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ISSUE 009


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ISSUE STAFF Editors EMILY EWBANK BENJAMIN MORRIS MONICA SANGA SUNNY SCHNEBERGER Text Editor Ana Calhoun Editorial Staff Beth Arnold Shelby Blessing Eliza Bober Rachel Bullock Claire Edelen Katherine Guenthner Tommy Guerra Alden Hall Andrew Houston Carrie Joynton Azusa Kakuda Grace Mathieson Shelley McDavid Kelsey Harper Odom James Sherman Alex Warr Alexandra Webster Drew Wilson Jessica Zarowitz

Copyright Š 2013 ISSUE: All rights reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-9786228-8-6 Printed in an edition of 1300.


ISSUE 009


TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD 4

GARLAND FIELDER + CHARLTON LEWIS

STUDIOS 8

DESIGN I + DESIGN II

10

DESIGN III

12

DESIGN IV

14

DESIGN V

16

DESIGN VI

18

VERTICAL STUDIO

22

ADVANCED STUDIO

26

TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIONS STUDIO

28

LANDSCAPE STUDIO

30

COMMUNITY + REGIONAL PLANNING STUDIO

32

PUBLIC INTEREST DESIGN

34

WOOD DESIGN

36

PROTOTYPE


FEATURED PROJECTS 38

REMOTELY CLOSE

42

AUGMENTED REALITY

44

THE SEMI-TRANSPARENT BLOCK

50

TRANSITION ROWING CENTER

54

FLATBED PRESS

58

POP-UP SHOP

60

AREA FOR RECOVERY

62

TAKING ROOT

68

STRIATED GENERATION

70

ZEN MEDITATION CENTER

74

[RE]OCCUPY NEW ORLEANS

78

THE KINETIC KNOT PROJECT

84

COASTAL RESILIENCE

88

AUSTIN REUSE CENTER

92

GALVESTON MARITIME COLLECTION

98

NORTH BROTHER ISLAND

Nicolas Allinder Melissa Cataldo Samantha Schwarze + Lauren Vogl

Jeff Ziemann

Shelby Blessing

Lily McCourt Eliza Bober + Michelle Bright

Rachel Bullock + Kaziah Haviland Amanda Kronk Drew Wilson Travis Avery, Travis Cook, Laine Hardy + Travis Ritchie Chad Bunnell

Yoko Shimajuko Anna Katsios + Alison Steele Michael Beene

Ian Ellis + Frances Peterson

104 KARU-SA Maria Garza 108

ALIEN POD

112

CÓRDOBA BRICK HOUSE

116

POETICS OF BUILDING

120

FLEX DRESS

122

PROXY NO. 13

126

A STRETCH OF WALLER CREEK

130

RED BLUFF CIRCUIT

134

AIRPORT BOULEVARD COLOSSEUM

Clifton Harness

136

MARITIME MUSEUM OF GALVESTON

June Jung + Young Min Park

140

CACTUS + SUCCULENT COLLECTION

Studio Team: Shortall Rachel Bullock, Sophia Monahon + Selina Ortiz

Studio Team: Coker

Rose Wilkowski Studio Team: Beaman Danuta Dias, Sara Fallahi, Liang Lu + Bailey Rankin

John Cunningham

Andrés Felipe Calderón


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FOREWORD

One of the hardest parts about earning an education in architecture is defining what exactly the pursuit of architecture is. This component of architectural education is deceptively complex. At first, we think that making architecture is about making beautiful buildings or spaces in which people can experience their lives in meaningful ways. This only rarely happens, but it can happen, and experiencing such spaces inspired me to pursue a degree in architecture. However, I have come to another definition of architecture as a student at UTSOA. This redefinition is a result of the collaborative opportunities students are given via the unique curriculum of the Vertical Studios that combine so many different backgrounds into a single program. Students come with backgrounds in science, engineering, literature, math— almost every conceivable endeavor is incorporated. There are those, of course, with backgrounds in architecture, but they are not the defining majority by a long shot. By including graduates with diverse backgrounds, as well as undergraduates that are getting their primary education in architecture, a mixing of ideas can happen in studio that is exciting and meaningful. What I have learned is that this symbiosis is the actual definition of architecture—it is the defining characteristic which gives meaning to the built environment. Focusing on collaboration as the essence of architecture defines it as a service rather than a product, however elegant that product may end up. My own background is in fine art. In that pursuit, one spends so much time alone in the studio; it is precious time, but time spent without others. This solitude is built into that medium, so to speak. I am now finding value in architecture that I did not find in art. Due to the complexity of the medium, the collaborations in architecture actually create relationships that give meaning to the built environment. And we learn the value of this approach here at UTSOA by the very nature of its unique educational process. It is one that has taught me to value the built environment not because of its inherent utility (which is profound), but rather because architecture stands monument to the act of collaboration with others. By sharing ideas, talents, and perspectives in a design collaboration, the structures that are built become temples, in a way, to the act of people collaborating. They stand testament to the optimism of life. Joe Strummer once said that being in The Clash was like being in a boat with everyone on board rowing in the same direction. When that broke down, the band had to fold. The same is true in architecture. When like-minded, passionate people come together to create something that can be utilized, appreciated, and internalized, a special kismet occurs. GARLAND FIELDER M.ARCH. I / M.F.A., B.F.A., B.A.


As an endeavor, the discipline of architecture has always been an embodiment of individual creativity, talents, and desire. Accordingly, these defining characteristics have been juxtaposed against myriad influences that allow for a potentially richer manifestation and representation of an intent. In ISSUE: 009, this compendium of student work, the point of departure is in the reflection upon the nature of individualistic achievement within the sphere of collective effort and thought. The studio experience affords a unique opportunity for an individuality of thought, discussion, and consequence. But within that same experience lies the framing of the discourse as a collectively influential process. Forgive the reference to my southern Baptist heritage, but the voices of the “whole” constitute the harmony of the chorus, while the soloist soars with a joyously supportive resonance. Indeed… It is that collective voice of the studio experience that is part of the rootedness of the exemplary projects represented within the bounds of this volume. Certainly each piece, in its own way, responds to those familiar particulars of a “project”: program, site, contextual response, and other specific agendas. However, equally represented, and to be considered, should be the influence of the collaborative dialogue imparted upon each project from a myriad of sources and stimuli. Within the realm of a studio and the subsequent collective experiences, there is that democratization that allows for a sharing of ideas and a synthesis of thought and ambitions. Contextually, that collective experience may be unique to a particular studio, but the body of those experiences spans the width and breadth of the the careers represented and on display here—careers that are but in their infancy and that give reason for much optimism for what might be yet to come. From a purely reflective standpoint, I have been privileged to enjoy a collaborative presence as both faculty and as a student, first as an undergraduate here at UTSOA, and most recently as I similarly pursue a post-professional agenda. The multiplicity of roles I assumed, and the richness of their accompanying experiences, have helped to frame a dramatically different and personal sense of place for myself over the years. The realization of the impact that the relationships cultivated, within the academy, with students, and with peers, is a refreshing one and affects profoundly a retrospective view of the world around me. It is likely, for the reasons above, that I have a heightened appreciation for the compilation of work within this volume. It is an archive of not just individual achievement, but a tangible representation of, and validation in, a belief in the nature of the studio discourse and the pedagogical aspirations embodied therein. In no small measure, it is equally compelling as a student-driven initiative that seeks to archive a particular circumstance at this particular intersection of time and thought. I offer my congratulations to the many contributors to this body of work, and on their behalf I present ISSUE: 009. CHARLTON LEWIS Adjunct Professor, M.ARCH. II / B.ARCH.


STUDIOS


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DESIGN I Summer 2012 IGOR SIDDIQUI [Performance Space]

Fall 2012 ROBERT MEZQUITI CLAY ODOM JOYCE ROSNER IGOR SIDDIQUI [Performance Space]

ALEX WARR: Siddiqui

UNDERGRADUATE


DESIGN II Spring 2012 ROBERT GAY ROBERT MEZQUITI SMILJA MILOVANOVIC-BERTRAM LOIS WEINTHAL NICHOLE WIEDEMANN [Arboretum Pavilion]

Summer 2012 JUDY BIRDSONG [Arboretum Pavilion]

CHERYL McGIFFIN: Milovanovic-Bertram

TRAVIS SCHNEIDER: Gay


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DESIGN III Fall 2012 JUDY BIRDSONG SARAH GAMBLE ALAN KNOX JUAN MIRÓ [Austin Green Center]

TAMIE GLASS [Interiors: Poetry And Literature Center]

ALEX WARR: Knox

CHERYL McGIFFIN: Knox

UNDERGRADUATE


ALEX WARR: Knox

BENJAMIN VELA: Glass


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DESIGN IV Spring 2012 JUDY BIRDSONG CHARLES DI PIAZZA ALLISON GASKINS CHARLTON LEWIS [Urban Design Housing]

CLAY ODOM [Interiors: Pop-Up Shop]

CARLOS CARBALLO: Di Piazza

CLIFTON HARNESS: Birdsong

UNDERGRADUATE


ELIZABETH LE BLANC: Lewis


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DESIGN V Fall 2012 MICHAEL LEIGHTON BEAMAN [Proxy No. 13] ELIZABETH DANZE + DANILO UDOVICKI [Refuge + Asylum] ALLISON GASKINS [Interiors: Proximity: Surrounding The Body] JACK SANDERS [Design / Build: Pavilion] CLAY SHORTALL [Research of the Robot]

LILY McCOURT: Gaskins

BROOKS CAVENDER: Danze + Udovicki

UNDERGRADUATE


JESSICA GLENNIE + REID JOSLIN: Sanders

BROOKS CAVENDER: Danze + Udovicki


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DESIGN VI Spring 2012 JOHN BLOOD DANELLE BRISCOE ULRICH DANGEL ED RICHARDSON [Sound Building: Rowing Center]

TAMIE GLASS [Interiors: City Social Club]

AMY WU: Blood

UNDERGRADUATE


JOHANNA SPENCER: Richardson

MADISON DAHL: Dangel


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VERTICAL STUDIO Spring 2012 MICHAEL BENEDIKT [Zen Retreat Center] LARRY DOLL [An Urban Refuge] PETER RAAB + SARAH GAMBLE [Waller Creek Intervention] JOYCE ROSNER [Flatbed Press] VINCENT SNYDER [It’s New to Me]

JON HANDZO: Raab + Gamble

NICHOLAS STESHYN: Raab + Gamble

GRADUATE


KYLE ENGOIAN: Rosner

BENJAMIN MORRIS: Snyder


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VERTICAL STUDIO Fall 2012 DEAN ALMY [Constructing Implied Space] DANELLE BRISCOE [(to) Wonder] ULRICH DANGEL [Reclaimed Space] MATT FAJKUS [Steamline Living] FRANCISCO GOMES [Persistence + Adaptation]

THOMAS JOHNSTON: Fajkus

GRADUATE


SHELLEY McDAVID: Gomes

CLAIRE EDELEN: Almy


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ADVANCED STUDIO Spring 2012 DEAN ALMY [Urban Design: Zagreb] COLEMAN COKER [Coastal Resilence: Corpus Christi] DEREK DELLEKAMP [[Un]Restricted Access] CARMEN GARUFO [Digital Media Arts Complex and Conference Center] BARBARA HOIDN [Belo Horizonte, Brazil: Hotel for Pampulha] MURRAY LEGGE [Andros: Live/Work] CARL MATTHEWS [Austin Public Library] JUAN MIRĂ“ [Studio Mexico] ADAM PYREK [Capitol Building for the State of Alaska] ALLAN SHEARER [Showtime!] CLAY SHORTALL [Augmented Reality] IGOR SIDDIQUI [Designing an Art World: The Contemporary Art Fair] GARY WANG [Center For Academic and Spiritual Life] Summer 2012 SIMON ATKINSON [Studio London] COLEMAN COKER [Coastal Resilence: Port Isabel Preserve + South Padre Island]

CAMERON KRAUS: Hoidn

UNDERGRADUATE + GRADUATE


SIQI LIU: Mir贸

HECTOR GARCIA-CASTRILLO: Wang


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ADVANCED STUDIO Fall 2012 SIMON ATKINSON [South Central Dallas] MICHAEL BENEDIKT [Seaholm Power Plant Intake Structure Adaptive Re-Use] JOHN BLOOD, ELIZABETH DANZE, IGOR SIDDIQUI + DANILO UDOVICKI [Study Abroad: Europe] COLEMAN COKER [Poetics Of Building] DAVID HEYMANN + HOPE HASBROUCK [Campus Martius To Novartis] SMILJA MILOVANOVIC-BERTRAM [Study Abroad: Italy] STEVEN MOORE [The Green Alley Demonstration Project] AGUS RUSLI [Bioengineering And Neuroscience Research Laboratory: Dallas] WILFRIED WANG [C贸rdoba, Argentina: Brick Mid-Rise] LOIS WEINTHAL [Interior Skins]

JEFFREY BLOCKSIDGE, JENNA DEZINSKI + ALLISON REID: Milovanovic

UNDERGRADUATE + GRADUATE


KYLE ENGOIAN + JON MAUTZ: Heymann + Hasbrouck

MEGAN MOWRY: Benedikt


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TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIONS STUDIO Spring 2012 MATT FAJKUS [Culinary Arts Institute] FRANCISCO GOMES [East Havana Kindergarten] Fall 2012 MICHAEL GARRISON [Eco-Tourism Lodge: Uganda] ADAM PYREK [Maritime History Collection: Galveston] VINCENT SNYDER [Inuit Art Center + Winnipeg Art Gallery]

GARLAND FIELDER + ANDREW GREEN: Garrison

UNDERGRADUATE + GRADUATE


BRIAN DOHERTY + KARL GLEASON: Gomes

KEVIN KINSEY + NICHOLAS STESHYN: Snyder


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LANDSCAPE STUDIO Spring 2012 HOPE HASBROUCK [Design and Visual Studies in Landscape Architecture II: Mist, Float, Play] JASON SOWELL [Comprehensive Landscape Studio] Fall 2012 ALLAN SHEARER [Edges And Seams: Recentering the Campus along Waller Creek] JASON SOWELL [Design and Visual Studies in Landscape Architecture I]

TRAVIS GLENN + KEVIN SULLIVAN: Sowell

MICHAEL STEINLAGE: Hasbrouck

GRADUATE


ANNIE PALONE + JESSICA ZAROWITZ: Sowell

DANUTA DIAS, SARA FALLAHI, LIANG LU + BAILEY RANKIN: Shearer

TRAVIS GLENN + KEVIN SULLIVAN: Sowell


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COMMUNITY + REGIONAL PLANNING STUDIO Spring 2012 BJØRN SLETTO [Latin America: Los Platanitos] Fall 2012 MING-CHUN LEE [Physical Planning] PATRICIA WILSON [Mexico]

NATHAN BRIGMON, MATT CLIFTON, TANIA DÁVILA, OMAR DÍAZ, RACHAEL DIE, JARED GENOVA, ROSARIO RIZZO, DANIELLE ROJAS, BETH ROSENBARGER + PAMELA SERTZEN: Sletto

GRADUATE


SOPHIA BENNER, JULIO CARRILLO, TERI DURDEN, ALAN HALTER + AYNAZ NAHAVANDI: Lee


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PUBLIC INTEREST DESIGN Summer 2012 FRANCISCO GOMES STEVEN MOORE

ELIZABETH DE REGT, LAURA EDWARDS, JENA HAMMOND, EDEN LEW + NATALIE RAMIREZ: A Mobile Tool Shed in Holly

UNDERGRADUATE + GRADUATE


CLAIRE EDELEN, KRISTINA OLIVENT, ALLISON STOOS + DREW WILSON: Reclaimed Water Project


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WOOD DESIGN Spring, Summer + Fall 2012 MARK MACEK

BRANDON CAMPBELL: Trestle Table

ANA CALHOUN: Meditation Chair

UNDERGRADUATE + GRADUATE

JESSICA MILLS: Tuesday Chair


HANYEN WU : Mesquite Chair + Table


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PROTOTYPE Spring 2012 IGOR SIDDIQUI

CONNER BRYAN + JEFFREY McCORD

WILL HERMAN + ERIC LAM

UNDERGRADUATE + GRADUATE

RACHEL BULLOCK + BRITTANY COOPER


PROJECTS


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REMOTELY CLOSE NICOLAS ALLINDER Murray Legge / Advanced / Spring 2012

Remotely Close is a live-work retreat composed of nine structures that appear to float on the surface of the island of Andros, located in the Northern Cyclades, a Grecian archipelago. Program and circulation have been articulated to tacitly develop a community in which writers may interact with actors and set designers. A tension is revealed not only through the manner in which inhabitants of Andros interact with the neighboring islands but also through the inherent qualities of filmmaking. From a distance, the islands forming an archipelago are perceived as a singular entity. However, upon closer inspection, each of these islands reveals its own unique identity. Tension between community and individual are also present in the process of filmmaking: a film is a collective effort that will always transcend the talents of any one individual. These tensions found in the proximity and remoteness of islands in an archipelago and between individual efforts and a collective product in film became the starting point for a live-work retreat for filmmakers on the Greek island of Andros. The project’s form is derived from a study of program, circulation, and views on the complex, rolling site. The steeply stepped landscape is the result of the struggle between ancient man-made terraces and the natural process of erosion. The project itself consists of nine pads, or islands, which appear simultaneously to converge and diverge. Their tenuous relationship is heightened by the fact that the islands are themselves lifted off the ground by pilotis and shear walls. Various programs, categorized by their communal or individual qualities, are spread throughout the islands, allowing multiple centers of activity to develop each island appears to be a homogenous element, it consists of several individual spaces (i.e., bedrooms) and communal spaces (i.e., work rooms).


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AUGMENTED REALITY MELISSA CATALDO Clay Shortall / Advanced / Spring 2012

Augmented Reality is a live view of the physical world augmented by computer-generated sensory input. The Augmented Reality studio was comprised of three parts: low-tech A/R-inspired exploration, development of theory, and implementation. The low-tech exploration combined cryptography with image manipulation. A Grasshopper script took any two photos as inputs. It then created a cloud of circles such that the first image is read as pixels made of circles in plan, and the second image is read as pixels made of small lines in elevation. For the theory portion of the studio, I was inspired by Steven Wolfram’s idea that, with computation, simple rules can yield complex results. These types of mathematically chaotic systems can explain many patterns found in disciplines ranging from biology to economics to quantum physics. I investigated chaos theory with the goal of creating a 3-D A/R experience that illustrates the continuum between recognizable pattern and chaos in the context of buildings. For implementation, Processing, a computer programming language, was combined with image data. Several images, as well as real-time web-cam data, were the source material for raw visual/spatial data used to build chaotic geometries. The low-tech object shows a continuum between randomness and order. From the correct viewing angles, the image is visible. However, as one moves around the object to a corner view, the image’s pixels appear completely randomized by the grey values of the second image. The continuum between randomness and order sparked an interest in visualizing chaos theory using the Processing language. The “chaotic” images represent the evolution of a script for recursive chaotic branching structures converging to a set of points in threedimensional space. The Vray renderings from Processing script output to Rhino more clearly show the geometry of the chaotic branching panels breaking from the rectangular room as the lines go back to the position on the original wall that the panels broke out from.


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THE SEMI-TRANSPARENT BLOCK SAMANTHA WHITNEY SCHWARZE + LAUREN VOGL Dean Almy / Advanced / Spring 2012

Once considered to be on the eastern periphery of Europe, Croatia is quickly becoming more geographically centralized due to the expansion of the European Union. The Semi-Transparent Block investigates the nature of this “Peripheral Moment” and its relationship to public and private space. Following Invisible Zagreb, a project creating temporary public spaces in underutilized areas of the city, Badel Block (a once privately owned block) deviates from its previous function and allows for public programs to infiltrate. Badel Block is located on Vlaška Street, the threshold between the Upper and Lower Towns, where the topography of the foothills meets the urban block morphology of the city. The Semi-Transparent Block references this spatial threshold found along the north face of Badel Block. Housing located here is based on land divisions found in Croatia’s agrarian past while allowing for a reading of a completed block that relates to the existing tower on Vlaška Street. However, the perimeter of the Badel Block is completed in a semi-transparent way: both public and private programs infiltrate the center and periphery of the block. A series of layers, accomplished through the use of various ground manipulations and building materials, creates thresholds that define varying degrees of public and private spaces. The primary programmatic elements include a library for the city of Zagreb as well as multiple performance venues. An “art walk” zone of semi-public space along the north face of the block unifies several housing typologies: a live-workshop for artists-in-residence, as well as incubator offices, a culinary academy, and housing and hostel units that take advantage of the existing Gorica building. The investigation of program was rooted in the exploration of the “Peripheral Moment” as well as a site-specific response to Red Empty, a light installation in the distillery.


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TRANSITION ROWING CENTER JEFFREY ZIEMANN Ed Richardson / Design VI / Spring 2012

The rowing center serves as a transition between land and water, offering visitors multiple opportunities to engage with the water based on personal routine and preference. The program is aligned along the shoreline to allow for many paths, while remaining transparent enough to maintain the view across the water. The goal of the rowing center is not to be a destination, but rather a threshold that facilitates and dramatizes the process of moving out onto the water. Program is arranged in a way to assist in the rower’s progression through his/her routine. Circulation is presented in an easily understood manner that accommodates the flow of both recreational rowers and competitive rowers. The separation of these types of rowers allows for users to progress at their own individual rates, while the proximity of these two groups at certain points allows for educational interaction. Both the public trail and interior circulation are integrated into the program in a way that provides unique views of the storage facilities and boats while avoiding the traffic caused by the intersection of program and circulation. By creating the opportunity for interaction between rowers and runners, this design displays a sport that often remains private to the general public. Additionally, the openness of the bays creates a funnel that takes advantage of the breeze off of Lady Bird Lake, using the Venturi effect to maximize the use of this breeze in the hot Austin climate.


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FLATBED PRESS SHELBY BLESSING Joyce Rosner / Vertical / Spring 2012

The printmaking process navigates the space between singularity and mass production, creating works of art that are at once unique originals and part of a larger edition. The consistency of the printing press and the printing matrix (carved wood block, lithographic limestone, etched copper plate, etc.) balances with the inconsistencies of ink, paper, and the human hand. This building for Flatbed Press, a printmaking studio in Austin, TX, celebrates the print, the printing press, and the printmaker. At its core is a large day-lit printing hall containing printing presses of all types, which allows for open collaboration between printmakers or subdivision by moveable walls when more privacy is required. The printing hall is contained within an edition of four concrete forms, which provide space for specialized printing functions (monotype, relief, etching, lithography) on the ground floor and private studios for artists-in-residence accessible by a catwalk above. Gaps between the concrete forms allow limited glimpses into the printing hall from a public pathway that travels between the street and Flatbed’s courtyard gallery entrance. The gallery is also accessible from a café connecting to the street at the front of the site, drawing visitors in to see the prints produced here. From the sunken gallery, visitors can also catch a glimpse of the high clerestory windows that light the hall, while working artists are protected from view. At the back of the site are Flatbed’s administrative and sales office and four apartments for artists-inresidence, which overlook the courtyard and are linked to their studios by an external catwalk with views into the gallery. Repetition and exception are employed to create a building that is like a print. This is further emphasized in the choice of materials: the concrete forms hold textured impressions of their formwork on the exterior, and Flatbed Press’s sign is carved directly into the wooden screen that filters south light into the printing hall and its exterior porch.


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POP-UP SHOP LILY McCOURT Clay Odom / Design IV: Interiors / Spring 2012

The focus of this project was to translate the daring couture designs of Alexander McQueen into a small-scale pop-up shop. A form driven by the programmatic functions of seating, storage, transaction, and display developed from a single plane into a multifaceted volume. The slight transitions from wall to occupiable space speak to the formal language of the McQueen brand. Harsh angles create a sense of unease but also invoke an air of intrigue. The form is aggressive, yet accommodating, to program requirements. The shop is designed with a 360-degree approach in mind, thus fashion pieces are displayed on each face. The hanging display is split into two branches to maximize display space for the elaborate McQueen dresses. A self-supporting accessory wall transitions into seating and can be accessed from both the exterior and interior approach. The central display feature is an encased mannequin that houses a specialized couture garment. This method of display serves to question the boundary between fashion and art: the garment can be seen and adored, but the everyday customer cannot access it. The entire form is draped in an applied pattern that developed from the initial analysis of the McQueen brand. Through a series of repetitions and manipulations, a vulture skull outline evolved into an intricate pattern that abstractly represents a butterfly. This bizarre design exemplifies the essence of McQueen’s style: the art of combining unusual elements to create beautiful objects. The application of the pattern to the form is driven by program and the structural potential of the pattern as a three-dimensional object. The importance of the pattern is that it is not a purely aesthetically driven application, but a design tool used to help the space function structurally and to reinforce the McQueen brand. It not only functions as a small-scale retail environment but also develops an experience that reinforces the brand, sparking user interest in the realm of high fashion design.


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AREA FOR RECOVERY ELIZA BOBER + MICHELLE BRIGHT Jason Sowell / Comprehensive Landscape / Spring 2012

Across cultures, funeral customs and disposition practices can vary immensely, yet the act of mourning and grieving is a universal experience. Thus, the cemetery thus can act as a mediating space that encourages healthy recovery from grief through its form and material. The design proposal investigates this relationship and applies it to a 1,500-acre site just outside of Bastrop, Texas, where the landscape itself is recovering from the 2011 wildfires. The site is designed as an Area for Recovery by addressing four tasks of healthy grieving and articulating these tasks onto the site at different scales. Ranging from the material and maker to the funeral procession and plot disposition layout, each layer of the site is considered with respect to healthy recovery from a loss or disaster. The final task results in a deeper reinvestment in the deceased and the landscape on which we all depend.


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TAKING ROOT RACHEL BULLOCK + KAZIAH HAVILAND Matt Fajkus / Technical Communications / Spring 2012

The building is located in the Fauborg Marigny neighborhood of New Orleans, a quirky and unconventional neighborhood that is a mixed-use zone and a premier destination for jazz clubs. The building form is a response to the shift in the city grid that occurs in the Marigny Triangle, where the grid of the French Quarter morphs into that of the eastern neighborhoods. The neighborhood typology of the courtyard is adapted to create a garden that is not fully enclosed, but instead opens to the residential neighborhood to encourage community integration and encourage a transparency of process and visual learning. The culinary school program is arranged into three areas: a kitchen wing, a school wing, and a reveal between that allows for public access. On the public face, the bakeshop anchors the corner on the ground floor, allowing access from both Frenchman and greater Marigny. In order to take advantage of the rising interest in local food initiatives in New Orleans, we created a culinary school that will focus on whole-cycle learning—from cultivation through consumption. The garden and its relationship to the other programmatic elements make this process visible. The structural properties of steel allowed for an optimization of the relationships between garden, school, and public space. Elevating the central garden opens up the community space below and creates direct connections to the second floor kitchens. Teaching kitchens are the central feature of the building. Large rigid steel frames on the east side of the kitchen wing allow for a large window wall with sliding doors so that the classrooms spill out into the garden. The remainder of the program is unified under a galvanized steel mesh that is wrapped into the exposed steel structure and modulates the Louisiana sun. A flex-kitchen creates a multifunction space for food distribution, community classes, student experimentation, pop-up, restaurants, or events.


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STRIATED GENERATION AMANDA KRONK Peter Raab + Sarah Gamble / Vertical / Spring 2012

In striating the land, and following the coursing of natural systems, an artificial topography is generated. Each striated series of contours becomes a programmed layer; collectively, these layers are sliced by a perforated fragment to join the hard, infrastructural edge of the street to the soft, natural edge of the creek. Each layer begins to dematerialize along the descent to the creek, allowing for an exposed mediated edge of occupation. This, in turn, regenerates the creek edge. Restricted access is provided to the training and fitness rooms and changing facilities (the training layer). The artificial CrossFit roof deck, however, is permanently accessible through its connection to the hike and bike trail. Restricted access is provided to the entry lobby, open exercise area, and supporting spaces (the open layer). The stretch deck is primarily accessed through this layer; however, it also may be accessed from the exterior. Permanent access is provided to the cafe and terrace to operate independently (the public layer). The creek edge is opened here to allow for a soup kitchen for the homeless to access from multiple nodes. The materiality reinforces the hardened condition facing the urban edge with a limestone assembly. This condition slowly begins to break down, both structurally and visually, throughout the transition to the softened creek edge. A thick fitness-training roof deck extends from the limestone assembly, disintegrating into a cross-braced curtain wall and then into a vegetated screen wall, which acts as a filter of light to transform the subsequent layers both diurnally and seasonally.


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ZEN MEDITATION CENTER DREW WILSON Michael Benedikt / Vertical / Spring 2012

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is a public botanical garden and research unit of The University of Texas at Austin. The Wildflower Center was chosen as the location for this project, a Zen meditation center, because of its serene quality and natural beauty, which aid in the practice of meditation. The site selected within the Wildflower Center is accessible to visitors, but is in an area of the Wildflower Center that has not been managed or developed and is unlikely to see many pedestrians. The Meditation Center includes a meeting hall, cafeteria, guest rooms, apartments for staff, and a zendo for the practice of meditation. The form of the Meditation Center is long and thin, which emphasizes the horizontality of the site. The grouping of buildings is on a plinth that is flush with the ground at the entrance and remains level as the landscape slopes away towards the rear. The primary objective of the design was to create a clearly defined boundary without making a complete enclosure. The entrance is through a large slot opening in a gabion wall, which is offset by another wall. The boundary at the rear of the site is created by a plinth, which provides visitors visual access to the Wildflower Center but prevents physical access. Because of its calming qualities, water was a central feature of the design. A large reflecting pond divides the program of the Meditation center into three distinct zones—residential, public, and meditation. The zendo, where group meditation is practiced, is the focal point of the center and is placed in the middle of the reflecting pond to emphasize this. Water is also used to create a boundary around the zendo in order to minimize distraction for the meditators. The Meditation Center is joined together as a whole with a thin, lightweight saw-toothed roof structure that shades the buildings but also allows indirect light to enter the interior.


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[RE]OCCUPY NEW ORLEANS TRAVIS AVERY, TRAVIS COOK, LAINE HARDY + TRAVIS RITCHIE Derek Dellekamp / Advanced / Spring 2012

Imagine reappropriating a massive naval base on the east bank of the Mississippi River; connecting it to a vibrant cultural promenade; opening it to the public; and reoccupying it with emerging businesses, an innovative school, a regional research center, community services, bars, restaurants, open space for recreation and a public, rooftop pool. For one hundred years, NSA New Orleans has been the property of the US Department of Defense and inaccessible to the neighborhood, community, and city. Now it is the largest public amenity in the city, with massive potential and an incredible view. The site is now open for public occupation with a school and economic engine that redefines the relationships between public and private, creativity and industry. Research, education, innovation, community, ecology, and economy converge—promoting new urban relationships and allowing local culture to adapt and expand. This project is a confluence of people, place, and ideas—a new destination on the cultural and riverfront promenade of New Orleans. Returning the Mississippi Riverfront to the public realm, this collective cultural asset reimagines and redefines city life. This new, dynamic civic space forms a symbiotic loop that sustains both the economy and culture of New Orleans over time. Rather than simply prescribing solutions, this project seeks to construct a network of spatial relationships which the community can appropriate dynamically as they see fit. The three massive military warehouses on site are opened up to light and occupation through a series of atria and large spaces. These new spaces form exciting locations for people to come together and explore the buildings while also providing ample interior daylight and fluid access through the site. Drawing on local shipbuilding industry, locally manufactured steel trusses are used to transform the buildings while making a nod to the existing architecture. Collectively, we have the power to define our cultural identity, shape our economic reality, and live as a part of a dynamic, resilient system. This is the new confluence of the city, and the city is yours.


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THE KINETIC KNOT PROJECT CHAD BUNNELL Larry Doll / Vertical / Spring 2012

Engaging the kinetic experiences of the Seaholm industrial district, the Knot Project questions the opportunities found within a live-work facility. The project’s design merges two contradictory programs, residential housing and a materials recovery facility, and integrates them by weaving and knotting experiential spaces. The project has three elements: the residential program, the industrial program, and the separation structure. This separation structure shapes the spaces that the residential and industrial programs occupy. It creates isolation and protection with connection and integration between the programs and their experiential qualities. The function of the industry drives the internal form, and only in certain moments does it show itself to the outside world. The residential program tightly wraps around the industrial program and follows a continuous experiential transect, creating a trajectory of outdoor and indoor spaces. This trajectory offers panoramic views of downtown Austin and becomes an extension of the Shoal Creek trail. The building leaves one with a sense of experiential confusion by knotting the two opposing programs. The user can walk through the void, experiencing the crunch of gravel beneath, the textured concrete formwork beside him/her, the filtering of light from above, while the sound of shattering glass being processed isolates him/her from the surrounding city.


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COASTAL RESILIENCE YOKO SHIMAJUKO Coleman Coker / Advanced / Spring 2012

This project focuses on stabilizing coastal edges by using sea grass, a critical component of our ecosystem, as the catalyst for the growth of natural habitats in Laguna Madre. To mitigate sea grass loss, oyster reef prototypes are introduced into the program. These oyster reef prototypes help dissipate wave energy, thereby reducing turbidity and increasing water clarity, which in turn decreases light attenuation. These reefs will be propagated throughout the coastline to help stabilize sea grass habitats and attract fish, oysters, and crustacean, as well as a variety of bird species, which will enhance this ecosystem. Supplemental infrastructure will also be implemented throughout the site in order to bring awareness to the importance of these natural systems. Recycled shipping containers are used as a prototype for visitor centers and kayak and fishing rentals. Several kayak launches, which lead directly to the sea grass habitat, are provided throughout the site so that kayakers can explore these natural habitats. Surrounding the sea grass habitat are the oyster reef prototypes connected to decks, which provide opportunities for rest throughout the Laguna. They also connect with the existing fishing bridge, becoming moments of access between water and land.


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AUSTIN REUSE CENTER ANNA KATSIOS + ALISON STEELE Matt Fajkus / Vertical / Fall 2012

Inspired by Austin’s plan for Zero Waste by 2040, our design intent was to create a community center that would help facilitate this goal. We chose to concentrate our efforts on educating the community about reusing and repurposing materials. Recycling minimizes waste and reduces pressure on limited natural resources; however, it’s not enough. 95 percent of a product’s environmental impact happens before it is ever placed on the shelf, and not all products are designed in a way that make recycling possible. We are in need of a paradigm shift that values thrift and resourcefulness over newness. We need to demand products from a closed loop production system, and refuse to support companies that do not adhere to these values. The Austin Reuse Center will function as a community center to address these issues. Fundamental to the center is the idea of collective reuse and repurposing of materials, ranging in scale from craft items to building materials. These materials can be stored and transformed within one building, demonstrating the process of reuse to visitors, as well as allowing the public to be involved in to process. By dedicating spaces for storage, education, display, and creation, the Reuse Center will be a hub for a wide range of society. The materials can be used in children’s crafts, for designers, and for residents of Austin who would like to access workshop spaces, but it can also be used as a testing facility for disaster relief efforts. Based off the adage “Give a man a fish and he eats for a day, but teach a man to fish and he can feed himself for life,” creating a place to teach and educate the public on working with materials and making objects can have a lasting effect on the community.


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GALVESTON MARITIME COLLECTION MICHAEL BEENE Adam Pyrek / Technical Communications / Fall 2012

This project is inspired by a premodern understanding of the sea. Before ocean cruises were a regular form of recreation, before cargo ships and oil rigs were a common sight, and before technology allowed for an accurate mapping of ocean behavior, the ocean was a mysterious and often terrifying entity. The history of maritime technology traces our endeavors to understand, explore, and capitalize on the sea. This design for a maritime museum in Galveston, Texas, seeks to embody the essence of early conceptions of the sea through its spatial structuring and physical construction. An algorithmic approach to the museum’s layout and form was used to construct a building that is unpredictable and ambiguous upon first glance. As visitors enter the museum and circulate through its spaces, its logic never becomes completely apparent and one’s sense of navigation is lost to an unpredictable sequence of spaces and adjacencies. The building is clad in an undulating brick attached to a steel frame and oscillates between references to ship building and the high-Victorian architecture of downtown Galveston. Its dark and massive appearance is intended to build mystery, just as Caspar David Friedrich’s monk might have experienced during his lonely night on a dark shore.


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NORTH BROTHER ISLAND IAN ELLIS + FRANCES PETERSON David Heymann + Hope Hasbrouck / Advanced / Fall 2012

This project is a proposal for an inclusionary learning school for autistic children on North Brother Island, an abandoned medical facility in New York’s East River. Due to its seclusion and over fifty years of natural decay and growth, North Brother became the home for many colonial water birds. The work here aims to provide a necessary resource for the Bronx, which is heavily underserved in terms of schools for children with autism spectrum disorder, to help dissolve the negative stigma of the island, stabilize its naturalized growth as habitat for the birds, and introduce research and education programs to provide a cutting edge learning environment for the public, parents, and children. The school is situated in the center of the island, taking advantage of the high ground and avoiding the historical nesting areas along the eastern and southern shores. As well as restoring five of the islands existing buildings for reuse by the school, the structures further south toward the habitat are reused as field offices for the New York City Parks Department, Cornell University Department of Ornithology, and the Audubon Society, with four structures left to decay naturally into the bird habitat. The school consists of three classrooms looking out onto three unique courtyards, designed to respond to the specific needs of students with varying disorders along the autism spectrum. The classrooms are identical for ease of construction, yet the structural roof and gardens provide the variably systematic environment that benefits educators as well as students. Winding paths entice visitors to explore the island without disturbing the children or native birds. Open park spaces create meeting areas between public, school, and research functions. The seemingly contradictory programs and occupants here actually serve each other through their mutual need for isolation, vegetation, and research.


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KARU-SA MARIA GARZA Michael Benedikt / Advanced / Fall 2012

Located on Town Lake, the Seaholm Intake building is one of the only buildings found on the site. It has an iconic presence in Austin, and the project implies its refurbishment rather than demolition. During the design process, it was essential to maintain the beauty and character of the existing building, while simultaneously activating the space through the incorporation of a hibachi restaurant. Trying to maintain a light touch on the existing building, demolition is minimized as the building is enhanced through clean, sleek additions. Fabric adds softer qualities to the space and stands in contrast to the existing rough texture of the building, while also enhancing its given character. A red glass passageway is used to guide the users down the stairs and into a darker space. In this way, the existing condition of lightness on the upper floor and the darkness on the lower floor is amplified.


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ALIEN POD ISABELLE ATKINSON, JOHN BODKIN, LEO CABALLERO, DARREN CATTLE, SAM CIGARROA, CLIFTON HARNESS, ELIZABETH LE BLANC, THANH LY, JENNIFER STEIN, MICHAEL STOLLE, DAVID THOMPSON, JAMES THOREEN, CINDY TO + DANNY VALLES Clay Shortall / Design V / Fall 2012

Clay Shortall’s Design V Studio focused on designing a BMX/skate park and realized a rationalized portion of the entire project with the 5 Axis LLC and OMAG BLADE 5 Generation 3 5-Axis CNC router. From this investigation, the question arose: What happens when technical aspects of digital fabrication technology merge with the creative mind? Our studio has mastered the hybrid in a project called Alien Pod. The 5-Axis router is a CNC tool used to mill the final model out of a 390-pound block of limestone. Its ability to cut stone into the smooth shape that retains the idea of movement of a skater is what makes the router vital in this specific project. Various digital technologies were employed to fabricate the Alien Pod. The process from design to fabrication for the piece required an advanced understanding of form-making with 3-D modeling programs, such as Rhino3d and 3DS Max. After prototyping the model with the Makerbot Replicator 2 and other 3-D printers, the final piece was milled down to a 2.5' x 3' x 1' model. The design process began with each student using a word to drive his/her project throughout its development. As individual visions became more refined, the studio created a final model that showcased their holistic understanding of the capabilities of the digital fabrication technology. The collective goal was to create one unique piece that has a flowing surface to accommodate the movement of the skater or biker and that can be replicated and nested into itself to create continuity. The result of this replication process introduces a “kit of parts” methodology into the design process, which is the process of organizing individual forms and arranging them into one flexible system and produces an unbroken form conducive to skater/BMX movement. Special thanks to Will Meredith.


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CÓRDOBA BRICK HOUSE RACHEL BULLOCK, SOPHIA MONAHON + SELINA ORTIZ Wilfried Wang / Advanced / Fall 2012

The northern part of downtown Córdoba is semiindustrial, with many surface parking lots and warehouse buildings. Revitalization of this area would provide ample opportunities for densification in the downtown area. Working in a team of three, we developed an urban strategy for the infill of this area, which sought to avoid homogeneity or displacement while allowing for organic growth and an increase in green space. We created a series of rules to guide development in the area. Any units added were to be flexible in terms of program, and each building was to be designed predominately with brick. Using these parameters, we then designed prototypical units for three different lot conditions, which were then applied to solutions for three specific lots. The urban design strategy defined a framework for the incremental transformation of the neighborhood through the insertion of new buildings in available lots. The objective was to introduce semiprivate green spaces and pedestrian streets to allow for more street frontage, while preserving historic and higher density buildings. The team developed a generic mixed-use typology for insertion into available lots of varying sizes. The typology, which was adapted by each designer for specific lot sizes, was defined by a shared reinforced brick structural system, a pedestrian arcade, and quotas for open space. This strategy allowed for greater specificity and a range of façade articulation. A building typology was designed to be compatible with a deep 6m, 12m+ lot and a shallow 12m+ lot. The driving objectives for the generic design were to maximize the availability of light, access to patio spaces, and create buffers from the street. Just as the urban strategy provides an armature for future development, the structural system provides an armature that can be modified vertically and horizontally through the introduction or removal of infill walls.


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POETICS OF BUILDING ELIZABETH DE REGT, LAURA EDWARDS, WILSON HACK, JENA HAMMOND, JON HANDZO, JACKIE HENSY, JESSICA PAINTER, MOLLY PURNELL, DAVID SCHNEIDER, GREG STREET + TRISTAN WALKER Coleman Coker / Advanced / Fall 2012

At the outer edge of the South Texas Botanical Gardens, an architectural intervention attempts to connect the environmental conditions of this harsh landscape: creek, wetland, marsh, and meadow. The project continues the language of a series of wayfinders that exist on the site, leading the patron from the main facilities to this untamed edge. The intervention is a simple move in the landscape; it is comprised of the wayfinding wall, a walking platform, stadium seats and steps, a second wayfinding wall in the marsh, and a viewing bench. The steps are marked by the water levels in the wetland as rain and flooding pass water through the area. To reach the second wall and the bench, the patron must pass through the wetland. After this journey, the patron is rewarded with bucolic views to the creek and a prime spot from which to observe the seasonal bird flights above.


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FLEX DRESS ROSE WILKOWSKI Lois Weinthal / Advanced / Fall 2012

The project goal was to create a closely fitting second skin for the body, within the realm of clothing, where a rigid material is fitted to the body. That material is then cut where the most movement is needed, and an extremely flexible material is added underneath to allow for the rigid pieces to shift. The pattern made by the cuts identifies pivot points of the body. This combination of materials allows for the body to regain its range of motion. As the layer closest to the body, the flexible material is only revealed when the body changes from a relaxed, standing position. The recognized and accepted form of a typical dress defines the extent of the garment. This concept evolved from two previous projects: the Excess Dress and the Plaster Arm. While the Excess Dress becomes an accurate map of the body working from the outside in, the Plaster Arm is a true map of the body on the inside and becomes less accurate with each added layer of plaster gauze. The Flex Dress is an attempt to use the layering principles explored in the Plaster Arm as well as the concept of highlighting areas of manipulation found in the Excess Dress to make a garment that is more consistently an accurate map of the human body. The rigid felt serves as a map when the body takes a standing, neutral position. The flexible spandex allows the pieces of felt to move, creating an adaptable map that can accommodate any position. By choosing a contrasting color for the flexible material, the areas of the body that manipulate the original felt map the most are emphasized when the body is in motion.


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PROXY NO. 13 KANIETRA DIAWAKU, BEN HAMILTON, TOHEED KHAWAJA, ANA LOZANO, JACK LOZANO, NICOLE MARKIM, HAI NGUYEN, CATALINA PADILLA, JULIA PARK, RODOLFO RODRIGUEZ, NATHAN SHEPPARD, JOHN STUMP + CHRIS WINKLER Michael Leighton Beaman / Design V / F2012

The Design V studio focuses on design research as it relates to architecture: its practice, theory, history, methodologies, technologies, and culture. Entitled Proxy No. 13, the agenda for this studio was to explore each of these issues in a singular design framework. The Proxy series is an approach to design research that places equal weight on concepts and constructions. The Proxy Series began in 2007 as a set of process-based projects focused on the exploration of emerging technologies as both the material and methodological basis of design. Proxies are constructions that examine the nature of architectural design, production, and theory as a manifestation of programming, processes, procedures, manufacturing, and assembly. Each project investigates a discrete set of architectural issues spanning all five of these categories, but is allowed the freedom to pursue nonarchitectural solutions. No. 13 is funded, designed, manufactured, and assembled by beta-field, a design and research office, and architecture students from The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture. To form an operative framework, the studio was broken up into seven concept transitions (Rationalization/Operation, Operation/Strategy, Strategy/Object, Object/System, System/Iteration, Iteration/Instance, Instance/Output) and four phases (Rationalization, System Generation, FormalizationNormalization, and Realization). In these four phases, students were asked to work individually, in groups, and as a single class. The studio explored the use of parametric modeling, manufacturing, and assembly methods, while examining the history and theoretical underpinnings of computation and computationally based design strategies. The course culminated in a site-specific installation in Houston and Austin, Texas. The project was designed for 4411 Montrose, a collection of galleries (Barbara Davis Gallery, Anya Tish Gallery, Wade Wilson Art, Zoya Tommy Contemporary) in Houston, Texas, and was subsequently on display in Goldsmith Hall at UT Austin.


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A STRETCH OF WALLER CREEK DANUTA DIAS, SARA FALLAHI, LIANG LU + BAILEY RANKIN Allan Shearer / Landscape / Fall 2012

The primary design challenge of this project was to reimagine the Waller Creek Corridor on The University of Texas at Austin campus. This presented a unique opportunity to introduce a new type of corridor to the campus that would redefine Waller Creek as the baseline around which this campus is traveled and experienced. The project investigation began by looking at the existing corridor network on campus and resulted in identifying the campus as a series of lines and limits. This series of lines consisted of the thread (the corridor), which spans the length of campus, ties into the existing corridor network, and has the potential to collect, connect, and direct movement and development in and around the campus and the city corridor; the trace (the banks) that defines the riparian edge, and thickens and thins on the surface creating the space that allows activity to happen; and the crack (the creek), which divides the campus into two distinct parts. The limits of the corridor were defined not only by physical boundaries but also by social potential. The studio was also asked to address three objectives: to engage the creek, to enhance the environment, and to improve access. The four sites along this new baseline—the Knot, Bend, Loop, and Turn—were chosen based on their potential to extend the currently neglected creek into existing buildings, vegetated areas, and the transportation network. Each site accommodates future development along the creek by providing activity spaces, shaded pathways, and expanded sidewalks. These future developments include the new complex for the Cockrell School of Engineering, a light rail route along San Jacinto Street, and a visitor center for prospective students at the southern end of the creek corridor.


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RED BLUFF CIRCUIT JOHN CUNNINGHAM Ulrich Dangel / Vertical / Fall 2012

The Red Bluff Circuit is a live-work development that derives its organization and spatial articulation from three distinct assertions: not all creative people work in the same environment, live-work is a call to economization, and large developments must take environmental responsibility for their existence. Divided into three separate conditions, the massing is based around different live-work organizations. The Hermitage provides each resident with his/her own workspace; the Collaborative offers smaller living spaces and a large common work space; and the Cooperative accommodates those interested in communal living. These cooperatives are responsible for maintaining all of the site’s off-grid utilities, which include water reclamation, bio-digestion, composting, agriculture, and promotion. Each unit consists of at least one off-site fabricated module that is inserted via crane into a masonry wall and core structural grid. The modules rest on large steel angles embedded within the masonry walls and can be removed for renovation, repair, or replacement.


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AIRPORT BOULEVARD COLOSSEUM CLIFTON HARNESS Judy Birdsong / Design IV / Spring 2012

The future of Airport Boulevard in Austin, Texas, has unlimited possibilities. Located along IH-35, the building functions as a sound barrier between the highway and the rest of the site. Rising from the middle of the site, the building slowly ramps up to an elevation one hundred feet above the ground plane for spectacular views of downtown Austin. The design respects the existing neighborhood by hugging the perimeter of the site and never exceeding forty feet in height in areas adjacent to the neighborhood. The roof of the building creates a pedestrian path with a leisurely 5 percent slope that provides continuity between the north and south ends and, because of its elevation, increases access to views for pedestrians. Single-loaded, open air corridors rise to eight floors in the south and four floors in the north, allowing for greater density, light, and breezes. A light-up automated parking garage acts as an anchor and billboard for the entire road, while addressing the practical need for vehicle parking.


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MARITIME MUSEUM OF GALVESTON JUNE JUNG + YOUNG MIN PARK Adam Pyrek / Technical Communications / Fall 2012

The new building for the Maritime Museum will serve not just as an icon for Galveston but for the whole of the Gulf of Mexico. The design employs controlled daylighting by means of vertical voids throughout, which results in increased user comfort and provides visual access to the surrounding landscape. The faรงade utilizes vertical windows and other elements found within other buildings along the Strand in order to create a rhythmic balance and cohesion with its immediate context. The design provides public amenities, which serve as civic spaces that relate to the programmatic functions of restoration, exhibition, education, and preservation. The restoration room is closely connected with the preservation rooms, display rooms, and admission space. This connection allows visitors to witness the entire restoration process with the intention of increasing the volunteer and donor base.


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CACTUS + SUCCULENT COLLECTION ANDRÉS FELIPE CALDERÓN Danelle Briscoe / Vertical / Fall 2012

Enchantment is part of everyday life, a state of open­ness to the disturbing-captivating elements in everyday experience. This idea, discussed by Jane Bennett in The Enchantment of Modern Life, was the basis for the design of a cactus and succu­lent conservatory and research center in the Zilker Botan­ ical Garden. In this proposal, the idea of enchant­ment, as a happenstance, an act of nature, is contrasted with the notion of built enchantment, the artifice. The studio used enchantment as a vehicle for wonder. In this project, wonder is driven by the visitor’s experience of the building and its collection, which celebrates the artifice-nature dichotomy. In the special exhibition room, a selective group of exotic/ endangered cacti and succulents is displayed. Tapered glass prisms are extruded from the ceiling and hold them in their isolated microcosm. The plants are treated as jewels, a symbol of their value and fragility. The formal concept of the project is generated from the way in which the building interacts with the landscape. This interaction creates moments of tension and relief between the built and the natural environment. The building meanders on the site, negotiating its presence on the landscape, while the slightly sloping site is an opportunity to accentuate their differences. The sloping ground becomes a sod roof; the natural landscape is transformed into an artificial one. The collection was divided thematically in two green­ houses: cacti and succulents. Each greenhouse, towering sixty feet high, punctures through the sod roof, emerging like a glass spectacle from the artificial landscape. The towers have both a sculptural presence and performative function. The height allows for the passive ventilation of the greenhouses through the creation of a heat-stack effect, conducting hot air up and out through the top. The visitor areas are separated from the administrative and research areas by a small courtyard, which also serves as a transitional space between greenhouses.


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INDEX Allinder, Nicolas 38–41 Atkinson, Isabelle 108–111 Avery, Travis 74–77 Beene, Michael 92–97 Benner, Sophia 31 Blessing, Shelby 54–57 Blocksidge, Jeffrey 24 Bober, Eliza 60–61 Bodkin, John 108–111 Bright, Michelle 60–61 Brigmon, Nathan 30 Bryan, Conner 36 Bullock, Rachel 36, 62–67, 112–115 Bunnell, Chad 78–83 Caballero, Leo 108–111 Calderón, Andrés Felipe 140–141 Calhoun, Ana 34 Campbell, Brandon 34 Carballo, Carlos 12 Carrillo, Julio 31 Cataldo, Melissa 42–43 Cattle, Darren 108–111 Cavender, Brooks 14, 15 Cigarroa, Sam 108–111 Clifton, Matt 30 Cook, Travis 74–77 Cooper, Brittany 36 Cunningham, John 130–133 Dahl, Madison 17 Dezinski, Jenna 24 Dávila, Tania 30 De Regt, Elizabeth 32, 116–119 Dias, Danuta 29, 126–129 Diawaku, Kanietra 122–125 Díaz, Omar 30 Die, Rachael 30 Doherty, Brian 27 Durden, Teri 31 Edelen, Claire 21, 33 Edwards, Laura 32, 116–119 Ellis, Ian 98–103 Engoian, Kyle 19, 25 Fallahi, Sara 29, 126–129 Fielder, Garland 4, 26 Garcia-Castrillo, Hector 23 Garza, Maria 104–107

Genova, Jared 30 Gleason, Karl 27 Glenn, Travis 28, 29 Glennie, Jessica 15 Green, Andrew 26 Hack, Wilson 116–119 Halter, Alan 31 Hamilton, Ben 122–125 Hammond, Jena 32, 116–119 Handzo, Jon 18, 116–119 Hardy, Laine 74–77 Harness, Clifton 12, 108–111, 134–135 Haviland, Kaziah 62–67 Hensy, Jackie 116–119 Herman, Will 36 Johnston, Thomas 20 Joslin, Reid 15 Jung, June 136–139 Katsios, Anna 88–91 Khawaja, Toheed 122–125 Kinsey, Kevin 27 Kraus, Cameron 22 Kronk, Amanda 68–69 Lam, Eric 36 Le Blanc, Elizabeth 13, 108–111 Lew, Eden 32 Lewis, Charlton 5 Liu, Siqi 23 Lozano, Ana 122–125 Lozano, Jack 122–125 Lu, Liang 29, 126–129 Ly, Thanh 108–111 Markim, Nicole 122–125 Mautz, Jon 25 McCord, Jeffrey 36 McCourt, Lily 14, 58–59 McDavid, Shelley 21 McGiffin, Cheryl 9, 10 Mills, Jessica 34 Monahon, Sophia 112–115 Morris, Benjamin 19 Mowry, Megan 25 Nahavandi, Aynaz 31 Nguyen, Hai 122–125 Olivent, Kristina 33 Ortiz, Selina 112–115


Padilla, Catalina 122–125 Painter, Jessica 116–119 Palone, Annie 29 Park, Julia 122–125 Park, Young Min 136–139 Peterson, Frances 98–103 Purnell, Molly 116–119 Ramirez, Natalie 32 Rankin, Bailey 29, 126–129 Reid, Allison 24 Rizzo, Rosario 30 Ritchie, Travis 74–77 Rodriguez, Rodolfo 122–125 Rojas, Danielle 30 Rosenbarger, Beth 30 Schneider, David 116–119 Schneider, Travis 9 Schwarze, Samantha Whitney 44–49 Sertzen, Pamela 30 Sheppard, Nathan 122–125 Shimajuko, Yoko 84–87 Spencer, Johanna 17 Steele, Alison 88–91 Stein, Jennifer 108–111 Steinlage, Michael 28 Steshyn, Nicholas 18, 27 Stolle, Michael 108–111 Stoos, Allison 33 Street, Greg 116–119 Stump, John 122–125 Sullivan, Kevin 28, 29 Thompson, David 108–111 Thoreen, James 108–111 To, Cindy 108–111 Valles, Danny 108–111 Vela, Benjamin 11 Vogl, Lauren 44–49 Walker, Tristan 116–119 Warr, Alex 8, 10, 11 Wilkowski, Rose 120–121 Wilson, Drew 33, 70–73 Winkler, Chris 122–125 Wu, Amy 16 Wu, Hanyen 35 Zarowitz, Jessica 29 Ziemann, Jeffrey 50–53


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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ISSUE: is an annual student-run publication featuring graduate and undergraduate work at The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture. Its intent is to foster interaction and the interchange of ideas among students, as well as to record the intellectual activities of the school. We would like to recognize the following faculty members who have generously contributed funds from their endowments toward the publication of ISSUE: 009. Without them, the publication of this book would not have been possible. Thank you. FREDERICK STEINER Dean, School of Architecture Henry M. Rockwell Chair in Architecture

KEVIN ALTER Sid W. Richardson Centennial Professor in Architecture Director, UTSOA Summer Academy in Architecture

MICHAEL BENEDIKT Hal Box Endowed Chair in Urbanism Director, Center for American Architecture and Design

COLEMAN COKER Ruth Carter Stevenson Regents Chair in the Art of Architecture

ELIZABETH DANZE Paul Philippe Cret Centennial Teaching Fellow in Architecture Director, Professional Residency Program

DAVID HEYMANN Harwell Hamilton Harris Regents Professor in Architecture

BARBARA HOIDN O’Neil Ford Centennial Chair in Architecture

LAWRENCE SPECK W.L. Moody, Jr. Centennial Professor in Architecture Lawrence W. Speck Excellence Fund

WILFRIED WANG O’Neil Ford Centennial Chair in Architecture

NICHOLE WIEDEMANN Meadows Foundation Centennial Fellow in Architecture

UTSOA ADVISORY COUNCIL AND FRIENDS OF ARCHITECTURE


FROM THE EDITORS Nine years ago, ISSUE was started by a small group of graduate students to record and showcase each other’s work. It started off informally, but quickly expanded and established itself as an important record of student activities in the UTSOA. It is distributed to students and faculty free of charge, and its statement of intent “to foster interaction and the interchange of ideas among students as well as to record the intellectual activities of the UTSOA” remains mostly unchanged since its inception. At this point, ISSUE is still run entirely by students and is comprised of submitted student work. The editorial board changes over every year, and this constant renewal is an opportunity for selfreflection and growth. This year, we have separated the book into two parts: studio pages and individual projects. The studio pages present every studio that was offered in 2012, including undergraduate, graduate, landscape, interior, community and regional planning, and urban design studios. It also includes other seminars that operate similar to studios, such as: prototyping, wood design, and Public Interest Design. After the studio pages, we present 27 individual projects, which a curatorial group of students have decided represent the best student work of the past year.

ISSUE: 009 issue.publication@gmail.com http://soa.utexas.edu/publications/issue http://www.theissuecollective.com School of Architecture The University of Texas at Austin


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ISSUE:009  

Editors EMILY EWBANK BENJAMIN MORRIS MONICA SANGA SUNNY SCHNEBERGER

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