Page 1

ADVOCACY

TENNESSEANS FOR UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE

GOVERNMENT RELATIONS GUIDELINES

Hank Dye Vice President for Public and Government Relations hank.dye@tennessee.edu 865-974-8184

Nashville Office: Anthony Haynes Associate Vice President and Director of State Relations anthony.haynes@tennessee.edu 615-741-8220

Washington, DC Office: Kurt Schlieter Associate Vice President and Director of Federal Relations kschliet@tennessee.edu 240-271-8305

THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE IS AN EEO/AA/TITLE VI/TITLE IX/SECTION 504/ADA/ADEA INSTITUTION E17-0405-004-004-12


BE COURTEOUS Always have a friendly and professional demeanor, even if you are unhappy with the official. Your goal is to get the official where you want them on an issue or request, not to let them know you think they are wrong or let you down. A loss or disappointment today may be your victory tomorrow. So as the old saying goes, “Never burn a bridge.”

ADVOCACY

TENNESSEANS FOR UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE

BE BRIEF

Government at both the state and federal levels has a powerful influence on higher education in general and on the University of Tennessee specifically – from the standpoint of funding and regulation. Accordingly, it is critical that the University represent itself effectively before the various governing bodies.

institutes, providing strategy and direction for all political and government contact.

Government relations for the University is a centralized function of the system administration, with staff and leadership devoted to representing all campuses and

The Office of Public and Government Relations seeks to provide training, direction and assistance to all who wish to advocate on behalf of the University.

Government officials and staff never have enough time. Be clear, concise and to the point. Ask for what you want, say what you mean. The easier you can make it for them to understand and work with you, the greater the chance of your desired outcomes. A meeting with an elected official or staff is not a forum or presentation. You need to be able to make your case in no more than 5-10 minutes. If you are given more time, let the official or staff ask questions.

Important to the success of the effort is the support of alumni, faculty, students and friends in consistently and effectively telling University’s story through relationships, contact and follow up with elected officials.

PROVIDE INFORMATION Always provide easy to understand, accurate and concise information as a “leave behind.” It is important to let the official or staff know what you’re providing them to review later, but you can summarize what is in the information you provided.

BE THANKFUL Always thank officials and staff for their time. Provide information on how you can be reached and offer to follow up.

USE YOUR GOVERNMENT RELATIONS TEAM Collectively, the University’s Government Relations Team has more than 100 years of experience working with government officials at all levels. The staff provides helpful information on contacting government officials including letter or email 1

protocol, political sensitivity, timeliness, status of legislation or issue activity and other information that can help you be more successful. Do not hesitate to contact state or federal relations staff for assistance. 10


OVERVIEW OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE

GENERAL GOVERNMENT RELATIONS PROTOCOL AND ETIQUETTE

The University of Tennessee is proud to fulfill a mission unique in all of public higher education in Tennessee. That mission is to provide top-quality higher education, research and economic development for the benefit of all Tennesseans. As the state’s land-grant institution and most comprehensive research university, UT further distinguishes itself with a presence in all 95 counties and extensive public service outreach that includes

There are some generally accepted practices in working with all government officials (local, state or federal) acknowledged by all within the government relations field.

BE KNOWLEDGEABLE As you try to persuade and convince an elected official or staff, it is important that they have a degree of confidence in you, your request and knowledge about the subject. This requires knowing both your side of an issue and the counter arguments. It is also important to know the full ramifications of what you are advocating (e.g. budgetary impacts, political effects. etc.) Position yourself in the audience’s mind as their expert on the matter. This will position you to better secure the outcomes you desire.

UNIQUE AND EXCEPTIONAL ASSETS

BE TRUTHFUL Never provide an elected official or staff with information that is incorrect or that you are unsure of its accuracy. Never guess. It is always better to say, “I’m not sure about that, but will be happy to confirm and get back with you.”

UT and the Battelle Corporation co-manage and operate Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the world’s largest government-sponsored laboratory. This distinction puts UT among just a handful of universities nationwide that manage a Department of Energy national lab. Oak Ridge National Laboratory includes $3 billion in research facilities, equipment and expertise in East Tennessee. These resources include the $1.4-billion Spallation Neutron Source; the world’s fastest unclassified supercomputer; joint research centers; state tax exemptions; and funding for joint faculty appointments, and they are the basis of the UT-Oak Ridge partnership and are both unique and uniquely successful. The UT Health Science Center, with a more than 9

the single-largest 4H youth program of any state. Statewide, the University’s economic impact – made by all campuses, collectively – means more than $2.5 billion annually in income to Tennessee, more than 53,600 jobs, and an estimated $237.6 million in state and local tax revenue. Nearly 50,000 students are enrolled at the campuses at Knoxville, Chattanooga, Martin, Tullahoma and the Memphis-based Health Science Center. The University of Tennessee also includes the statewide institutes of agriculture and public service. More than 325,000 people worldwide are UT alumni, and more than 184,000 of those live in Tennessee.

$2.3-billion economic contribution to the state, has trained more than 70 percent of Tennessee’s doctors, including residents and fellows in the College of Medicine; 75 percent of dentists; and 40 percent of pharmacists. UTHSC also generates more economic activity than any other educational enterprise – public or private – in Memphis or West Tennessee. The Institute of Agriculture and Institute for Public Service are the “front door” of the University in many communities across the state, providing various research, training and outreach programs. The College of Veterinary Medicine, established by state law in 1974, is one of only 28 in the nation. Located on the Agriculture campus in Knoxville, the college trains students from across the nation and throughout the world in the latest practices and science of veterinary medicine. The College also plays a critical role in working with the agriculture and food science industries and governmental agencies in monitoring and ensuring the safety of Tennessee’s and the nation’s food supply and against acts of bioterrorism. 2


FEDERAL RELATIONS

GOVERNMENT RELATIONS All levels of government relations for the University are centrally coordinated through the Office of Public and Government Relations. The office serves as chief liaison between the University and federal, state and local governments. The University provides service and support to policymakers by engaging its numerous experts, capabilities and resources. The University's government relations office serves the interests of the University by working closely with faculty, University leaders, and the Student Government Association and the UT Alumni Association to improve understanding and support for the University's academic, research, and

The Office of Federal Relations serves as primary liaison with the Administration, Congress, federal agencies and the many higher education associations and coalitions headquartered in Washington, D.C. Its staff advocate for the University of Tennessee's mission in education, research and service, and on behalf of the University's interests in legislative and regulatory matters. The staff directly serve UT administration, faculty, staff and students to help enable high-quality educational opportunities for the benefit of our students and the state of Tennessee.

outreach mission. The government relations staff also advise and counsel these groups on advocacy on behalf of the University. Specific pages on the University website are dedicated to government relations, both federal and state. Visit www.tennessee.edu and click the government relations access. You will find volumes of background information, archives, directions and helpful links – and frequently updated reports and comments on hot issues and higher education activity.

The Office of Federal Relations is open to students, faculty, and staff who are visiting the area. The office is available to offer support to University personnel who travel to Washington to meet and communicate with members of Congress and other federal officials.

ARE YOU A LOBBYIST? As an entity that engages in lobbying and interacts with members of Congress, federal agency staff, and executive branch officials, the University of Tennessee must comply with regulations contained in the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act of 2007 (HLOGA) (P.L. 110-81) and the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 (P.L. 104-65, as amended). These laws require the UT System to track all 3

The office promotes the University's education, research, and public service activities to Congressional members, committee staff, and agencies in an effort to increase federal support for and increase knowledge of the University of Tennessee. The Office of Federal Relations seeks to raise the University’s profile on Capitol Hill and throughout the various federal agencies by marketing and publicizing its missions and activities. The Office of Federal Relations coordinates with others in higher education to advocate for increased federal support of research and development and to address various policy issues concerning higher education. The office also coordinates the University’s response to inquiries from legislative offices, ranging from policy questions to informational items and to constituent concerns. As with state relations, faculty, staff and students are occasionally asked by the federal relations staff to provide expertise, advice or suggestions on proposed legislation or a political issue. The issues may be different, but the protocol is similar. If you have questions or concerns, the Office of Federal Relations welcomes the opportunity to help.

“lobbying contacts” and “lobbying activities” – terms defined below – to the Clerk’s office quarterly. Over the past two years, the executive branch also has issued additional guidance that clarifies events and activities that trigger these reporting requirements. The Office of Federal Relations is responsible for tracking, certifying, and reporting all covered interactions on behalf of all UT personnel. This page provides guidance to University personnel on what activities must be reported. For further clarification or guidance, contact Kurt Schlieter at 240-271-8305 or kschliet@tennessee.edu. 8


STATE RELATIONS The Office of State Relations maintains a daily presence at the state capitol in Nashville. Staff serve as the University’s primary liaison with the Tennessee General Assembly, Office of the Governor and state executive agencies. The Office supports the President and his staff in legislative, public policy and political analysis, and in helping identify new opportunities for partnering with state government. State officials often seek the help of the State Relations staff when crafting legislation and policy with potential to impact UT and public higher

STATE RELATIONS PROTOCOL Faculty, staff and students are sometimes asked by government relations staff to provide expertise, advice or suggestions on proposed legislation or a political issue. Such information may be needed on a very short timeline, and it is important that University personnel be responsive to such calls. The timeliness of a response often can determine the outcome of a critically important issue affecting academics, research or outreach. On rare occasions, faculty, staff or students may be asked to testify before legislative committees. These visits are coordinated through the State Relations Office, and appropriate staff will help prepare faculty, staff or students for testimony with information and tips on how to address the committee, how long to

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE GUIDELINES: OFFICIAL CONTACTS WITH STATE AND FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS AND ENTITIES

education. The State Relations staff works to ensure legislative proposals have little or no financial burden on the University or create obstacles for faculty or staff in performing their duties. State relations staff also work with bill sponsors to advocate for legislation that could benefit the University. When legislation is introduced that could negatively impact the University, its staff or students, State Relations staff try to work with sponsors to discourage advancement of the bill or to mitigate adverse effects. When it is important for the University to take public stands on legislation, that happens.

Government relations at both the state and federal levels are critical areas for the University. More than 50 percent of unrestricted funding comes via state legislative appropriations and federal grants and appropriations. Both state and federal governments are major resources for all campuses and institutes, particularly in the area of research. As an entity that engages in lobbying activities, the University must comply with federal regulations contained in the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 and the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act of 2007. Therefore, it is imperative that the policies and positions set forth by the Board of Trustees, the President and authorized University officials be coordinated and communicated clearly through one central point of contact with state or federal government elected or appointed officials and external individuals or groups engaged in government relations and advocacy (collectively, “government officials”).

The Office of State Relations also helps coordinate visits and engage elected officials on UT campuses and works with individual campuses and institutes on their specific concerns.

speak, and how to best represent the University. Occasionally, a faculty member may be asked to provide expert testimony on particular subjects by a professional association or a non-University group. In these cases, the faculty member is representing his or her own expertise rather than University position or policy. It’s important that faculty giving such testimony make clear that while employed by the University, their opinions and ideas are their own. In these instances, the government relations team should be notified of the invitation and appearance and welcomes the opportunity to provide advice and counsel to the witness.

The President, through the Office of Public and Government Relations, directs a coordinated federal and state legislative agenda annually for the University of Tennessee system – its campuses, institutes, and units. The Vice President for Public and Government Relations is responsible for coordinating the communications with, outreach activities involving, and engagement of governmental officials relating to all University legislative, policy, and budgetary matters. The Vice President assures the involvement of appropriate members of University staff and/or units. Reporting to and under the supervision of the Vice President, the Director of Federal Relations and the Director of State Relations serve as the University’s official liaisons for all contact with government officials.

Every legislative session, the General Assembly debates controversial issues that do not directly affect the University. In these cases, a faculty or staff member who wants to contact a legislator to express an opinion may do so as a constituent or private citizen, rather than as a UT employee on behalf of the University. If you have questions or concerns, the Office of State Relations welcomes the opportunity to help.

University employees may not act, or give the appearance of acting, on behalf of the University when communicating with government officials concerning University legislative, policy, or budgetary matters unless specifically authorized by the President, the Vice President for Public and Government Relations, the Director of Federal Relations, or the Director of State Relations. Faculty or staff contacted by government officials about a University legislative, policy, or budgetary matter shall consult with the government relations staff as promptly as possible and prior to providing a response that reasonably could be construed to represent the official position of the University. Staff, whose position may involve activities similar to those of the University’s Director of Federal Relations or State Relations, shall coordinate their engagement of government officials with the appropriate Director. Faculty or staff who have legislative proposals, funding requests or points of view that reasonably could be construed as the official position of the University are expected to coordinate with the appropriate Director prior to making contact with any government official. These guidelines are directed only to the issue of official representation of the University. These guidelines are not intended to restrict protected personal expression by University employees nor are they intended to restrict University employees from identifying their profession or place of employment in the context of their communications with government officials. However, University employees must make clear they are expressing personal views and not an official position of the University. July 20, 2010

7

4


engaging key stakeholders to best advocate for the University with elected officials. The Council’s goal is to present one, unified and inclusive voice to maximize the University’s impact and influence at both the state and national levels. The Council involves informed and engaged groups of stakeholders willing to work as a grassroots team to represent the University when called upon. The Council serves as an umbrella entity to

ALUMNI LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL REGIONS

At-Large Appointment

At-Large Appointment

Lauderdale

UTHSC Faculty, Staff & Student Groups

UTM Faculty, Staff & Student Groups

Regional ALC Members

Regional ALC Members

UTSI Faculty, Staff & Student Groups

Region 5 Vice Chair

Regional ALC Members

Region 6 Vice Chair

Regional ALC Members

Region 7 Vice Chair

Regional ALC Members

Region 8 Vice Chair

Region 9 Vice Chair

Regional ALC Members

Regional ALC Members

UTC Faculty, Staff & Student Groups

UTK, UTIA Faculty, Staff & Student Groups

2

m

Wayne Lawrence

Maury

Warren

Giles

4

Bedford

Coffee

Mo

Lincoln

ore

White

Franklin

Bledsoe

Loudon

7

Hancock

Jefferson

McMinn

Hamilton Bradley

Polk

Monroe

Greene

Cocke Sevier

Blount

hn

so

n

Sullivan

Hawkins

Union Grainger en l mb Ha

Roane Rhea

Marion

Claiborne

Knox

Van Buren

Grundy

Anderson

ie

Regional ALC Members

Region 4 Vice Chair

1

Lewis

Cannon

Morgan Cumberland

ch

Regional ALC Members

Region 3 Vice Chair

Hardin

Hardeman

Perry

Putnam

DeKalb

at

Region 2 Vice Chair

Henderson

McNairy

UT ADVOCACY COUNCIL

Region 1 Vice Chair

Madison

Chester Fayette

Rutherford

Smith

qu

Shelby

Williamson

Wilson

Hickman

Crockett Haywood

Davidson

Scott Campbell

Overton Fentress Jackson

Se

Tipton

Dickson

Humphreys

Carroll

Pickett

Clay

Macon Trousdale

igs

UTIA Representative

Gibson

r

Rotating SGA Representative

Houston

Decatu

Rotating Faculty Senate Representative

Henry Benton

Dyer

ALC Chair

Weakley

Sumner atha

La

Obion

Robertson

Che

ke

Stewart Montgomery

6 Jo

5

Me

3

OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE

BOT Chair Advancement & Public Affairs

Membership is organized into 10 geographic regions across the state. Each has a regional vice chair. Within a region, membership includes Alumni Legislative Council members and any campus or institute staff who reside within that geographic area.

The Alumni Association and the Office of Public and Government Relations share responsibility for management of the Council, with the UT System president having final authority. A Council oversight committee that functions as a strategy and liaison

UT OFFICE OF PUBLIC AND GOVERNMENT RELATIONS & UT NATIONAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

Chancellor Representative

element among members and staff. All campus or institute advocacy groups are incorporated within the Council and subject to its direction.

l

The UT Advocacy Council is a government relations initiative to expand, strengthen and enhance the University’s political capacity by training and

encompass alumni, friends, faculty, staff and student advocacy groups within each campus and institute. Training is provided to Council members, and a communications network exists for sharing up-to-date information and notification of needs for support.

Marshal

ADVOCACY STRUCTURE

Washington Carter i ico Un

10

9

8

Region 10 Vice Chair

Regional ALC Members

5

6


engaging key stakeholders to best advocate for the University with elected officials. The Council’s goal is to present one, unified and inclusive voice to maximize the University’s impact and influence at both the state and national levels. The Council involves informed and engaged groups of stakeholders willing to work as a grassroots team to represent the University when called upon. The Council serves as an umbrella entity to

ALUMNI LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL REGIONS

At-Large Appointment

At-Large Appointment

Lauderdale

UTHSC Faculty, Staff & Student Groups

UTM Faculty, Staff & Student Groups

Regional ALC Members

Regional ALC Members

UTSI Faculty, Staff & Student Groups

Region 5 Vice Chair

Regional ALC Members

Region 6 Vice Chair

Regional ALC Members

Region 7 Vice Chair

Regional ALC Members

Region 8 Vice Chair

Region 9 Vice Chair

Regional ALC Members

Regional ALC Members

UTC Faculty, Staff & Student Groups

UTK, UTIA Faculty, Staff & Student Groups

2

m

Wayne Lawrence

Maury

Warren

Giles

4

Bedford

Coffee

Mo

Lincoln

ore

White

Franklin

Bledsoe

Loudon

7

Hancock

Jefferson

McMinn

Hamilton Bradley

Polk

Monroe

Greene

Cocke Sevier

Blount

hn

so

n

Sullivan

Hawkins

Union Grainger en l mb Ha

Roane Rhea

Marion

Claiborne

Knox

Van Buren

Grundy

Anderson

ie

Regional ALC Members

Region 4 Vice Chair

1

Lewis

Cannon

Morgan Cumberland

ch

Regional ALC Members

Region 3 Vice Chair

Hardin

Hardeman

Perry

Putnam

DeKalb

at

Region 2 Vice Chair

Henderson

McNairy

UT ADVOCACY COUNCIL

Region 1 Vice Chair

Madison

Chester Fayette

Rutherford

Smith

qu

Shelby

Williamson

Wilson

Hickman

Crockett Haywood

Davidson

Scott Campbell

Overton Fentress Jackson

Se

Tipton

Dickson

Humphreys

Carroll

Pickett

Clay

Macon Trousdale

igs

UTIA Representative

Gibson

r

Rotating SGA Representative

Houston

Decatu

Rotating Faculty Senate Representative

Henry Benton

Dyer

ALC Chair

Weakley

Sumner atha

La

Obion

Robertson

Che

ke

Stewart Montgomery

6 Jo

5

Me

3

OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE

BOT Chair Advancement & Public Affairs

Membership is organized into 10 geographic regions across the state. Each has a regional vice chair. Within a region, membership includes Alumni Legislative Council members and any campus or institute staff who reside within that geographic area.

The Alumni Association and the Office of Public and Government Relations share responsibility for management of the Council, with the UT System president having final authority. A Council oversight committee that functions as a strategy and liaison

UT OFFICE OF PUBLIC AND GOVERNMENT RELATIONS & UT NATIONAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

Chancellor Representative

element among members and staff. All campus or institute advocacy groups are incorporated within the Council and subject to its direction.

l

The UT Advocacy Council is a government relations initiative to expand, strengthen and enhance the University’s political capacity by training and

encompass alumni, friends, faculty, staff and student advocacy groups within each campus and institute. Training is provided to Council members, and a communications network exists for sharing up-to-date information and notification of needs for support.

Marshal

ADVOCACY STRUCTURE

Washington Carter i ico Un

10

9

8

Region 10 Vice Chair

Regional ALC Members

5

6


STATE RELATIONS The Office of State Relations maintains a daily presence at the state capitol in Nashville. Staff serve as the University’s primary liaison with the Tennessee General Assembly, Office of the Governor and state executive agencies. The Office supports the President and his staff in legislative, public policy and political analysis, and in helping identify new opportunities for partnering with state government. State officials often seek the help of the State Relations staff when crafting legislation and policy with potential to impact UT and public higher

STATE RELATIONS PROTOCOL Faculty, staff and students are sometimes asked by government relations staff to provide expertise, advice or suggestions on proposed legislation or a political issue. Such information may be needed on a very short timeline, and it is important that University personnel be responsive to such calls. The timeliness of a response often can determine the outcome of a critically important issue affecting academics, research or outreach. On rare occasions, faculty, staff or students may be asked to testify before legislative committees. These visits are coordinated through the State Relations Office, and appropriate staff will help prepare faculty, staff or students for testimony with information and tips on how to address the committee, how long to

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE GUIDELINES: OFFICIAL CONTACTS WITH STATE AND FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS AND ENTITIES

education. The State Relations staff works to ensure legislative proposals have little or no financial burden on the University or create obstacles for faculty or staff in performing their duties. State relations staff also work with bill sponsors to advocate for legislation that could benefit the University. When legislation is introduced that could negatively impact the University, its staff or students, State Relations staff try to work with sponsors to discourage advancement of the bill or to mitigate adverse effects. When it is important for the University to take public stands on legislation, that happens.

Government relations at both the state and federal levels are critical areas for the University. More than 50 percent of unrestricted funding comes via state legislative appropriations and federal grants and appropriations. Both state and federal governments are major resources for all campuses and institutes, particularly in the area of research. As an entity that engages in lobbying activities, the University must comply with federal regulations contained in the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 and the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act of 2007. Therefore, it is imperative that the policies and positions set forth by the Board of Trustees, the President and authorized University officials be coordinated and communicated clearly through one central point of contact with state or federal government elected or appointed officials and external individuals or groups engaged in government relations and advocacy (collectively, “government officials”).

The Office of State Relations also helps coordinate visits and engage elected officials on UT campuses and works with individual campuses and institutes on their specific concerns.

speak, and how to best represent the University. Occasionally, a faculty member may be asked to provide expert testimony on particular subjects by a professional association or a non-University group. In these cases, the faculty member is representing his or her own expertise rather than University position or policy. It’s important that faculty giving such testimony make clear that while employed by the University, their opinions and ideas are their own. In these instances, the government relations team should be notified of the invitation and appearance and welcomes the opportunity to provide advice and counsel to the witness.

The President, through the Office of Public and Government Relations, directs a coordinated federal and state legislative agenda annually for the University of Tennessee system – its campuses, institutes, and units. The Vice President for Public and Government Relations is responsible for coordinating the communications with, outreach activities involving, and engagement of governmental officials relating to all University legislative, policy, and budgetary matters. The Vice President assures the involvement of appropriate members of University staff and/or units. Reporting to and under the supervision of the Vice President, the Director of Federal Relations and the Director of State Relations serve as the University’s official liaisons for all contact with government officials.

Every legislative session, the General Assembly debates controversial issues that do not directly affect the University. In these cases, a faculty or staff member who wants to contact a legislator to express an opinion may do so as a constituent or private citizen, rather than as a UT employee on behalf of the University. If you have questions or concerns, the Office of State Relations welcomes the opportunity to help.

University employees may not act, or give the appearance of acting, on behalf of the University when communicating with government officials concerning University legislative, policy, or budgetary matters unless specifically authorized by the President, the Vice President for Public and Government Relations, the Director of Federal Relations, or the Director of State Relations. Faculty or staff contacted by government officials about a University legislative, policy, or budgetary matter shall consult with the government relations staff as promptly as possible and prior to providing a response that reasonably could be construed to represent the official position of the University. Staff, whose position may involve activities similar to those of the University’s Director of Federal Relations or State Relations, shall coordinate their engagement of government officials with the appropriate Director. Faculty or staff who have legislative proposals, funding requests or points of view that reasonably could be construed as the official position of the University are expected to coordinate with the appropriate Director prior to making contact with any government official. These guidelines are directed only to the issue of official representation of the University. These guidelines are not intended to restrict protected personal expression by University employees nor are they intended to restrict University employees from identifying their profession or place of employment in the context of their communications with government officials. However, University employees must make clear they are expressing personal views and not an official position of the University. July 20, 2010

7

4


FEDERAL RELATIONS

GOVERNMENT RELATIONS All levels of government relations for the University are centrally coordinated through the Office of Public and Government Relations. The office serves as chief liaison between the University and federal, state and local governments. The University provides service and support to policymakers by engaging its numerous experts, capabilities and resources. The University's government relations office serves the interests of the University by working closely with faculty, University leaders, and the Student Government Association and the UT Alumni Association to improve understanding and support for the University's academic, research, and

The Office of Federal Relations serves as primary liaison with the Administration, Congress, federal agencies and the many higher education associations and coalitions headquartered in Washington, D.C. Its staff advocate for the University of Tennessee's mission in education, research and service, and on behalf of the University's interests in legislative and regulatory matters. The staff directly serve UT administration, faculty, staff and students to help enable high-quality educational opportunities for the benefit of our students and the state of Tennessee.

outreach mission. The government relations staff also advise and counsel these groups on advocacy on behalf of the University. Specific pages on the University website are dedicated to government relations, both federal and state. Visit www.tennessee.edu and click the government relations access. You will find volumes of background information, archives, directions and helpful links – and frequently updated reports and comments on hot issues and higher education activity.

The Office of Federal Relations is open to students, faculty, and staff who are visiting the area. The office is available to offer support to University personnel who travel to Washington to meet and communicate with members of Congress and other federal officials.

ARE YOU A LOBBYIST? As an entity that engages in lobbying and interacts with members of Congress, federal agency staff, and executive branch officials, the University of Tennessee must comply with regulations contained in the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act of 2007 (HLOGA) (P.L. 110-81) and the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 (P.L. 104-65, as amended). These laws require the UT System to track all 3

The office promotes the University's education, research, and public service activities to Congressional members, committee staff, and agencies in an effort to increase federal support for and increase knowledge of the University of Tennessee. The Office of Federal Relations seeks to raise the University’s profile on Capitol Hill and throughout the various federal agencies by marketing and publicizing its missions and activities. The Office of Federal Relations coordinates with others in higher education to advocate for increased federal support of research and development and to address various policy issues concerning higher education. The office also coordinates the University’s response to inquiries from legislative offices, ranging from policy questions to informational items and to constituent concerns. As with state relations, faculty, staff and students are occasionally asked by the federal relations staff to provide expertise, advice or suggestions on proposed legislation or a political issue. The issues may be different, but the protocol is similar. If you have questions or concerns, the Office of Federal Relations welcomes the opportunity to help.

“lobbying contacts” and “lobbying activities” – terms defined below – to the Clerk’s office quarterly. Over the past two years, the executive branch also has issued additional guidance that clarifies events and activities that trigger these reporting requirements. The Office of Federal Relations is responsible for tracking, certifying, and reporting all covered interactions on behalf of all UT personnel. This page provides guidance to University personnel on what activities must be reported. For further clarification or guidance, contact Kurt Schlieter at 240-271-8305 or kschliet@tennessee.edu. 8


OVERVIEW OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE

GENERAL GOVERNMENT RELATIONS PROTOCOL AND ETIQUETTE

The University of Tennessee is proud to fulfill a mission unique in all of public higher education in Tennessee. That mission is to provide top-quality higher education, research and economic development for the benefit of all Tennesseans. As the state’s land-grant institution and most comprehensive research university, UT further distinguishes itself with a presence in all 95 counties and extensive public service outreach that includes

There are some generally accepted practices in working with all government officials (local, state or federal) acknowledged by all within the government relations field.

BE KNOWLEDGEABLE As you try to persuade and convince an elected official or staff, it is important that they have a degree of confidence in you, your request and knowledge about the subject. This requires knowing both your side of an issue and the counter arguments. It is also important to know the full ramifications of what you are advocating (e.g. budgetary impacts, political effects. etc.) Position yourself in the audience’s mind as their expert on the matter. This will position you to better secure the outcomes you desire.

UNIQUE AND EXCEPTIONAL ASSETS

BE TRUTHFUL Never provide an elected official or staff with information that is incorrect or that you are unsure of its accuracy. Never guess. It is always better to say, “I’m not sure about that, but will be happy to confirm and get back with you.”

UT and the Battelle Corporation co-manage and operate Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the world’s largest government-sponsored laboratory. This distinction puts UT among just a handful of universities nationwide that manage a Department of Energy national lab. Oak Ridge National Laboratory includes $3 billion in research facilities, equipment and expertise in East Tennessee. These resources include the $1.4-billion Spallation Neutron Source; the world’s fastest unclassified supercomputer; joint research centers; state tax exemptions; and funding for joint faculty appointments, and they are the basis of the UT-Oak Ridge partnership and are both unique and uniquely successful. The UT Health Science Center, with a more than 9

the single-largest 4H youth program of any state. Statewide, the University’s economic impact – made by all campuses, collectively – means more than $2.5 billion annually in income to Tennessee, more than 53,600 jobs, and an estimated $237.6 million in state and local tax revenue. Nearly 50,000 students are enrolled at the campuses at Knoxville, Chattanooga, Martin, Tullahoma and the Memphis-based Health Science Center. The University of Tennessee also includes the statewide institutes of agriculture and public service. More than 325,000 people worldwide are UT alumni, and more than 184,000 of those live in Tennessee.

$2.3-billion economic contribution to the state, has trained more than 70 percent of Tennessee’s doctors, including residents and fellows in the College of Medicine; 75 percent of dentists; and 40 percent of pharmacists. UTHSC also generates more economic activity than any other educational enterprise – public or private – in Memphis or West Tennessee. The Institute of Agriculture and Institute for Public Service are the “front door” of the University in many communities across the state, providing various research, training and outreach programs. The College of Veterinary Medicine, established by state law in 1974, is one of only 28 in the nation. Located on the Agriculture campus in Knoxville, the college trains students from across the nation and throughout the world in the latest practices and science of veterinary medicine. The College also plays a critical role in working with the agriculture and food science industries and governmental agencies in monitoring and ensuring the safety of Tennessee’s and the nation’s food supply and against acts of bioterrorism. 2


BE COURTEOUS Always have a friendly and professional demeanor, even if you are unhappy with the official. Your goal is to get the official where you want them on an issue or request, not to let them know you think they are wrong or let you down. A loss or disappointment today may be your victory tomorrow. So as the old saying goes, “Never burn a bridge.”

ADVOCACY

TENNESSEANS FOR UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE

BE BRIEF

Government at both the state and federal levels has a powerful influence on higher education in general and on the University of Tennessee specifically – from the standpoint of funding and regulation. Accordingly, it is critical that the University represent itself effectively before the various governing bodies.

institutes, providing strategy and direction for all political and government contact.

Government relations for the University is a centralized function of the system administration, with staff and leadership devoted to representing all campuses and

The Office of Public and Government Relations seeks to provide training, direction and assistance to all who wish to advocate on behalf of the University.

Government officials and staff never have enough time. Be clear, concise and to the point. Ask for what you want, say what you mean. The easier you can make it for them to understand and work with you, the greater the chance of your desired outcomes. A meeting with an elected official or staff is not a forum or presentation. You need to be able to make your case in no more than 5-10 minutes. If you are given more time, let the official or staff ask questions.

Important to the success of the effort is the support of alumni, faculty, students and friends in consistently and effectively telling University’s story through relationships, contact and follow up with elected officials.

PROVIDE INFORMATION Always provide easy to understand, accurate and concise information as a “leave behind.” It is important to let the official or staff know what you’re providing them to review later, but you can summarize what is in the information you provided.

BE THANKFUL Always thank officials and staff for their time. Provide information on how you can be reached and offer to follow up.

USE YOUR GOVERNMENT RELATIONS TEAM Collectively, the University’s Government Relations Team has more than 100 years of experience working with government officials at all levels. The staff provides helpful information on contacting government officials including letter or email 1

protocol, political sensitivity, timeliness, status of legislation or issue activity and other information that can help you be more successful. Do not hesitate to contact state or federal relations staff for assistance. 10


ADVOCACY

TENNESSEANS FOR UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE

GOVERNMENT RELATIONS GUIDELINES

Hank Dye Vice President for Public and Government Relations hank.dye@tennessee.edu 865-974-8184

Nashville Office: Anthony Haynes Associate Vice President and Director of State Relations anthony.haynes@tennessee.edu 615-741-8220

Washington, DC Office: Kurt Schlieter Associate Vice President and Director of Federal Relations kschliet@tennessee.edu 240-271-8305

THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE IS AN EEO/AA/TITLE VI/TITLE IX/SECTION 504/ADA/ADEA INSTITUTION E17-0405-004-004-12

UT Advocacy Brochure  

University of Tennessee Government Relations Guidelines

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