on the web site with S&OA or with the secretariat of the research group. The agreement describes the proposed assignment and the Master‟s assignment committee. The committee should meet the following requirements: - The chair of the research group is part of the committee. - The mentor is part of the committee. - The committee should have at least one member who is a member of the scientific staff of another research group. This person may be someone of another UT faculty. - In case of an external assignment (in a company, research institute etc), besides the abovementioned persons an extra company supervisor should be part of the committee. In addition to the information above, the Master‟s assignment application contains a full list of courses in your Master‟s programme (S506-form from S&OA) and a contract between you and the research group. You should hear back from the Board of Examiners approximately four weeks after you submitted your application. Since the actual start date might be different from the one you indicated on the application, S&OA should be notified when you start your assignment. The secretaries of the research group has forms for this.

13.3 Progress and coaching Progress  

   

Individual assignments require high levels of independency. In the first place, students are responsible for their own progress, planning and arrangements for coaching during the assignment. In general, students are expected to perform the assignment at the working space of the research group (instead of working at home). In this way, a normal working rhythm can be generated which allows for social contacts and improves coaching. Potential absence has to be announced. Students should make a good time schedule to ensure that the assignment can be finished in the planned period. This schedule can be discussed with the daily supervisor to determine whether it is realistic and should be adapted when circumstances turn out to be different. If there is a delay of more than two weeks, the mentor should inform S&OA, and mention the reason. Tip: start as soon as possible with the thesis. Postponing writing generally leads to delays. Tip: for evaluation of written work (parts of thesis or other work) supply it timely to the daily supervisor.

79


13. The master’s Assignment

Coaching  

Students should preferably have a weekly meeting with their daily supervisor to discuss progress, time schedule and scientific work: approach, theory, modelling, experiments, results, etc.. Plan all meetings of the Master‟s assignment committee timely, together with the daily supervisor and mentor. At least one interim meeting is required. At these meetings, a research approach, progress (especially halfway) and results will be discussed. The draft version of the thesis or the management summary can be point of discussion during these meetings if it is sent to the committee in advance. It is possible that the coaching you get differs from your expectations or previous agreements. If this is the case discuss it with your mentor. If problems cannot be resolved contact the chair of the graduation committee. If this does not solve the problems contact the student advisor or the programme director.

Group presentations and social events  

At some groups, it is also a habit to give short presentation(s) for people within the group. The organisation of all events is strongly dependent of the size and culture within the group.

13.4 Completion of assignment Course of actions The final part of the assignment consists of preparations of a final version of the thesis and preparation of the Master‟s assignment colloquium. The colloquium itself is the conclusion of the Master‟s assignment, during which you will defend the Master‟s thesis before committee and interested others (the colloquium is public and will be announced in TNW-news, the University newspaper etc.). Furthermore, at least a month prior to the colloquium (including holidays), an application form for the Master‟s exam has to be signed by the chair of the research group and student, submitted to S&OA (Horstring Zuid 204) and approved by the Board of Examiners, for an example you are referred to Appendix 6. One month is required to comply with the meeting frequency of the Board of Examiners and is required for S&OA to generate a diploma. S&OA will give her consent and provide a list of grades. Students should check this grade list for correctness and completeness. This list can be adapted, only until a week before the colloquium and only based upon formal written evidence from grade slips, formal official grade lists by S&OA and official emails. Additionally, upon completion a digital version of the final Master‟s thesis has to be handed over to S&OA-ST.

Master’s thesis  

The thesis must be written in English. The number of theses has to be conferred with the mentor of your Master‟s assignment committee.  Reproduction of the report (copying and binding) has to be conferred with the secretary of the research group.  A digital version has to be sent to S&OA (see previous). The Master‟s theses are required for the accreditation of the study programme. Points for evaluation:  Contents and structure (contents, introduction, summary, illustrations, clear formulation)  Language and style (is it suited for the people who should read it)  Discussion and conclusion of results plus recommendations for future work  References, list of symbols, description of the experimental set up, etc.

80


13. The master’s Assignment Colloquium  

The sheets for the colloquium must be in English. The presentation should be given in English. Exceptions can be made by the chair of the research group.  The presentation is in the first place meant for the scientific members of the research group (and possibly the research partners or clients) and in second place for other interested parties such as fellow students, family, etc.  The speaking time should be approximately 30 minutes, the defence afterwards approximately 10 minutes. Exceeding the 30 minutes of presentation, limits the time for defence. However, this too is an essential part of the colloquium to be taken into account in the overall evaluation. Arrangements:  The student is responsible for planning the colloquium with all committee members present.  A location for the colloquium can be arranged after consent of S&OA. (All courses have to be completed. Otherwise presentation of the diploma is not possible!) Along with the formal application for the Master‟s exam, the arrangements for the colloquium can be made. On the application form, the estimated number of attending persons and preference for location has to be indicated.  The student is responsible for arranging the required presentation material (beamer, pointers, lights, etc.) at the arranged location for presentation. It is advised to check this in advance. (Consult the secretary of the group if necessary.) Points for evaluation:  Contents and structure.  Message and media (selection of presented work considering the attending parties, functionality, readability).  Explanation of used methods and results (clarity).  Style of presentation and use of audio-visual matter (functionality, clarity).  Presentation skills (interaction with audience, speech, maintaining public‟s attention, enthusiasm).  Discussion / answering questions.

Overall evaluation The student will be evaluated on two major aspects during the assignment. At the end of the colloquium the student will receive two grades, one for each aspect. The content of both aspects will be discussed bellow. Assessment research qualities: o Problem analysis (definition of the research goals) o Execution of the graduation project (theoretical skills & experimental skills) o Analysis of the results (complexity of the research, and feed-back to the research goals) o Accessibility and usefulness of the results (can the results be published?) Assessment of the reporting and general aspects: Report (thesis): o Contents and structure, o Design and lay-out, o Language, o Discussion of results, conclusions and recommendations, o Literature references, list of symbols, description of laboratory set-up, etc. Colloquium: o Contents, o Message, and connection to public, o Explanation about methods and results (clearness), o Style of presenting and use of audio-video support tools, o Discussion and response to questions. General aspects: o Independence of student, o Originality and creativity, o Attitude, effort, pace, dedication, commitment, o Co-operation with “problem owner” and with co-workers.

81


13. The master’s Assignment After the colloquium Directly after the colloquium, the Master‟s assignment committee determines the final grade for the Master‟s assignment and presents the diploma and the temporary grade list at which the mark for the Master‟s assignment is still missing. After a few days, S&OA sends the final grade list with the mark for the Master‟s assignment to the student‟s home address. The student may invite guests for a drink afterwards, which is up to the student and has to be personally arranged. To preserve the quality of the study programme, the student is expected to cooperate in a final survey by filling in the “Exit enquete” of the Quality Assurance Committee. This concerns questions about the chosen curriculum, internship and Master‟s assignment. Especially the connection of the different programme parts is of importance in this matter.

13.5 Sign out at CSA and IBG, and stop grants S&OA-CT will inform CSA about graduation of the official graduation dates. CSA will then inform the DUO. For students that graduate during the academic year (ending in July), it is important to sign out of the programme/university directly after graduation at CSA. In this way, the student can apply for a refund for a part of the tuition fees from the official date of signing out. This can be arranged at CSA (Student Services, Vrijhof) from the end of the month in which graduation takes place and by means of an application form for tuition refunds. The application has to be submitted within a month after graduation. Students personally have to stop their study grants. For Dutch students this means that they should personally take care of quitting „studiefinanciering´ and turn in their OV-card.

13.6 Credit points during masters assignment From the moment you start the Master‟s assignment (official date on the application form), study progress is monitored at S&OA. Virtual EC points are awarded to the student‟s record every month, with a maximum of 36 EC. This may be of interest for study grants. The full 45 EC are only recorded to the student‟s total record at actual graduation.

13.7 Checklist for procedures At least 1 month prior to starting date of Master‟s assignment: o Student acquires a Master‟s assignment project by consulting the staff of the chosen research group. o Student, Professor, and mentor / daily supervisor compose and agree on a project description. o Student and Professor sign an application form for the Master‟s assignment, to get consent for proposed assignment and confirmation to have fulfilled all requirements for starting the Master‟s assignment. (See appendix 6 for an example) o Student submits application form to S&OA, who will pass it on to the Board of Examiners. Start of the assignment: o Student signs safety rules provided by the secretary of the research group (if necessary) o The secretary of the group registers the contact information of the student. o The daily supervisor appoints a working space to the student, introduces the other staff members and plans the assignment. During the assignment o Student and daily supervisor have (a weekly) consultation. o Student and daily supervisor make interim colloquium plans. o Student and Master‟s assignment committee plan at least two one meetings. At completion o Student sets date and time for colloquium after consult with Master‟s assignment committee. o Student returns “application form Mater‟s exam” to S&OA at least one month before the planned colloquium. See appendix 6 for an example. o The colloquium is announced internally by the secretary of the group and externally by S&OA by announcements in TNW news, the University newspaper etc.. o Student / S&OA arranges room for colloquium and presence of required audio-visual materials. o Student invites guests for colloquium and may plan a drink. o Student (with help of secretariat) takes care of reproduction and distributed of the report at least two weeks prior to the colloquium. o Student hands over an electronic version of the thesis (PDF format) to S&OA. 82


13. The master’s Assignment o o

S&OA sends admission with unsigned diploma, temporary grade list and empty grade slip to the daily supervisor and informs student. Student clears desk, possibly dismantles experimental set-up, returns books and backs up data.

After colloquium o Student signs diploma. o Daily supervisor sends filled-in grade slip to S&OA. o S&OA sends final grade list to student‟s home address. o Student signs out of programme at CSA (and IBG). o Student turns in Master‟s exit survey of the Quality Assurance Committee at S&OA

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14. Course Information

84


14. Course Information

Course Information

85


14. Course Information

14. COURSE INFORMATION In this chapter information is given for all courses given in the Master tracks M&M (former CTM) and PT. This information is also given at Osiris. All courses are listed alphabetically. Please note: it is possible/likely that the information given in the programme guide has changed since its publication. You can find the most up to date information in the course catalogue/course information in Osiris, always check Osiris when planning your masterâ€&#x;s. 193737010

ChE

5.0 EC

-

Advanced Ceramics

Lecturer(s)

dr. A.J.A. Winnubst

Course description

The aim of this course is to obtain insight in processes, which play a role in the fabrication of inorganic (ceramic) materials and ceramic coatings. The fabrication process is treated and the importance to understand the effects of processing variables on the evolution of microstrctural parameters is emphasized. Basic processes are treated like powder preparation. powder treatments (milling and mixing), forming into a green shape and sintering. Basic phenomena ar e.g.: particle size. interaction between particles, nucleation/crystallisation, solid state reactions and transport phenomena within and between solid state particles. Elective course track Molecules & Materials

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

Study material

193770030

ST/ ChE/ AT

5.0 EC

Q-

Lecturer(s)

Course description

Additional info

a.j.a.winnubst@utwente.nl

BSc chemical engineering or advanced technology

An assessment can contain one or more of the following items: Small exam, practical work, case study, project report and/or presentation (in consultation with student) Lecture notes

Lab Course Advanced Materials dr.ir. J.E. ten Elshof j.e.tenelshof@utwente.nl (contact) dr.ir. G. Koster g.koster@utwente.nl dr.ing. A.J.H.M. Rijnders a.j.h.m.rijnders@utwente.nl Functional inorganic materials (especially complex metal oxides) are used in almost every modern device. Inorganic materials exhibit properties that are mostly difficult or impossible to achieve with other materials, so their presence is often crucial for the functionality of a device. Nanoelectronics, superconductors, magnetic and many electrical materials are just some examples. The way in which inorganic components are made is usually decisive for the final crystallographic structure, microstructure and functional properties of the material. This lab course is intended as a hands-on introduction to the field of advanced functional inorganic materials, their synthesis and characterization. Students get an individual assignment depending on his/her interests. The assignment may focus on the deposition of thin films or nanostructures by advanced physical or chemical deposition methods, the characterization of crystallographic structure by X-ray diffraction, the characterization of microstructure by atomic force microscopy or elecron microscopy, or a combination of these. Elective course track Molecules & Materials The topic of this lab course will be determined together with the student(s). Possible themes are the synthesis of functional materials and structures by physical or chemical deposition methods, and the 86


14. Course Information

Prior knowledge Exam

characterization of microstructure and crystal structure by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction or other relevant techniques Report

Study material

-

193700060

ChE

5.0 EC

Q4

AMM: Applications

Lecturer(s)

dr.ir. R.G.H. Lammertink

r.g.h.lammertink@utwente.nl

Course description

- Inzicht verschaffen in diverse aspecten (IP, marketing, financieel) die een rol spelen bij het commercialiseren van een materiaalkundige technologie - Ervaring opdoen met project werken, plannen, rapporteren. - Eigenhandig relevante patentliteratuur kunnen vinden en selecteren. - Potentiele doelgroepen kunnen beschrijven, selecteren en onderbouwen m.bn.t. marketing aspecten - Een eenvoudige winst-verlies rekening en een begroting kunnen opstellen

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

De studenten werken in groepen van 4 a 5 aan een project. Uitganspunt van dit project is een patent (bij voorkeur een UT patent) op materiaalkundig gebied. Iedere groep maakt eerst een mindmap t.a.v. hun project. Daarna wordt een project planning gemaakt. Voor ieder van de drie onderdelen, patent-marketing-financien, wordt door iedere groep een presentatie gegeven. Alle drie onderdelen komen ook terug in het uiteindelijke rapport. Compulsory course track Molecules & Materials -

Study material

Handouts from presentations, articles and a patent.

193700010

ChE

5.0 EC

Q1

Lecturer(s)

Course description

AMM: Characterization Dr.ir. P. Schon (coordinator) dr.ing. A.J.H.M. Rijnders a.j.h.m.rijnders@utwente.nl dr. A.H. Velders a.h.velders@utwente.nl Materials Characterization refers to the use of techniques to probe into the internal structure and properties of molecules and materials. This course includes various modern, state of the art analytical techniques to characterize structure and properties of advanced materials and molecules. It emphasizes the general applicability to organic and inorganic materials. The central goal is to provide a fundamental understanding of various aspects of molecular and continuum (macroscopic) scale characterization of organic and inorganic materials, which are divided into various problems: 1. Molecular characterization 2. Ensemble characterization - in solution - in solid state 3. Surface / Interface characterization 4. Heterogeneous systems: dispersions, particles 87


14. Course Information

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

Contents - optical Microscopy - Electron Microscopy - Diffraction Techniques (XRD, ED) - Solution Caracterization (Scattering, Chromatography (GPC, HPLC) - Electronic Spectroscopy - Vibrational Spectroscopy - X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance - Scanning Probe Microscopy Compulsory Course Track Molecules & Materials Written exam

Study material

-

193700040

ChE

5.0 EC

Q3

AMM: Inorganic materials science

Lecturer(s)

dr.ing. A.J.H.M. Rijnders

Course description

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

The aim is to provide knowledge of fundamental aspects of the structure/composition in relation to the properties and performance of advanced inorganic materials. Thes are novel materials or modified materials with new or enhanced properties to cope with the increased demands in technological applications. These are, amongst others, electronic applications (dielectrics and ferroelectris), optical applications (tranparant conducting oxides) and materials for energy production and storage (ionic conductors, and mixid electronic/ionic conductors). Compulsory Course Track Molecules & Materials 133531 Chemie en Technologie van Anorgan. Materialen Written exam

Study material

Tilley, Understanding solids: the science of materials, Wiley 2007

193700020

ChE

5.0 EC

Q1

a.j.h.m.rijnders@utwente.nl

AMM: Molecular and biomolecular chemistry and technology

Lecturer(s)

prof.dr.ir. J. Huskens

j.huskens@utwente.nl

Course description

The course will discuss supramolecular systems going from basic molecular recognition (involving single, monovalent interactions), to systems with cooperative and/or multivalency, and finally to lage polyvalent systems. For all subclasses, molecular and biomolecular examples will be discussed as well as materials applications. Contents 1. Noncovalent interactions, development of supramolecular chemistry 2. Synthetic host-guest chemistry I: cation-binding hosts 3. Synthetic host-guest chemistry II: binding of guests in solution 4. Molecular recognition in biological systems, enzyme catalysis 5. Molecular imprinting (review article), and other materials applications 6. Sensor concepts and sensor devices 7. Cooperativity: molecular and biomolecular 8. Multivalency: effective molarity concept, cyclization, cell membrane recognition 9. Polyvalent systems I: macromolecular assembly + supramolecular polymers 10. Polyvalent systems II: coordination polymers, MOFs 88


14. Course Information 11. Polyvalent systems III: proteins an protein folding 12. Polyvalent systems IV: virus assembly 13. Polyvalent systems V: DNA + artificial DNA constructs 14. Polyvalent systems VI: layer-by-layer assembly 15. Polyvalent systems VII: supramolecular materials Compulsory course track Molecules & Materials -

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam Study material

J.W. Steed & J.L. Atwood: " Supramolecuar Chemistry", 2009, 2nd edition, Wiley PY Bruice: "Organic Chemistry", 2007, 5th edition, Pearson International Edition/Prentice Hall (or older edition) (chapters/paragraphs on structur of cabohydrates, proteins, an nucleic acids) Supplementary handouts (review articles, presentation files)

193700030

ChE

5.0 EC

Q2

AMM: Organic materials science

Lecturer(s)

prof.dr. G.J. Vancso

g.j.vancso@utwente.nl

Course description

Organic materials feature enormous variations in their physical properties as a result of the tremendous wealth of the different possible existing molecular structures of carbon based compounds. The consequence of this plethora of properties is that function and use of organic materials can be tailored by controlling molecular structure virtually at will by using modern synthetic approaches, allowing one to realize many advanced applications, which belonged to the realm of phantasy just a few decades ago. In this lecture molecular structure-property relations will be discussed for the different types of (advanced) synthetic and natural (macromolecular)organic materials, including man-made polymers, liquid crystals, carbon allotropes (nanotubes, fullerenes and graphenes), dendrimers, nucleic acids, proteins and polysaccharides. Materials selection diagrams will be used to compare organic, inorganic, metallic and other materials,focusing on mechanical properties. Similarities and differences on the basis of molecular/atomic structures among the different classes of materials will be elucidated. Approaches will be treated which allow materials engineers to quantitatively estimate physical properties based on the molecular structure (by the so-called group contribution techniques). Effects of processing on structure (texture) and hence on properties will be demonstrated. A description and comparison of the major classes of the most frequently used industrial polymers for different function will complement this course. This is an advanced level graduate course, thus basic knowledge of organic chemistry, materials science and polymer science taught in the bachelor curriculum is a prerequisite and will be assumed.  Introduction (course overview, keywords of knowledge required, exam expectations, recommended literature) (lecture notes)  Overview of structures of the major classes of organic materials (polymers, liquid crystals, carbon allotropes (nanotubes, fullerenes and graphenes), dendrimers, nucleic acids, proteins and polysaccharides (lecture notes)  Materials selection diagrams, organic, metallic and ceramic materials  contrasts andsimilarities (M.F. Ashby, Materials Selection in Mechanical Design)  Carbon allotropes as molecular building blocks (fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphenes)  Dendrimers and hyperbranched structures 89


14. Course Information   

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

Elastomers, rubber and hydrogels Liquid crystals as functional materials Relationships between polymer structure and properties Part I: main chain effects (H.R.Allcock et al., Contemporary Polymer Chemistry, 3rd Ed. Chapter 22)  Relationships between polymer structure and properties Part II: side chain effects (H.R.Allcock et al., Contemporary Polymer Chemistry, 3rd Ed. Chapter 22)  Group contribution techniques for estimating properties based on molecular structure (D.W. van Krevelen, Properties of Polymers); Calculation examples  Industrial polymers (H. Ulrich, Introduction to Industrial Polymers)  Influence of processing, texture and anisotropy Part I. (I.M.Ward, Editor, Structure and Properties of Oriented Polymers)  Influence of processing, texture and anisotropy Part II. (I.M.Ward, Editor, Structure and Properties of Oriented Polymers)  Electroactive organic materials  Photonic organic materials (solar cells, light emitting organics, photochromism, photonic band gap materials)  Natural organic engineering materials Compulsory Course Track Molecules & Materials Written exam (closed book)

Study material

Handouts, presentations

193700050

ChE

5 EC

Q3

AMM: Project Organic Materials

Lecturer(s)

dr. M.A. Hempenius

m.a.hempenius@utwente.nl

Course description

-This practical course aims to broaden the knowledge of students in the areas of (i) polymer synthesis (condensation polymerization, ATRP) and polymer molecular characterization (e.g. GPC, 1H NMR); (ii) thermal characteristics of polymers such as glass-transition and melting / crystallization behavior (DSC, optical microscopy) (iii) polymer processing (blend formation) to fabricate materials with controllable surface properties (wetting, contact angle measurements); (iv) influencing polymer surface properties by chemical modification using microcontact printing. The course aims to illustrate structure-property relations in polymeric materials, i.e. how polymer chain characteristics and composition influence macroscopic properties. The following topics are dealt with in a collaboration between MST, MTP, and PBM: Crystallizable polymers, synthesis and crystallization kinetics: In this assignment the crystallizable aromatic polyesters poly(tetramethylene terephthalate) (T4) and poly(pentamethylene terephthalate) (T5) will be synthesized for a crystallization study using DSC and optical microscopy. Due to differences in polymer composition, poly(tetramethylene terephthalate) and poly(pentamethylene terephthalate) will have different thermal properties. The polymers will be synthesized and thermal characterization and crystallization experiments (spherulite growth rate measurements, thermal transitions) will be performed using DSC and optical microscopy. Polymer blends: Blends of a polar and a non-polar polymer are of interest as materials showing controllable wetting. By adjusting the composition of the blend, the surface characteristics can be tailored from relatively hydrophilic to superhydrophobic. The surface structure can be 90


14. Course Information

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam Study material

investigated by SEM and optical microscopy. Surface properties, regarding wettability, will be studied by contact angle measurements as a function of temperature. Polymers for gas separation membranes: Gas separation membranes usually require glassy high Tg materials with a large free volume, or crosslinked high free volume polymers. In this project, a polymer will be identified, synthesized and used for membrane fabrication. Acrylic or methacrylic monomers will be polymerized by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) to produce homopolymers or random copolymers. If necessary, the project can be extended to block copolymers. This assignment involves polymer synthesis by ATRP and characterization (GPC, DSC, 1H / 13C NMR). The polymers will be used for membrane fabrication and gas separation measurements will be performed. Microcontact printing using hydrophilic stamps: In Microcontact Printing, just as in many conventional printing techniques, a patterned stamp is brought into contact with a substrate to transfer an ink to and thus create an image of the stamp pattern on the substrate surface. In a subsequent processing step this image may be transferred into the substrate material by, for instance, an etching or a material deposition process. In this assignment, microcontact printing will be performed using hydrophilic poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamps. Stamps will be fabricated and rendered hydrophilic by an O2 plasma treatment. A phenomenon typical for stamps undergoing this treatment, hydrophobic recovery, will be monitored using water contact angle measurements. The hydrophilic stamp is used to transfer an acid to a spin-coated film of poly(tert-butyl methacrylate) to create a micrometer-scale poly(methacrylic acid) pattern that corresponds with the stamp pattern. The pattern is analyzed by optical microscopy and perhaps AFM. The carboxylic acid regions can be further functionalized by attachment of fluorescent molecules. Compulsory course track Molecules & Materials Reports on the experiments, followed by a discussion handouts

193700070

ChE

5 EC

Q4

AMM: Project Inorganic Materials & Molecular S&T

Lecturer(s)

dr.ir. G. Koster g.koster@utwente.nl

Course description

Prior knowledge Exam

Two small projects with the duration of 4 weeks each. The projects will be conducted in groups of maximal 4 students and situated in a research group laboratory. Ech project will be judged by a short report (3000 words max) or article. laboratory introduction to the concepts that were theoretically introduced during one of the AMM courses AMM courses Small report or article (3000 words)

Study material

-

Additional info

91


14. Course Information 193750010

ChE

5.0 EC

Q

Advanced Molecular Separations

Lecturer(s)

dr. ir N.E. Benes

Course description

The course comprises two parts. First, the theoretical framework of Maxwell-Stefan is introduced to describe multi-component mass transport. Secondly, the Maxwell-Stefan modelling is applied to molecular separation problems based on adsorption, absorption and membrane separations. The first part is classical in its educational methods: lectures followed by excercises. The second part enrolls the student in the teaching activities. Students develop and present materials in lectures. Case studies carried out in MathCad deepen the presented theory. Elective course track Processtechnology bachelor courses on transport phenomena, equilibria Written exam

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam Study material

n.e.benes@utwente.nl

course is based on book of J.A. Wesselingh 'Multi-component mass transport' Sheets used during the lectures, additional scientific publications

193740050

ChE/ APH

5.0 EC

Q4

Biochemistry

Lecturer(s)

dr. A.A. Poot

Course description

During this course basic knowledge is provided concerning compounds and processes in living cells. Topics include cell structure, biomembranes, amino acids, proteins and enzymes, the role of ATP, glycolysis and oxidative metabolism, genetic information, gene regulation, recombinant DNA technology, tissues and cancer. To obtain basic knowledge about cellular processes. Written exam

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam Study material

a.a.poot@utwente.nl

Essential Cell Biology, Alberts et al., garland Publishers, New York, 2e druk 2004, peperback ISBN 0-8153-3481-8

193742000

ChE/ BME

5.0 EC

Q-

C.S. Biomedical Chemistry

Lecturer(s)

prof.dr. J.F.J. Engbersen

Course description

Exam

In this course a literature survey and report is made on a subject in the area of controlled drug delivery and/or gene therapy Elective course track Chemistry and Technology of Materials This is a supplemetary course. Therfore, it follows on the compulsory coruses in the Chemical Engineering programme or in the Biomedical Engineering program. essay and discussion

Study material

-

Additional info Prior knowledge

j.f.j.engbersen@utwente.nl

92


14. Course Information 193740020

BME/ ChE

5.0 EC

Q1

Biomedical Materials Engineering I

Lecturer(s)

dr. P.J. Dijkstra

Course description

Introduction in Biomedical Technology. In this seminar the type, structure, mechanical and physical properties of tissues and implant materials are related to each other. Examples of materials selection and their application will be given. Response of implant materials on the biological system (biocompatibility) in relation te degradation (corrosion, tribology, polymer degradation) are discussed. Special topics comprise hard tissue replacements (e.g. orthopedic) and soft tissue replacements (e.g. vascular prostheses). Elective course track Molecules & Materials Preferred: 191300070 Project materiaalkunde 191355370 Basiscursus materialen 191355380 Chemie en Technologie van Organische Materialen Written exam

Additional info Prior knowledge

Exam Study material

p.j.dijkstra@utwente.nl

Syllabus Biomedische materiaaltechniek beschikbaar gesteld tijdens collegeSupply of syllabus "Biomedische materiaaltechniek" at first lecture.

193740030

ChE

5.0 EC

Q3

Biomedical Materials Engineering II

Lecturer(s)

dr. A.A. Poot

Course description

Prior knowledge Exam

This course deals with the basic principles of tissue-biomaterial interactions, surface modifaction of biomateirals and controlled drug gelivery, Moreover, groups of 3-4 students have te write a research proposal which has to be defended during a plenary session. To learn basic principles of tissue-biomaterial interactions, surface modification of biomaterials and controlled drug delivery. Written exam

Study material

handouts van colleges

Additional info

193735040

ChE/ BME

5.0 EC

Q2

a.a.poot@utwente.nl

Biomedical Membrane Applications

Lecturer(s)

D. Stamatialis

Course description

The course covers all biomedical applications where the artificial membrane plays a crucial role. Main topics are: membrane filtration, drug delivery, hemodialysis, blood filtration, blood oxygenation, bio-artificial organs, tissue engineering. Elective course track Molecules & Materials Oral examination, presentations and written assignments

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam Study material

d.stamatialis@utwente.nl

Basic Principles of Membrane Technology, Second edition by M. Mulder, Kluwer Academic publischers, ISBN 0-7923-4247-x Handouts distributed via Teletop.

93


14. Course Information 193765020

ChE

5.0 EC

Q2

Lecturer(s)

Catalysis for Sustainable Technologies

Exam

dr. K. Seshan k.seshan@utwente.nl prof.dr.ir. L. Lefferts l.lefferts@utwente.nl The central theme of the course is the use of catalysis to solve current environmental problems. Legislation regarding environmental pollution is getting more stringent every day. Catalysis, by minimizing pollution, provides two ways to improve quality of our environment. These are: 1: development of alternative cleaner processes 2: cleaning up emissions from currant processes. In this course, the role of catalysis in both these situations will be discussed especially withe the use of examples that cause air and water pollution. For the purpose of evaluation students are required to make a literature study on the topic assigned to them, make a report and present a colloquim. Background to environmental problems, catalytic solutions, alternative cleaner processes, renewable and sustainable solutions to energy, chemicals and fuels. Optional Course Track Process Technology Essential: 134506 Kinetiek en katalyse Colloquium and report + oral exam

Study material

Lecture sheets via TeleTop

Course description

Additional info Prior knowledge

193765030

ChE

5.0 EC

Q4

Catalysis in the Process Industry

Lecturer(s)

prof.dr.ir. L. Lefferts

Course description

Exam

Almost all of the chemical and petrochemical processes are catalyst based. In this course aspects of catalysis that are important for industrial application are outlined. In addition to a general introductin to industrial catalysis,typical refinery processes such as cracking, alkylation, reforming, hydrotreating, and petrochemical processes as epoxidation, ammonia synthesis, oxychlorination will be descussed in detail. Students are required to make a literature study over a topic of current relevance, assigned to them. This study will have to be presented in the form of a report as well as a colloquium. Elective course M&M and PT track Compulsory: 134506 Kinetiek en katalyse Colloquium and report + oral exam

Study material

Lecture notes via Teletop

Additional info Prior knowledge

193765000

ChE

5.0 EC

Q-

l.lefferts@utwente.nl

C.S. Catalytic Processes and Materials

Lecturer(s)

prof.dr.ir. L. Lefferts

l.lefferts@utwente.nl

Course description

The course implies a literature assignment on material science of catalysts, including mostly both preparation as well as characterization of catalytic materials. Details will be defined in consulatation. The subject is alway directly connected to one of the running reserach projects within CPM. The student will first describe the ongoing research (target, 94


14. Course Information

Exam

background, approach), whereafter a literature assignment will be issued on a detailed subject within the research project. Elective course track Molecules & Materials Compulsory: Kinetics and Catalysis (134506) Coloquium and report

Study material

-

Additional info Prior knowledge

193735030

ChE

5.0 EC

Q-

Chemical Product Development

Lecturer(s)

dr. ir. D.C. Nijmeijer

Course description

Prior knowledge Exam

The course covers the process from product idea to product or prototype. As such, the students proceed through the techniques used in designing and developing. Chemical engineers are often working in the development of new products where chemistry is often only one of the disciplines. Development is therefore mostly done in interdisciplinary teams. Understanding of costs, marketing and selling are therefore also important. The course is supported by lectures following the book of Hans Wesselingh et al. "Design and Develop". The main activities are carried out in small teams based on a product needs analysis. Elective course track Processtechnology Case studies are preformed in groups of 2 students. -

Study material

Design and Develop, by J.A. Wesselingh, S. Zinck Kiil and M.E. Vigild

Additional info

193715020

WB/C hE

5.0 EC

Q 1+2

d.c.nijmeijer@utwente.nl

Chemical Reaction Engineering

Lecturer(s)

dr.ir. D.W.F. Brilman

Course description

The main goal of the course 'Reactor and micro-reactor engineering' is to present a general introduction in th physical and chemical aspects of chemical reaction engineering. Following an introduction on ideal reactors, more complex systems will be discussed, such as non-ideal behaviour (residence time distribution), multiple reactions (product selctivity) , heat effects and mass transfer in multiple phase homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. Setting up and solving mass and energy balances plays a major role in the dimensioning of chemical reactors, and will play a major role in the course. At the end of the cours one will be able to describe single en multi phase chemical reactors in terms of model reactors. and determine conversion and selectivity accounting for the residence time distribution time distribution, mass transfer, reaction kinetics, equilibria and heat effects. Compulsory Course Track Processtechnology Preferred: Physical transport phenomena, Kinetics & catalysis Written exam

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam Study material

d.w.f.brilman@utwente.nl

Lecture notes with excerices syllabus Optional Books: 95


14. Course Information 'Chemical Reactor Design' (Westerterp, Van Swaaij and Beenackers) Chemical Reaction Engineering (Levenspiel) 193770090

ChE

5.0 EC

Q-

Chemistry of Inorganic Materials and Nanostructures

Lecturer(s)

dr.ir. J.E. ten Elshof

Course description

Exam

The design and synthesis of advanced functional materials by chemical processing methods requires a thorough understanding of the basic reaction mechanisms and physical phenomena that play a role in the sequence of steps that lead from starting molecular precursors via nanoparticles to the final functional solid. This course provides an introduction into the chemistry of inorganic materials, the most common chemical synthesis methods, and their deposition into low-dimensional nanostructures, thin films and micropatterns. Topics that are discussed in the course include inorganic molecules; structural solid state chemistry; physical chemistry of inorganic surfaces; nucleation and growth of nanoparticles; morphogenesis of particles with fractal-like structure; synthesis of inorganic materials; soft chemistry; thin films; lowdimensional nanostructures; soft lithography; sintering. 133001 Anorganische chemie 19373506 Colloids and Interfaces Literature Essay or assignment

Study material

handouts

Additional info Prior knowledge

193735060

ChE/ BME

5.0 EC

Q1

j.e.tenelshof@utwente.nl

Colloids and Interfaces

Lecturer(s)

dr. ir. R.G.H. Lammertink

Course description

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

Description of interfaces and surfaces. All kinds of interfaces between different phases (gas, liquid, solid) are treated. Htermodynamic descriptions of these interfaces and adsorption onto them are deduced. Several techniques for characterizing interfaces are discussed. During contact hours, the contents of the book will be presented and discussed. Exercises will be made and discussed. A limited number of students will be allowed to do a small practicum. The remainder of the group will in small groups discuss a scientific paper. Learning objectives of this course include:Gain insight in important interfacial aspects Be able to explain and describe different interfacial phenomena (wetting, adsorption, colloida stability). Critically evaluate scientific literature on interfacial phenomena. Elective course for M&M and PT track Written exam

Study material

Interfacial Science An Introduction, G.T. Barnes and I.R. Gentle.

193740010

BME/ ChE

5.0 EC

Q2

Lecturer(s)

r.g.h.lammertink@utwente.nl

Controlled Drug and Gene Delivery prof.dr. J.F.J. Engbersen

j.f.j.engbersen@utwente.nl 96


14. Course Information Course description

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

Controlled drug delivery technology represents one of the emerging and challenging frontier areas in the development of modern medication and pharmaceuticals. Controlled drug delivery systems aim to achieve more effective therapies which eliminates the potential for both under- and over-dosing originating from uncontrolled drug release and avoid the need for frequent dosing and target the drugs better to a specified area, minimizing drug side effects. Targeted drug delivery can be accomplished by the introduction of ligands (carbohydrates, hormones, and peptides) or antibodies to the drug delivery system in such a way that it binds preferentially to malignant cells that are uniquely expressing certain receptors at the cell surface. In gene therapy, a genetic disorder or chronic disease is treated by delivering DNA or RNA to the targeted cells, inducing or suppressing a specific genetic function like new immune activity, or the development of enzymes that destroy viral or cancerous genetic material within cells. The ideal drug or gene delivery system should be nontoxic, biocompatible, safe from accidental release, simple to administer, easy to fabricate and sterilise, and should have efficient drug or gene targeting specificity. Delivery systems based on polymeric backbones can fulfill the majority of these requirements and have come to the centre stage of biomaterials research in recent years. This course gives a review of the recent advances and directions of future developments in controlled release technology. Topics included are: fundamental principles of controlled drug and gene delivery and their pharmaceutical applications in various delivery routes (oral, pulmonary, nasal, oculary, brain, etc.); delivery from biodegradable polymeric systems (nanoparticles, hydrogels, microspheres, dendrimers, etc.), microstents and nanodevices; delivery in tissue engineering. Elective course in track Molecules & Materials Assignments and test

Study material

Hand-outs will be given during the lectures

193770060

BME/ ChE

5.0 EC

Q3

Lecturer(s)

Corrosion and Corrosion Resistance

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

dr. B.A. Boukamp b.a.boukamp@utwente.nl The objective is to familiarize students with mechanisms of corrosion that lead to corrosion of metals an alloys and with corrosion protection technology. Besides regular classes this cours will present industrial 'case studies'. The program also includes a practical course and a visit to an institution, active in corrosion research. Subjects: Corrosion as electrochemical or chemical reaction between construction materials and the environment. Thermodynamics and kinetics of corrosion. Various forms of corrosion and specific measures to avert these problems. Methods for studying corrosion processes. including an introduction to electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Corrosion protection: anodic and cathodic protection and coatings. Principles of - and coutermeasures for high temperature corrosion. Importance of design and tooling considerations in construction. Economical and environmental consideration. Elective course track Molecules & Materials 191350010 Evenwichten 2 (Equilibra 2) Case study and presentation

Study material

-

Course description

97


14. Course Information

19411014

ChE/ ME

3.0 EC

Q2

Lecturer(s) Course description

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam Study material

Cost, Management & Engineering ir. H. Kroon h.kroon@utwente.nl prof.dr.ir. M.J.F. Wouters m.j.f.wouters@utwente.nl INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE To be able to develop a product, you need to know how much money you can invest in assets. The implications of costs in different engineering problems are discussed. LEARNING GOALS The goals for this course are: - be able to calculate on the investments you have to make - understand different concepts of costing - be able to identify factors that influence the costs of the projects you work on - be able to solve cases in the field of new product development and new production planning. The course is for four different groups of students: ME (IDM)-, IO-, WBand CT students. CONTENT In the work of engineers there are a lot of decisions with implications for the costs and rewards for the designs they make, the products they work on and the companies they work for. In practice you have to make a lot of decisions with huge cost effects and with serious cash flow implications. This course gives you the knowledge to be able to make the right economic evaluations for your decisions. This course addresses various topics of cost management that are relevant to engineers, with a particular focus on new product development processes. Topics are: - investment decisions: what are implications of investments to the companies, what are implications of alternative design decisions and how do you invest in capital in fast changing environments. - engineering decisions; what are implications of designs of products for the production and exploitation costs. - control decisions: how can we use cost concepts in the work we do in our projects. FORM OF EDUCATION Lectures. During these sessions the topic of that session are discussed and some cases are made. Elective course track Process Technology Written exam Engineering economy, W.Sullivan, J.A.Bontadelli and E.M. Wicks, 12th edition, Prentice Hall

193737030

ChE

5.0 EC

S2

Defects and Impurities

Lecturer(s)

dr. H.J.M. Bouwmeester h.j.m.bouwmeester@utwente.nl

Course description

This course is specially for students with an interest in solid state chemistry and solid state electrolchemsitry. The emphasis is on the thermodynamics of defects in solids such as electons, vacant lattice sites an interstitial atoms, and associated transport properties. Applications including the solid oxide fuel cells, batteries, dense mixed ionic-electronic conducting membranes, oxygen sensors and pumps will be discussed. Elective course track Molecules & Materials Compulsory:

Additional info Prior knowledge

98


14. Course Information

Exam

Anorganische chemie Energie en entropie Written exam

Study material

syllabus

5740030

ChE

4.0 EC

Q2

Lecturer(s)

Energy from Biomass

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

ir. E.A. Bramer e.a.bramer@utwente.nl dr. S.R.A. Kersten s.r.a.kersten@utwente.nl The course will start with an introduction on the global energy resources and the role of biomass, with aspects of biomass as a renewable energy source and global warming. Biomass characterization, analysis and the basic principles of biomass treatment steps like: drying storage, torrefaction, pyrolysis, gasification combustion; energy conversion will be discussed. Modeling of biomass conversion on particle and reactor scale will be examined. Chemical, thermo dynamical, heat and mass transfer aspects will be handled. The thermo chemical processes of biomass conversion like combustion, gasification and pyrolysis will be discussed in more detail. The different types of equipment applied in these processes will be treated. Attention will be given to the co-production of valuable products (e.q. bio-chemicals) and fuels from biomass, so-called: biorefinery. Emissions of solid and gaseous components and the measures to prevent these emissions will be part of the course. Elective course track Processtechnology -

Study material

-

Course description

195740060

ChE

4.0 EC

Q4

Hydrogen Technology

Lecturer(s)

dr. K. Seshan

k.seshan@utwente.nl

Course description

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

Hydrogen is considered the fuel for the future as it provides scope for more efficient use of energy via fuel cell applications. However, there are quite a few scientific and technological barriers that need to be overcome to make transition to a hydrogen based energy economy in daily life. Aspects that are crucial to bring this to practice will be addressed by a variety of experts (academic and from Industry) in different areas. The topics will include catalytic, sustainable and reaction engineering aspects of hydrogen production, its purification, separation, storage for transport, and application in fuel cells for power generation. Elective course track Processtechnology -

Study material

-

99


14. Course Information 193770000

ChE

5.0 EC

Q-

Lecturer(s)

C.S. Inorganic Materials Science

Course description

dr.ir. J.E. ten Elshof j.e.tenelshof@utwente.nl dr.ing. A.J.H.M. Rijnders a.j.h.m.rijnders@utwente.nl Contents of this optional course are defined together with the student.

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

Elective course track Molecules & Materials -

Study material

-

19379900 9

ChE

20 EC

Q-

Internship Chemical Engineering

Lecturer(s)

Ing. A. Folkers

stage@tnw.utwente.nl

Course description

The internship is an integral part of the Master of Science of Chemical Engineering programme. (Master's students with a preceding HBO-bachelor diploma have an adapted programme without an internship period. If these students wish, they may ask for an internship period as well as an additional course). The internship has to be scheduled in the first or the second year of the master, has to cover at least 13 weeks (20EC) and should be conducted preferably at a company but can also be conducted at a research institute or a university. Students may start the assignment after completing their bachelor‟s degree. The TNW master programmes offer several opportunities for adding an international dimension to the knowledge and the practical experience of a student. Therefore the internship may be carried out in the Netherlands or abroad. We believe a stay abroad is a valuable component of the study; therefore stimulating measures like the Twente Mobility Fund (TMF-fund) and the Erasmus-scholarship are available.

Internships are coordinated by the internship coordinator. Orientation for internship has to start six months prior to national internship and a year prior to international internship. This time is required for actual arrangements of the internship, such as getting an accommodation, visa and all formalities. Application for the internship has to be submitted to the Student Mobility System http://webapps.utwente.nl/srs/en/srsservlet At the Blackboard organizations site „Internships TNW‟ all relevant information, internship posts and all required forms for the internship are available. International students should also contact Rik Akse during the arrangement of the internship. (h.a.akse@utwente.nl ) Additional info

Compulsory course track Chemical Engineering Information regarding the subscription will be published via the student webapplication SMS and the internship website of the faculty.

Prior knowledge Exam

BSc Diploma

Study material

Blackboard Organizations: Internships TNW http://www.tnw.utwente.nl/che/education/internship/

-

100


14. Course Information 193720040 5.0 EC

APH /Ch E Q1+ 2

Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

Lecturer(s)

Prof.dr.ir. R.G.H. Lammertink

Course description

In the course introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it is taught how problems as introduced in IFTV (191370091) and FTV (191370201) can be solved numerically by means of CFD. Through practice sessions the student learns to implement flow problems in a CFD computer program. The knowledge and skills of the student are tested through an assignment. This course is recommended for students which on basis of their graduation specialization wish to deepen and broaden their knowledge on physical transport phenomena. Elective course Track Processtechnology Compulsory: Introduction to Physical Transport Phenomena 191370091 Physical Transport Phenomena 191370201

Additional info Prior knowledge

r.g.h.lammertink@utwente.nl

Exam Study material

?

ChE

5.0 EC

Q3

Lecturer(s)

Introduction to Inorganic Materials /Homologation – Inorganic materials

Course description

prof. dr. ing. D.H. A. Blank dr.ir. G. Koster -

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

Elective course track Molecules & Materials -

?

ChE

5.0 EC

Q1

Lecturer(s)

d.h.a.blank@utwente.nl g.koster@utwente.nl

Chemistry & technology of organic mat. II / Homologation – Organic Materials

Course description

prof.dr. G.J. Vancso prof. J. Feijen prof.dr. J.F.J. Engbersen -

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

Elective course track Molecules & Materials -

Study material

-

193770070

ChE

5.0 EC

Q?

g.j.vancso@utwente.nl j.feijen@utwente.nl j.f.j.engbersen@utwente.nl

Imperfections

Lecturer(s)

dr. ir. G. Koster g.koster@utwente.nl

Course description

Study of a topic in solid state chemistry concerning a deviation from perfect crystallinity. For example, at a crystal surface, atoms are not similarly 101


14. Course Information

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

coordinated as the bulk atoms, pointdefects, color centres, quasi crystals etc. What are the consequenses for the properties? Can defects be synthesized in a controlled manner and thereby the properties of a material. The course will be given in the form of informal lectures and discussion sessions. Some lectures will be given by the students. There will be an exam, the final grade is determined by the exam, homework and the lectures. Elective course track Molecules & Materials AMS courses exam, homework assignments, lecture

Study material

selected papers and articles

193737000

ChE C.S. Inorganic Membranes Q?

5.0 EC Lecturer(s)

Prof. dr. ir. A. Nijmeijer

Course description

a.nijmeijer@utwente.nl

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

In this course various topics from the world of inorganic membranes can be studied. This can range from a purely materials science oriented project to a more processtechnology oriented project (e.g. the application of inorganic membranes in the industry). The work can vary from a purely theoretical/literature study project to a more practical oriented project. report

Study material

-

193799500

ChE

5.0 EC

Q?

Literature Essay Minor Subject

Lecturer(s)

dr. ir. J.E. ten Elshof j.e.tenelshof@tnw.utwente.nl

Course description

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

The objective of the literature essay is to learn how to get acquainted with a topic from the recent literature in a critical, evaluating manner in a restricted period of time. The assignment is compulsory for MSc students in the track Molecules & Materials, and can only be carried out in a chair that is not involved in the Master thesis assignment. Supervision of the assignment is done by the CHE-teacher who defined the topic of the essay. Evaluation of the essay is done by two persons, one of them being the supervisor. Students who want to carry out a literature essay assignment should contact the coodinator, or one of the contact persons of the participating research chairs. Their names can be found on the website of the course. Compulsory course track Molecules & Materials. Literature Essay

Study material

-

193799120/ 193799130

Ch E

45 EC

Q-

Master’s Assignment Molecules and Materials: o 19379912 Research Aspects (25 EC) o 19379913 Reporting and General Aspects (20 EC) 102


14. Course Information Lecturer(s)

Master Assignment Committee. See chapter 13 for details

Course description

The individual Master‟s assignment is the completion of the Master‟s programme. The central theme is that the student learns and proves that (s)he is able to define, perform and completa a research project independently. The assignment is performed in one of the Chemical Engineering research groups of the UT under the supervision of a mentor and the responsibilty of a Master‟s Assignment Committee. Sometimes the assigment can be done partially at an external organisation. Compulsory course track Molecules & Materials See chapter 13 for additional info -

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam Study material

-

193799140/ 193799150

Ch E

45 EC

Q-

Master’s Assignment Process Technology o 19379914 Research Aspects (20 EC) o 19379915 Reporting and General Aspects (20 EC)

Lecturer(s)

Master Assignment Committee. See chapter 13 for details

Course description

Prior knowledge Exam

The individual Master‟s assignment is the completion of the Master‟s programme. The central theme is that the student learns and proves that (s)he is able to define, perform and completa a research project independently. The assignment is performed in one of the Chemical Engineering research groups of the UT under the supervision of a mentor and the responsibilty of a Master‟s Assignment Committee. Sometimes the assigment can be done partially at an external organisation. Compulsory course track Processtechnology See chapter 13 for additional info -

Study material

-

Additional info

193730000

ChE

5.0 EC

Q1

Lecturer(s)

Course description

Additional info

Prior knowledge

C.S. Materials Science and Technology of Polymers prof.dr. G.J. Vancso g.j.vancso@utwente.nl dr. H. Schonherr h.schonherr@utwente.nl dr. M.A. Hempenius m.a.hempenius@utwente.nl This course covers the following subjects:  Controlled Polymerizations.  Organometallic Polymers, Synthesis and Use in Functional Surfaces.  Single-Chain Chemistry and Physics of Smart, Responsive Polymers.  Confinement Effects and Polymers.  Materials Chemistry and Nanofabrication with Block Copolymers.  Micro- and Nanoscale Defined Surface Functionalization and Structuring for Controlled (Bio)Chemistry, Patterning and Biointerfacing. Elective Course Track Interested students should contact prof. Vancso (.j.vancso@tnw.utwente.nl). MTP will contact them individually to discuss the course schedule. 103


14. Course Information Exam

-

Study material

-

193735000

ChE

5.0 EC

Q3

C.S. Membrane Technology

Lecturer(s)

dr.ir. D.C. Nijmeijer

Course description

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

The course deals with the most important aspects of membrane technology. The topics include: materials properties, membrane preparation, characterization, transport phenomena, and module design, It therefore covers this area from the molecular aspects (materials) all the way to the implementation of membranes in processes. The assignment includes a referee report for a manuscript that is submitted to the journal of membrane science. In small groups, the students evaluate the correctness, originality, and novelty of a scientific manuscript. The deliverable of this assignment is a referee report, that will be sent to the editor of the journal. Elective Course Track Molecules & Materials Written exam, assignment

Study material

Basic principles om membrane technology by Marcel Mulder

193735050

ChE / BME

5.0 EC

Q4

d.c.nijmeijer@utwente.nl

Membrane Technology Laboratory

Lecturer(s)

D. Stamatialis

Course description

The course covers a broad range of experiments with artificial membranes. The students prepare and characterize their own membranes end evaluate them in various biomedical (drug delivery, hemodialysis, blood oxygenation, tissue engineering) and other applications Compulsory: CT + international MSc 19373500 Membrane Technology, 19373500 C.S. Membrane Technology 19373504 Biomedical Membrane Applications The students perform laboratory experiments and prepare experimental reports including analysis and discussion of the results. The course is coupled to the courses 19373500 and 19373504 which cover the relevant theory. Basic principles of Membrane Technology, second edition by M.Mulder, Kluwer Academic publichers, ISBN 0-7923-4247-x Handouts distributed via teletop

Additional info Prior knowledge

Exam

Study material

193780000

ChE

5.0 EC

Q-

d.stamatialis@utwente.nl

C.S. Mesoscale Chemical Systems

Lecturer(s)

prof. dr. J.G.E. Gardeniers

j.g.e.gardeniers@utwente.nl

Course description

In physics and chemistry the mesoscopic scale is the length scale at which one can reasonably discuss material properties or phenomena without 104


14. Course Information

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

having to discuss individual atom behaviour. Applied research at this scale is covered by the fields of nanotechnology and microtechnology (including microsystem technology, MST, micro electromechanical systems, MEMS, and microreaction technology). The aim of the research group Mesoscale Chemical Systems is to study the behaviour and control of fluids, including miscible and immiscible liquids, gases and two-phase gas-liquid systems and of the chemical species contained in these fluids in a confined environment and more specifically, near plain, nanostructured and/or or reactive surfaces and interfaces. The main research themes are: i. "exciting" chemistry in microreactors, focusing on microfluidic systems to which electronically controlled stimuli are applied in order to control the course of chemical reactions; ii. microfluidic process analytical technology, focusing on integrated chromatography-based separation methods and integrated spectroscopic techniques, like MS and NMR; iii. catalytic microdevices and nanostructures. In the C.S. project, the student is expected to perform a literature study on a topic of choice, that relates to the described field-. The report may also serve as an introduction to a Master's assignment. Elective course for M&M and PT track Written report (in English)

Study material

-

193775000

ChE

5.0 EC

Q-

C.S. Molecular Nano Fabrication

Lecturer(s)

prof.dr.ir. J. Huskens

Course description

The course Paper & Presentation deals with all kinds of skills you need being a scientist: from defining a topic, through searching and evaluating information, keeping notebooks, to writing and presenting your results.

Additional info

Exam

Elective course track Molecules & Materials. Required for students who want tot do their MSc project in MnF or SMCT Compulsory: Organic Chemistry Oral exam

Study material

Handouts, presentations an exercises (through Teletop)

Prior knowledge

193760030

ChE

5.0 EC

Q4

j.huskens@utwente.nl

Molecule Spectrometry

Lecturer(s)

dr. A.H. Velders a.h.velders@utwente.nl

Course description

In this course magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques will be treated, like Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (EPR). Focus is on advanced (N)MR tecniques, 1D, 2D and pseudo 2D. Goals is to acquire knowledge on the different possible techniques that can be used to characterize and/or investigate (inorganic/organic/biological) small molecules, supramolecular systems, macromolecules and nanoparticles. 105


14. Course Information Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

Elective course track Molecules & Materials BSc niveau Molecuulspectroskopie (TMS 136025) Written exam

Study material

Bruice. Organic Chemistry, 4e/5e ed. Atkins, Physical Chemistry, 7e/8e ed. Handouts Blackbord

193720020

ChE

5.0 EC

Q3

Multiphase Reaction Technology

Lecturer(s)

dr. F. Gallucci

Course description

Exam

Doel van het vak is om inzicht en ervaring te verwerven met betrekking tot het selecteren en gebruiken van reactoren/contactapparatuur in de procestechnologie. In de hoor/werkcolleges zullen diverse typen apparatuur worden behandeld, zoals: fluid bedden, gepakt bed reactoren, risers, bellenkolommen, schotelkolommen, slurry reactoren, geroerde tankreactoren en trickle bed reactoren. Het vak wordt afgesloten met een eindopdracht uit de behandelde twee hoofdgroepen contactoren: gasvloeistof (vast) en gas-vast Compulsory course Track Processtechnology 191370091 Inleiding fysische transportverschijnselen 191370201 Fysische transportverschijnselen 19371502 Chemical Reaction Engineering assignment

Study material

syllabus

Additional info Prior knowledge

193740040

ChE

5 EC

Q?

Organic Chemistry of Polymers

Lecturer(s)

prof.dr. P.J. Dijkstra

Course description

-

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

Oral

Study material

-

193730040

ChE / BME

5.0

Q1

f.gallucci@utwente.nl

p.j.dijkstra@utwente.nl

Polymers & Material Science pract.

Lecturer(s)

Dr. M.A. Hempenius

m.a.hempenius@tnw.utwente.nl

Course description

Dit vak is komt voort uit het voormalig practicum Polymeerchemie en Materiaalkunde. Dit is een CS vak waarin studenten kunnen kiezen voor een practische opdracht om hun kennis in specifieke gebieden van polymeerchemie en materiaalkunde te verdiepen. Voorbeelden van onderwerpen zijn fabricage van functionele oppervlakken dmv microcontact printing op dunne polymeerfilms, levendepolymerisaties (anionisch of gecontroleerd radicaal (ATRP) enz. Over elk experiment wordt een verslag geschreven dat wordt nabesproken met de assistent. 106


14. Course Information

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

Elective course track Molecules & Materials Final grades are based on work, reports and discussions

Study material

Folder with prescriptions, machine manuals and special theory.

193740000

ChE

5.0 EC

Q?

C.S. Polymer Chemistry and Biomaterials

Lecturer(s)

prof. dr. J.F.J. Engbersen

Course description

Topics regarding Polymer Chemistry and Biomaterials

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

Elective course track Molecules & Materials -

Study material

-

193750030

ChE

5.0 EC

Q3

Lecturer(s)

Course description

Additional info Prior knowledge

Exam Study material

j.f.j.engbersen@utwente.nl

Process Equipment Design dr.ir. T.C. Bor t.c.bor@utwente.nl prof.dr.ir. T.H. van der Meer t.h.vandermeer@utwente.nl dr.ir. I.G. Racz i.g.racz@utwente.nl dr.ir. A.G.J. van der Ham a.g.j.vanderham@utwente.nl dr.ir. B.H.L. Betlem b.h.l.betlem@utwente.nl The objectives of this course are the transfer of insight, knowledge, and experience for the technological design of (chemical) process equipment. Contents: Design methodology. Equipment for momentum transport: pumps, fans, compressors. Equipment for heat transport: heat exchangers without and with phase transitions (condensers/reboilers). Equipment for mass transport: distillation columns, absorbers, strippers, and extraction columns. Mechanical design aspects of process equipment. The oral exam evaluates in particular a (group) assignment for the design of three different types of equipment focussing on momentum, heat and mass transport. For (CHE) students not familiar with mech. design some additional introduction lectures are given. For (ME) students not familiar with the unit operations Distillation/ Absorption/Stripping and Extraction also additional intro. lect. will be presented Compulsory course track Processtechnology Essential: 191370091 Introduction to Physical Transport Phenomena (CT) 191370201 Physical Transport Phenomena (CT) 115413 Introduction to Fluid Dynamics (Inleiding Stromingsleer) (WB) en 115414 Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer I (Stroming en Warmte, WB) Oral exam after (group) assignment Course Notes (dictaat) “Process Equipment Design� additional Course notes via Teletop

107


14. Course Information 193790010

ChE

10 EC

Q-

Lecturer(s) Course description

Additional info Prior knowledge

Exam

Study material

193775020

ChE

5.0 EC

Q4

Lecturer(s) Course description

Process Plant Design / PPD Lectures prof.dr.ir. H. Van den Berg h.vandenberg@utwente.nl dr.ir. A.G.J. van der Ham a.g.j.vanderham@utwente.nl The objective of this process design course is to transfer a method for process design. The method teached for the analysis and the design of chemical processes uses methods for “conceptual” design and “process systems design” which have been developed in the last twenty years. The lectures use fundamentals of this approach and translate them into applications. The basic disciplines teached in the undergraduate curriculum will be recapped, integrated and expanded. Many aspects of doing an industrial project will be practized. Such as: phasing and project organization, how to handle alternatives, selection and evaluation of technologies. Functional analysis of existing processes and how to create concepts for improved designs. Basics of mass balances will be given, follow up into process simulations. Basics of heat integration, and fundamentals and application of process safety will be teached. Equipment selection and design will be applied. Perspectives for future developments will be discussed. We use e.g. Aspen Plus process simulation programs and HTFS programs for selection and design of heat exchangers. Systematic approach of process safety. Basics and application of process control and process economics are parts of the program. Generation and evaluation of process alternatives has to be practiced. About half of the 10 EC is spent for the development of a process design assignment, which is carried out in teams of about four students in parallel to the lectures and workshops. Compulsory course track Processtechnology Basic disciplines – Thermodynamics and flowsheeting, Multiphase reactor technology, Reactor and micro reactor engineering, Process equipment design. Bachelor education completed. Preferred: Process control, catlysis, membranes, thermodynamics and phase equilibria, relationship processtechnology and society (economics, environment). Written, open book. Candidates have to perform a process design task as a team of two in a limited time (0.5 day). Secondly: Evaluation of the process design assignment carried out in prallel to the lectures. J.M. Douglas, “Conceptual Design, of Chemical Processes” W.D. Seider, J.D. Seader, D.R. Levin, “Process Design Principles”

Physical Organic Chemistry P. Jonkheijm p.jonkheijm@utwente.nl prof.dr.ir. J. Huskens j.huskens@utwente.nl Making correlations between stable organic structures and reactive intermediates enables students to develop reaction mechanisms using concepts of structure and bonding. The students will learn the ability to anticipate and design organic chemistry experiments and decipher their mechanism using concepts of kinetics and dynamics. Several examples from organometallic chemistry, bio-organic chemistry and enzymology are used to highlight the utility of the techniques in different fields. The students will advance their analysis of electronic structure theory by getting acquinted with notions of quantum mechanics. The students will apply these notions to the analysis of pericyclic reactions, photochemistry and electronic organic materials. 108


14. Course Information Additional info Prior knowledge Exam Study material

Elective course track Molecules & Materials Elective Course MSc assignment MnF/SMCT 191300041 Structuur en reactiviteit 191320013 Organische chemie oral/written Modern physical organic chemistry, Eric V. Anslyn/ Dennis A. Douhgherty, University Science Books, Sausalito, California, 2006

193760000

ChE

5.0 EC

Q-

C.S. Supramolecular Chemistry and Technology

Lecturer(s)

dr. W. Verboom

Course description

See 19377500

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

Elective course track Molecules & Materials Compulsory: 191320013 Organische Chemie Oral exam or essay

Study material

handouts

193720050

ChE

5.0 EC

Q1

w.verboom@utwente.nl

Theory of Phase Equilibria

Lecturer(s)

dr.ir. M.A. van der Hoef

Course description

Prior knowledge Exam

The first part of this course consists of a recapitulation of elementary thermodynamics from a more formal viewpoint by using state functions, rather than from processes, as is common in most undergraduate courses. This formalism will then be applied to a description of phase-equilibria between two or more phases of single component systems. This is followed by a description of phase equilibria in two- and threecomponent systems, where the solutions are considered to be ideal. Finally, non-idealicity is introduced via excess functions and activity models. The most important application is found in the calculation of the Px,y diagram of a binary system, starting from well-known excess state functions such as the Peng-Robinson and the RKS equation of state. This calculation will require some code development. This course is highly suitable for self study, where assistance from the lecturer can be obtained on an individual basis, preferably by appointment. In any case it is requested to get into touch with the lecturer before commencing. In the case of self-study, the course can be done the whole year round. If there is sufficient interest, a limited set of lectures will be given, in principle in the third term. Possible to work with 2 student on one report Elective course for M&M and PT track Report assignments

Study material

Syllabus

Additional info

m.a.vanderhoef@utwente.nl

109


14. Course Information 193785000

ChE

5.0 EC

Q-

C.S. Thermo-Chemical Conversion of Biomass

Lecturer(s)

dr. S.R.A. Kersten

Course description

-

Additional info Prior knowledge Exam

-

Study material

-

193735010

ChE

5.0 EC

Q2

s.r.a.kersten@utwente.nl

Thermodynamica and Flowsheeting

Lecturer(s)

dr.ir. A.G.J. van der Ham

Course description

Exam

The course deals with the principles of flowsheeting, the practical use of modern flowsheeting software and the advantages but also the limits of these programs. At the end of the course we hope that students appreciate and are able to work with the flowsheeting tools available, but are also aware of the pitfalls linked to wording with these programs. A thougtless use of flowsheeting will eventually lead to science fiction. The theory is discussed in seven lectures, dealing with topics like flowsheet analysis to obtain the best calculation sequence, models of unit operations available and how they work, models to describe the thermodynamic and physical data of pure components but also of mixtures, convergence methods and accelerators, etc. Parallel to the lectures also workshops are given where the students learn to work with an industrial flowsheeter (Unisim). The course is completed with a project dealing with all the subjects discussed in the lectures. The report is graded. Compulsory course for the Track Processtechnology Essential: 191385060 Seperation Methods Assignment + oral exam

Study material

Handouts via Blackboard

Additional info Prior knowledge

a.g.j.vanderham@utwente.nl

110


Appendices

Appendices

111


Appendices

APPENDIX 1 – MAP OF THE UNIVERSITY

112


Appendices

APPENDIX 2 – ORGANISATIONAL CHART TNW FACULTY

Dean

Research Institutes

Prof. dr. ir. G. van der Steenhoven

Mesa+ Impact MIRA

Bureau of the Faculty

Faculty Counsel Adviescommissies

Kamer van hoogleraren TNW Kamer van hoogleraren TN Kamer van hoogleraren CT

Research Groups TNW

Educational Directors AT Dr.ir. J. Flokstra BMT Mw. drs. H. A. T. Miedema ST Dr. B.H.L. Betlem TG Mw. drs. H. A. T. Miedema TN Mw. dr. N.J.C. Letteboer

Managing Director M.M. van Aken

- Bureau Faculty Dean (BFD) - Personnel & Organization Dept. - AMH (working conditions, environment & housing) - Financial Department - Communication Department - Purchase Department - ICT Service - TCO Technical Support

- Educational Coördination - Study Advice - Bureau of Educational Affairs - Study information - Science information

113


Appendices

APPENDIX 3 – STAFF CONTACT INFORMATION Name

Adress

Phone

Email

A ing. A.H. Akse

Horsttoren 615

2886

h.a.akse@utwente.nl

B dr. ir. N.E. Benes

Meander 329

4288

n.e.benes@utwente.nl

B prof. Dr. ir. H. Van den Berg

Meander 229

4482

h.vandenberg@utwente.nl

B dr. Ir. B. H. L. Betlem

Horsttoren 609

3043

b.h.l.betlem@utwente.nl

B prof. Dr. ing. D.H. A. Blank

NanoLab 2001

2714

d.h.a.blank@utwente.nl

B dr. B.A. Boukamp

Carre 3190

2990

b.a.boukamp@utwente.nl

B dr. H.J.M. Bouwmeester

Meander 349

2202

h.j.m.bouwmeester@utwente.nl

B mw. B.A. Bruggink-de Braal

Horsttoren 605

2082

b.a.debraal@utwente.nl

B ir. E.A. Bramer

Horstring N234

2597

e.a.bramer@utwente.nl

B dr.ir. D.W.F. Brilman

Meander 222

6969

d.w.f.brilman@utwente.nl

C prof. dr. J.J.L.M. Cornelissen

Carre 4225

4380

j.j.l.m.cornelissen@utwente.nl

D dr. P. J. Dijkstra

Zuidhorst 242

3004

p.j.dijkstra@utwente.nl

E dr. ir J.E. ten Elshof

Carre 3249

2695

j.e.tenelshof@utwente.nl

E prof.dr. J.F.J. Engbersen

Zuidhorst 255

2926

j.f.j.engbersen@utwente.nl

F

prof. J. Feijen

Zuidhorst 244/245

2976

j.feijen@utwente.nl

F

Ing. A. Folkers

Horsttoren 609

2772

a.folkers@utwente.nl

G dr. ir. V.J. Gadgil

NanoLab NL1001

4276

v.j.gadgil@utwente.nl

G Prof. Dr. R. Gani

Meander 223

4482

r.gani@utwente.nl

G prof. Dr. J.G.E. Gardeniers

Meander 149

4356

j.g.e.gardeniers@utwente.nl

H dr. ir. A.G.J. van der Ham

Meander 218

5430

a.g.j.vanderham@utwente.nl

H dr. M.A. Hempenius

Carre 4239

2975

m.a.hempenius@utwente.nl

H dr.ir. M.A. van der Hoef

-

-

m.a.vanderhoef@utwente.nl

H dr. A. van Houselt

Meander 359

2999

a.vanhouselt@utwente.nl

H prof.dr.ir. J. Huskens

Carre 4221

2995

j.huskens@utwente.nl

J

Carre 4229

2987

p.jonkheijm@utwente.nl

K dr. S.R.A. Kersten

Meander 216

4430

s.r.a.kersten@utwente.nl

K dr. ir. G. Koster

Carre 3247

4710

g.koster@utwente.nl

K ir. H. Kroon

-

4167

h.kroon@utwente.nl

dr. P. Jonkheijm

L

prof.dr. ir. R.G.H. Lammertink Meander 314

2063

r.g.h.lammertink@utwente.nl

L

prof.dr.ir. L. Lefferts

Meander 357

2858

l.lefferts@utwente.nl

M drs. A.D. van der Meer

Carre 2441

4851

a.d.vandermeer@utwente.nl

M prof. dr. ir. G. Mul

Meander 225

3890

g.mul@utwente.nl

N prof. dr. ir. A. Nijmeijer

Meander 346

2262

a.nijmeijer@utwente.nl

N dr. ir. D.C. Nijmeijer

Meander 325

4185

d.c.nijmeijer@utwente.nl

O Mevr. N. H. Oesterholt

Horstring Z 204

2925

n.h.oesterholt@utwente.nl

P dr. A.A. Poot

Zuidhorst 243

3671

a.a.poot@utwente.nl

R dr. ir. I.G. Racz

-

-

i.g.racz@utwente.nl

R dr. ir. G. van Rossum

Meander 219

3902

g.vanrossum@utwente.nl

R dr. ing. A.J.H.M. Rijnders

Carre 3243

2618

a.j.h.m.rijnders@utwente.nl

S dr. K. Seshan

Meander 361

3254

k.seshan@utwente.nl 114


Appendices S D. Stamatialis

Zuidhorst 254

4675

d.stamatialis@utwente.nl

S M.A. Stehouwer, MA

Horsttoren 707

2678

m.a.stehouwer@utwentel.nl

S prof. dr. ir. W.P.M. van Swaaij Meander 224

2880

w.p.m.vanswaaij@utwente.nl

V prof. G.J. Vancso

Carre 4243

2967

g.j.vancso@utwente.nl

V dr. A.H. Velders

Zuidhorst 232

2988

a.h.velders@utwente.nl

V dr. W. Verboom

Carre 4219

2977

w.verboom@utwente.nl

W dr. A.J.A. Winnubst

Meander 348

2994

a.j.a.winnubst@utwente.nl

W mw. E. Wisselo

Horstring Z 204

3000

e.wisselo@utwente.nl

115


Appendices

APPENDIX 4 – OER-TNW Please note: a new Master CER will be published in January 2012, it will be placed on the ChE website for your information.

Faculty of Science and Technology

General section of the programme part of the student statute, including the Course and Examination Regulations (OER) for the master's degree programmes Applied Physics, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Nanotechnology, Technical Medicine (Art. 7.13 and 7.59 WHW)

Faculty of Science and Technology

Reference: Date:

TNW100001/vdh 26th March 2010

116


Appendices Table of contents Preamble

Applicability of the regulations ......................................................................... 118

Paragraph 1

General ..................................................................................................................... 119

Article 1 Article 2 Article 3 Article 4 Article 5 Article 6 Article 7 Article 8 Article 9 Article 10 Article 11 Article 12

Definition of terms ............................................................................................ 119 Programme content ......................................................................................... 121 Information about units of study ...................................................................... 121 Programme learning outcomes ....................................................................... 121 Admission to the programme (WHW, art. 7.30), double Masterâ€&#x;s ................... 121 Language ......................................................................................................... 122 Allocation of students ...................................................................................... 122 Archiving .......................................................................................................... 122 Student counselling WHW, art. 7.13 clause 2u), ............................................. 122 Studying with a functional impairment (WHW art. 7.13 clause 2m) , .............. 122 Facilities (WHW art. 7.59) ................................................................................ 123 Internal quality assurance and workload ......................................................... 123

Paragraph 2

Examinations (WHW art. 7.10 clause 1) ...................................................... 124

Article 13 Article 14 Article 15 Article 16 Article 17 Article 18 Article 19 Article 20

Enrolment, frequency, time periods (WHW art. 7.13 clause 2j) , .................... 124 Examination forms and means of assessment ................................................ 125 Oral examinations (WHW art.7.13 clause 2n) ................................................. 125 Validity of examinations (WHW art.7.13 clause 2k) ........................................ 125 Registration and publication of results (WHW art.71.3 clause 2o) .................. 125 Right of inspection and appraisal (WHW art. 7.13 clause 2p and 2q) ............. 126 Administrative errors or oversights .................................................................. 126 Exemption from an examination or practical exercise (WHW art.7.13 clause 2) 126

Paragraph 3

Final examinations ........................................................................................ 127

Article 21 Article 22 Article 23 Article 24 Article 25

Programme-related final examination (WHW, art. 7.10 and 7.13 clause 2a) .. 127 The board of examiners (WHW, art. 7.12) ...................................................... 127 Time periods, final examination frequency (WHW, art. 7.13 clause 2j) .......... 127 Certificate and registration (WHW, art. 7.11) .................................................. 128 Degree and title (WHW art.7.10a, 7.19a and 7.20) ......................................... 128

Paragraph 4

Appeals and complaints ............................................................................... 129

Article 26

Individual appeals and complaints (WHW, art. 7.61) ...................................... 129

Paragraph 5

Discrepancies, amendments and implementation ..................................... 129

Article 27 Article 28 Article 29 Article 30 Article 31

Regulation discrepancies ................................................................................ 129 Amendments to the regulations ....................................................................... 129 Transitional regulations ................................................................................... 130 Publication ....................................................................................................... 130 Inception date .................................................................................................. 130

117


Appendices Preamble Applicability of the regulations 1. This general section applies to the course and final examinations of the Applied Physics (Croho: 60436 Applied Physics), Biomedical Engineering (Croho: 66226 Biomedical Engineering), Chemical Engineering (Croho: 60437 Chemical Engineering), Nanotechnology (Croho: 60028 Nanotechnology) and Technical Medicine (Croho: 60033 Technical Medicine) Master's degree programmes. 2. There is a programme-specific appendix for each of the degree programmes stipulated in the first clause of this article. Examination commissions themselves stipulate rules for the purpose of the examinations without consulting other parties (WHW art.7.12). These are stipulated in a separate "Examination Commission Rules" document. 3. Per programme, the general section, the programme-specific appendix and the examination commission rules together comprise the programme-specific part of the student statute, including the course and examination regulations for the Master's degree programme concerned, henceforth referred to as: the regulations. 4. The legal jurisdiction of a programme's examination commission is applicable to all units of study which relate to a study programme. The definitions in the general section, in the programme-specific appendix and in the examination commission rules are also applicable to units of study that are taught by non-TNW Faculty or non-University of Twente lecturers (WHW art.7.12). 5. The Faculty of Science and Technology, henceforth referred to as TNW, is responsible for the programmes taught. 6. The Dean stipulates the general section and the programme-specific appendices of the course and examination regulations. 7. English translations of this general section, the programme-specific appendices and the examination commission rules are available. In the event of discrepancy, the Dutch text and not the English takes precedence.

118


Appendices Paragraph 1 Article 1

General

Definition of terms

The meaning of terms appearing in the regulations is the same as that of terms appearing in the Higher Education and Research Act (WHW). As follows, the terms and their definitions: a.

Final project

the Master's thesis. Regarding Technical Medicine, the final project is done during the clinical specialisation internship, b. Final colloquium closing presentation on the final project, c. Croho Central Register of Higher Education Study Programmes; The Croho registers higher education programmes recognised by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, d. curriculum see 'study programme', e. dean head of the faculty, f. lecturer member of staff responsible for teaching within a unit of study g. EC European Credit, a 28-hour study point as stipulated by the Act, h. ECTS European Credits Transfer System; agreements have been made whereby the same system to define study-load is utilised; a year's study-load totals 60 European Credit Points i.e. 1,680 hours ((WHW art. 7.4), i. examination evaluation, whereby the board of examiners determines by means of the respective article 7.10 of the Act, whether all the requirements with regard to the Master's exam have been complied to, j. board of examiners the programme's board of examiners, which is implemented by the Dean in compliance with article 7.12 of the Act, k. examiner person who, in compliance with article 7.12, clause 3, is appointed by the board of examiners for the purpose of holding examinations. This can only be a member of staff who is responsible for teaching in the respective unit of study or an external expert, l. faculty the Faculty of Science and Technology of the University of Twente, m. authorised evidence authorised evidence is a list paraphrased by - or on behalf of - an examiner, or other document, or alternatively results published via the information system in use, n. certification proof that the final examination has been passed in compliance with article 7.11, clause 2 of the Act. o. institution University of Twente, p. clinical internship in a clinical setting, students learn to apply medical-technological processes based on professional behaviour, within diagnostics and/or the treatment of patients, q. term a semester is divided into two terms, r. unit of study a programme unit of study as stipulated by article 7.3, clauses 2 and 3 of the Act, as well as a practical exercise, s. study programme the programme that describes which units of study comprise the Master's degree programme (also known as curriculum), t. programme the Master's degree programme, as stipulated in the appendix of this general section, u. programme commission a commission consisting of lecturers and students whose tasks include making recommendations regarding the course and examination regulations and, if required or by own initiative, making recommendations to the Dean about all matters regarding educational content and teaching within their programme (WHW, art.9.18), v. programme director: the person who is given the responsibility by the Dean of managing the programme (WHW, art. 9.17); a detailed description of the Programme Director's responsibilities can be found in the faculty regulations, w. laboratory practice a unit of study including practical exercises in the form of conducting tests or experiments, x. practical exercises a practical exercise as stipulated in article 7.13, clause 2d of the Act is a unit of study or part thereof, with emphasis on the activity of the student him/herself, such as: 119


Appendices 1. conducting a literary study, writing a paper or making an experimental design, writing an essay, an article or position paper or giving a public presentation, 2. carrying out a design or research assignment, conducting tests and experiments, participating in laboratory practice, applying skills, 3. doing an internship, participating in fieldwork or an excursion, 4. participating in other required didactic activities, with the aim of acquiring the requisite skills, for example goal-oriented training in clinical skills in a purpose-built skills laboratory, y. professional conduct a personal style of work manifested in verbal communication, behaviour and appearance, whereby the standards and values of the practice of one's profession are evident; z. regulations the programme-specific part of the student statute, including the course and examination regulations for the Master's degree programme in question, per degree programme, comprising a general section, the programme-specific appendix and the relevant board of examiners' rules; aa. S&OA Student and Study Administration, bb. semester the academic year is divided into two semesters, cc. student person who is enrolled in a programme, in compliance with article 7.34 and 7.36 of the Act, dd. student information web application for registering all relevant system student and study details, ee. student advisor the person appointed by the Dean who serves as a contact person between students and the department, and as such acts in the interests of the students and fulfils the role of mentor and advisor, ff. study guide the (printed) programme guide or (internet) description, which contains specific information with regard to the programme, st st gg. study year the period that commences on 1 September and concludes on 31 August of the following year. The academic year comprises 60 EC‟s or 1,680 hours, hh. study point unit of study-load, expressed in EC (European Credit), in compliance with the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS); one study point consists of a study-load of 28 hours. ii. study speed a figure that represents which part of the programme has been completed in a given period according to nominal planning, jj. examination an analysis of a student's knowledge, insight and skills with regard to a unit of study, as well as the assessment of that analysis by at least one examiner appointed for this purpose by the board of examiners, kk. test interim assessment of knowledge, insight and skills with regard to a part of a unit of study (also referred to as a 'preliminary examination' – „deeltentamen‟ - or an 'interim test' – „tussentoets‟), ll. flexible programme an board of examiners-approved programme compiled by the student and assessed by means of a final examination (WHW, art. 7.3c), mm. workday the days from Monday to Friday, with the exception of public holidays and the fixed staff holidays when people are not at work, nn. act the Higher Education and Research Act, abbreviated to WHW, Orders and Decrees 593, and subsequently amended accordingly, oo. WHW Higher Education and Research Act.

120


Appendices Article 2

Programme content

1. Regarding the programme, at least the following descriptions have been included in the programme-specific appendices: a. content of the programme and the respective final examination (WHW art. 7.13, clause 2a), b. content of majors (WHW art. 7.13, article 2b), c. organization of practical exercises (WHW art. 7.13 clause 2d), d. study-load of the programme and of each of its constituent units of study (WHW, art) 7.13 clause 2e), e. number and sequence of the examinations and practical exercises (WHW art.) 7.13 clause 2h), f. programme types: full-time, part-time, dual, in compliance with the Central Register of Higher Education Study Programmes (Croho), (WHW, art. 7.13 clause 2i), g. assessment forms: oral, written, individual, group, etc. (WHW art. 7.13 clause 2l), h. sequence requirements: whether having successfully passed examinations is a prerequisite for studying or taking other examinations; entrance requirements and obligations with regard to participating in practical exercises (WHW art. 7.13 clause 2s,t), i. requirements that are established for the content of the programme's flexible component and for the choices to be made, j. transitional regulations, as defined in article 27 of this general section. 2. The programme-specific appendix pertains integrally to these regulations.

Article 3

Information about units of study

1. No later than two weeks prior to the start of a study period (semester or term) when a unit of study is offered, the responsible examiner publishes the following aspects of the course: size, required prior knowledge and unit of study content, study material, examination requirements, examination form, the weighting of the final grade in the case of several forms of assessment, and the teaching forms. If a book has been set as study material, the responsible examiner of the unit of study publishes this at least 10 weeks prior to the start of the lectures. 2. The information stipulated in clause 1 is in any case registered in the information system used by the UT.

Article 4

Programme learning outcomes

The target objectives and learning outcomes (WHW, art. 7.13, clause 2, sub-clause b) are stipulated in the programme appendix.

Article 5

Admission to the programme (WHW, art. 7.30), double Master’s

1.

Admission to a Master's programme is stipulated in the programme appendix.

2.

The Dean of the TNW Faculty establishes an admissions commission, for the purpose of admitting students to the Master's programme for whom the Master's programme in question is not a follow-on Master's, as stipulated in article 7.30a of the Act. The composition of the admissions commission is stipulated in the programme appendix.

3.

The commission, as stated in clause 2, has been authorised by the Executive Board (reference S&C/387.191/lk) to admit or reject applicants.

4.

In the case of a student following two Master's programmes (the 'double Master's'), including at least one Master's programme at the TNW Faculty, the boards of examiners concerned determines the specific requirements which the study programme of the student in question must meet.

121


Appendices 5.

The student, the S&OA and if applicable the admissions commission, as stipulated in clause 2 of this article, are required to inform the boards of examiners concerned as soon as possible of the fact that the student is following two Master's programmes.

Article 6

Language

1.

The Master's programme's language of instruction is English (Resolution 343.967 University of Twente Board of Governors 343.967).

2.

The examinations and final examinations are to be held in English, unless the specific nature, the set-up or the quality of the course, or the origin of a student gives cause to hold the examination or final examination in Dutch.

3.

If neither the examiner nor the examinee objects, an examination may be held in another language.

4.

Programme-specific additions to the stipulations in the article have been established in the programme appendix and/or the Board of examiners Rules

Article 7

Allocation of students

1.

Students are allocated to laboratory practice by the laboratory practice coordinators, taking into account as much as possible a student's previously-stated preference. Students are given timely notice of their allocation, in addition to which they are given the opportunity before a certain deadline to change the dates, in consultation with the laboratory practice coordinators.

2.

It is compulsory for students to report to the laboratory practice rooms on the dates and at the times as determined on the deadline date. Non-attendance due to circumstances beyond one's control will be assessed by the laboratory practice coordinators.

3.

Students who have not complied on two occasions to the registration terms for laboratory practice, will initially be barred from participating in one of the laboratory practices. They will be admitted only once they have submitted a substantiated request, which then subsequently, potentially with certain conditions, is granted by the board of examiners.

Article 8

Archiving

The examiner, who has assessed a student's written examination, ensures that the submitted examination is filed for a minimum of two years by the respective chair or group administration. After said period, the examination in question may be destroyed.

Article 9

Student counselling WHW, art. 7.13 clause 2u),

1.

The Dean is responsible for student counselling.

2.

One or more study advisors are appointed for each degree programme.

3.

Students, who after three attempts still have not obtained a pass grade for a unit of study and still wish to do so, are required to submit a request to still be permitted to take the examination for the corresponding unit of study. This request must be accompanied by an implementation plan drawn up by the student, in consultation with the examiner of the corresponding unit of study and the study advisor. The board of examiners rules on the request.

4.

The Dean is responsible for registration and timely publication of the examination results of individual students in the institution's student information system.

Article 10 Studying with a functional impairment (WHW art. 7.13 clause 2m) , 122


Appendices 1.

2.

A functional impairment is defined as a chronic physical, sensory or other functional disorder which may restrict a student's progress. a. By means of an intake interview with the study advisor and/or student dean and in consultation with the student, will be determined which modifications are considered the most effective. If modifications have been granted, achievement of the learning outcomes must be safeguarded. b. Based on the interview referred to in a., the student, in consultation with the study advisor or student dean, writes a request to have the modifications granted. c. The request will, if possible, be submitted to the Dean of the Faculty three months prior to participating in studies, taking examinations or doing practical exercises. d. The request will be supported by documentation (such as a medical certificate from a doctor, psychologist or, in the case of dyslexia, from a BIF, NIB or NVO- registered test centre), which are deemed reasonable and required to assess it.

3. a. The Dean determines within a period of 20 workdays after receipt, or sooner if deemed necessary by the urgency of the request, the appropriateness of the request as stipulated in clause 2, and informs the student and the relevant study advisor of his/her ruling. b. In the event that the Dean does not grant the request, he/she informs the student on what grounds the decision has been made, and informs the student of the possibility of lodging a complaint or making an appeal. c. Upon granting the request, the period for which it is valid will be indicated. Before the end of the period, an evaluation will take place between the applicant and respective study advisor. Both the effectiveness of the granted modifications as well as the necessity for its continuation will then be discussed. 4.

The authority stipulated in clause 3 is conferred by the Dean to the Programme Director. All references in this article to 'Dean of the Faculty' or 'Dean' must be interpreted as 'Programme Director'. What is stipulated in art.26.3 of this general section is applicable to an appeal against a decision, as stipulated in clause 3 of this article.

5.

In addition to clause 3a of this article, the Programme Director also informs S&OA of his/her ruling. S&OA informs teachers in a timely manner of modifications which are related to their unit of study.

Article 11 Facilities (WHW art. 7.59) 1. Information for and about the study and regarding administrative procedures is supplied via Internet or intranet. The University of Twente works with an electronic learning environment. 2. Students are required to have a laptop when starting their studies. Students can obtain a laptop at the Notebook Service Centre (NSC). With the laptop, students will be able to make use of the University of Twente's wireless network, providing them with access to intranet and Internet. 3. There is a limited number of project rooms available to students for carrying out activities together. Besides the project rooms, there is also a study room in the central university library. 4. The TNW Faculty provides student associations with rooms to carry out their activities. 5. An extensive collection of relevant literature for the programme is available in the university library. If required, the libraries at the Universitair Centrum in Nijmegen and at the Medisch Spectrum Twente in Enschede may be used. Furthermore, there is an extensive collection with relevant literature for the Technical Medicine programme, available in the department's study rooms. 6. Students who are allocated to a Chair during their final project have, at the very least, a table, chair and computer facilities at their disposal.

Article 12 Internal quality assurance and workload

123


Appendices 1.

The internal quality assurance system is described in the department's quality assurance manual. In this manual, there is a detailed description of the organisation, the procedures and the commissions concerned, including the programme commission.

2.

When determining and devising the study programme, we endeavour to achieve as much as possible an evenly-distributed study-load for the students in every term, semester and study year. This entails a study-load of 30 Âą 1 EC per semester and 15 Âą 1 EC per term.

Paragraph 2 Examinations (WHW art. 7.10 clause 1) Article 13 Enrolment, frequency, time periods (WHW art. 7.13 clause 2j) , 1.

Students are required to register for written examinations and tests.

2.

Information regarding enrolment deadlines for written examinations and tests can be found on the annual timetable.

3.

In the event that a student has not enrolled before the deadline, his/her right to take the test or examination in question will be lost.

4.

Students may withdraw from taking an examination up to five days prior to it.

5.

The opportunity to take written and oral examinations is offered at least twice a year. Practical exercises may be completed at least once a year. The rules that apply to a practical exercise will be published at the start of the unit of study. The opportunity to take an examination at the end of the study period (semester or term) in which the corresponding unit of study is offered, will be provided for all units of study. In exceptional cases, the student may deliberate with the examiner about the possibility of an individual examination.

6.

The examination timetable for the year will be published one month prior to the start of that study year.

7.

The scheduled times of examinations for the semester will be published before the start of that semester.

8.

Rescheduling an examination to another time than that stated in the timetable is only permitted upon authorisation from the Dean. The student will be informed of this rescheduling.

9.

The authority referred to in clause 8 is conferred by the Dean to the Programme Director. The Programme Director must inform the board of examiners of the decision to reschedule at the examination meeting directly following the decision.

10. In exceptional cases, the board of examiners can deviate from the number of and manner in which examinations can be taken. 11. Contrary to that determined in clause 5 of this article, the opportunity is provided to take an examination at least once in a given academic year for a unit of study that was not taught in that same year.

124


Appendices Article 14 Examination forms and means of assessment 1.

An examination can include the following forms: a written examination, an oral examination, a series of tests, the assessment of practical exercises, as stipulated in article 1 of this general section. the assessment of an oral and/or written presentation of a practical exercise, as stipulated in article 1 of this general section, a combination of the aforementioned forms.

2.

Information regarding forms and types of examinations, and in the case of multiple forms of testing, the weighting for the final grade can be found in the University of Twente's subject information system (article 3 of this general section).

3.

Students have the right to consult recent mock and/or old examinations and the corresponding assessment norms.

Article 15 Oral examinations (WHW art.7.13 clause 2n) 1.

Oral examinations are public, unless in exceptional cases otherwise determined by the board of examiners.

2.

The board of examiners formulates rules to ensure that oral examinations are held correctly.

3. The Board of Examiners Rules stipulates that the term „publicâ€&#x; in clause 1 entails that both the student as well as the lecturer can request the board of examiners to appoint one or more independent observers.

Article 16 Validity of examinations (WHW art.7.13 clause 2k) 1.

The validity of an examination result is 6 years.

2.

Students can submit a request to the board of examiners to extend the validity of an examination result. If the board of examiners rejects this request, it will support its arguments in writing.

Article 17 Registration and publication of results (WHW art.71.3 clause 2o) 1.

In order to certify that an examination has been taken, an authorised verification of an obtained grade for a particular unit of study - as stipulated in art. 7.11 of the Act - is produced by the corresponding examiner on behalf of the student.

2.

The examiner determines the results within one day of an oral examination having been taken and informs the student.

3.

What is stipulated in clause 2 is not applicable if the oral examination is part of a series of oral examinations of the same unit of study, extending over more than one workday. In that case, the examiner determines the results of a series of oral examinations within one workday of the examinations.

4.

The student receives the authorised verification as stipulated in clause 1 within 20 workdays. If the examiner is not able to do so due to extenuating circumstances, he/she justifies this to the board of examiners. The student(s) concerned is (are) informed without delay by the board of examiners, including notification of the deadline when the results will finally be published. If, according to the board of examiners, the examiner is deemed to be at fault, the commission can instruct another examiner to determine the grade.

125


Appendices 5.

If a second examination has been scheduled shortly after the first one has been set, the examination results must be available soon enough for students to have at least 10 workdays to prepare for the second examination.

6.

If an assessment for a unit of study is obtained by means of taking several tests or a combination of examination forms, as stipulated in article 14, the examination date is the most recent of the following dates: - the date when the last of a series of tests is taken; - the submission date of an assignment, report or thesis; - the submission date of the last of several assignments; - the date when an oral presentation of a practical exercise is assessed.

Article 18 Right of inspection and appraisal (WHW art. 7.13 clause 2p and 2q) 1.

During a period of at least 6 months after the results of a written examination have been published, students may be granted right of inspection of the assessed piece of work upon request. Upon request, students will be provided with a copy of the assessed piece of work at cost price, unless the board of examiners decides otherwise.

2.

During a period of at least 6 months after the results have been published, students who have taken a written examination are entitled to an appraisal with the corresponding examiner. The appraisal will take place at a time and place determined by the examiner.

3.

If a joint appraisal is organised by or due to the board of examiners, students may only submit requests, as stipulated in the previous clause, once they have been present at the joint appraisal and have underpinned the request in question, unless when they are not able to attend the joint appraisal due to circumstances beyond their control.

4.

What is stipulated in clause 4 is similarly applicable, if the board of examiners or the examiner gives the student the opportunity to compare his/her answers with the model answers.

5.

During a period not exceeding 20 workdays after the results of an examination have been published, an appraisal requested by a student involving the examiner and the student may take place, during which grounds for the assessment are given by the examiner.

6.

The board of examiners may decide to deviate from what is stipulated in clauses 1, 2 and 5.

Article 19 Administrative errors or oversights If it appears that a mistake in an examination result, grade sheet or a student's study progress report has been made, both the department as well as the student are required, immediately upon establishing it, to inform the other party and to cooperate in correcting the mistake made. The administration provided by S&OA serves as conclusive evidence, with the exception of proof to the contrary. An authorised verification produced by the examiner (as stipulated in art. 17, clause 1 of this General section) is valid in all cases.

Article 20 Exemption from an examination or practical exercise (WHW art.7.13 clause 2) 1.

If necessary, having obtained advice from the examiner in question, the board of examiners may upon request from the student issue an exemption from an examination or practical exercise.

2.

The grounds upon which the board of examiners can grant an exemption from a particular examination, relate exclusively to the level, content and quality of the examinations or final examinations previously passed by the student, or otherwise to non-higher education-acquired knowledge, insight and skills.

3.

Exemption from the requirement to participate in practical exercises can be granted to students who can prove that they believe that they will experience a moral dilemma, as a result of having to carry out a particular assignment or practical exercise. In that case, the board of examiners will 126


Appendices establish whether the practical exercise may be carried out in another manner to be determined by them.

Paragraph 3 Final examinations Article 21 Programme-related final examination (WHW, art. 7.10 and 7.13 clause 2a) 1.

The Master's programme is assessed by means of the Master's final examination The Master's final examination for the Applied Physics, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering and Nanotechnology programmes comprises a study-load of 120 EC's. The Technical Medicine Master's final examination comprises a study-load of 180 ECâ€&#x;s.

2.

If the examinations of the Master's programme-related units of study have been passed, then the Master's final examination is taken.

Article 22 The board of examiners (WHW, art. 7.12) 1.

The Dean of the TNW Faculty establishes a board of examiners for the purpose of holding the Master's final examination and for the purpose of organising and coordinating the examinations in the Master's programme. In several Master's programmes, the board of examiners for the Master's programme is the same as the board of examiners for the corresponding Bachelor's programme.

2.

Boards of examiners themselves stipulate rules for the purpose of the final examinations, without consulting other parties (WHW art.7.12 clause 4). These are stipulated in a separate "Board of Examiners Rules" document.

3.

The Dean appoints the members of the board of examiners from current staff members who are responsible for teaching in the department (WHW art. 7.12 clause 2).

4.

The board of examiners consists of at least two professors.

Article 23 Time periods, final examination frequency (WHW, art. 7.13 clause 2j) 1.

The board of examiners convenes twice a year. During these meetings, it is determined whether those students who have enrolled for the Master's final examination have passed.

2.

The times when the board of examiners meetings are held are published before the start of the academic year. The precise dates are published no later than ten weeks prior to their confirmation.

3.

Students who wish to enrol for the Master's final examination, must submit a request for this purpose no later than 4 weeks prior to the board of examiners meeting. This must be done by means of the corresponding form that must be submitted to S&OA.

127


Appendices Article 24 Certificate and registration (WHW, art. 7.11) 1.

To certify that the Master's final examination has been passed, the board of examiners issues a certificate. The certificate is signed by the chairperson of the board of examiners. In his/her absence, it can also be signed by one of the commission members.

2.

If a student has passed all the components of the programme, with the exception of the final thesis, then the board of examiners may decide that the certificate will be issued once the final project has been passed.

3.

The certificate will state the following (WHW art.7.11): which programme it concerns; which final examination it concerns; which degree has been conferred (WHW art. 7.10a); if applicable, which qualification it relates to (WHW art.7.6 clause 1); when the programme was last accredited or otherwise when the programme passed the 'new programme assessment‟ (WHW art. 5a.11).

4.

The final examination-related components and their assessment are stated on the appendix attached to the certificate (WHW art.7.11). The non-final examination-related components, which at the request of the student have been assessed before the result of the final examination has been determined, are also stated, (provided that those components have been passed).

5.

A diploma supplement is attached to the Master's final examination certificate, obtained for passing the Master's final examination (WHW art.7.11 clause 3). Its purpose is to provide an insight into the type and content of the completed programme, also bearing in mind the international recognizability of the programmes. The supplement contains in any case the following: the name of the programme and the name of the university; that it concerns a scientific education programme; a description of the programme's content; the followed master‟s programme track; the programme's study-load;

6.

If the board of examiners has awarded the classification of 'with distinction' to the student, this will be stated on the certificate.

7.

Students who have passed more than one examination and who cannot be issued with a certificate as stipulated in clause 1 of this article, will upon request receive a board of examinersissued declaration, in any case stating the examinations which they have passed (WHW art.7.11 clause 4).

8.

S&OA is responsible for keeping records of final examination results. This office also keeps a record of which certificates have been issued to students.

Article 25 Degree and title (WHW art.7.10a, 7.19a and 7.20) 1.

The degree of Master of Science (MSc) is conferred on those who have passed the final examination.

2.

Applied Physics, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering and Nanotechnology programme students, who have passed the corresponding programme's Master's final examination, are entitled on the grounds of article 7.20 of the Act to use the title of „ingenieur‟.

128


Appendices Paragraph 4 Appeals and complaints Article 26 Individual appeals and complaints (WHW, art. 7.61) 1.

A complaint may be lodged to the board of examiners against an examiner's decision within 4 weeks of the student having been informed of this decision. The deadline, as stated in the following clause, for submitting an appeal against an examiner's decision to the Examination Board of Appeals remains unaltered.

2.

An appeal may be lodged to the Examination Board of Appeals against the decision of the board of examiners or an examiner, within 4 weeks of the student having been informed of this decision (WHW art.7.61).

3.

On the grounds of this regulation, a complaint may be lodged to the Dean against the ruling of the Dean, within 6 weeks of the student having been informed of this ruling.

Paragraph 5 Discrepancies, amendments and implementation Article 27 Regulation discrepancies If there are discrepancies between a study guide and/or other regulations concerning the study programme, and this general section or the accompanying appendices, then what is stipulated in these regulations, including in the appendices, takes precedence.

Article 28 Amendments to the regulations 1.

Amendments to the content of the regulations are enacted by the Dean by means of special decree. a. For amendments to the general section of the course and examination regulations, the corresponding programme commissions are required to provide recommendations and the Faculty Council is required to give their assent. b. Amendments to the programme-specific appendix of a programme's course and examination regulations are enacted, after receipt of recommendations from the corresponding programme commission and Faculty Board, by the Dean by means of special decree. c. Amendments to board of examiners rules are enacted by the board of examiners itself, by means of special decree.

2.

Amendments to the content of these regulations can only be valid for the current academic year, provided that the interests of the students are not unreasonably prejudiced or if it is a matter of circumstances beyond one's control.

3.

A decision made by the board of examiners cannot retroactively be affected by content amendments to these regulations, to the detriment of a student.

129


Appendices Article 29 Transitional regulations 1.

If amendments to the composition of the study programme are made or if these regulations are amended, the Programme Director stipulates and publishes transitional regulations.

2.

The period of validity is included in the transitional regulations.

3.

The transitional regulations are published on the programme's website.

4.

Premises of the transitional regulations, in the event that the study programme is amended, are: a) Amendments to the study programme are, if possible, stipulated prior to the year in which the amendments are to be implemented. The aim of amendments to the study programme is to improve the programme and they are valid for all student generations. b) It cannot be guaranteed that all the programme's units of study, which existed when a student enrolled for the programme, will still be included in the study programme. The study programme that has most recently been authorised by the Dean forms the basis for determining the results of the Master's final examination.

5.

Included in the transitional regulations in any case are: a) which of the eliminated units of study, for which examinations have been previously passed, are equivalent to the units of study from the current study programme - as included in the programme appendix; b) that, if a unit of study without practical exercises is eliminated from the programme, the opportunity to take the final examination twice in the subsequent academic year or to receive an alternative means of assessment is offered. c) that, if a unit of study with practical exercises is eliminated from the programme, at least one unit of study is indicated to be done instead of the eliminated unit of study. In exceptional cases, the board of examiners can permit deviations from the number of and manner in which examinations of eliminated units of study can be taken.

6.

What is stipulated in art.26.3 of this general section is applicable to an appeal against a decision, as stipulated in clause 1 of this article.

7.

The transitional regulations require the approval from the board of examiners of the definitions, as stipulated in clause 5a and 5c, and of the period of validity as stipulated in clause 2 of this article.

Article 30 Publication The Course and Examination Regulations (OER) and the corresponding appendices are published on the programme's website.

Article 31 Inception date st

1.

These regulations will be effective as of 1 April 2010 and replace the regulations dated 13 September 2007.

2.

The OER is applicable to all students who are enrolled in the programme

th

Enacted by the Dean of the TNW Faculty, in accordance with articles 9.15 clause 1a, 7.13 clauses 1 and 2, 9.38b, 9.18 clause 1a and 7.59 of the Higher Education and Research Act, having taken into account the recommendations of the programme commission and after approval from the Faculty Council. th

Enschede, dated 26 March 2010

130


Appendices

APPENDIX 5 – OER ChE

Faculty of Science and Technology

Programme-specific appendix of the Chemical Engineering (ChE) Master's Programme Course and Examination Regulations (art. 7.13 and 7.59 WHW)

Table of contents Preamble Article 1 Article 2 Article 3 Article 4 Article 5 Article 6 Article 7 Article 8 Article 9 Article 10 Article 11 Article 12 Article 13 Article 14 Article 15 Article 16 Article 17 Article 18

......................................................................................................................... 132 Programme objectives ..................................................................................... 132 Programme learning outcomes ........................................................................ 132 Admission commission .................................................................................... 133 Admission to the programme ........................................................................... 133 Standard Master's programme ........................................................................ 135 Condensed Masterâ€&#x;s Programme .................................................................... 138 'PT course' study programme .......................................................................... 139 PT-students Master's examination procedure ................................................. 140 HBO-student study programme ....................................................................... 141 Requirements for HBO-students ...................................................................... 142 Advanced Technology Bachelor's pre-Master's programme ........................... 143 Transitional regulations .................................................................................... 143 Safety ............................................................................................................... 143 Practical exercises ........................................................................................... 143 Sequence of units of study .............................................................................. 144 Flexible programme ......................................................................................... 144 Student Counselling ......................................................................................... 144 Inception date and amendments ..................................................................... 144

Reference: Date:

TNW100004/vdh th 26 March 2010 131


Appendices Preamble a.

The rules in this appendix apply to the full-time Chemical Engineering Master's programme (Croho-number 60437). b. Together with the General Section (TNW100001/vdh) and the Chemical Engineering Board of Examiners Rules (TNW 100009/vdh), this appendix constitutes the programme part of the Student Statute, including the course and examination regulations of the Chemical Engineering Master's programme of the Faculty of Science and Technology at the University of Twente. c. In the event of disagreement, the Dutch appendix and not this English version of the appendix is legally-binding. d. The Act refers to the Higher Education and Research Act (WHW).

Article 1

Programme objectives

The University of Twente's Chemical Engineering Master's programme aims: 1. to train students to practice their profession independently. In this case it entails conducting fundamental or application-driven scientific research, as well as working with existing scientific knowledge and applying it to continuously different and new practical situations. 2. to stimulate interdisciplinary cooperation in scientific development based on chemical background knowledge. 3. to develop skills in, knowledge of and insights into a specialism of the discipline, with the onus on insight into and approach to scientific problem-formulation; 4. to offer student-oriented education of high quality in terms of international standards. 5. to enable acquisition of part of the knowledge and insight within an international context; 6. to offer an inspiring academic learning environment and routes with appropriate workloads to a demanding and heterogeneous student population; 7. to develop the capability of conveying acquired knowledge to others. The programme aims to impart such knowledge, skills and insight regarding the field of chemical engineering, so that students are capable of independently practising their profession or being eligible for potential subsequent education to become a scientific researcher, technological designer or teacher.

Article 2

Programme learning outcomes

The level at which the discipline must be practised during and after the programme is established internationally. Graduates: 1. must be capable of keeping specialist literature on relevant sub-areas up to date generally and using it. 2. must be capable of familiarising themselves with a sub-area of chemical engineering in a reasonable amount of time; 3. must be capable of formulating a research plan of action based on generally-formulated question in a sub-area of chemical engineering; 4. must be capable of analysing and interpreting research results and must be capable of drawing conclusions from them. 5. must be employable in positions where knowledge and research skills in the field of chemical engineering are required; 6. must have sufficient insight into the social role of chemistry and/or chemical engineering to be able to choose and practise a profession responsibly; 7. must have insight into the role of chemical engineering in a sustainable society; 8. must be capable of working with others, conveying knowledge to others, giving a lecture, writing a report or an internationally-accessible scientific publication and of participating in a discussion about a specialist subject. 9. must be capable of devising, conducting and evaluating experiments and their corresponding 132


Appendices controls independently; 10. must be able to place the obtained results and conclusion within the framework of results obtained by others; Process Technology track graduates: 11. must be capable of designing a realistic process, including sub-phases, such as devising flow diagrams, describing equipment and process flows and calculating the behaviour of process equipment; as well as indicating alternatives for these sub-phases. 12. must have insight into the possible influences of the process on the properties of the product, possible bi-products or waste products and insight into the general rules for methods of preparation of certain types of combinations and products, and must be able to contribute to devising possible methods of preparation. Molecules and Materials track graduates: 13. must possess knowledge of the formulation of various products, the specifications, methods of analysis and the interaction between components, and of the essential physical and mechanical methods required for the manufacture of chemical and technological products. Water Technology track graduates: 14. must possess knowledge of fermentation, organic-chemical, bioelectrical and biochemical conversions, as well as of physicochemical phenomena in water technology; must be able to formulate goals and research hypotheses for research and possess skills for development and regulation in the field of water technology.

Article 3

Admission commission

6.

The Dean of the TNW Faculty establishes an admissions commission for the purpose of admitting students to the Master's programme for whom the Master's programme in question is not a followon Master's as stipulated in article 7.30a of the Act.

7.

The commission, as stated in clause 1, has been authorised by the Executive Board (reference S&C/387.191/lk) to admit or reject applicants.

8.

The admission commission consists of a minimum of two members, including: a. the Programme Director: b. in the case of foreign students, the professor of the Chair where the student wishes to graduate and the internationalisation coordinator; c. in the case of HBO (university of applied sciences)-students, the HBO coordinator; The Programme Director is the chairperson of the admission commission. If the chairperson of the commission deems it necessary, the secretary of the board of examiners and/or study advisor can be added to the commission.

Article 4

Admission to the programme

1.

Direct admission to the programme can be obtained by: a. A degree from one of the Chemical Engineering Bachelor's programmes at a Dutch university. b. Proof of admission to the programme, issued by the admission commission.

2.

When assessing a request for admission to the Master's programme, the admission commission may require that certain subjects are passed before proof of admission to the Master's programme is issued.

3.

When issuing proof of admission to the Master's programme, the admission commission may award exemptions from certain components of the Master's, with the exception of the final project.

4.

When issuing proof of admission to the Master's programme, the admission commission may stipulate conditions to the student for the specific Master's programme content and determine that admission is only to a certain track. 133


Appendices 5.

Rulings referred to in clause 3 and 4 of this article made by the admission commission, require approval from the board of examiners.

6.

Under certain conditions, Master's students from foreign universities who are well advanced in their Master's programme may be admitted to the Condensed Masterâ€&#x;s Programme of the Chemical Engineering Master's programme (article 6 of this programme appendix). a. The Condensed Masterâ€&#x;s Programme comprises a minimum of 75 ECs. b. Only students who are granted an exemption totalling 45 ECs by the Chemical Engineering programme's board of examiners can be admitted to the programme. c. A student is only admitted to the Condensed Masterâ€&#x;s Programme if the student's specific programme, including the exemption to be given, is approved by the Chemical Engineering programme's board of examiners.

7.

Those whose prior education was in a technical or physical sciences area and who work in the commercial sector, may be admitted to the 'PT-course' training programme. The training programme is stipulated in article 7 of this programme appendix. Having passed the supplementary sections, those who have successfully completed the PT-I and PT-II courses, can be admitted to the programme's Master's examination. The procedure for admission to the Master's examination for those in possession of the PT-I and PT-II certificates, is stipulated in article 8 of this programme appendix.

8.

The following applies to students with a Chemical or Chemical Engineering HBO-diploma: a. They can be admitted to a pre-structured pre-Master's programme totalling 25 EC, whereby they are also given permission to do part of a stipulated homologation programme and a number of subjects from the Master's programme. b. If the admission commission detects serious gaps in a student's prior education, extra requirements totalling a maximum of 30 ECs may be stipulated besides the pre-structured pre-Master's programme. c. If they meet the corresponding requirements stipulated by the board of examiners during their first year of study, they will be granted permission, if still applicable, to complete the pre-structured pre-Master's programme and any extra requirements of the homologation programme, and to continue with the Master's programme as is applicable to them. d. After completing the pre-structured pre-Master's programme and any extra requirements, they may be admitted to the Master's programme, whereby they are also exempted from the internship (19379900, 20 ECs), and instead of this they must include a homologation programme of 20-21 ECs in their Master's programme. The pre-Master's programme, homologation programme and the Master's programme for students with a Chemical Engineering or Chemistry HBO-diploma, determined by the board of examiners, are stipulated in article 9 of this programme appendix. The requirements which they must meet during their first study year are stipulated in article 10 of this programme appendix.

9.

Students who have an Advanced Technology Bachelor's degree are admissible to the standard Master's programme if, within their Bachelor's programme, they have met the conditions for their pre-Master's course list, stipulated in article 11 of this programme appendix. The content of the pre-Master's course list chosen by the student determines if the student is to be admitted to the Molecules and Materials (MM), Process Technology (PT) or Water Technology (WT) tracks.

10. Students who have a foreign degree must be able to demonstrate their proficiency in English, both oral and written. Proof that their score on a certified test meets the standard may be an admission requirement. Namely, a total score of 6.0 or higher on the IELTS test or a score of 80 1 or higher on the internet-based TOEFL test . Students with a Bachelor's degree from countries 2 with English only as the language of instruction in higher education are exempted from this language requirement. 11. Students who are enrolled in the University of Twente's Chemical Engineering Bachelor's programme may submit a request to the Programme Director to take subjects from the Master's programme. In order to obtain this permission, all the following minimal conditions must be met: a. students have passed the first year of the Chemical Engineering programme; 159159134 1 2

IELTS: International English Language Testing System; TOEFL: Testing of English as a Foreign Language; see the UT website regarding admission to the Master's programmes: http://www.utwente.nl/admissionoffice/master/internationaal/ List of countries can be found on http://www.utwente.nl/admissionoffice/master/internationaal/ under General Admission Requirements.

134


Appendices b.

students have passed a minimum of 90 ECs from the B2 and B3 programmes and/or have obtained an exemption. c. the Master's subjects students wish to follow are explicitly stated in the request; d. the request from the student in question includes a study plan; e. the aforementioned plan has been signed by the study advisor.. The study plan referred to in d. and e. can demonstrate that a student's study progress will supposedly be delayed if the request is not granted, but can also show that a student has a high study rate and wishes to do more subjects than is minimally required by the Bachelor's examination. Before the Programme Director makes a decision, he/she requests advice from the board of examiners.

Article 5

Standard Master's programme

The Master's programme has three specialisations (tracks), namely: 1. Molecules and Materials (M&M), 2. Process Technology (PT). 3. Water Technology (WT). The structure of the M&M and PT track programme is as follows: 1. four (PT) or five (M&M) compulsory subjects of 5 ECs; 2. a compulsory project of 10 ECs (the design subject Process Plant Design for the PT track and two Advanced Molecules and Materials (AMM) projects of 5 ECs for the M&M track); 3. the final project commission's chairperson determines 15 ECs of electives, in consultation with the student; 4. a number of electives, such that the programme in total comprises a minimum of 120 ECs, taking into account that:  a maximum of 5 ECs may be social science subjects for the purpose of the trip abroad; 5. an external internship of 20 ECs; 6. a final project of 45 ECs within the chosen track. The so-called 'Contract Research Projectâ€&#x; for the purpose of the trip abroad may be registered as a Selected Topic (Capita Selecta) from a group (elective) or as the separate elective '19379970 CR Study Tour Assignment (Opdracht Studiereis)'. The M&M and PT track compulsory subjects are: M&M track compulsory subjects Code

Name

PT track compulsory subjects ECs Code

193700030 AMM Organic materials science 193700010 AMM Characterization

5 5

193700040 AMM Inorganic materials science 193700060 AMM Applications

5 5

193700020 AMM Molecular and Biomolecular chemistry and technology 193700050 AMM Project Organic Materials 193700070 AMM Project Inorganic Materials and Molecular Science and Technology

5 5 5

Name

ECs

193715020 Chemical Reaction Engineering 193720020 Multiphase Reaction Technology 193750030 Process Equipment Design 193735010 Thermodynamics and Flowsheeting

5 5

193790010 Process Plant Design

10

5 5

The structure of the WT track programme is as follows: 1. a maximum of 4 homologation subjects, which depending on the prior knowledge, are compulsory (maximum 19 ECs) 2. six profiling subjects of 4 or 5 ECs (total of 28 ECs) are compulsory for the chosen track 3. a track-specific design subject of 12 ECs is compulsory 4. a number of track-specific electives, such that the programme in total comprises a minimum of 120 ECs 5. an external internship of 20 ECs 6. a final project of 40 ECs within the WT track. 135


Appendices The track is taught in cooperation with Wageningen University and the University of Groningen. The homologation lectures and this track's compulsory subjects are offered by Wetsus-Institute in Leeuwarden.

136


Appendices Compulsory subjects for the WT track: Homologation subjects for the WT track Code Name 19379500 Mathematical Principles in Water Technology 19379501 Transport Phenomena in Water Technology 19379502 Water Microbiology 19379503 Colloid Chemistry for Water Technology

Compulsory subjects for the WT track

ECs 5 5 5 4

Code Name 19379504 Global Water Cycle 19379505 Biological Water Treatment and Recovery Technology 19379506 Advanced Water Treatment Processes 19379509 Process Dynamics and Control (for Water Technology) 19379507 Reactor Design for Water Treatment 19379510 Bioreactor Design for Water Treatment 19379508 Process Design (for Water Technology)

ECs 5 5 5 5

4 4 12

The final project is assessed by means of two grades, one for conducting chemical-technological research and one for general aspects and the report. Conducting chemical-technological research entails problem analysis (familiarisation with a particular discipline, identifying problems and formulating research questions and approach), implementation (the theoretical and experimental approach and execution) and results analysis (analysis of the results and their relevance). The general aspects comprise independence, commitment, cooperation, originality and creativity. The report comprises the oral report (presentation of and discussion about the research) and the written report (the final project report). The following applies to all tracks:  The electives are selected in agreement with the final project commission's chairperson.  The course list requires approval by the final project commission's chairperson and the board of examiners.

137


Appendices Article 6

Condensed Master’s Programme

A student's specific programme, including the exemptions to be granted, must be approved in advance by the Chemical Engineering Master's programme board of examiners. The following rules apply in this case: 1. The Condensed Master‟s Programme comprises a minimum of 75 ECs: 30 ECs in subjects and 45 ECs for the final project. 2. Students who are admitted to the Condensed Master‟s Programme may be exempted from a maximum of two compulsory M&M and PT track subjects. 3. Students who are admitted to the Condensed Master‟s Programme M&M track are permitted to replace the subject 19370002 AMM Molecular and Biomolecular Chemistry and Technology with the subject 19377502 Physical Organic Chemistry. 4. Students who are admitted to the Condensed Master‟s Programme M&M track may be exempted from one of the M&M track Advanced Materials Science Projects. 5. A minimum of one elective must be included in the programme. Additionally, a minimum of one subject (5 ECs) is selected in consultation with the final project group as preparation for the final project. An overview of the Condensed Master‟s Programme: Compulsory courses M&M track: 3 out of 5 Code

Name

Compulsory courses PT track: 2-3 out of 4 EC

193700030 AMM Organic materials science 193700010 AMM Characterization 193700040 AMM Inorganic materials science 193700060 AMM Applications

5 5 5 5

193700020 AMM Molecular and Biomolecular chemistry and technology

5

Sub-total

15

Code

Sub-total Electives: 1-2

5

5

193735010 Thermodynamics and Flowsheeting

5 5 5

Sub-total 10-15 Design Project 193790010

Process Plant Design

10

5 Sub-total

5-10 5-10

Internship: optional Master’s final project

EC

193720020 Multiphase Reaction Technology 193750030 Process Equipment Design

Advanced Materials Science Project: 1-2 parts 193700050 AMM Project Organic Materials 193700070 AMM Project Inorganic Materials and Molecular Science and Technology

Name

193715020 Chemical Reaction Engineering

Electives: 1-2

10 5-10

Internship: optional 45 Total min.75

Master’s final project

45 Total min.75

138


Appendices Article 7

'PT course' study programme

The faculty offers a Process Technology (PT) course. This is intended for people who have been educated in a technical field or in the field of applied physics, who work in the commercial sector and wish to acquire further qualifications in process technology. The course also provides refresher courses and extra training for or re-training of engineers (MSc., BSc) and chemists (BSc., Dr.). The course consists of two parts, PT-I and PT-II. The homologation part of PT-I consists of 5 subjects from the Chemical Engineering Bachelor's programme. Knowledge of these subjects is required for the four compulsory subjects from the Process Technology track which comprise the second part of PT-I. PT-II consists of four electives and an individual assignment. The electives can serve as a means to broaden one's knowledge or as a necessary underpinning of the individual assignment. The individual assignment is carried out in the company where the participant works and is concluded by means of a written report. Supervision and assessment is carried out by one of the Chemical Engineering Master's programme lecturers. An abstract must be sent in advance to the course coordinator and the assignment must be approved by the company and the supervisor. Upon successfully completing the PT-I and PT-II courses, a Final Company Assignment can be carried out. If they also pass this, students will meet the requirements for the Master's final examination, stipulated by the Chemical Engineering Master's programme board of examiners. The procedure for admission to the Master's examination for those in possession of the PT-I and PT-II certificates, is stipulated in article 8 of this programme appendix. An overview of the study programme for PT-students: PT-I Subject code 19134015 19138506 19134506 19137009 19137007 PT-I Subject code 19371502 19372002 19375003 19373501 PT-II 19379960

Homologation subjects from BSc Chemical Engineering Name Equilibriums Separation Technology excl. laboratory practice Kinetics and Catalysis Introduction to Physical Transport Phenomena Physical Transport Phenomena excl. internship Sub-total Compulsory subjects MSc Chemical Engineering PT-track Name Chemical Reaction Engineering Multiphase Reaction Technology Process Equipment Design Thermodynamics and Flowsheeting Sub-total Individual assignment (incl. design) 4 Electives from the PT-track electives list Sub-total

xxxxxx

Final Company Assignment Total

ECs 5 3.5 4 4 4 20.5 ECs 5 5 5 5 20 20 20 40 40 120.5

139


Appendices Article 8

PT-students Master's examination procedure

1. Students who have Process Technology course I and II certificates may submit a written request to the board of examiners secretary in order to be admitted to the Chemical Engineering Master's final examination. A CV with a detailed overview of course(s) followed and relevant work experience must be attached to this request. 2. Students must do a Final Company Assignment. This component comprises a written and oral report of part of the student's activities within the company where he works. The report must show that the activities are being performed at academic level. The scope of the activities must be comparable to a final project of a Master's student from the standard Process Technology track and must include research and/or design aspects. 3. For the assessment of the Final Company Assignment, the board of examiners appoints a final project commission, consisting at least of: a. The professor of one of the Chairs involved in the Process Technology track; b. The board of examiners secretary; c. A member of the Faculty's scientific staff who is an expert in the field of the student's report. 4. The final project commission assesses whether a student has conducted chemicaltechnological research or has made a design of a sufficient scientific standard, which satisfies the programme learning outcomes that also apply to the final project of the standard Master's programme.

140


Appendices Article 9

HBO-student study programme

Students with a Chemistry or Chemical Engineering HBO-diploma may be admitted to the Master's programme if they have completed one of the pre-structured pre-Master's programmes of 25 EC's. If the admission commission detects serious gaps in a student's prior education, extra requirements totalling 30 ECs may be stipulated. The following table shows which pre-structured pre-Master's programme must be completed in order to be admitted to the M&M track and which pre-structured pre-Master's programme is required in order to be admitted to the PT track. Pre-structured pre-Master's programme M&M Track Subject code Name ECs 191512000 or Calculus A or Calculus I excl. 4 191521000 Maple 191521100 or Calculus B or Calculus II excl. 4 191521100 Maple 191512060 + Linear Algebra A+B or Linear 191512080 or 4 Algebra 191521200 Sub-total 12

Pre-structured pre-Master's programme PT track Subject code Name ECs 191512000 or Calculus A or Calculus I excl. 4 191521000 Maple 191521100 or Calculus B or Calculus II excl. 4 191521100 Maple 191512060 + Linear Algebra A+B or Linear 191512080 or 4 Algebra 191521200 Sub-total 12

191355400 191355380 191350010

Advanced Materials Science Chemistry and Technology of Organic Materials

5

191355400

5

191370090

Equilibria II

3

191370200

Total

25

Advanced Materials Science Introduction to Physical Transport Phenomena Physical Transport Phenomena excl. laboratory practice Total

5 4 4 25

Students with a Chemistry or Chemical Engineering HBO-diploma and who have completed one of the pre-Master's programmes from the table above, will be admitted to the Chemical Engineering Master's programme, under the following conditions: 1. Admission is valid for the track for which the pre-structured pre-Master's was followed. 2. Students are exempted from the unit of study 19379900 Internship (20 ECs) 3. Students must include the homologation programme stipulated by the board of examiners for the corresponding track in their Master's programme. 4. A student's Master's programme must also meet the requirements stipulated for the standard Master's programmes in the M&M and PT tracks (article 5 of this appendix). The following table shows the M&M and PT track homologation programmes: M&M track homologation programme Chemistry and Technology 191355310 5 of Inorganic Materials 191340150 Equilibria 5 Physics of Atoms and 191340200 4 Molecules 191345060 or Kinetics and Catalysis or 45 193902810 Interfaces and Catalysis Information acquisition 2 course Total 20/21

PT track homologation programme Sustainable Energy 191315130 Technology 191340150 Equilibria Separation Technology excl. 191385060 laboratory practice 191345060 or Kinetics and Catalysis or 193902810 Interfaces and Catalysis Information acquisition course Total

5 5 4 45 2 20/21

Instead of the aforementioned pre-structured pre-Master's programme, students from Saxion University of Applied Sciences may also do the follow-on minor of 30 ECs during their HBOprogramme. This minor consists of the same subjects as the pre-structured pre-Master's, supplemented by 19135531 Chemistry and Technology of Inorganic Materials for students who wish to be admitted to the M&M track, and 19131513 Sustainable Process Technology for students who wish to be admitted to the PT track. Students who have done this minor have consequently already done one of the subjects from the homologation programme and as a result have 5 ECs more for electives. 141


Appendices Article 10 Requirements for HBO-students 1.

Students who have been admitted in accordance with article 4.8 of this programme appendix to the pre-Master's and homologation programme, are given a pre-recommendation after the first term of being enrolled. This pre-recommendation is issued by the board of examiners, based on st the HBO-coordinator's recommendations. For students who are admitted per 1 September, the st pre-recommendation is issued at the latest in December; for students who are admitted per 1 February, the pre-recommendation is issued at the latest in June.

2.

Students who have been admitted in accordance with article 4.8 of this programme appendix to the pre-Master's and homologation programme, are given a recommendation after three terms. st For those students who are admitted per 1 September, the recommendation is issued at the st latest in June; for students who are admitted per 1 February, the recommendation is issued at the latest in December.

3.

Students who have passed all the subjects from the pre-Master's programme stipulated for them, will be given a positive recommendation.

4.

Students who have not yet passed all the subjects from pre-Master's programme stipulated for them, is given a positive recommendation if they meet the following requirements: a) During the first three terms of being enrolled, 25 ECs or more have been obtained; b) 12 ECs or more have been obtained from the pre-structured pre-Master's programme; c) at least one of the following subjects has been passed: Calculus A (19151200), Calculus B (19151202), Calculus I (19152100), Calculus II (19152110). In all other cases, students will be given a negative recommendation.

5.

A positive recommendation entails that students are granted permission to complete the preMaster's programme stipulated for them and homologation programme, and to continue with the corresponding Master's programme (see article 9 of this programme appendix). The definitions in article 15 of this programme appendix continue to apply in this case.

6.

A negative recommendation entails that students may only do pre-Master's subjects and subjects in the homologation programme, and may not do other Master's subjects. This restriction comes into force in the term following the date on which the negative recommendation is issued. The restriction expires when all the pre-Master's subjects have been passed.

7.

The recommendation is issued by the board of examiners.

8.

In exceptional cases, the board of examiners may decide to make an exception to the aforementioned rules.

142


Appendices Article 11 Advanced Technology Bachelor's pre-Master's programme An overview of the pre-Master's programme for Advanced Technology (AT) students. Subjects from the van AT B2-programme Code

Name

19390232 19390281 19390261 19390202

Modelling of physical systems Interfaces and Catalysis Production Technology Basic Chemistry (incl. laboratory practice)

ECs 5 5 5 5

Sub-total

20

Subjects to be included as specialisation subjects in the AT B3 programme For the M&M track Subject code

Name

For the PT or WT track ECs

Chemistry & Technology 5 of Organic Materials Chemistry & Technology 19133531 5 of Inorganic Materials Minimum of 2 of the following Chemical Engineering B2 subjects 19132001 Organic Chemistry 4 19133001 Inorganic Chemistry 3 19135001 Equilibriums II 3 19136025 Applied Molecular Spectroscopy 3 Supplemented to a min. of 20 ECs with electives from the Chemical Engineering Bachelor's Sub-total 20 Total 40 19135539

Subject code

Name

ECs

Separation Technology 5 (incl. laboratory practice) Introduction Physical Transport 19137009 4 Phenomena Physical Transport Phenomena 19137020 6 incl. internship Supplemented to a minimum of 20 ECs with electives from the Chemical Engineering Bachelor's. Recommended subject:: 19138506

19131513 Sustainable Process Technology Sub-total Total

5 20 40

Article 12 Transitional regulations 1.

If the study programme included in articles 5, 6, 7 and 9 of this appendix is amended, or if one the articles included in the general section or programme appendix is amended, the Programme Director will stipulate and publish transitional regulations.

2.

The conditions which transitional regulations must meet are stipulated in article 29 of the general section.

3.

The transitional regulations are published on the programme's website.

Article 13 Safety There are safety requirements for working in a laboratory. Students are obliged to inform themselves 3 of these rules and to adhere to them.

Article 14 Practical exercises It is not required to pass units of study that include practical exercises until after these practical exercises have been carried out.

159159143 3

See the â€&#x;Health & Safety and Environmental Regulations' ('Arboen Milieureglementâ€&#x;) http://www.tnw.utwente.nl/intra/diensten/amh/ and the TNW laboratory practice group information http://www.tnw.utwente.nl/onderwijs_overig/practica/ .

on on

143


Appendices Article 15 Sequence of units of study 1.

Before starting a unit of study, students must meet the prior knowledge requirements of that unit of study.

2.

Students whose follow-on Master's programme is the Chemical Engineering Master's programme (WHW art. 7.13, clause 3), may only begin the internship and final project if they have obtained the Chemical Engineering (Crohonummer 56960) Bachelor's degree.

3.

Students may only begin the final project if they have obtained a minimum of 65 ECs of the Master's programme.

4.

Before the final colloquium can be held, all other units of study need to have been passed.

5.

The board of examiners is authorised to dispense with the requirements stipulated in clauses 1 to 4 of this article, in the event that strict adherence to that which is stipulated would result in an unwarranted delay in study progress. Students can submit a request for this to the board of examiners.

Article 16 Flexible programme Contrary to that which is stipulated in articles 5, 6, 7 and 9 of this appendix, students can request permission from the board of examiners to follow a flexible programme as stipulated in art. 7.3c of the Act. The board of examiners assesses whether the programme corresponds to the programme's field, is coherent and is of a sufficient standard in light of the programme's learning outcomes.

Article 17 Student Counselling 1.

The study advisor has, on the one hand the responsibility to advise students individually upon request regarding their studies, and on the other hand, to inform the programme director of students' study progress.

2.

When choosing a final project Chair, the Chair professor assigns a mentor.

Article 18 Inception date and amendments These regulations will come into effect on 1 February 2009.

st

April 2010 and replace the regulations dated 27

th

Enacted by the Dean of the Faculty, having obtained recommendations from the Faculty Council and programme commission. th

Enschede, dated 26 March 2010

144


Appendices

APPENDIX 6 – Board of Examiners’ Rules Faculty of Science and Technology

Chemical Engineering Master's Programme Board of Examiners’ Rules (art. 7.12 WHW)

Table of contents Article 1 Article 2 Article 3 Article 4 Article 5 Article 6 Article 7 Article 8 Article 9 Article 10 Article 11 Article 12 Article 13 Article 14

The board of examiners ........................................................................................ 146 Examiners ............................................................................................................. 146 Examination arrangements, forms and means of assessment ............................ 146 Written and oral examinations .............................................................................. 146 Discipline during examinations ............................................................................. 147 Fraud..................................................................................................................... 147 Rules for a crisis situation ..................................................................................... 148 Registration and publication of examination results ............................................. 149 Flexible programme .............................................................................................. 149 Examination results .............................................................................................. 149 Outstanding ability ................................................................................................ 150 Choice of Master's course list and graduation procedure .................................... 150 Final project commission ...................................................................................... 151 Inception date ....................................................................................................... 151

Reference: TNW100009/vdh th Date: 15 March 2010

145


Appendices Article 1

The board of examiners

1. The board of examiners nominates one of its members to be chairperson and secretary. 2. The board of examiners may be assisted by programme staff, for example the programme director, the programme coordinator, study advisor and tutors. They have an advisory role in the meetings. 3. The board of examiners may ask for advice from study advisors and student counsellors regarding decisions to be made concerning individual students; in which case the information provided about the student will be regarded as strictly confidential. 4. The board of examiners may decide to confer some of its authority, if necessary with certain constraints and conditions, on the chairperson or the secretary, provided that this is not in conflict with the law or these regulations. 5. An S&OA member adopts the role of registrar during the board of examiners meetings. 6. Board of examiners meetings are closed.

Article 2

Examiners

For the purpose of holding examinations, the board of examiners appoints one or more examiners for each part of an examination, and in the case of several examiners, one of them is chosen as head examiner. Only staff members who teach as well as non-university experts can be appointed as examiners (WHW art. 7.12).

Article 3

Examination arrangements, forms and means of assessment

1. Before an examiner can hold a written examination, at least one other lecturer with relevant expertise assesses whether the proposed examination is sufficiently representative, whether the questions have been clearly stated and whether the degree of complexity matches that of the content taught. 2. Whether the final assessment of a unit of study is to be written, oral or is to take place in another form is stipulated in the description entered in the subject information system. 3. The appointed examiner may, in favour of the student, deviate from that which is stipulated in clause 1 and 2 of this article. 4. At the request of a student, the board of examiners may permit an examination to be held in a different form to that stipulated in the second clause of this article.

Article 4

Written and oral examinations

1. A written examination has a maximum duration of 3.5 hours; an oral examination a maximum duration of 1.5 hours. In the case of students with a functional impairment, deviation from this is permitted, as stipulated in article 10 of the general section of the programme part of student statute, including the course and examination regulations for the TNW faculty's Master's degree programmes. 2. The assessment of the written examination takes place in compliance with the previouslyformulated standards for the different examination questions or parts thereof. Students are informed of the maximum number of points to be gained for each question of the written examination, by stating this on the examination question paper. 3. Oral examinations are held in public. This entails that both students as well as lecturers can request the board of examiners to appoint one or more independent observers. 146


Appendices 4. The examiner can not hold more than one oral examination at a time, unless otherwise agreed upon between the examiner and the student in question. 5. Examiners who wish to offer an extra examination opportunity to students can obtain permission from the board of examiners (article 13, clause 10 of the general part of the course and examination regulations). The authority to rule on this and to find a suitable time and date in the timetable may be conferred by the board of examiners on the Programme Director. The Programme Director must inform the board of examiners of a decision made in this regard at the examination meeting directly following the decision.

Article 5

Discipline during examinations

1. For each written examination, one or more invigilators are appointed by the head examiner, in order to ensure that the examination takes place in an orderly fashion. 2. During an examination, all electronic devices must be turned off, with the exception of devices which the examiner has explicitly permitted to be used. 3. During the examination, if requested, students must be able to provide identification in the form of proof of enrolment (student card). 4. Upon or after receipt of the examination question paper, every student must provide the invigilator with a completed examination card (name, student registration number, address, name and subject code of the relevant unit of study). By this means, the student states his/her wish to take the examination.

Article 6

Fraud

1. In the event of fraud, the student in question will not be assessed. In this case, the board of examiners can ban him/her for a maximum of one year from taking one or more examinations (WHW art.7.12, clause 4). 2. If the unit of study where fraud has previously been committed is still to be assessed, in such instances the board of examiners can also impose the form of the examination on the student. 3.

Fraud is defined as: a. Making use of more or other aids during an examination or parts of an examination than those authorised by the head examiner prior to the examination or examination section. b. Making use of aids or help during an examination or parts of an examination which students knew or should have known were not authorised. Help or aids as stipulated in the previous sentence are in any case: i. cheating, with or without: - the aid of notes - by copying during examinations - by letting someone else copy from one's own examination - by coming into contact, regarding the examination content, with people other than the invigilators, whilst the examination is being held or whilst the work has not yet been handed in. - with the aid of electronic devices ii. Forgery. c. Studentsâ€&#x; behaviour before the start of an examination or part of an examination, which the examiner considers fraudulent and has stated as such, and where he/she has stated which measures will be imposed when having determined this behaviour. Showing one's work to other students falls under this behaviour. d. Plagiarism.

4. The definitions in clause 3 of this article apply to all forms of examinations or parts of examinations, as stipulated in article 14 of the general section of the programme part of student 147


Appendices statute, including the course and examination regulations for the TNW faculty's Master's degree programmes. Article 7

Rules for a crisis situation

1. The Executive Board, or the building manager on their behalf, establishes whether there is a crisis situation or an imminent crisis situation. 2. Once this has been established, (a part of) the building is evacuated in compliance with the corresponding rules that are in force. 3. The board of examiners is informed by the lecturer within one day of the crisis situation, as stipulated in clause 1. 4. If a crisis situation occurs or is imminent, during or shortly before an examination, the following applies: if a crisis situation is imminent before the start of an examination, the examination is immediately postponed. In consultation with the board of examiners, the head examiner sets a new examination time and date. The new examination time and date that has been set within a month (not including holidays), is binding. This is published via the usual means of communication within three workdays after the building has been re-opened. 5. If a crisis situation occurs or is impending, during or shortly before a lecture or laboratory practice, then this will be postponed immediately. In consultation with the board of examiners, the head examiner sets a new lecture or laboratory practice time and date. The time and date are published no later than one day after the re-opening of the building, via the usual means of communication. 6. In the event of a crisis situation or imminent crisis during an examination, the following steps should, if possible, be followed: a. Students' names and student registration numbers must be stated by students on all examination work. b. Those present must, by order of the authority or invigilator in charge, vacate the examination room immediately. c. Students must leave the examination work done behind in the examination room. 7. The board of examiners is responsible for concluding an examination that has been interrupted or has been postponed due to a crisis situation or an imminent crisis situation. 8. In the event that students have been able to start the examination, the board of examiners may rule, if possible and within reason, that the lecturer determines the final grade based on the (partially) answered questions that were handed in. 9. In the event that the board of examiners, on the grounds of clause 8, rules that the lecturer cannot determine a final grade, a re-take of the examination interrupted by the crisis situation will be organised for the affected students within a month (excluding holiday months) of the crisis situation, provided the aforementioned students had registered for the examination in question. 10. The board of examiners ensures that an examination that has been interrupted or has been postponed due to a crisis situation does not count as an examination attempt, as stipulated in article 9 clause 3 of the general part of the Chemical Engineering Master's programme course and examination regulations.

148


Appendices Article 8

Registration and publication of examination results

1. The results of a test are registered by the examiner as part of his/her own administration. No assessment, as defined in clauses 4 to 6 of this article, is made on the basis of test results. The students in question are informed of their results by the examiner, whilst taking into account the students' privacy. 2. In the event that a unit of study is assessed by more than one examiner, the head examiner ensures that this is done based on the same standards. 3. If a written examination has been given a 5 as grade, a student may request for the work to be assessed by a second examiner. If after consultation between both examiners differing assessments remain, the grade is determined by means of the average of both assessments. As a rule, assessments are expressed in terms of the grades from 1 to 10. The grades represent the following: 1: very poor 2: poor 3: a distinct fail

4: fail 5. almost a pass 6: pass

7: a distinct pass 8: good 9: very good

10: excellent

Examination sections may be graded 'G' („gedaan‟ = „done‟), if according to the examiner(s) a student has at least performed reasonably. Exemptions will be indicated with a 'V' („vrijstelling‟) and fails with an 'O' („onvoldoende‟) on the grade sheet. 4. If a student does not appear for an examination for which he/she has registered and for which he/she has not withdrawn on time, this will be registered in the Student and Study Administration system. This counts as a fail when determining the number of examination attempts (article 9, clause 3 of the general part of the Chemical Engineering Master's programme course and examination regulations). 5. If a student has been assessed several times for the same unit of study, the highest grade counts. Article 9

Flexible programme

1. Contrary to that stipulated in articles 5, 6, 7 and 9 of the programme appendix, students are granted permission to take the Master's final examination based on a set of self-compiled examination sections (a flexible Master's programme, in accordance with WHW art. 7.3c), provided that this set has been approved by the board of examiners. The following requirements apply: - The total size is 120 ECs - It comprises a final project with a nominal study-load of at least 50 ECs

Article 10

Examination results

1. The result can be: pass or fail. If a student has failed, the board of examiners may grant him/her the right to have one or more examination sections re-assessed within a stipulated period. 2. The board of examiners determines when the Master's final examination result is to be dated. As a rule, this is the date of the most-recently passed examination section. 3. Students that comply to all of the requirements stipulated below are said to have passed the Master's examination (WHW art. 7.10): - all examination sections have been assessed; - no examination sections have been graded lower than a 6; 4. The stipulation in clause 3 of this article also applies to a flexible Master's final examination, as described in article 9 of these rules. 5. Board of examiners rulings and results of votes held are recorded in the meeting's minutes. 149


Appendices Article 11

Outstanding ability

The board of examiners may confer the classification 'with distinction' on the Master's degree. For this purpose, the board of examiners assesses the results obtained in the entire Master's programme, whereby the minimum requirements to be eligible for the classification 'with distinction' are: - The average grade of all the Master's final project sections is a 9.0 or higher; - The average grade of the other sections of the Master's final examination is an 8.0 or higher; - A maximum of one examination section can be graded with a 6.

Article 12

Choice of Master's course list and graduation procedure

1. If a student has decided with which Chair he/she wishes to do his/her final project, he/she formulates in consultation with the professor of the Chair (the final project professor) a proposal for the final project and he/she discusses the content of his/her course list. The course list requires authorization by the final project professor. 2. The final project professor is responsible for setting up a final project commission, in compliance with article 13 of these rules, within four weeks of the student requesting it. 3. The final project professor, in consultation with the student, formulates a definite Master's final project description. 4. If there is temporarily no professor at the Chair where a student wishes to do his/her final project, the board of examiners will determine who may assume the tasks of the final project professor, as stipulated in article 13 of these rules. 5. Students fill in the following details both on the „Graduate contract TNW-ChEâ€&#x; form and on any appendices referred to: the composition of the final project commission; the final description of the final project; the course list including results obtained; if relevant, an overview of the units of study as yet to be completed and the schedule to complete them; a graduation contract including the planned final project start and finish dates, the interim appraisal and interim report dates. This form can be downloaded from the programme's website. The form signed by the student and chairperson of the final project commission requesting approval of the final project, the composition of the final project commission, the course list and the final project schedule must be submitted to the board of examiners (c/o S&OA), one month before the student wishes to start the final project. 6. The board of examiners gives a ruling within two weeks of receipt of the request, excluding holidays stated in the timetables. 7. The student will be informed of the ruling in writing. All members of the final project commission receive a copy of the ruling. If the board of examiners has not ruled within four weeks of receipt of the request stipulated in article 5 of this article, excluding holidays stated in the timetables, approval is deemed to have been given. 8. Starting the final project if the board of examiners has not yet given its approval, as stated in clause 6 or clause 7, is not permitted. 9. The chairperson of the final project commission is responsible for carrying out the procedure concerning the final project correctly. In any case, he/she ensures that the agreements made in the graduation contract are kept; thereby, once a fortnight the daily supervisor holds a progress meeting with the student, and the final project commission discusses the progress and the course of the final project on at least one occasion. 10. As part of the final project's assessment, a report by the student regarding the approach, progress and result of this project is submitted to the final project commission. The final project report must be written in English. 150


Appendices 11. Students defend the final project report before the final project commission by means of a colloquium. The final colloquium is public and must be presented in English. 12. Students must fill in and submit the „Application form graduation colloquiumâ€&#x; to the board of examiners (c/o S&OA) no later than four weeks before the planned colloquium date.

Article 13

Final project commission

1. A final project commission is assembled to supervise and assess the final project. The final project professor is responsible for the composition of the commission. 2. The final project commission consists of a minimum of three members. The commission must meet the following requirements: - the chairperson is professor of the Chair where the student is doing his/her final project; - the student's daily supervisor during his final project is a member of the commission; - the daily supervisor is a permanent or temporary member of the scientific staff of the aforementioned Chair; - if the daily supervisor is a research assistant, then the member of staff who supervises the research assistant, must also be a member of the commission; - the commission has a minimum of one permanent member of the scientific staff from a Chair pertaining to the university's technical domain other than where the final project is being done. 3. Scientific experts not belonging to the discipline Chemical Engineering or to the university may be a final project commission member. 4. It is possible to do one's final project at another university or research institute, provided that a professor of the discipline Chemical Engineering is willing to act as final project professor. 5. If the final project is done at another university or research institute, a representative of this organisation must be added as an advisory member to the final project commission. 6. The composition of the final project commission must be approved by the board of examiners.

Article 14

Inception date st

These regulations will come into effect on 1 April 2010. Enacted by the Chemical Engineering Board of Examiners, th

Enschede, 15 March 2010.

151


Appendices

APPENDIX 7 – MASTER’S ASSIGNMENT FORMS Note that all of these forms (and more updated versions of them) can easily be downloaded from http://www.utwente.nl/tnw/organisatie/organisatie/SenO/onderwijszaken/formulieren/chemical_enginee ring/ and that these are just examples of the forms.

152


Appendices

7.1 Graduate contract Graduate Contract – TNW / ChE

Room: Address: Zip code: City: Country: Phone: E-mail:

University of Twente S&OA-TNW-CHE Horstring Zuid 204 P.O. Box 217 7500 AE Enschede Nederland +31 53 489 2925 boz-ct@tnw.utwente.nl

To:

Board of examination Chemical Engineering

Subject:

Approval master graduate committee, master assignment and examination subjects. Graduate contract.

From:

Name student:

.................................................. std. nr. ……………………

Research unit:

..................................................

Herewith I make a request, in accordance with section 12.5 of the Chemical Engineering Masters‟s Programma Board of Examiners‟ Rules (see masterguide), to get approval for the hereafter mentioned formation of the graduate committee, the defined master assignment, the defined examination subjects and the graduate contract. Planning  Starting date of master assignment .. / .. / …. ( dd / mm / yyyy )  At the start of the assignment I do / do not fulfill all requirements to start with the assignment.  I plan to finalize all requirements for the master certificate in .........................(month, year) Graduate committee Chair

....................................................................................

Member from other research unit

....................................................................................

Tutor

....................................................................................

Member

....................................................................................

Member

....................................................................................

______________________________________ (Signature of student) date: .. / .. / …. ( dd / mm / yyyy)

______________________________________ (Signature of Chair master assignment committee) date: .. / .. / …. ( dd / mm / yyyy)

Note: To start with the assignment at the planned date, this request including all enclosures has to be filed at the office for educational affairs at least one month before the start of the assignment. This month is necessary to complete all administrative actions. Enclosures are: 1. Definition master assignment 2. Examination subjects 3. Graduate contract

153


GRADUATE CONTRACT – TNW / ChE

Student:

............................................................ std. nr. …………………

Research unit:

.................................................................................................

Chair master assignment Committee: Tutor:

........................................................................

.................................................................................................

1. To be completed examinations and other study commitments.

total of ........ EC

Subject code

Subject name

EC

...................

................................................................ ...................

...................

................................................................ ...................

...................

................................................................ ...................

...................

................................................................ ...................

2. Extracurricular activities leading to part-time attention to the assignment. ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… ………………………………………………………………………………………………………

3. Planned interruption (Vacation, Surgery etc.).

total of ....... weeks

…………………………………………………………………… .. / .. / …. tot .. / .. / …. …………………………………………………………………… .. / .. / …. tot .. / .. / …. …………………………………………………………………… .. / .. / …. tot .. / .. / ….

4. Planning Master Assignment (concerning point 1 to 3) Number of EC

.............. M&M =45 EC, PT = 45 EC, WT =40)

Date of start ( dd / mm / yyyy )

.. / .. / ….

Date of halfway discussion of progress

.. / .. / ….

Date presentation halfway report

.. / .. / ….

Are there any other reports planned?

yes / no

If yes, when?

.. / .. / ….

In which week are you starting with the end report

........................

Expected Week of graduation

........................

154


-

The research group ensures a adequate support. At the start of the master assignment a substitute tutor will be assigned.

-

The tutor shall assure that there will be enough time to complete the subjects mentioned under point 1.

-

The student notifies the mentor as soon as possible if any change in the points 2 and 3 occurs.

-

The tutor (or any other member of the graduation committee) immediately reports any changes in the planning to the office for educational affairs.

-

The student is entitled to a progress meeting every two weeks

-

The oral defense of the resulting Masterâ€&#x;s thesis is the final requirement in the Chemical Engineering programme. This means that you must have passed all other requirements of the programme before the date of this oral defense.

Signed for approval, Enschede,

.. / .. / ‌. (dd / mm / yyyy)

_______________________________ Student

_______________________________ Tutor

______________________________ Chair Graduate Committee

Note: A copy of this contract is filed at the office for educational affairs (BOZ-ST/CHE) at least one month before the start of the assignment. Both the student and the research group also hold a copy of this agreement. The student uses his contract as a guide for realization of the project.

155


7.2

Colloquium Form

Room: Address: Zip code: City: Country: Phone: E-mail:

BOZ-TNW-CHE Horstring Z-204 P.O. Box 217 7500 AE Enschede the Netherlands +31 53 489 2925 boz-ct@tnw.utwente.nl PART 1 Application form for Colloquium of Master thesis and arrangement for colloquium PART 2 Application form for Master’s exam CHE

Please submit this part of the form to S&O-TNW-CHE at least four weeks before the planned colloquium. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------PART 1

Application form for Colloquium of Master thesis

Please fill out the form in capitals: Name student:…………………………………………

Student number:…………………………………………

Mobile Phone:…………………………………………. MSc track: PT/ M&M/ WT Name

research

Group:…………………………………

Faculty

research

group:

…………………………….. Chair: …………………………………………………… External member:……………………………………… Mentor: …………………………………………………. Members:……………………………………………….. Colloquium of the MSc assignment Title: …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ….. Date colloquium: ……………………………………….. Time: ……………………………………………………. Number of attendees:………………………………….

(estimated)

Preferred room: ………………………………………………. (S&OA-TNW-ChE) makes reservation and sends confirmation.

Please fill in part 2 of this form when you want to apply for the Masters Exam CHE.

156


Appendices

Room: Address: Zip code: City: Country: Phone: E-mail: PART 2

S&OA-TNW-CHE Horstring Z204 P.O. Box 217 7500 AE Enschede the Netherlands +31 53 489 2925 boz-ct@tnw.utwente.nl Application form for Master’s exam CHE

Please submit this part of the form to S&O-TNW-CHE at least four weeks before the graduation date. Please fill out the form in capitals: Name

student:…………………………………………

Student

number:………………………………………… Mobile Phone:…………………………………………. MSc track: PT/ M&M/ WT Date of birth: …………………………………………. Place

of

birth:…………………………………………

Country:………………………………………………….

Herewith, student does apply for the final MSc. exam. The date of the last part of the exam is:……………….

Signature of student: ………………………………………………………… Date:………………………………………………….

After this part of the form is returned the exam program will be checked. A copy of the MSc thesis report must be send to S&OA-TNW, by e-mail or on CD. All MSc thesis reports will be treated confidentially and are not available for third parties. The faculty would appreciate it if you would take the time to fill out a questionnaire, concerning the study program, and send it back to S&OA-TNW. http://www.utwente.nl/tnw/organisatie/organisatie/SenO/onderwijszaken/formulieren/chemical_engineering/ctmast erexitenquetejan200.doc

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

PART 3 Filled in by the Board of Examiners Decision of the Board of Examiners:

Student is NOT graduated/ is graduated /

cum laude

Signature of Dr.ir.A.G.J. van der Ham, secretary ………………………………………………………… Date:…………………………………………………

157


Appendices

APPENDIX 8 – LINKS TO WEBSITES Education: 3TU’s Cooperation of Delft, Eindhoven, Enschede University of Twente Startpage University of Twente Addressbook Graduate information at UT Central Student Administration (CSA) Student Support (counsellors, e.d.) Student Union Sports on campus Library Student Portal Student rights and duties (Charter)

Programme rights and duties (OER) Abbreviations (in Dutch)

http://www.3tu.nl/en

http://www.utwente.nl http://webapps.utwente.nl/telefoongids/nl /telgidsservlet http://graduate.utwente.nl http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentservices/en/ http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/en/ http://www.studentunion.utwente.nl http://www.sport.utwente.nl http://www.utwente.nl/ub http://my.utwente.nl http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentenbegeleiding/en/reg ulations/charter/ http://www.tnw.utwente.nl/che/education/regulations/ http://www.utwente.nl/afkortingen

Faculty TNW and ChE Programme Faculty TNW http://www.tnw.utwente.nl MSc Programme - ChE http://www.tnw.utwente.nl/che/ Students and Education Administration (S&OA) http://www.tnw.utwente.nl/organisatie/organisatie/SenO/ Study association Alembic http://alembic.utwente.nl/ UT and ChE related institutes Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicin (MIRA) http://www.utwente.nl/mira/ Institute for Nanotechnology (MESA+) http://www.mesaplus.utwente.nl Practical information: General information for following an UT Master‟s programme: http://graduate.utwente.nl General practical information: http://www.utwente.nl/master/international/practicalinformation/ Notebook Service Centre - Problems with notebooks & software: http://www.utwente.nl/icts/nsc/ Unionshop http://www.unionshop.nl Health and Safety: http://www.utwente.nl/pao/info_voor/ medewerkers/arbo

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Appendices Admission and Enrolment to Programmes: Enrolment: http://www.utwente.nl/so/studentservices/en/enrolment/ International Office – studying abroad and internationalisation: http://intoffice.utwente.nl Traineeships: http://www.utwente.nl/stage/en/ Evaluation of efficiency of study methods: (Dutch) http://vsm.cs.utwente.nl Study with a disability: http://www.handicap-studie.nl Explanation of JobPayments “UT-Flex” http://www.utwente.nl/hr/en/Information_about/utflex/ Doctor: http://www.campushuisarts.nl/en Webapplications at UT-level Overview accessible at MyUniversity portal Application Use Link Xtra-card Activity card http://webapps.utwente.nl/sup SMS Student Mobiliteit Systeem http://webapps.utwente.nl/srs UT-Flex The Virtual temp agency http://webapps.utwente.nl/flx Travel insurance: http://webapps.utwente.nl/reisverzekeringen TRA Temporary Registration Internet Access http://webapps.utwente.nl/tra WebMail Email http://xs.utwente.nl WebFTP Storing data online http://webftp.utwente.nl SNT DAS Network card registrations https://das.snt.utwente.nl Datumprikker Appointment planner http://www.datumprikker.nl

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Master of Science Chemical EngineeringProgramme guide2011 – 2012  

Master of Science Chemical Engineering Programme guide 2011 – 2012

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