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alumni MAGAZINE Spring 2016

THE BOB DYLAN ARCHIVE FINDS A HOME AT TU’S HELMERICH CENTER FOR AMERICAN RESEARCH


Christiansted, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands

Groundbreakingg RESEARCH

Anthropology doctoral student Alicia Odewale is preparing to return to St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands for a second summer of groundbreaking research on the history of enslaved Africans. She will compare findings from St. Croix’s Christiansted National Historic Site with evidence she has collected at Montpelier Plantation in Virginia. The comparisons between urban and rural slave sites are important contributions to African diaspora archaeology. Odewale’s work and the projects of many other ambitious graduate students are graciously supported by TU’s Annual Fund. Give today and watch their research endeavors change the course of history.

To make your tax-deductible gift, visit

www.utulsa.edu/giving or call 918-631-3514.

TU Annual Fund 800 S. Tucker Drive Tulsa, OK 74104


Dear Friends, Down through the decades, university research has produced a cornucopia of advances, including vaccines and radiation therapy, no-till farming and Carbon-14 dating, FM radio and digital technology, and daily trappings as common as the child-proof safety cap and frozen orange juice. The University of Tulsa remains an active player in that legacy. On any given day, TU faculty members and their student teams pursue more than 200 research projects that command about $75 million in funding from industry, government and other sponsors. We operate 15 research consortia and joint-industry projects and seven interdisciplinary research institutes. And one of our hallmark programs, the Tulsa Undergraduate Research Challenge (TURC), extends advanced research opportunities to ambitious undergraduates – many of whom have gone on to become professors themselves. In the fall of 2014, we were proud to open the Helmerich Center for American Research, a building on the Gilcrease Museum grounds dedicated to conserving, exploring and sharing the treasures of the Gilcrease Archive. For want of space, that collection of more than 100,000 rare books, maps and other documents had long sat as one of Tulsa’s most unrealized cultural assets. It did not take long for our building of the Helmerich Center to pay off in a dramatic and unexpected way. During the past year, we have been discreetly forming and finalizing an agreement to house the archive of Bob Dylan, the most prolific American poet and songwriter of the last century, and the most powerful lyrical voice of our time. That trove of notebooks, lyrics, essays, correspondence, photos, studio masters and more will soon stand alongside the Woody Guthrie Center, the Gilcrease Collection, Philbrook Museum and the Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art as one of the defining treasures of our city. We are truly honored to be entrusted with this volume of the

The University of Tulsa Alumni Magazine The University of Tulsa Magazine ISSN 1544-5763 is published by The University of Tulsa, 800 South Tucker Drive, Tulsa, OK 74104-9700. Publication dates may vary according to the university’s calendar, events and scheduling.

In 1978, Arizona State University doctoral student Steadman Upham worked on an archaeological excavation at the ancestral Hopi site of Nuvakwewtaqa (A.D. 1280 – 1350) on the Colorado Plateau in Arizona. The project was funded by the National Science Foundation and closely coordinated with the Hopi Tribal Council and Hopi elders. American experience, and we look forward to working with scholars from around the world to share Dylan’s legacy as part of our larger ongoing effort to draw the unknown into the brighter light of understanding. Best regards,

Steadman Upham, President

Steadman Upham

Leslie Cairns (MA ’99)

PRESIDENT

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Kayla Hale

John Lew and Erik Campos

VICE PRESIDENT FOR INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT

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Amy Berry England (MBA ’11) ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT OF INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT

Mona Chamberlin DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS

Amy Freiberger (BSBA ’96, MBA ’99) POSTMASTER: Send change of address to The University of Tulsa Magazine Office of Alumni Relations 800 S. Tucker Drive • Tulsa, OK 74104-9700

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ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI RELATIONS

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Leslie Blanchet (BSBA ’06) ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI RELATIONS

Amy Dodson (BS ’80) Katy Hough COORDINATOR OF ALUMNI RELATIONS

The University of Tulsa does not discriminate on the basis of personal status or group characteristics including, but not limited to individuals on the basis of race, color, religion, national or ethnic origin, age, gender, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, genetic information, ancestry, or marital status in the administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, employment policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic and other University sponsored programs. Questions regarding implementation of this policy may be addressed to the Office of Human Resources, 800 South Tucker Drive, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104-9700, 918-631-2616. Requests for accommodation of disabilities may be addressed to the university’s 504 Coordinator, Dr. Tawny Taylor, 918-631-2315. To ensure availability of an interpreter, five to seven days notice is needed; 48 hours is recommended for all other accommodations. TU#16035

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In this Issue F E AT U R E S 4 Very truly yours In a series of articles, TU professors examine the impact of Bob Dylan on the American landscape and anticipate the high volume of scholarly interest his archives will attract to Tulsa. 14 Biology breakthroughs gain global attention Professors Charles Brown and Warren Booth are world renown as the go-to guys for cliff swallows and nonsexual reproduction in various reptiles. 16 Refining research for mass appeal College of Engineering and Natural Science professors’ research cuts a wide swath, from pinpointing the causes of big rig truck crashes to innovative methodologies for toxic remediation.

O N T H E C OV E R The University of Tulsa will enable researchers to explore the behind-the-scenes working of modern genius Bob Dylan, whose personal archive is housed at the Helmerich Center for American Research on the Gilcrease Museum campus.

18 Economic connections for the win In the Collins College of Business, research ranges from making global markets available to small and medium-sized businesses to examining the impact of sports on societies and economies. 20 Active imagination at work Eric Wickel, professor in the Oxley College of Health Sciences, proposes that kids’ after-school activities have long-ranging implications for their future health. 22 Delving into the legal system Is long-term incarceration on death row cruel and unusual punishment? Professor Christopher Russell’s research looks to answer that question, while the Lobeck Taylor Family Advocacy Clinic at TU provides legal remedies for the less fortunate.

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24 Better lives via timely analysis Community service spans many fields — from research to determine how to increase Oklahoma teachers’ salaries to providing neighborhood mental health services. T H E

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D E PA R T M E N T S 1 Letter from the President 26 University News 34 Athletic News 36 Alumni News 40 Class Notes 47 In Memoriam 49 Bookend

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DYLAN’S BACK PAGES FIND A HOME IN TULSA BY ANDREW GRANT WOOD

Bob Dylan is one of the world’s most popular and acclaimed artists, having made an indelible impact on music and culture for more than 50 years. First making his way to New York City in 1961 as a young singer and interpreter of traditional music, Dylan quickly became a powerful creative force in that city’s thriving folk music scene. Drawing on an array of musical and cultural influences, the singer and songwriter developed his own original blend of blues, folk, rock and pop, soon being regarded internationally as an important and truly original artist. In an era when most recording artists tended not to write or publish their own material, Dylan’s powerful songs inspired a new generation of musicians to create and perform original work.

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Now, more than a half century later, Dylan is an American icon and an artist who continues to reach new audiences the world over. His creative output is unmatched and features a catalog of more than 600 songs, 37 studio albums, three books (Tarantula, 1971, Writings and Drawings, 1973, and Chronicles: Volume One, 2006) and several series of original paintings and drawings, as well as appearances in several films and performances on numerous television programs. Dylan is the recipient of some of the world’s most prestigious accolades including the Presidential Medal of Freedom – the nation’s highest civilian honor (2012), France’s Officier de la Legion d’honneur (2013), the National Medal of Arts (2009), a Pulitzer Prize (2008),

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Sweden’s Polar Music Prize (2000), 11 Grammy Awards, an Academy Award and Golden Globe Award (both in 2000). He is an inductee of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (1988), the Songwriters Hall of Fame (1982) and the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame (2002). Dylan is also one of the world’s most active and popular live performers, traversing the globe each year for 100-or-more concerts in front of audiences that span generations. Now, in what will prove to be a boon to Tulsa’s appeal to fans and researchers worldwide, the Bob Dylan Archive will make its permanent home in Tulsa.

THE COLLECTION

The Bob Dylan Archive, comprised of more than 6,000 items spanning nearly the entire length of his career, was acquired by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and The University of Tulsa and will be housed at TU’s Helmerich Center for American Research. The materials — nearly all of which have never been viewed or accessed by outside parties — will be made available to scholars and curated for public exhibitions in the near future. An intimate perspective of the artist’s working process can be evidenced in a vast assortment of handwritten song lyrics. Beginning with songs on the 1964 album Another Side of Bob Dylan, much of the material is heavily revised, annotated and often includes omitted material. Highlights include various drafts of many of Dylan’s creations along with a raft of lesser known song lyrics and fragments. Of particular interest to researchers, the archive contains a considerable number of unrecorded lyrics along with a collection of tunes written by musicians Dylan admired. The collection also includes essays, poems, liner notes, correspondence, autobiographical bits and philosophical musings. Many of these are associated with Dylan’s mid-1960s efforts while others trace the artist’s work, changing attitudes and personal activity. Another major section of the archive contains notebooks and correspondence. Recording session reports, contracts, sheet music of Dylan’s songs and scores of photographs also populate the collection. Astoundingly, master tapes of the artist’s entire musical catalog as well as hundreds of hours of film and video material are in the collection, as well as the film originals of Murray Lerner’s Festival! (1965), D.A. Pennebaker’s Don’t Look Back (1967), Dylan’s (with Howard Alk and Pennebaker) Eat the Document (1971), Dylan and Alk’s Renaldo & Clara (1978), Martin Scorsese’s Bob Dylan: No Direction Home (2006) and a host of music shorts and videos.

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DYLAN 101

Bob Dylan was born in 1941 in Duluth, Minnesota, and raised in nearby Hibbing. After graduating from high school, he moved to Minneapolis in the fall of 1959 and then to New York City in early 1961. Almost immediately, the newly arrived 20-year-old began performing an assortment of folk and blues songs in Greenwich Village coffee houses and clubs. Attracting the attention of Columbia Records’ John Hammond, Dylan released his first album (Bob Dylan) in 1962. Two albums soon followed: The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan in 1963 and The Times They Are A-Changin’ in 1964. Key early live performances included the Newport Folk Festival in 1963, followed soon after by appearances at New York City’s Town Hall and Carnegie Hall. On Aug. 28, Dylan sang at the March on Washington at which the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered his “I have a dream” speech. With a distinguished cast of talented young backing musicians in mid-1965, Dylan “went electric” and created a powerful, truly original blend of American music. Many folk traditionalists balked at his new sound, denouncing what they believed to be Dylan’s apparent “sell out” to pop commercialism. Performing again at Newport in late July 1965, Dylan’s three-song electric blues set enraged much of the festival establishment who heard only excessive volume and noise. Touring Australia, Scandinavia (Stockholm and Copenhagen) and the British Isles the following year with members of a group that would later become The Band, Dylan and his colleagues were booed and heckled at many of their performances.

There would be no looking back, however. Riding high on a blue streak of creative energy, his language and sound became more original — imaginative, sophisticated and cinematic. Subsequent work after 1970 included the much-heralded Blood on the Tracks (1975), Desire (1976), Time Out of Mind (1997), Love and Theft (2001) and Modern Times (2006) as well as the celebrated Bootleg Series volumes 1-12 containing previously unreleased material, live recordings, outtakes and alternate versions. President Barack Obama summed up Dylan’s impact and influence while bestowing the Presidential Medal of Freedom upon him in 2012: “Bob moved to New York at age 19. By the time he was 23, Bob’s voice — with its weight, its unique, gravelly power — was redefining not just what music sounded like, but the message it carried and how it made people feel. … There is not a bigger giant in the history of American music. All these years later, he’s still chasing that sound, still searching for a little bit of truth. And I have to say that I am a really big fan.” Yet despite being an American cultural icon for more than a half century, Dylan is an incredibly private person who has rarely lifted the veil on his creative process. With the creation of the artist’s archive in Tulsa, any number of fresh new perspectives on Dylan will inevitably arise.

GUTHRIE CONNECTION

As a young man from Minnesota, making his way in Greenwich Village at the height of the early 1960s folk revival, Dylan was an avid listener of all kinds of traditional music: Scottish and British ballads, Appalachian tunes, blues and country. Like so many of his generation, Dylan learned the songs of Woody Guthrie. In fact, Dylan identified with Guthrie’s determined individualism, his politics, his authentic “man of the people” persona. The young artist eventually met up with his hero in the Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in New Jersey. By then, Guthrie was slowly dying of Huntington’s disease. Dylan honored Guthrie, so the legend goes, by playing him one of his own compositions: “Song to Woody.” “Perhaps it is only fitting that the Bob Dylan Archive make its home in Tulsa, the same city that brought home the Woody Guthrie Archive and built the Guthrie Center in the Brady Arts District between The University of Tulsa’s main campus and TU’s Helmerich Center for American Research.

Note: Andrew Grant Wood is a musician, DJ and the Stanley Rutland Professor of American History at The University of Tulsa. He is author, most recently, of Agustín Lara: A Cultural Biography. Oxford University Press, 2014. 8

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AT THE CROSSROADS: DYLAN’S AMERICA B Y S E A N L AT H A M

Why has Bob Dylan’s archive come to Tulsa? It’s a good question. Dylan has a few local connections, but you have to squint to see them. He collaborated with Oklahoma’s own Leon Russell a handful of times, and his early folk songs were published in the magazine Broadside by Sis Cunningham, who grew up in Oklahoma before moving to New York. He knew and loved Woody Guthrie, but only met him in a New Jersey hospital. Dylan’s tours stop regularly in Tulsa, and he mentions the state in a few lyrics. Still, all this hardly seems reason enough to declare the city the new capital of Dylan’s America. The best answer to the question “Why Tulsa?” might be “Why not?” The treasures held in these archives connect with and feed the ever-evolving arts and humanities culture that helps define our city. The University of Tulsa’s McFarlin Library holds the papers of some of the 20th century’s greatest writers, and TU is known globally as the research center for poet James Joyce. Gilcrease Museum and the Helmerich Center for American Research contain dazzling riches that are just now being unlocked. Philbrook Museum, the Woody Guthrie Center and a growing number of art galleries rub shoulders in the vibrant Brady Arts District with Cain’s Ballroom, AHHA, the Brady Theatre and the nascent OK Pops Museum. So Dylan’s notebooks and recordings, his diaries and photographs, his lyrics and letters arrive in a city

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now super-charged by the arts. These materials, in fact, arguably lodge him just where he belongs: between James Joyce and Woody Guthrie, between modern poetry and popular music, and between the small towns of northern Minnesota where he was born and the deep South where the blues music he reinvented first took shape. Tulsa has always been a crossroads, and crossroads are magical places where people meet, mix and change. One of the things that most plainly singles out Dylan’s genius is his endless insistence on evolution. After penning some of the greatest modern folk songs, he became a rock star; and when rock hit its crest in 1968, he was at home in a basement, inventing roots music. He is, in fact, our modern Hermes — a god of the roads, a rolling stone, always in motion, always changing. Here in Tulsa, his music, his art and his genius will remain at the crossroads of American creativity, intersecting with voices and sounds from the past and those from the future who will take up the challenges his work still poses. Note: Sean Latham is Pauline McFarlin Walter Endowed Chair of English and Comparative Literature at The University of Tulsa where he serves as editor of the James Joyce Quarterly. He is founding director of the Oklahoma Center for the Humanities at TU and currently teaches a special topics course on Bob Dylan soon to be available on iTunesU.

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A RICH TROVE FOR SCHOLARS BY JOSEPH L. RIVERS

Following on the heels of Tulsa’s relatively recent acquisition of the Woody Guthrie Collection, Bob Dylan’s archive stands to make the city an essential destination for conducting scholarly popular music research and generating artistic activity. This is fitting, as Guthrie was a significant early inspiration for and influence on Dylan. His long and continuing artistic career strides an everchanging American environment that touches on many disciplines, and this collection provides a rich source of materials for scholars of popular music, film studies, American studies, history, sociology, political science and cultural studies. Continued biographical, literary and musical research on Dylan will depend on access to this collection by scholars from around the world, and we can anticipate the steady creation of papers, monographs, colloquia, symposia, conferences and classroom studies emanating from this collection. The life, career and concert performances of Dylan also hold an especial fascination for documentary filmmakers, as a number of films have chronicled his life and music up to the present, but by no means have they had the definitive say. No doubt the archive will continue to inspire and foster new feature and documentary films centered on Dylan, his artistic work, his literary writings and his role and importance in shaping and reflecting American culture. Film and music scholars will be able to examine hundreds of hours of music and documentary

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film and video material, including raw documentary footage, script notes, concert footage, outtakes, interview tapes and other undocumented private, uncirculated tapes not available anywhere else. Examples of the vast amount of information waiting to be unearthed and research waiting to be conducted include: The examination of “Chimes of Freedom” lyrics scrawled on hotel stationery and dotted with cigarette burns. The dissection of Dylan’s decision to transition from acoustic to electric. The analysis of correspondence between Dylan and beat poet Allen Ginsberg. Most importantly, the Helmerich Center is a suitable, congenial and secure location for archival materials that will enable all of us to remember, celebrate and learn more about one of America’s greatest popular musical artists. We can expect this newly accessible collection to attract a host of scholarly activity and provide the spark for artistic and research endeavors for decades — even centuries — to come. Note: Joseph L. Rivers is J. Donald Feagin Professor of Music and professor and chair of the Department of Film Studies at The University of Tulsa. He is composer for the forthcoming documentary film High Stakes: The Life and Times of E.W. Marland, the musical score for Wahzhazhe: An Osage Ballet and the choral composition Will Rogers SelfPortrait.

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FILM ORIGINALS IN THE DYLAN COLLECTION MURRAY LERNER’S FESTIVAL! (1965) D.A. PENNEBAKER’S DON’T LOOK BACK (1967) DYLAN’S (WITH HOWARD ALK AND PENNEBAKER) EAT THE DOCUMENT (1971) DYLAN AND ALK’S RENALDO & CLARA (1978) MARTIN SCORSESE’S BOB DYLAN: NO DIRECTION HOME (2006) S P R I N G

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BIOLOGY BREAKTHROUGHS GAIN GLOBAL ATTENTION

Charles Brown

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Every summer for the past 35 years, Biology Professor Charles Brown has packed his bags and headed north for a research excursion in the remote plains near Ogallala, Nebraska. The mission: to collect data on cliff swallows. His three decades of work are widely respected as some of the most extensive investigations into animal coloniality. Brown’s papers have been published in multiple research journals internationally, and he is among a long list of TU faculty who travel or collaborate coast-to-coast for research of global interest. In addition to Nebraska, Brown has observed cliff swallows in Oklahoma, Texas and North Dakota. In the 1980s, he traveled to Arizona to study violet green swallows. Further west, Brown is a consultant for the historic Mission San Juan Capistrano in California where large colonies of cliff swallows began nesting on the property in the 1700s. After the birds’ habitat began to disappear in the 1990s, the mission sought Brown’s expertise to reestablish a cliff swallow colony. The city holds a Swallows Day festival every year in March to celebrate the legend of the birds’ annual return to San Juan Capistrano from Argentina. “It’s a great forum to promote the birds every year,” Brown said. “When I go out there, national media are swarming. It’s a platform to promote conservation of the species.” To analyze the data he collects each summer in Nebraska, Brown works closely with statisticians in Canada and North Dakota. His long-term ecological studies involving disease, social behavior and demography are instrumental in identifying environmental threats to cliff swallows. In 2013, Brown’s research on natural selection in cliff swallows was published in the journal Current Biology and earned him a segment on the National Public Radio show Science Friday. The findings of how birds can rapidly evolve to avoid new urban threats (such as cars on a highway) reached countries as far


“FOR UNDERGRADS TO DO THIS KIND OF WORK, PUT THEIR NAMES ON THE RESEARCH PAPER AND RECEIVE CREDIT, IS PHENOMENAL.” Warren Booth away as Germany and Ireland and made headlines in Science, Nature and USA Today. “I counted 450 different media stories from the roadkill research alone,” Brown said. “The story was very accessible to a lot of people and attracted wide interest.” Other areas of his research include a partnership with TU colleague Warren Booth, an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Science. Booth lends his knowledge of invasive species, specifically bed bugs, to Brown’s research of cliff swallow parasites. While currently collaborating on bed bug research with biologists in the Czech Republic, Booth also is known

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internationally for parthenogenesis research he began as a post-doc. In 2010, he documented reproduction in an unfertilized female snake sample. The research was widely accepted among biologists and led to followup studies in other species of snakes. Booth’s lab has performed parthenogenesis studies on king cobras from Holland, multiple types of domestic rattlesnakes, python and anaconda samples from the United Kingdom’s West Midland Safari Park, komodo dragons from zoos in Texas and water snakes from Missouri, North Carolina and Georgia. He assigns the work to undergraduates for oncein-a-lifetime laboratory experience. “It’s more beneficial for the students to do the DNA extraction, sequencing and analysis,” Booth said. “Parthenogenesis is such a small part of what our lab does, but it’s received media attention worldwide. For undergrads to do this kind of work, put their names on the research paper and receive credit, is phenomenal.” In 2014, Booth published a review paper in the Biological Journal of the Linnean Society about the same parthenogenesis concept but in a different species of snake. The paper was accessed online 35,000 times and is the highest ranked document in the journal’s history. Its popularity garnered Booth the role of parthenogenesis consultant for the BBC, and ABC Australia featured his research in a 2015 episode of the science show Catalyst. “It’s good for TU,” Booth said. “The university is being recognized across the globe. I receive 50 or 60 e-mails a day just from people interested in learning more or from prospective students who want to attend TU for the research.”

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REFINING RESEARCH It’s the ultimate goal for many faculty members to watch their months or years of research culminate in a tangible, marketable product. Commercialization has the power to legitimize a research concept and demonstrate its applicability to prospective investors and clients. TU strives to improve society as a whole through its academic discoveries. Commercialization supports the university’s entrepreneurial climate and goals. “Commercializing a product brings TU a lot of visibility in academic circles in the state and around the world,” said Bill Lawson, director of technology commercialization. “As products roll out with TU patents, we receive credit for providing economic development.” Under the leadership of President Steadman Upham, TU has commercialized three products, and a fourth is in development. All patent recommendations undergo a thorough review and approval process by the president’s office to determine their financial feasibility. TU’s most recognized project to date was introduced by Jeremy Daily, an associate professor of mechanical engineering, who launched Synercon Technologies LLC in 2013. The company provides a line of equipment and software for use in heavy vehicle crash investigations and serves a niche market for state highway patrol organizations nationwide. Products include the Forensic Link Adapter, a “black box” for heavy duty trucks programmed to download engine control module data after a crash. “We ultimately help people who have suffered tragedy by providing clear information on what happened,” Daily said. His interest in crash forensics welcomed mechanical engineering, computer science and electrical engineering students to assist with the research. In true grassroots fashion, the prototypes were built in Daily’s home garage. “I don’t know how I would’ve done it without TU’s help,” he said. “Commercializing a product is drastically

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Jeremy Daily different from typical academic research. You realize how your efforts really matter and see how you can actually use the product.” Juggling the responsibilities of a start-up company, research and teaching is a challenge, but Daily says it’s important to share the experience with his students. Two of his former students are employed by Synercon today. “I now understand the business side of the operation,” he said. “We’re able to talk with clients about cyber security issues we study too, and there’s always potential for continued research.” Students from the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences and the Collins College of Business often collaborate for research and product design to compete in the Oklahoma Governor’s Cup competition. Lawson says the annual event encourages interdisciplinary research and promotes many of TU’s commercial prospects. TU teams consistently earn top honors. “The student body has quite a thirst for this kind of entrepreneurship,” he said. “It’s exciting when successful academic endeavors can be made available to society in general.” On the horizon, TU is partnering with Flinders University in Adelaide, South Australia, to commercialize research that began two years ago in a TU chemistry laboratory. As participants in the Tulsa

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FOR MASS APPEAL Undergraduate Research Challenge, senior Austin Evans and alumnus Michael Crockett (BS ’15) worked alongside Justin Chalker, then a TU assistant professor of chemistry, to develop a polymer that removes mercury from water and soil. Nontoxic and inexpensive to make, the compound is made entirely of waste generated by the petroleum and citrus industries. Chalker, who is now a professor at Flinders University, said the compound appeals to a global market, targeting the serious environmental problem of mercury pollution. “We’re currently in discussions with fine chemical companies, geoscience firms, mining agencies and remediation companies,” he said. “I’m most interested in seeing our discovery make a positive impact on the environment.” Chalker said developing the research into a field-ready product will generate more impact than it would as a mere academic exercise. Strategic industrial partnerships will lead to additional support for lab research, science discoveries and university contributions. “Both institutions will share revenue generated from the technology’s commercial license agreements,” he said. The partnership between TU and Flinders University ensures access to a global network for Chalker and his research team. Development for commercial sale is still in the preliminary stages but has elevated TU’s international reputation. “We’ve already talked to 17 different entities from four different continents,” Lawson said. “It’s some of the most exciting work I’ve gotten to do.”

The skin of citrus fruits contains one of polysulphide’s main components, a byproduct of the citrus industry known as limonene. Mass quantities of limonene combined with sulfur generated from petroleum refining are readily available for alternative use.

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ECONOMIC CONNEC OVERCOMING OBSTACLES TO SUCCESS Advancements in technology mean physical borders no longer confine business practices, giving rise to the importance of international business research. Wellspring Associate Professor of International Business Mike Troilo’s primary research efforts center on this very topic, and more specifically, small to medium-sized enterprises. “These businesses are an engine of economic growth, which is important for job creation, innovation, productivity and wages,” said Troilo. He notes there is a significant body of research focused on discovering efficiencies in larger, multinational companies. “While it’s helpful to examine larger firms as conduits of growth and incremental innovation, I look at how smaller firms are able to undertake radical innovations to stimulate economic growth.” Last fall, Troilo and Mark Collins, the Edward E. and Helen T. Bartlett Foundation Professor of Business, presented a paper at the Academy for International Business Central and Eastern European Chapter conference in Poland. The study, which received two awards at the conference, examines the effect of court proceedings on businesses in terms of efficiency, strength and impartiality. “Legal hurdles are a huge obstacle in most parts of the world, especially for small firms,” says

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Troilo. “Yet, policy makers recognize the importance of these businesses. Research like this helps to answer the question of how we can remove these obstacles.” Data derived from international business research can translate to practical initiatives such as the policy guidebook for developing small and medium enterprises in the Asia Pacific region that Troilo coauthored with the United Nations. The guidebook compiles information outlining steps that enterprises in this area can use to prosper and grow. “Aspiring business owners could get the job done if they just knew how to access certain information, such as export regulations,” said Troilo. “Government can be useful as a conduit of information, making it simple for entrepreneurs to start businesses.” Troilo will have the opportunity to further expand his research during a Fulbright study in Portugal this summer. He chose Portugal because of its size. He will explore ways the country can expand to join the global economy. “How can Portugal enjoy the prosperity that globalization can bring? What industries should they target? How can the country connect into larger global value chains? These are all questions I hope to begin answering.”

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TIONS FOR THE WIN EXAMINING THE BUSINESS OF SPORTS In a global society, perhaps nothing has the power to unite people worldwide more than sports. As TU’s Warren Clinic Associate Professor of Sports Management Adrien Bouchet notes, “We live in sports-minded societies.” And the statistics validate his statement. International sports market intelligence firm Sportcal estimates that more than 330 million people attended the top 25 sporting events in the world in 2014 — a figure that surpasses the entire U.S. population. Much of Bouchet’s research examines how the business of sports affects society and the global economy. Last summer, he and Brian Walkup, assistant professor of finance, traveled to Germany to study the Bundeslige (the country’s soccer league) courtesy of a grant funded by TU’s Center for Global Education. “The trend in Germany is for huge corporations like Volkswagen, Bayer, adidas and Evonik to purchase equity shares in the country’s sports teams. This contrasts with U.S. teams, which generally are owned by individuals,” said Bouchet. “We wanted to speak to executives and academics to find out what’s behind this trend.” Volkswagen employs about 100,000 workers in its headquarters, located in the small German city of

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Wolfsburg. Bouchet explains that the company was looking for ways to make the city a cool destination for its employees, who love soccer. “Owning a soccer team made sense for Volkswagen from an employee recruitment and retention strategy,” he said. Audi, the German automobile manufacturer, bought 10 percent of Bayern Munich because of its status as one of the world’s top soccer clubs, giving the company prime exposure around the world. Bouchet and Walkup have summarized the research they conducted during the summer and will submit it for future publication in academic journals. They also will create a case study to bring business concepts to life in the classroom. “In this field, it’s important to connect our research with practical application,” he said. Bouchet also emphasizes the significance of sport research in establishing ties with other universities. “While in Germany, we visited three universities to present our research to their sport management faculty in hopes of strengthening our academic relationships around the world.”

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ACTIVE IMAGINAT “RESEARCH SUGGESTS THAT MAKING A COMMITMENT AS A FAMILY TO ADOPT HEALTHY BEHAVIORS IS AN IMPORTANT STEP TOWARDS HEALTHY LIVING.”

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Have you ever wondered what kids do after school? Findings from a new study completed by Eric Wickel, associate professor of kinesiology and rehabilitative sciences, raise questions about this period of the day as youth transition from childhood to adolescence. “I was concerned about physical activity among children,” said Wickel, who earned his doctorate in health and human performance from Iowa State University and has been teaching at TU for 10 years. “Many studies rely on cross-sectional designs to report activity and sedentary levels, but few are available to specifically examine longitudinal trends.” Using data from the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, Wickel’s research compared levels of sedentary, light, moderate and vigorous physical activity between 3 and 10 p.m. among a group of 375 children at age 9 and then again at age 15. The findings, which are being published in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, show a decline in moderate-to-vigorous activity. The decline was significantly greater among girls compared with boys and among overweight/obese youth compared with youth with normal body mass index. “During a busy week, parents need to think creatively about ways to make activity fun. Importantly, research suggests that making a commitment as a family to adopt healthy behaviors is an important step toward healthy living,” said Wickel, an active runner. His data was gathered objectively by accelerometers, which provide a better measure of activity patterns than pedometers and are free from the threat of recall bias associated with self-report. “We need to be able to track people over time using objective assessment tools,” Wickel said. “The development study is a rich data set that includes demographic, interpersonal and environmental measures collected from birth to 15 years, which allows investigators to examine age-related patterns and report associations with health-related outcomes.” Wickel said secondary studies that utilize existing data help answer questions about whether childhood behaviors have an impact on people later in life. “The more information we can gain from studying patterns and correlates of youth behavior, the more opportunity we can create for well-designed interventions,” Wickel said. “Promoting activity among children has to be a priority for both schools and parents. Research and education provide a starting point for that discussion.” The father of two young children, Wickel next will examine whether physical activity in youngsters affects cognitive skills such as executive function and academic achievement during adolescence while accounting for biological and social factors.

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DELVING INTO SPENDING DECADES ON DEATH ROW: IS IT CONSTITUTIONAL? It has been 40 years since the U.S. Supreme Court reversed one of its own rulings and decided that the death penalty is, after all, constitutional. The passage of time, however, has not curtailed the often-heated debates that surround this contentious issue. Russell Christopher, professor of law, who joined the faculty in 2002, is a scholar in criminal law and procedure. He has published research in leading law journals that explores one key aspect of the death penalty that nearly every court in the U.S. has refused to consider and that has attracted growing attention among many legal scholars — the time spent on death row. One of Christopher’s principal arguments is that prisoners often spend decades on death row between the time they are sentenced in court until they are executed. Nationally, the average time that a prisoner resides on death row is 16 years. In California and Florida, the average time is 25 years. Moreover, many inmates never even meet their executioner: Due to long-term death row incarceration (DRI), they often die of causes related to old age before their sentence can be carried out. Christopher contends that prisoners who endure

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long-term DRI are subjected to an additional form of punishment beyond the death sentence. Punishment that goes beyond the original sentence, he says, amounts to an excessive (or disproportionate) form of punishment, which the Supreme Court’s rulings forbid. “For some capital offenders,” he argues, “the death penalty has become . . . punishment in the form of life imprisonment without the possibility of parole, plus capital punishment.” Death penalty proponents counter that long-term DRI is due to “the prisoner’s choice” to have his or her case subjected to the judicial system’s lengthy appeals process, so residing on death row for decades is the prisoner’s fault. Therefore, the argument goes, a capital offender cannot delay execution via interminable appeals and, at the same time, claim that the delay in execution and the decades spent on death row constitute cruel and unusual punishment. Yet, the appeals process in death penalty cases is automatic and mandatory under many state laws. In addition, the Constitution provides anyone convicted of a crime with the right to appeal that conviction as far as the federal judicial process allows, as well as the right to be free from cruel and unusual punishment. Prisoners who opt for the former, Christopher argues, cannot be forced to waive or forfeit the latter. Therefore, he contends, “It is the state, not the prisoner, that has chosen to impose, and must administer, capital punishment, and it must do so in a constitutional manner. And it is the state’s actions, often due to lack of financial resources to handle a court system’s case load, that cause a prisoner to sit in solitary confinement for so many years while his case is appealed.” Sometimes, he notes, the consequence of satisfying one constitutional right can violate another. As for a solution, Christopher argues that capital offenders have a right to speed and accuracy in their cases as well as due process and freedom from excessive punishment. “If the state cannot meet these constitutional requirements,” he says, “and execute a condemned person within a reasonable amount of time — for example, five years — his death sentence should be converted to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.” Christopher’s articles on long-term DRI can be found in the The UC Davis Law Review (February 2016), The Washington & Lee Law Review (June 2015) and The Minnesota Law Review (December 2014).


THE LEGAL SYSTEM TU LAW STUDENTS DEVELOP ROADMAP FOR ACCESS TO JUSTICE When former Tulsa Mayor Kathy Taylor, and her husband, Bill Lobeck, donated nearly $1 million to endow the Lobeck Taylor Family Advocacy Clinic at the College of Law, they placed TU in a position of leadership on a legal issue that has become a crisis of national proportions. The issue begins with a fundamental pillar of our democratic society. Every person has a constitutional right to what is chiseled in stone on the front of the U.S. Supreme Court building: “Equal Justice Under Law.” But according to Anna Carpenter, assistant clinical professor of law and director of the Lobeck Taylor Family Advocacy Clinic: “To receive equal justice under our nation’s laws, a person must have meaningful access to our justice system. Today, however, only about 20 percent of people who need legal assistance in civil cases actually receive it.” While the Constitution provides for the right to counsel in a criminal case, even if the defendant cannot pay the legal fees, that right does not apply in a civil case. “As a result,” Carpenter explains, “millions of low-income Americans with legal problems that involve divorce, child custody and domestic violence must go to court without an attorney. Some may have to represent themselves. And sometimes, people simply never seek legal relief at all.” To bring more attention to this issue, the National Center for Access to Justice published its first Access to Justice Index in 2014. Based on extensive research on leading indicators, Oklahoma ranked 50th in the nation in providing adequate access to justice in civil cases. In response, the State Supreme Court established the Oklahoma Access to Justice Commission to improve and expand the delivery of civil legal services. (Forty other states have similar access to justice commissions and initiatives.) The court appointed one of Tulsa’s leading attorneys, David Riggs (JD ’68), to lead the commission. Given the scope of the problem, he saw the need for in-depth research and impartial analysis to support the commission’s work, so he turned to the Lobeck Taylor Family Advocacy Clinic for help. Carpenter asked three students — Bethany Jackson,

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Joe Lang and Cybil Rajan — to conduct research on the complexities that low-income people encounter when they seek access to justice and to develop a set of strategic recommendations to help citizens make informed decisions when they have a legal problem. Carpenter supervised the students’ work, which gave them the kind of advanced legal experience that is not available in every law school. After more than 1,000 hours of collective work on the project, the students presented their 85-page report, A Roadmap for Reform: A Continuum of Interventions for Access to Justice in Oklahoma, to the commission in December 2015. Riggs expressed his gratitude to the students and the legal clinic for their excellent work. “The research and report that these TU Law students produced was precisely what the commission needed to sharpen its focus and identify workable solutions to access to justice problems in Oklahoma,” he said. To be sure, the students’ report is only the first chapter in a much larger story about access to justice in Oklahoma. It remains to be seen whether the report’s initial recommendations will be adopted and funded and whether every citizen in the state can then be assured of “Equal Justice Under Law.” For more information about the NCAJ and its Access to Justice Index, visit www.ncforaj.org.

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BETTER LIVES VIA SOLUTION TO OKLAHOMA TEACHER CRISIS Matthew Hendricks became interested in labor economics as a graduate student at the University of Minnesota. But is wasn’t until he arrived at TU five years ago that he began to examine how restructuring salaries might affect teacher turnover and productivity. Oklahoma’s public K-12 education system consistently ranks low when compared with other states. Teacher pay and retention are two key areas where Oklahoma struggles. If an educator only stays in public schools a few years, they never reach their full potential and districts must hire new teachers.

OPTIMAL VS. CURRENT OKLAHOMA SALARY SCHEDULES $55,000 $50,000

■ current ■ optimal ■ optimal 5% increase ■ optimal 10% increase ■ optimal 15% increase

$45,000 $40,000 $35,000 0

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“Teaching is one of our most important labor markets because of the ripple effects of a quality education: Productivity in industry increases, while crime rates and reliance of social services decrease,” Hendricks said. “Society can see a huge payoff if we can move the needle – even slightly – when it comes to improving the education system.” He was able to use data from Oklahoma and neighboring Texas to evaluate teacher recruitment and retention. Among other findings, his most recent research, published just last fall, shows: • Teacher salaries in Texas are about 16 percent higher on average than teacher salaries in Oklahoma, and 34 percent higher when comparing urban schools in Dallas and Houston with schools in Tulsa and Oklahoma City. • About 17 percent of new teachers exit Oklahoma public schools each year, compared with 11 percent in Texas. • Among teachers with 10 years’ experience, about 10 percent exit Oklahoma schools, while the figure in Texas is about 7 percent. The solution? Hendricks found that if the salary schedule was adjusted to give newer teachers a pay bump earlier in their careers, they would be more likely to stay in the public school system. This reconfiguration of when teachers receive raises wouldn’t cost the state any additional tax dollars, which might help it gain support from both ends of the political spectrum. “Regardless of political affiliation, everybody wants to see teacher productivity rise. And there are ways to increase those levels without any great cost to the state,” he said. “If we take some of these steps, we’re likely to see big benefits.”

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TIMELY ANALYSIS HELPING IMPROVE MENTAL ILLNESS Based on research of community needs, TU’s True Blue Neighbors Behavioral Health Clinic was formed to provide an experiential learning environment for psychology graduate students while providing free services to the Kendall Whittier neighborhood and a handful of agencies that require a mental health resource. The facility, which opened at 4th and Lewis in 2015, offers therapy for individuals and families as well as testing for children referred by Tulsa Public Schools to determine what the underlying cause may be for academic issues. However, the clinic was unable to serve some students from the nearby Kendall-Whittier Elementary School because many of the children are Hispanic and are just learning English or have parents who only speak Spanish. That’s where Jennifer Coronado (BA ’15) comes into the picture. Coronado grew up in the neighborhood and attended Kendall-Whittier. Her native language is Spanish, and her undergraduate degree is in psychology. “I love this community. I’m glad I can help open doors at the clinic to Spanish-speaking clients,” she said. “I chose psychology as a profession because I wanted to find ways to help people live better lives. Sometimes, someone’s

psychological state affects their physical state.” The Behavioral Health Clinic offers therapy based on the clients’ needs. Coronado said the graduate students, who are supervised by TU professors, employ empirically supported treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy that teaches clients to deal effectively with stressors, modify their thoughts and focus on their strengths. They also administer IQ tests to children and show them ways to cope with learning disabilities or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. “There’s been a high level of interest already. So far, we’ve been able to see everyone with only a short waiting list, mostly for Spanish-speaking clients. Now, we’ll be able to address their needs efficiently,” Coronado said. She added that the teachers at Sequoyah Elementary and Kendall-Whittier Elementary, just a few blocks from the clinic, appreciate the university’s presence in the neighborhood. “TU volunteers and facilities mean increased resources for the school,” Coronado said. And simply having a world-class college next door has transformed the area from Delaware Avenue to Lewis Avenue — once a haven for criminal activity — into an up-and-coming neighborhood. “The children see the university as something attainable,” she said. “TU serves as a sort of role model, an example of how an organization can positively impact an entire community.”

The True Blue Neighbors Behavioral Health Clinic is committed to providing empirically supported treatment services and assessments for a number of different concerns, including: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Academic performance Anxiety problems Conflict resolution Depression Parenting problems Phobias and other disorders Relationships Social skills Stress management Post-trauma symptoms

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Upham inducted into OK Hall of Fame

TU dedicates Hardesty Hall Hardesty Hall opened in grand fashion with a campuswide dedication party on August 27, 2015, held in conjunction with First Thursday, TU’s annual student organization fair. The university community celebrated with food vendors, live music, a light show and fireworks display. The new residence hall, which is next door to the Allen Chapman Student Union, provides luxury living accommodations for 300 students. Features include: leisure areas on each floor, the Burnstein Family Lobby and

Student Lounge; the Bernsen Student Lounge, a multipurpose space; free laundry facilities with LaundryAlert; a student kitchen; carpeted rooms with moveable furniture; and freestanding closets. Hardesty Hall also is home to the Holmes Student Center which houses the Phillips 66 Career Services Center, the Chevron Multicultural Resource Center, the Office of Student Affairs, the Center for Global Education and TU’s English Institute.

TU President Steadman Upham was among eight honorees inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame in 2015. Membership in the Hall of Fame is the highest honor an Oklahoman can receive from the state. Upham has led TU for more than a decade and currently serves as the university’s 19th president. Highlights of his administration include the addition of nearly 40 academic programs, the establishment of interdisciplinary research institutes in nanotechnology and bioinformatics, the launch of the Oxley College of Health Sciences, a partnership with the City of Tulsa to manage Gilcrease Museum, the opening of the Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education in downtown Tulsa, construction of the Helmerich Center for American Research and the adoption of a university culture that fosters community service engagement through programs such as True Blue Neighbors.

Office of Diversity and Engagement established In the summer of 2015, TU created the Office of Diversity and Engagement to identify needs and opportunities to improve the university’s diversity in representation and culture. The office is administered by Jacqueline Caldwell, TU’s inaugural vice president for diversity and engagement. Caldwell, who has been at TU for 10 years, previously served as associate vice president and director of the Presidential Scholars Program. TU is deeply committed to providing a rich and fulfilling college

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experience and continues to ensure multicultural students and faculty are represented and supported across campus. “Diversity is fundamental to our institutional excellence,” said TU President Steadman Upham. “A much more diverse group of students will attend college over the next decade and beyond. Many of these applicants will be the first in their family to attend college, and some will need significant financial assistance to make their dream of a college education a reality.”

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Times Higher Education World University Rankings publisher Times Higher Education has listed TU among the top 20 best small universities in the world. TU is one of only five American universities to make the list, released in January 2016. The ranking includes universities of fewer than 5,000 students that feature intimate campus environments where students often feel part of a tight community. U.S. News & World Report TU ranks No. 86 among national universities and is a top 50 private university, according to the 2016 U.S. News & World Report rankings released in September 2015. TU, the highest ranked college in Oklahoma, has been named a top 100 national university for the past 13 years. TU’s College of Law and Collins College of Business are among the top 100 colleges in their fields according to 2016 rankings compiled by U.S. News. This marks the fourth year for the law school and the third year for TU’s business programs to make the top 100 list.

TU’s College of Law has been recognized as one of the country’s most outstanding law schools by the Princeton Review. TU is featured in the Princeton Review’s 2016 edition of its annual book, The Best 173 Law Schools. Kiplinger’s Finance Kiplinger’s Personal Finance has named TU to its list of the top 300 Best College Values of 2016. Kiplinger ranks the top 100 best values in each category. TU earned the No. 54 spot on the magazine’s list of best values among private universities. Fiske Guide to Colleges TU is listed in the 2016 edition of the Fiske Guide to Colleges. Compiled by former New York Times education editor Edward B. Fiske, the guide is a selective, subjective and systematic look at more than 300 colleges and

universities in the United States, Canada and Great Britain. Colleges of Distinction TU has been named a College of Distinction for 2015-16 as a nationally recognized school of excellence. Universities are selected from college counselor recommendations and research. TU is one of only three Colleges of Distinction in Oklahoma.

universitynews

TU rated a top university worldwide

Victory Media TU has been designated a 2016 Military Friendly School by Victory Media, an organization that helps connect the military and civilian worlds. TU also was named a top 25 university for Military Friendly graduate programs. The recognition provides service members and their families with transparent, data-driven ratings about post-military education and career opportunities.

Princeton Review The Princeton Review continues to recognize TU as one of the nation’s best institutions of higher learning. TU was named to several “best” lists for 2016 including Green Colleges, Private Schools and Best Western Colleges. TU’s outstanding academic programs earned it a place in The Best 380 Colleges. The Princeton Review declares TU one of the nation’s best colleges for students seeking a holistic education with great career preparation at an affordable price. The accolade was published in its 2016 edition of Colleges That Pay You Back: The 200 Schools That Give You the Best Bang for Your Tuition Buck.

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KENDALL COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

universitynews

Faingold joins UN languages society

Professor and son honored as outstanding mentors Kristin Oertel, the Mary Frances Barnard Associate Professor of 19th Century History, and her seventhgrade son, Owen, were honored with the Outstanding Mentor award in January by the Oklahoma Foundation for Excellence. Recipients are nominated based on their contributions to community service projects. The Oertels began volunteering at Kendall-Whittier Elementary School’s Youth Mentoring Program last year through TU’s True Blue Neighbors initiative. Each Wednesday, they read with second- and third-grade students

and help them with their homework. The mother and son also are fluent in Spanish and use their skills to help students refine their English; for many of the students, Spanish is their first language. “I’m glad the True Blue Neighbors program facilitates this kind of voluntarism, and I look forward to working with these kids in the years to come,” Oertel said. She and Owen were recognized at the state Capitol by former Oklahoma Gov. David Boren who created the Oklahoma Foundation for Excellence.

Eduardo Faingold, professor of Spanish and linguistics, has accepted an invitation to join the prestigious group responsible for analyzing language policy and advising the UN on language minority rights and endangered languages. The organization is known as the Study Group on Language and the United Nations. Lifetime membership is reserved for the world’s top language policy experts who meet at the group’s annual symposium in New York City. Faingold has served in the TU Department of Languages since 1995 and has published eight books and 50 papers on psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, bilingualism, language policy, immigration studies, Spanish in the United States and language rights. Faingold is recognized internationally for writing five major papers since 2004 on the topics of language rights in constitutions as well as statutes of Europe and the United States. A member of the International Academy of Linguistic Law and the International Society for Language Studies, he holds degrees from Tel-Aviv University and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Sociology class examines myths, truths of liberal arts Sociology and graphic design students teamed up to write and produce an informational video answering common questions and dispelling misconceptions about liberal arts education in the 21st century. Such myths include the liberal arts will not teach you marketable skills or that graduate school is required after majoring in the liberal arts. The reality is that the liberal arts help students cultivate skills that are useful in many different work settings, and career-level jobs can be obtained with a bachelor’s degree. To watch the video, please visit artsandsciences. utulsa.edu/liberal-arts-myths-and-realities/.

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND NATURAL SCIENCES

Construction is ongoing for Keplinger Hall’s multiphase renovation. Faculty offices in the Departments of Chemistry and Mathematics have been remodeled and are located on the main and lower levels. The dean’s office suite and the Russell School of Chemical Engineering are operating in temporary Keplinger locations while construction continues on new offices and classrooms.

“Everything is already so much brighter and spacious,” said James R. Sorem, dean of the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences. Large, well-lit classrooms with new desks and audio visual equipment are being reconfigured to seat up to 70 students. Sorem said construction managers hope to complete the next round of classroom renovations by this summer.

“It’s exciting,” he said. “We’re about 20 percent done with construction, and 50 percent of the funding is raised.” To support the Keplinger Hall project, please contact Natalie Adams at 918-631-3287, or natalie-adams@ utulsa.edu.

universitynews

Keplinger Hall remodel continues

Hall of Fame is April 21 The College of Engineering and Natural Sciences will host its annual Hall of Fame Ceremony on April 21 at Gilcrease Museum. This year’s inductees include: Diane (MS ’65) and Wiley (BS ’65) Cox, Robert Strattan, The A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Foundation, and A.R. and Marylouise (BFA ’44) Tandy, In Memoriam.

Computer science establishes two endowed chairs The Tandy School of Computer Science has established two new endowed chairs: Rose F. Gamble is the Tandy Professor of Computer Science Engineering, and Tyler Moore (BCS ’04, BAM ’04) is the Tandy Assistant Professor of Cyber Security and Information Assurance. They were honored at a special ceremony on Jan. 28. Gamble specializes in software engineering such as knowledgebased systems, formal verification and validation, distributed systems, software architecture and software integration. She is director of TU’s Software Engineering Architecture Team, founder of the Applied

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Research Center for Cloud of Things and instructor of the computer science capstone course where she and students provide nonprofit organizations with custom-designed software. Gamble has managed the implementation of multiple web applications for conducting human studies that track the trust levels of malicious online content and programmer’s code. She holds U.S. Patent 9,038,155 for an Auditable Multi-Claim Security Token. Gamble is a graduate of Westminster College and Washington University. Moore focuses on the economics of information security, cybercrime measurement and the development of

policy for strengthening security. He directs the Security Economics Lab at TU and StopBadware, a nonprofit anti-malware organization. Moore is founding editor-in-chief of the Journal of Cybersecurity, a new interdisciplinary publication from Oxford University Press. He has coauthored more than 60 peer-reviewed publications and has edited four books, including Economics of Information Security and Privacy. He is a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Intelligence Science and Technology Experts Group (ISTEG). Moore is a TU alumnus and graduate of the University of Cambridge in England.

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COLLINS COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

universitynews

Finance program recognized by CFA Institute

TU hosts MLP Conference Pinnacle Investment Advisors presented its fourth annual Tulsa Master Limited Partnership Conference Nov. 12, 2015, on TU’s campus. The event, which brings together leading industry experts, company executives and investors to meet and network, was cosponsored by TU’s School of Energy Economics, Policy and Commerce and Ernst & Young. Tulsa is home to a number of Master Limited Partnerships, which are publicly traded limited partnerships. Pinnacle established the conference in 2012 to bring together industry speakers who offer differing viewpoints on challenges that affect MLPs. More than 200 energy professionals, faculty members and students attended this year’s sessions, which addressed investment strategies, accounting and financial management best practices, economic development trends and legislative policies. Conference speakers included executives representing Shell Midstream, SemGroup/Rose Rock, Magellan Midstream and the Master Limited Partnership Association.

The University of Tulsa was welcomed into the CFA Institute University Recognition Program, becoming the first university in the state of Oklahoma to have a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA®)-recognized program. The BSBA degree in finance has been acknowledged as incorporating at least 70 percent of the CFA Program Candidate Body of Knowledge (CBOK) and placing emphasis on the CFA Institute Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice. The TU program positions students to obtain the CFA designation, which has become the most respected and recognized investment credential in the world. Entry into the CFA Institute University Recognition Program signals to potential students, employers and the marketplace that TU’s curriculum is closely tied to professional practice and is well suited to preparing students to sit for the CFA examinations. Through participation, TU is eligible to receive a limited number of CFA student scholarships each year. Full-time TU students interested in taking the Level I June exam can apply for a scholarship to help cover the costs. To become a CFA charter holder, candidates must pass a series of three exams and obtain four years of qualified work experience.

Executives inducted into Business Hall of Fame The Collins College of Business inducted three business leaders into its Hall of Fame during a special ceremony on Sept. 22, 2015, at Gilcrease Museum. Honorees included outstanding entrepreneur William F. Fisher Jr. (BS ’63), who retired as president and CEO of Miss Jackson’s in 2002; outstanding business leader Becky J. Frank, chairman, CEO and managing partner of Schnake Turnbo Frank; and outstanding business leader Steve W. Turnbo (BA ’68), chairman emeritus of Schnake Turnbo Frank. The Business Hall of Fame annually honors the widespread contributions of outstanding Tulsa business leaders who shape and strengthen the university, community and economy. The Collins College of Business Hall of Fame has inducted 44 individuals since its establishment in 2000. 30

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OXLEY COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES

College of Health Sciences takes Oxley name In September 2015, TU announced it would unite the university’s health programs under the new name Oxley College of Health Sciences. The college is based downtown at 1215 S. Boulder Ave. to better serve the health needs of Tulsa’s urban residents. TU occupies 50,000 square feet of the building, housing classrooms, student common areas and faculty offices for the college’s nursing, kinesiology and rehabilitative sciences and community medicine programs. Final renovations are underway on experiential laboratory space, outfitted with patient simulators and other state-of-the-art equipment to replicate real-world healthcare scenarios. The college’s name honors the Oxley Foundation’s long-term commitment to the university and its health initiatives. “Through programs that encompass physician training, brain research and nursing care, The University of Tulsa can help close critical healthcare gaps that affect the overall well-being of our state’s population,” said TU President Steadman Upham.

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The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship (ASF) has established a new program chapter in the Tulsa area, housed on the TU campus with support from the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University. Schweitzer Fellows are graduate students (specializing in health care, social work, law, education and other fields) who design and implement year-long service projects addressing the root causes of health disparities in under-resourced communities. “Our program will support a range

of projects that address health and well-being in multiple and creative ways to reach those with needs that often go unmet in traditional healthcare and social service settings,” said Rachel Gold, director of the Tulsa program. The process of moving their fellowship projects from initial concept to completion teaches Schweitzer Fellows valuable skills in working with others in allied fields. The chapter’s first class of recruits begin their fellowship term in April.

universitynews

Schweitzer Fellowship launched in Tulsa to serve community

Department of Kinesiology created The Oxley College of Health Sciences has combined TU’s athletic training and exercise and sport science programs into a new Department of Kinesiology and Rehabilitative Sciences. Greg Gardner, clinical professor of athletic training, serves as the department chair. The newly organized department houses exercise and sport sciences as well as athletic training education and research programs, clinical services, faculty and staff. The change allows the Department of Kinesiology and Rehabilitative Sciences to refine its undergraduate offerings to seven tracks: traditional, rehabilitative and therapeutics, teacher certification, teacher alternative certification, pre-athletic training, pre-health professions and pre-medicine. Students seeking a master’s degree in athletic training may complete their undergraduate and graduate degree goals in just five years.

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COLLEGE OF LAW

universitynews

Oil and gas in the 21st century

2016 Reunion Weekend in May The College of Law welcomes all law alumni for the 2016 Reunion Weekend, honoring the classes of 1966, 1976, 1986, 1996, 2006 and the 25th anniversary class of 1991. A welcome reception and open house will be hosted at John Rogers Hall, followed by individual class socials for the reunion classes in the Brady Arts District in Downtown Tulsa the same evening. The Classes of 1966, 1976, 1986 and 1996 will meet at the Hardesty Arts Center; the Class of 2006 at Dust Bowl Lanes and Lounge; and the Class of 1991 will celebrate at the Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education. Reunion Weekend will continue Saturday evening with the fifth annual TU Law Alumni Gala at Gilcrease Museum and the induction of five outstanding leaders from the legal community into the Hall of Fame. Inductees for 2016 are the Honorable John Dowdell (JD ’81), U.S. District Court Judge for the Northern District of Oklahoma; Kathy Taylor and Elizabeth Frame Ellison, Lobeck Taylor Family Foundation; and Benjamin P. Abney (BS ’66, JD ’68), Riggs Abney. TU Law will present the W. Thomas Coffman Award for Community Service posthumously to The Honorable Carlos Chappelle (JD ’80). Accepting on his behalf will be U.S. Attorney Danny Williams (JD ’91). For more information, please visit TULawAlumni.com/reunion.

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TU Law will host a two-day interdisciplinary conference, April 7-8, exploring the question of whether production and consumption of oil and gas will peak during the 21st century because of diminishing resources or competition from energy efficiency and other energy sources. The conference will feature nine leading energy practitioners, economists, analysts and scholars from across the nation. Keynotes will be presented by David Lawrence, Ph.D., chairman and CEO, Lawrence Energy Group (Houston, Texas); and Barry T. Smitherman, partner, Energy Regulation, Vinson & Elkins LLP (Austin, Texas). All sessions take place at Gilcrease Museum and the Helmerich Center for American Research at Gilcrease Museum. Visit law.utulsa.edu/oilconference for more information.

Clinical law conference Clinical law faculty from across the region and beyond will meet at John Rogers Hall October 6–8 for the 2016 Midwest Clinical Legal Education Conference. The fall conference, organized by Elizabeth McCormick, associate dean for experiential learning and director of clinical legal education, and clinical professors Anna Carpenter and Mimi Marton, will continue a decades long tradition of bringing together clinical teachers and scholars for plenary, concurrent and works-in-progress sessions. The conference will address the critical role of clinical legal education in preparing law students for the changing dynamics of law practice and the communities they serve. Check law.utulsa.edu for the latest updates.

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GILCREASE MUSEUM

Gilcrease Museum’s stake in Tulsa Vision A YES vote on April 5 would be transformational for Gilcrease Museum.

Gilcrease Museum has a $65 million capital project that is part of the Vision 2025 referendum to be presented to Tulsa voters on April 5, 2016. The benefits of a reimagined and expanded Gilcrease Museum are great and many — attracting an additional 500,000 visitors to Tulsa, expanding tourism for the local community and contributing to the local economy via sales tax and other investments. Enhancing Gilcrease Museum would put this major asset to work for the residents of Tulsa. Studies have shown that for every $1 invested in museums and other cultural organizations, $7 is returned in tax revenues.

The last expansion of the museum was completed in 1987. Now is the time to reinvest in this special Tulsa treasure. With Vision 2025 funding, planned improvements at Gilcrease Museum include a 100,000-squarefoot expansion of the museum, grand entry and great hall, children’s discovery space, new state-of-the-art traveling exhibition space, extended permanent collection exhibition space, and more amenities to enhance the visitor experience. Vision 2025 is not a new tax, but an extension of one that has been in place since 2003. The 0.6 percent Vision 2025 sales tax has raised more than $645 million for development,

including the BOK Center, Tulsa Parks, the Oklahoma Aquarium, street improvements and other projects. A yes vote on April 5 can transform Gilcrease Museum into the world-class facility our city-owned treasure deserves. Gilcrease Museum’s managing partner, The University of Tulsa, is committed to raising an additional $50 million in private funds for an endowment to ensure the long-term sustainability of museum operations. Since the partnership began in 2008, more than 20 inter-departmental collaborations have occurred, and future opportunities are yet to be realized. The benefit to both institutions continues to be a win.

Mexico art and culture exhibitions Two shows highlighting Mexican art, culture and traditions will open at Gilcrease in June and July. West Mexico: Ritual and Identity, organized by Gilcrease Museum, opens June 26 and runs through Nov. 27, 2016. This exhibition will feature a spectacular selection of ceramic figures and vessels from the Gilcrease collection augmented by items from public and private collections. The art and artifacts of the shaft tomb culture that flourished in West Mexico between 300 B.C.-500 A.D. will be examined and interpreted. Frida Kahlo: Through the Lens of

Nickolas Muray opens July 10 and runs through Sept. 11, 2016. The photographs in the exhibition, dating from 1937 to 1946, explore Muray’s unique perspective and bring to light Kahlo’s deep interest in her Mexican heritage, her life and the people who were significant to her. Title sponsor of the Gilcrease Museum 2016 exhibition season is the Sherman E. Smith Family Charitable Foundation. Generous support is also provided by Mervin Bovaird Foundation, C.W. Titus Foundation and the M.V. Mayo Charitable Foundation. 33


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Tulsa opens football season at home Philip Montgomery promised “fun, fast, physical football” when he was named head coach, and the 2015 season was just a glimpse of what’s to come. The Golden Hurricane averaged over 500 total yards, 333 yards passing and 37 points to rank among the top offenses in the country in Montgomery’s first season as coach. After returning to a bowl game last year, there’s much anticipation for 2016. Six 2015 bowl participants and four 10+ win teams highlight TU’s schedule. Tulsa kicks off the season at home against San José State on Sept. 3. The 10-win North Carolina A&T team rounds out the nonconference portion of TU’s schedule, while league members Cincinnati, East Carolina, SMU and Tulane visit H.A. Chapman Stadium this year. Deposits for new season ticket holders in 2016 currently are being accepted by calling 918-631-4688. Season tickets for the six regularseason games at H.A. Chapman Stadium are $78, $150, $210 and $270. Family Fun Zone for a family of four, including two adults and two children age 12-and-under, is priced at $195 for the entire season.

2016 TULSA FOOTBALL SEPTEMBER 3 SAN JOSÉ STATE 10 at Ohio State 17 NORTH CAROLINA A&T 24 at Fresno State OCTOBER 7 SMU* 15 at Houston* 22 TULANE* (Homecoming) 29 at Memphis* NOVEMBER 5 EAST CAROLINA* 12 at Navy* (CBS SN) 19 at UCF* 25 CINCINNATI* CAPS indicate home games. *American Athletic Conference games

Tulsa Golden Hurricane, adidas announce 8-year partnership The Department of Athletics announced an eight-year agreement with adidas to become the exclusive apparel provider for all 18 Golden Hurricane intercollegiate sports. The Portland, Oregon-based sports brand will be the official uniform, apparel, footwear and accessory provider for Tulsa Athletics beginning July 1, 2016 through the 2023-24 athletic season. “The Tulsa-adidas partnership marks the first time in school history for an all-inclusive sports deal.

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Aligning ourselves with a national leader in shoe and performance wear will certainly benefit our studentathletes and coaches,” said Tulsa Vice President and Director of Athletics Derrick Gragg. “Adidas has already gone above and beyond to make us feel like a valued partner.” Tulsa fans will be able to purchase official apparel at a wide variety of quality retailers including the Campus Corner Bookstore as well as on the official TU Athletics website.

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Cross Country wildly successful in 2015 Tulsa’s cross country teams ended the season with two more championships and two appearances in the NCAA Championships. The Golden Hurricane claimed its second consecutive sweep of the American Athletic Conference Championships — the sixth straight for the men and the third straight for the women. Head Coach Steve Gulley and his staff were selected as the American Athletic Conference Coaching Staff of the Year for both teams. The TU men and women both placed fourth at the NCAA Midwest Regional and earned at-large bids to the NCAA Championships. It was the first time both teams made the national championship meet in the same season.

NCAA Tennis Championships return to Tulsa The Michael D. Case Tennis Center will host its third NCAA Championship since the center opened in 2001. TU and the Tulsa Sports Commission will host the 2016 NCAA Division I Men’s & Women’s Tennis Championships, May 19-30. “As a university and community, we’re excited for the opportunity to host the NCAA Championship in tennis this year,” said Derrick Gragg, TU vice president and director of athletics. “Tennis tournaments bring a significant economic impact to the region. We are looking forward to the NCAA tournament and its projected total economic impact of over $5 million,” said Ray Hoyt, VisitTulsa & Tulsa Sports Commission president.

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H E L P U S AC H I E V E 1,600 active members in 2016! JOI N TO DAY

The Golden Hurricane Club provides TU with annual funding to help meet the rising costs associated with operating a top collegiate athletics program. Last year, nearly 1,400 members from 39 states answered the call by making a gift in support of Tulsa student-athletes. This year we need your help to reach 1,600

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as low as $50, you can help contribute to the

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800 South Tucker Drive

Tulsa, OK 74104

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ghc@utulsa.edu

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TU Uncorked 2016 returns to the Reynolds Center The Tulsa Chapter of the TU Alumni Association invites alumni and friends to the 12th Annual TU Uncorked wine festival on Friday, June 24, 2016. TU Uncorked will once again be held at the Donald W. Reynolds Center on campus. Honorary chairs are Cinda and Mark (MS ’84). Event chairs are Hillary (BSN ’13) and Matthew (BMG ’10) Hauth, with cochairs Anna (BBA ’02) and Michael (BSBA ’00, MBA ’03) Krupka. Since its inception, the event has raised more than $700,000 in scholarship funding for needbased students in the Tulsa area. Mark your calendars for another memorable evening to support these future TU alumni. To register and for more information, please visit TUAlumni. com/Uncorked. For sponsorship and volunteer opportunities, contact Leslie Blanchet at leslieblanchet@utulsa.edu, or 918-631-2092.

Hurricane Tracker referral program launched Do you know a qualified student who would be a great match for TU? The Alumni Association has partnered with the Office of Undergraduate Admission to help recruit the next class of the Golden Hurricane. The new program, Hurricane Tracker, encourages TU Alumni to refer prospective students for undergraduate admission. With this referral, the student will have their $50 application fee waived if they choose to apply. If you know a student who would be a great member of the TU family, please visit TUAlumni. com/hurricanetracker or contact the Office of Admission at 918-631-2307, or admission@utulsa.edu.

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UPCOMING EVENTS Homecoming 2016 dates announced The TU Alumni Association will present Homecoming Oct. 19-23, 2016. The Golden Hurricane Football team will take on the Tulane Green Wave at H.A. Chapman Stadium on Saturday, Oct. 22, time to be announced. Homecoming events include the Distinguished Alumni Celebration, the annual bonfire and pep rally, TU on Tap at Linde Oktoberfest, the Gold Medallion Society brunch and the Homecoming Tent Party. The Class of 1966 will celebrate its 50th Reunion, and the Class of 1991 will celebrate its 25th Reunion. Additional events will be announced in the coming months. Chair of the Homecoming 2016 committee is Sara Rogers (BEX ’02, JD ’11).

■ April 2 – 3rd Annual Young Alumni Cane Crawl ■ April 16 – TU Day ■ April 27 – Kansas City Chapter reception ■ May 4 – Oklahoma City Chapter reception ■ May 5 – Denver Chapter reception ■ May 6 – Final Bell Party celebrating the Class of 2016 ■ May 7 – Spring Commencement ■ May 11 – Houston Chapter reception

Give us a shout!

■ June 24 – 12th Annual TU Uncorked

If you are interested in volunteering on the Homecoming Committee,

For more information and additional events, visit TUAlumni.com.

TU Day on April 16

or if you would like to plan or organize a reunion for your group, contact Amy Dodson in the Office of Alumni Relations at amy-dodson@utulsa.edu.

If you have questions about Homecoming or are interested in sponsorship opportunities, please contact the Office of Alumni Relations at tualumni@ utulsa.edu, or call 918-631-2555. For more information, visit TUAlumni.com/ Homecoming.

The TU Alumni Association invites you to participate with a chapter or club near you on Saturday, April 16 for TU Day. TU Day celebrates university spirit and alumni service in the community as alumni and friends throughout the country partner with philanthropic organizations in their communities. In 2015, more than 10 Alumni Association chapters and clubs across the U.S. participated in the second annual TU Day. Visit TUAlumni.com/TUday to learn more.

TU alumni celebrate Golden Hurricane bowl game The Tulsa Golden Hurricane Football team battled the Virginia Tech Hokies on Dec. 26, 2015 in the Camping World Independence Bowl. The TU Alumni Association was there to cheer on the team,

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hosting a tent party for more than 500 alumni and guests before the game, including more than 60 current TU students. Watch parties were hosted in eight chapter cities nationwide.

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Alumni Clubs and Chapters

The Oklahoma City Chapter hosted a pregame party for alumni and fans on Friday, Sept. 18, 2015, the night before TU played OU.

Denver Chapter alumni and friends gathered for a Denver City Park jazz event on June 14, 2015. Kansas City Chapter alumni watched TU take on OU at a football watch party.

Alumni from the Los Angeles Chapter joined together for the TU-OU game.

Washington, D.C. alumni cheered on the DC United soccer team at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C. on Oct. 2, 2015.

The Houston Chapter hosted a weekend float trip in August 2015 on the Guadalupe River in New Braunfels, Texas.

The Midland Club gathered for a happy hour and welcomed TU student summer interns on June 22, 2015.


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OklaHomecoming 2015 brings together TU alumni

2015 Distinguished Alumni were honored at a celebration at the Lorton Performance Center on Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2015. Honored were Bill Carmody (JD ’88), Marcia MacLeod (BS ’75, JD ’80) and Wayne Rumley (BS ’60).

The Class of 1965 was honored at a reception on Oct. 23 and at the Gold Medallion Society Lunch on Oct. 24. The reunion chairs were Barbara (BS ’65) and John (BA ’65, JD ’67) Turner and Carolyn (BS ’67) and John (BA ’65, JD ’67) Woodard.

The Class of 1990 celebrated their 25th reunion at Homecoming 2015. The reunion was chaired by Thad Satterfield (BA ’90) and Andrea Nevaril Satterfield (BA ’90).

The Houston Chapter of the TU Alumni Association won the 2014-2015 Charles S. Monroe Chapter of the Year Award during Homecoming 2015. Thomas Porter (BSBA ’14), Houston Chapter president, accepted the award from Katie Ahrens (BS ’01, MS ’02) during the Alumni Association Board of Directors meeting on Oct. 23, 2015. The award is given annually to an officially chartered Seniors Claire Wood and Carter Neblett were crowned Homecoming Queen alumni chapter outside of Tulsa that develops programs and King during halftime. and participates in events that bolster and advance TU.

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1960s William Shewey (BS ’64) was elected to a second four-year term as mayor of Enid, Oklahoma. He was also appointed to the Board of Oklahoma Municipal League. Casey Cooper (BSBA ’65, JD ’67) was named to the 2016 edition of Best Lawyers. Casey was recognized for his work in the category of commercial litigation. He is employed by GableGotwals in Tulsa. Sidney G. Dunagan (BA ’65, JD ’68) was named to the 2016 edition of Best Lawyers. Sidney was recognized for his work in the categories of banking and finance law, bet-the-company litigation, commercial litigation, energy law and litigation-environmental. He is employed by GableGotwals in Oklahoma City. Charles (Chuck) McConnell (BS ’65) published his

first novel in 2015, Fire with Fire, A Jack Tallon Novel. He is a retired chemical engineer and energy service industry chief executive officer. He is a member of the TU College of Engineering and Natural Sciences Hall of Fame, an Outstanding Alumnus of the chemical engineering department, past Outstanding Engineer and past chairman of the Chemical Engineering Industrial Advisory Board. Chuck was also a 2012 and 2014 candidate for the Colorado House of Representatives. William E. Dunstan (MA ’66) announces the publication of The Portrait, his novel crackling with young romance and adventure. William lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Helen Howerton (BFA ’66) was the featured guest artist at the Akdar Shrine 2015 “Wine Feztival” in October 2015. A portion of the art sales was donated to

Jerry Swanson (BS ’65) and his wife, Ann, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary at the Mayo Hotel in Tulsa on August 8, 2015. Friends who helped them celebrate were Carol and Joel Walenta (BS ’64), Sharon and Don (BS ’64) Murphy, Jana (BS ’64) and Bill (BS ’64) Shewey and Annette and Tony (BA ’67) Liscio. The friends played football for TU in the late ’50s and early ’60s and have made it a tradition to come back each year for Homecoming. Each couple has celebrated 50 years of marriage during the last two years.

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How to submit Class Notes Please share your news with the Alumni Association! To submit your Class Notes and view other Class Notes that have been submitted online, visit TUAlumni.com/class-notes. You may also send an email to tualumni@utulsa.edu. Submitted Class Notes may be edited for length, style or content before publication in the TU Alumni Magazine.

the Tulsa Akdar Shriners organization that provides free medical treatment or surgery for children in Tulsa and northeastern Oklahoma. Helen’s originals also were included in the 45th Annual Women Artists of the West National Exhibition in Tucson, Arizona, in November 2015. Frank Mossadeghi (BA ’67, MA ’69) and his wife, Janet, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in August 2015. Their four children, spouses and seven grandchildren spent a week at the Biltmore Estate in Ashville, North Carolina, to commemorate the occasion. Dennis Bradford (BS ’69) was given a citation for his 33 years of service to the United States Small Business Association including 12 years as a member, vice chair and chair of the SBA National SBDC Advisory Board. Dennis was appointed to the SBA National Advisory Council by Ronald Reagan in 1982. He was reappointed to the Council by George H. W. Bush. He was appointed to the SBA National SBDC Advisory board in 2002 by George W. Bush and was reappointed by Barack Obama. Dennis also served as a delegate to the 1985 White House Conference on Small Business.

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Zina Richardson (BA ’77) has retired as conductor/music director of the Denver Pops Orchestra. At her farewell concert, she was honored by the orchestra and by the family of Leroy Anderson for her dedication to music and her love for and presentation of many of his works over the years, and for bringing the highest quality of “Pops Music” to the Denver Metropolitan area.

1970s Peter Bernhardt (BA ’73, JD ’76) has published his third novel, Red Romeo, a thriller about Stasi spy gigolos who prey on lonely women working in the West German government’s most secret divisions, inducing them to spy for communist East Germany. Ted Williams (JD ’74) has been named to The Best Lawyers in America for the St. Louis area for his work in personal injury and railroad law. Ted works for Williams Venker & Sanders LLC.

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Judy Young (BED ’78, MA ’80) has published more than 20 picture books for children. Her first children’s novel, Promise, was released in Aug. 2015. It is about an 11-year-old boy who, upon meeting his father for the first time, learns that choices determine who you are and who you will become. In addition, her picture book, A Pet for Miss Wright, was read by LaVar Burton on Reading Rainbow Storytime Video for National Reading Month.

Katie Irish (BA ’01) is the costume designer for the FX show The Americans starring Keri Russell. In summer 2015, she co-designed the costumes for the contestants on America’s Got Talent on NBC. She lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her husband, Scott Chinn (BA ’00), and their son, Desmond.

Christopher Brinkley (JD ’94) and his wife, Karen, relocated home to Yukon, Oklahoma. Chris is an attorney with Carr & Carr where he practices in the fields of product liability, trucking cases and other personal injury matters. In addition, the move simplifies logistics for Chris and Karen in their roles as cohosts of the 11th North American Solstice Sky Annual Meet, June 20-24, 2016 in Springdale, Arkansas. S P R I N G

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John Hale (BCS ’90, MS ’92, PhD ’97) and Kayla Acebo were married on July 6, 2015 in Tulsa. Both John and Kayla work at TU where John is a professor of computer science and the Tandy Professor of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, and Kayla is the vice president for institutional advancement.

Christopher Dirk Engles (BS ’02) married Cami Vastye Stinson on June 13, 2015 at the Artesian Hotel in Sulphur, Oklahoma. The newlyweds reside in Tulsa, where Dirk is a urologist, and Cami is an instructor at Preslar Music in Tulsa and the Academy of Contemporary Music in Oklahoma City. Pictured with the bride and groom are Sara Toiaivao, Maddox Engles, George Rice, Judy Rice, Kathy Engles, Rick Engles (BS ’76) and Clint Engles.

Landy Bible (BA ’95) married Martha Mangus on August 22, 2015 in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. TU alumni in the wedding were Lana Bible (BA ’15), Jonathan Kimmitt (BSBA ’01), Christopher Mayo (BA ’04) and Jonathan Kreilaus (BA ’11).

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Rick Dickson (BS ’76) announced that he will retire in May 2016 as the director of athletics at Tulane University where he has worked since 2000.

1980s Mark Ingram (BSBA ’80) has been named to Barron’s “Top 1,200 Financial Advisors: State-by-State” list of 2015 for the sixth consecutive year. Terry D. Ragsdale (BPE ’84) was named to the 2016 edition of Best Lawyers. Terry was recognized for his work in the categories of antitrust law, commercial litigation and energy law. He is employed by GableGotwals in Tulsa. Bryan Sanderlin (BSBA ’85) was recognized as Broken Arrow’s Business Person of the Year for 2015.

Bryan is the president of Oseco, a safety equipment manufacturer. He also is active in the local community and currently serves as the chairman of A New Leaf, a nonprofit organization that provides residential services and vocational training to individuals with developmental disabilities. Mary Quinn Cooper (JD ’86) has been selected as one of two Oklahomans in the 2015 edition of Benchmark Litigation’s “Top 250 Women in Litigation.” Mary is a trial lawyer and coleader of the litigation group at McAfee & Taft in Tulsa. Rodney Newman (BA ’86) published a book, Journeys with Celtic Christians, along with a leader guide for small group spiritual growth studies in September 2015. It draws inspiration from the art,

practice and theology of the early Christians of Ireland for faithful living in the modern world. Richard M. Carson (BS ’88) was named to the 2016 edition of Best Lawyers. He was recognized for his work in the categories of energy law and environmental law. Richard is employed by GableGotwals in Tulsa. Jenniffer Deckard (BSBA ’88) has been nominated as a director of the RPM International board of directors. Jenniffer is president and chief executive officer of Fairmount Santrol, a Chesterland, Ohio-based provider of high performance and sand-based products.

1990s

Camino de Santiago across Spain. Julie Nilsson Smith (BA ’90) published Master the Media: How Teaching Media Literacy Can Save Our Plugged-In World. The book was written to help teachers and parents educate the next generation on the history, purpose and messages behind the media. Judy MacLeod (MS ’91) was named Conference USA commissioner, making her the first female commissioner of a Football Bowl Subdivision athletics conference. Alicia J. Edwards (BS ’93, JD ’07) was named by Thomson Reuters to the 2015 Rising Stars lists. She practices law at GableGotwals in Tulsa. Scott Dannemiller (BA ’94) authored A Year Without a Purchase, which examines modern America’s spending habits and chronicles the highs and lows of dropping out of consumer culture. The book is the story of his family’s quest to spend a year without making any nonessential purchases.

Bennett Miller (BA ’90) completed the 500-mile religious walk known as the

Meaghan O’Grady Homack (BST ’94) and Jeffrey Homack welcomed a son, Blake Jeffrey Peter Homack, on May 31, 2015. The Homack family resides in Tucson, Arizona, where they run a cow/calf operation of black Angus cattle. Mary Lynn Hanna (JD ’95) joined Jackson Walker LLP in Dallas. She will practice in the ERISA/Employee Benefits and Executive Compensation section. Allison Johnston (BMG ’11) and Will Horner (BSBA ’11) were married on April 18, 2015 at St. Mary’s Cathedral in St. Cloud, Minnesota. TU alumni in the wedding party were Anne Gambrel (BEP ’11), Matthew Knofczynski (BMG ’11, MSE ’13) and Matthew Manuel (BSBA ’11). The couple resides in Syracuse, New York, where Allison is completing her Ph.D. degree in mechanical engineering at Syracuse University, and Will works in investment management for Manning and Napier Advisors.

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Angela Rogers (BA ’95) was named the lead director for NBA Tonight and NBA Coast to Coast.

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Christopher Lastrapes (BA ’03, MA ’05) was a contestant on Jeopardy! on Oct. 28, 2015. He is active with the Los Angeles Chapter of the TU Alumni Association and works in the film industry.

Jennifer Ann Stout (BM ’11) married Robson Bello Fricks on June 13, 2015 at Vesica Piscis Chapel in Tulsa. Alumni in the wedding party were Molli McDaniel (BM ’10), Lindsay Duncan Smith (BM ’09, BME ’09) and David Hsu (BCS ’13). Pictured with the bride and groom are Ricardo Fricks, Evelise Bello Fricks and Kyong Ae Kim. Jennifer’s father, Kenneth Ray Stout, passed away in 2013, but she knew he was there in spirit. During photos, a sudden rain shower began and a double rainbow followed. Jennifer is an executive assistant for an executive vice president at BOK Financial Corporation, and her husband is a software engineer for Flight Safety International.

Leslie Steinbeck Blanchet (BSBA ’06) and husband, Dustin, welcomed their first child, Owen John, on Oct. 2, 2015. Leslie serves as the associate director of the Office of Alumni Relations at TU, and Dustin is a photographer and video production professional.

Lindsay Duncan (BME ’09, BM ’09) married Sal Smith at First Presbyterian Church in Tulsa on June 27, 2015 and later had a reception in England. TU alumni in the wedding were Patricia Goble Duncan (BME ’77, MME ’83), Ponteha Nikjou (BA ’11), Jennifer Stout Fricks (BM ’11), Billy Duncan (BSBA ’11) and Linda Lytle Davis (BME ’85, MM ’87).

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LeeAnne Power Jimenez (BA ’97) was named as the K-12 science academic coordinator for Tulsa Public Schools.

in complex litigation focusing on consumer rights and employment law class actions.

Jennifer is the editor of The Buenos Aires Review and lives in Argentina.

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Chris Siegle (JD ’97) deployed as director of future operations and exercises for Combined Joint Task Force – Horn of Africa in September 2015. He leads a team in development of operational plans and partnerships, and interacts with foreign and U.S. Government agencies. Chris is an executive director in J.P. Morgan’s Private Bank in Scottsdale, Arizona, and a captain in the U.S. Navy.

Kasey R. McKenzie (JD ’00) joined the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Muskogee Oklahoma office, as a tribal service officer.

Matt Rice (BS ’01) was appointed publisher of StyleCaster, SheKnows Media’s flagship fashion and beauty property. As publisher, Matt is responsible for driving the brand’s repositioning efforts, which include overhauling the StyleCaster site; developing a new, more robust branded content and advertising offering; as well as strategic hiring to build out the brand’s sales and marketing teams.

David A. Davenport (JD ’98) has been recognized in Super Lawyers. David is an attorney at Winthrop & Weinstine in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Jennifer Croft (BA ’01) started a website entitled Homesick at homesickbook. space, which she calls a global digital literary project. The website started from a need to translate her book into different languages, but it has become a place for others to contribute their own stories, or their translations of portions of Jennifer’s original story into other languages.

Kimberly Neilson (BA ’98) was selected for inclusion in the 2015 San Diego Super Lawyers “Rising Stars,” a list that recognizes no more than 2.5 percent of the attorneys in each state. Kim specializes

Matt Willis (BSBA ’00) has been promoted to director, corporate audit services at Capital One. Matt currently resides in Midlothian, Virginia, with his wife, Jennifer, and two children, Bethany and Abigail.

of child custody, visitation and support.

Christy Caves (BA ’02, JD ’05) was named associate dean and director of professional development of The University of Tulsa College of Law. Lon Loveless (JD ’02) joined the law firm of Orsinger, Nelson, Downing & Anderson, LLP in Dallas. Lon practices all areas of family law litigation, including divorce, complex property division and issues

Melissa Hamby (MA ’05) received her doctorate in education leadership and policy studies from Oklahoma State University in summer 2015. She is in her 15th year as a clinical instructor at TU’s University School. Marisa L. Maskas (JD ’06) joined the law firm Howard & Howard Attorneys PLLC in Las Vegas, Nevada. Marisa concentrates her practice in civil litigation, including general commercial and business litigation and matters involving contract disputes and mechanic’s lien issues. Calvin Michael Moniz (BSBA ’06, MBA ’08, JD ’15) was appointed assistant dean of the Collins College of Business and director of the Business Career Center at The University of Tulsa. Sarah Hummel Brown (BA ’07, JD ’10) received a 30 Under 30 NextGen award from ionOklahoma Magazine. Lauren Donald (JD ’07) was named assistant dean for experiential learning and director of externships at The University of Tulsa College of Law. Noam Faingold (BM ’07) and Jeremy Forbis (BA ’01) released their debut album Burning City Orchestra in November 2015. The album, inspired by traditional and experimental classical, rock and jazz, reflects a deep commitment to diversifying the art of songwriting.

Erin Matson (BFA ’08) married Adam Lawson on July 11, 2015 in Tulsa. Friends and family in the wedding were Megan Meussner (BS ’05), Sarah Brown (BA ’07, JD ’10), Amy Cohlmia (BS ’07), Jennafer Butcher, Laura Beth Matson (BS ’09), Andy Matson (BSBA ’07), Quincy Hughes, Terry Burns and ring bearer Wyatt Hughes and flower girl Sarah Burns.

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Katie McKinney (BA ’14) married Abel Resendez (BPE ’13) on June 27, 2015. Their wedding party included Walker McKinney, Mike Wynn (BPE ’14), Alonso Zavala (BPE ’12), Elmer Bachtiar (BPE ’13), Arturo Resendez, Lizze Radford, Hope Tennery, Sierra Hickey, Rebecca Roselle and Chandler Moxley.

Angela Haack (BSN ’10) and Jared Rencher (BA ’12) were married on Sept. 6, 2015 at Vesica Piscis Chapel in Tulsa. Angela is a charge nurse for Saint Francis Hospital, and Jared is employed at Wheelhouse 20/20, a marketing firm. The couple met at a TU football game in 2008.

Kristyn Baker (BA ’14) and Tim Dixon (BAM ’10, MS ’12) were married at Holy Family Cathedral in Tulsa on July 25, 2015. The wedding party included Summer Hoggard, Jeffrey Metcalf (BA ’11, MBA ’15), Adrianna Soucy, Kevin Keller, Katherine Dixon, Michael Dixon, Morgann Dulle, Phillip Dixon (BCE ’14), Melissa Woodson, Tawnie Goodwin, Calvin Moniz (BSBA ’06, MBA ’08, JD ’15), Darah Martin (BS ’14), John Gray (BSBA ’10), Maggie Hunter (BA ’15), Colton Sheets (BMG ’10), Gentry Klawitter (BSN ’14), Tim Latimer (BMG ’12), Kimberly Andrew (BSB ’14) and Chris Fleming (MBA ’13).

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classnotes Andrea Hill (BEX ’13) married Matt Coffman (BMG ’13) on January 3, 2015 in Tulsa, with a reception following at Cain’s Ballroom. Matt proposed to Andrea on TU’s campus with a brick on Bayless Plaza on May 31, 2014. Alumni in the wedding party were Jonathan Rankin (BSBA ’13), Chris Fisher (BSBA ’14), David Simon (BS ’13), Jordan Seidl (BA ’11), Rebecca Kinshella (BSB ’13) and Paige Fisher (BMG ’14).

Barbara Moschovidis (BIL ’08) was named by Thomson Reuters to the 2015 Rising Stars lists. She practices law at GableGotwals in Tulsa.

2010s Lindsey Crane (BSB ’11) received her doctor of pharmacy degree in June 2015 from the University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy. She is working as a staff pharmacist for Walgreens in Oklahoma City. Jamie A. Miller (JD ’13) is a solo practice attorney in Tulsa and celebrated her first business anniversary in fall 2015. Anna Lukeman (JD ’15) joined McAfee & Taft in Tulsa as a labor and employment attorney. She

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represents management exclusively in all aspects of dispute resolution arising from the employer-employee relationship, including litigation before state and federal courts, arbitration panels and regulatory and administrative agencies. Abe Matamoros (BSBA ’15) founded EllieGrid, a smart pill container that takes the guesswork out of sorting and scheduling multiple medications taken on a daily basis. The device includes software that healthcare providers and caregivers can monitor to ensure a patient takes medication as prescribed. EllieGrid was among 13 startup companies recognized during Tulsa’s Global Entrepreneurship Week in November 2015.

Valerie Gail Whitlatch (BMG ’15) and Thomas “Mason” Linscott (BS ’14) were married on Aug. 22, 2015 at the Silo Event Center at Redberry Farm in Tulsa. The couple resides in Moscow, Idaho, where Mason is pursuing his doctorate in computational biology at the University of Idaho. Mason was awarded a National Science Foundation Fellowship earlier this year which will assist him in his research of cave beetles.

T H E

U N I V E R S I T Y

O F

T U L S A

A L U M N I

M A G A Z I N E


Roger Ted Abel (BS ’50), June 27, 2015 Reese Spencer Adams (BS ’79), September 29, 2015 Clyde “Wayne” Allen (MS ’57), June 20, 2015 Daniel Frank Allis (BS ’59, JD ’66), August 24, 2015 Richard Delano Amatucci (BA ’62, JD ’65), August 16, 2015 Rosemary Roark Andre (BM ’53), July 19, 2015 Marshall Lee Arp (BS ’62), August 18, 2015 James Edward “Casey” Ashe (BA ’81), August 28, 2015 Norris William Barry (BS ’57), August 18, 2015 Helen L. “Pat” Myers Bartlett (BA ’46), June 19, 2015 Marcus Valentyn Bastianen (MBA ’08), January 3, 2015 Jimmy DeWayne Benton (BS ’92), July 28, 2015 Edward Louis “Lou” Birmingham (BS ’38), June 20, 2015 Wayne W. Bland (BS ’59), October 29, 2015 Joe Hutch Brewer (BS ’53), June 2, 2015 Billy J. “Bill” Briggs (BS ’56), August 3, 2015 David McCaughey Brown (BS ’79), July 15, 2015 Wesley Jay Burris (BS ’58), July 6, 2015 Albert E. Bush (BA ’63), August 22, 2015 Carlos James Chappelle (JD ’80), June 28, 2015 Sue Carole McGill Christerson (BA ’58), June 22, 2015 James H. “Coop” Cooper (MS ’81), July 23, 2015 William “Bill” Cravello (BS ’63), July 20, 2015 Thomas S. “Tom” Crewson (JD ’62), October 14, 2015 Bruce E. Davis (BS ’69), August 1, 2015 Patricia Lloyd Deisenroth (BS ’66, MA ’71), July 1, 2015 Lewis Jackson “Jack” Downing (MM ’59), June 13, 2015 Donald Bernard Durbin (BA ’58), October 18, 2015 Paul E. Dykes (BA ’57, MA ’58), June 12, 2015 William E. “Bill” Ebrecht (BM ’69), July 23, 2015 Willard S. Emery (BS ’51), June 23, 2015 Philip L. Essley, Jr. (BS ’49, MS ’50), October 1, 2015

S P R I N G

2 0 1 6

Joe Harold Felts (BS ’86), September 23, 2015 Lenore H. Flinchum-Walker (BS ’74), June 23, 2015 Louis H. Fougerousse (BS ’56), August 5, 2015 Donald N. Fowler (BS ’50), August 9, 2015 Kenneth L. Frakes (BS ’73), June 18, 2015 Adolphus “Gene” Fritchie (BS ’72), October 29, 2015 Gerald G. “Jerry” Garland (BA ’52, MA ’63), August 17, 2015 Gary Paul Gibney (BS ’69), July 2, 2015 Lois Allene Graham (BS ’70, MS ’77), September 27, 2015 Jerry Randolph Grant (MS ’73), October 10, 2015 Sue Ann Grattopp (MA ’75), August 7, 2015 Robert J. Hampton (BS ’52, JD ’80), October 17, 2015 Shirley Jeanne Hand (BA ’57), October 10, 2015 Stephen Joseph Hardin (BS ’76), June 28, 2015 Judith Gay Blunk Harned (BS ’63), October 9, 2015 Billy Earl “Bill” Harrell (BS ’72), September 14, 2015 Norma Lee Henshaw (MS ’53), September 11, 2015 Windham Earl Hill (JD ’73), October 11, 2015 Oval Lee Howser (BA ’52), September 29, 2015 Billie Gene “Bill” Humphrey (BS ’51), August 24, 2015 Carol Beth Keene Hunt (BS ’67), September 30, 2015 Elizabeth Irene “Bette” Davis Ivey (BA ’53, MA ’61), November 6, 2015 Ralph Wayland Joslin, Jr. (BS ’63), October 30, 2015 David Michael “Mike” King (BS ’65), August 26, 2015 Juanita May King (BA ’63, MS ’73), July 27, 2015 Betty Tillman Kinser (BS ’67, MA ’71), May 24, 2015 William V. “Bill” Knight (MS ’68), October 7, 2015 Kathryn Lourene “Kathy” Skinner Lanford (BA ’67), July 23, 2015 Robert L. “Bob” Latch (BS ’56), October 31, 2015 J. David Lawson (BS ’65), July 19, 2015 James E. Littlefield (MS ’66), July 9, 2015 Marlene Jo Lockhart (BS ’64), May 12, 2015 Joann Stewart Lukken (BS ’48), July 28, 2015

Frederick C. Magruder (BS ’59), June 26, 2015 Jack Marshall (BS ’49), September 20, 2015 Marjorie Anne Mathieson (BA ’54), May 20, 2015 Janet Louise (Hill) McGrath (BSN ’82), October 30, 2015 Betty Verne Loranger Meadows (BA ’50), August 3, 2015 Richard F. “Rick” Mooney (BS ’75, MS ’79), July 26, 2015 Sidney M. “Sid” Moyers (BA ’65), October 4, 2015 Gregory Allen “Greg” Mueggenborg (JD ’07), June 24, 2015 Dorothy Jacoby Nix (BME ’47), August 11, 2015 William M. “Bill” O’Brien (BA ’57), July 21, 2015 Lawrence Ogden (BS ’48), October 22, 2015 William T. “Bill” Ouzts (BS ’60), September 7, 2015 Fran D. Palm (MTA ’60), June 24, 2015 Irene Evelyn Pappas (BSN ’84), November 6, 2015 Robert Harold Parker (BS ’75), November 13, 2015 Eleazar Madrid Perez (BS ’04, MS ’06), September 4, 2015 David W. Phillips (BA ’63, JD ’65), August 9, 2015 Frances Yeargin Phillips (BA ’46), July 1, 2015 Margherita Neville Pine (MA ’65), January 10, 2015 James O. “Jim” Pirtle (BA ’58), October 24, 2015 James Edward Poe (BA ’57, JD ’59), September 26, 2015 Ellwood M. “Bud” Powell (JD ’73), September 30, 2015 JoAnn Haslett Quintana (MTA ’69), May 30, 2015 Robert Allen “Bob” Rakestraw (BS ’50), July 15, 2015 Norma Adeline Reynolds (MS ’57), August 18, 2015 Patrick M. “Rick” Rockelli (JD ’80), October 6, 2015 Eileen Quinlan Rystrom (BA ’45), September 12, 2015 Wanda K. Sager-McGough (BA ’63), July 9, 2015

Hugh Victor Schaefer (JD ’61), May 29, 2015 Robert Henry Schlenker (BS ’51), October 31, 2015 Florence Elizabeth “Susie” Schmidt (BS ’68), September 27, 2015 Kenneth Richard Peter “Dick” Seeberger (BS ’58), March 9, 2015 L. T. “Rip” Sewell (BA ’51), July 4, 2015 Billy M. Shaw (JD ’82), August 16, 2015 Rex M. Shawger, Sr. (MS ’70), October 6, 2015 Forrest F. Shoemaker, Jr. (JD ’51), October 25, 2015 Francis Marvin “Frank” Singleton (BS ’49), March 27, 2015 John M. Slater, Sr. (BA ’49, JD ’55), July 17, 2015 Duane G. Smith (BS ’53), August 1, 2015 Kenneth Lee “Ken” Smith (BS ’83), May 15, 2015 V. Douglas “Doug” Smith (BS ’74), June 27, 2015 Aaron M. Steele (BS ’07), July 26, 2015 James A. “Jim” Strickland (BS ’50), October 13, 2015 Richard Hardin Stuebing (BS ’53), May 6, 2015 Katherine Summers Tabb (MS ’67), August 31, 2015 Gail R. Thomas (BS ’50), November 6, 2015 Warren L. Thompson, Jr. (BS ’58), August 10, 2015 Lucille Tack “Sue” Tillman (BA ’44), October 21, 2015 Darwin E. Waterman (EDD ’73), July 25, 2015 Robert Paul Webb II (EDD ’76), October 4, 2015 Betty Rose Wells (BS ’69), July 1, 2015 Newell E. West (JD ’53), September 9, 2015 Janet E. “Jan” Teagarden Wilbur (BS ’56), August 31, 2015 Leland E. “Lee” Wilson (BS ’50), July 30, 2014 Robert Jerald “Bob” Williamson (BS ’69), July 16, 2015 Dorothy Mae Woodson (BA ’48, MA ’75), August 24, 2015

inmemoriam

Alumni

Tributes may be submitted through the Online Community at TUAlumni. com, or by e-mail to tualumni@utulsa.edu. If a family member who is not an alumnus/a would like to receive a copy of the online tribute, please send a request to tualumni@utulsa.edu, or call 918-631-2555. This issue includes tributes received by November 15, 2015

47


Current Students Daniel Patrk “Dan” Vinyard, July 25, 2015

Former Students James “Jim” Adams, July 19, 2015 Charles Mark Allbright, July 6, 2015 Earnest Wayne “E. W.” Barbee, August 28, 2015 Bernard R. “Bernie” Bartlett, September 25, 2015 Mona Carroll Barton, July 22, 2015 Charles Eldridge Beard, August 27, 2015 Carl T. “Terry” Bierdeman, July 15, 2015 Jerry A. Billingsly, July 21, 2015 Tommy Dale Blakemore, Jr., July 1, 2015 Judith “Judi” Boone, July 18, 2015 John Wesley “Jack” Braden, Jr., September 9, 2015 Clara Jane “Janie” Carrens, August 12, 2015 Bobby Gene Cone, September 6, 2015 Gilbert Pierce Cornett, June 4, 2015 Harrison Cotton, July 14, 2015 Sharon Kay Archibald Daniels, October 22, 2015 Judith Anne Donald, October 23, 2015 Peggy Jeanine Clark Ede, August 10, 2015 John M. Evanoff, July 15, 2015 Gary Michael Fleener, October 28, 2015 Robert D. Funk, Sr., September 3, 2015 Ronald Robert Gibbons, October 16, 2015 Leonard A. Glenn, October 22, 2015 Constance A. “Connie” Simmons Griffith, September 25, 2015 Dolores Nell Grober, October 31, 2015 John E. Guentz, October 10, 2015 George Burnett Hauger, July 6, 2015 Florence Ruth Hill, September 10, 2015 Judith Ann “Jan” (Kemmerly) Jones, September 21, 2015 Ruth Margaret Harvey Kirkpatrick, September 6, 2015 Elizabeth Ann “Betsy” Rousch Matthews, September 1, 2015 Ralph McGill, Sr., March 21, 2015 Peter Joseph McMahon, Jr., June 19, 2015

48

John Robert Meadows, June 8, 2015 William L. “Larry” Mocha, June 1, 2015 Dayton W. Moss, August 17, 2015 Francis A. Murphy, August 1, 2015 Clay McNitt Murray, June 10, 2015 Sovenia Jane “Si” Rowan Murray, June 13, 2015 Virginia Todd Olds, February 23, 2015 Gregory Alan Reeves, September 10, 2015 Marie Estelle Sumonka Reinkemeyer, October 6, 2015 Margaret Rinaldi, October 27, 2015 William S. Roberts, July 7, 2015 John S. “Jack” Santee, August 18, 2015 William H. Schmalhorst, August 8, 2015 Floyd Charles Schulte, August 26, 2015 Joe Carey Stall, August 30, 2015 Everett L. “E. L.” Thomas, July 1, 2015 Brian Phillip “Bucky” Utter, June 10, 2015 Alpha Ann Grattan Vollmer, December 2, 2014 Ross Eugene Waltzer, June 22, 2015 Larry P. Watkins, July 22, 2015 John F. Williams, Sr., October 27, 2015 Gary Dale Woodard, October 5, 2015 Raleigh Winston Wright, September 23, 2015 Doris June Wynne, September 1, 2015

Friends, Faculty & Staff Raymond Joe Adams, November 7, 2015 R. Allen Alfrey, August 15, 2015 Helen E. April, November 8, 2015 Fay Nelges Audley, September 16, 2015 Charles L. Audrain, Jr., June 15, 2015 Robert C. Baginski, October 21, 2015 Gary Preston Baker, July 28, 2015 Patricia Sisson Cherry Bales, October 30, 2015 Wayne Randolph Beebe, July 4, 2015 Betty June Dings Belcher, July 27, 2015 James Rumsey Beverley, Jr., October 27, 2015

Constance Faye “Connie” Bird, October 21, 2015 Robert G. “Bob” Boone, July 18, 2015 Donald Robert Broadland, October 13, 2015 Ralph C. “R.C.” Bruner, October 1, 2015 Max Callard, May 19, 2015 Lee Roy Chapman, October 8, 2015 George M. Cheatham, Jr., July 20, 2015 Michael Lee Cole, August 24, 2015 Helen E. Collins, August 1, 2015 Alfred E. Cooper, October 10, 2015 Jerry Lee Dodson, September 1, 2015 Michael Alan Dotson, November 7, 2015 Maria Dowd, November 4, 2015 Melvin Glen Ede, June 8, 2015 Lewis Albert Edmonson, November 6, 2015 Barbara A. Featherston, August 2, 2015 Robert Harold Featherston, July 30, 2015 Elizabeth A. “Betse” Fedrick, September 22, 2015 Bill Charles Ferguson, September 14, 2015 David L. Garber, October 9, 2015 William P. “Bill” Gatlin, October 15, 2015 William A. Gent II, May 24, 2015 Richard H. Gladden, October 9, 2015 Donald E. “Don” Griffith, August 5, 2015 Jo Ellen Harlin, July 26, 2015 John Mitchell Hartz, October 16, 2015 Edward S. “Ed” Harris, November 5, 2015 Juanita Ione Harris-Hoeffer, October 7, 2015 Joyce Willis Heatherly, September 28, 2015 Doris Vilmure Hill, October 7, 2015 Charles James Hovorka, Jr., July 4, 2015 Brad Ellis Jenkins, October 5, 2015 Cherry T. Johns, October 31, 2015 Karen M. Jones, October 22, 2015 Loretta Jean Jones, June 24, 2015 William Boss “Bill” Jones, June 3, 2015 Ruth Ann Kana, May 26, 2015 Jack W. Kelley, September 15, 2015 Joseph A. “Joe” Kestner, TU McFarlin professor of English,

August 24, 2015 Barbara Brown Kimbrough, June 19, 2015 Shirley Klar, October 23, 2015 David Kenneth Knapp, July 12, 2015 Yvonne Melinda Lusk, October 14, 2015 Leslie Carter “Les” Matthies, November 4, 2015 Paul Raith Maxeiner, September 17, 2015 Richard E. McDaniel, former employee, July 17, 2015 Faith J. Meeks, October 21, 2015 Marshall E. Milligan, former TU associate professor of Economics, November 4, 2015 Martha Rebecca Herndon Monger, July 2, 2015 Robert E. Morgan, September 4, 2015 Anna Lucille Musgrove, August 18, 2015 James Albert Orton, June 4, 2015 Steven L. Powell, June 11, 2015 Walter Edwin Price, September 11, 2015 Cathy Ann Ramsey, former TU employee, October 19, 2015 James William Rich, June 8, 2015 Albert F. Rine, July 4, 2015 Patricia Kaye “Patty” Dickey Roberds, October 29, 2015 Thelma Hurley Reynolds Schmidt, August 23, 2015 Bill J. Schneider, June 26, 2015 Carol Marie Southard, November 11, 2015 Daryl F. Southard, August 22, 2015 Dan M. Standridge, February 15, 2015 Joan Johnson Stauffer, July 1, 2015 Hazel Frances Stephenson, October 26, 2015 Audrey Lorraine Striplin, former TU employee, September 7, 2015 Z. Inci Terry, September 28, 2015, former TU adjunct assistant professor of Psychology Thomas L. Thomas II, August 13, 2015 Gerald A. Tomasko, October 25, 2015 Marjorie L. Tomlin, August 3, 2015 Lyle Alan “Butch” Tracy, July 8, 2015 A. P. “Pete” Vorenkamp, August 10, 2015 William Milner “Bill” Waller, October 2015 Erich R. Westfield, June 11, 2015 James Edwin “Jock Doc” White, former TU team doctor, October 21, 2015 Gail Kennedy Woodley, September 15, 2015 Norma Jean “Twink” Yost, September 4, 2015


bookend TU students enjoyed their first fall semester inside the beautiful new three-story Hardesty Hall located in the heart of campus. The building features a 300-bed all-suite residence hall as well as the Holmes Student Center.


the university of

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SAVE THE DATE

2016

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OCTOBER 19-23

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OKTOBERFEST, OCT. 21 • TU VS. TULANE, OCT. 22

TU Alumni Magazine - Spring 2016  
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