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SCHOOL OF THE ENVIRONMENT

2019-2020


Art by Patricia Kambitsch

Our goal at the School of the Environment is to create and interpret knowledge on environmental issues through outstanding academic programs, and to provide students with the skills, knowledge, and experience necessary to make a substantive difference in the world. We are focused on creating new knowledge, training future leaders, engaging and forging partnerships with the wider community, and contributing to positive environmental and social change from the local to the global scale. The School acts as a hub for researchers and students from many different disciplines spanning the social sciences, natural sciences, and humanities, bringing together many different perspectives to bear on today’s pressing environmental challenges. Our faculty and instructors are a diverse community collaborating across departments, schools, and faculties at the University of Toronto and beyond.

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DIRECTOR'S MESSAGE When we work together, humanity is capable of great things. Rather than despair at the state of the world, our challenge is to rise up together and build a sustainable society, one that respects the land we live on, and the environment we share. In the process, we will need to transform almost every aspect of modern life, to end the reliance on fossil fuels, restore our wildernesses, and learn to live within the constraints of a finite planet. That journey begins with understanding. At the School of the Environment, our role is often to be knowledge translators—providing the knowledge needed for governments, communities, and corporations to make informed decisions, and linking the latest research on the state of the environment to the broader cultural, ethical and religious viewpoints by which we interpret our collective responsibility to future generations.  I hope this book will inspire you to join us on the journey, and to explore where your degree can take you. Professor Steve Easterbrook, Director, School of the Environment. Steve Easterbrook Director, School of the Environment

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OUR STUDENTS Laura Curran, fourth year

Majors in Environmental Science and Forest Conservation, Minor in Environmental Studies. "In second year, I joined the Environmental Students' Union (ENSU) and have remained on it ever since in various roles. ENSU has been a great way for me to make friends and to help foster community in the School. I was also part of the UofT BEES club, which bee-keeps on campus. This was very complementary to my environmental studies, and super fun! I would recommend students join a club or two so they can enjoy school in more ways than just classes."

Phebe CHow, fourth year

Specialist in Environmental Geography, Major in Environmental Studies, Minor in GIS. "First-year seminars are small classes that study very interesting and specific topics such as Debating & Understanding Current Environmental Issues and Psychology of Advertising. They really allowed me to engage with my professors and classmates in deep discussions, as well as work on more hands-on projects."

Grace King, fourth year

Specialist in Psychology, Major in Environmental Science, Minor in Environmental Behaviour.

"Thanks to the flexibility of the Environmental Studies major program at the School of the Environment, I could approach environmental issues from their intersections with the experiences of race, gender, sexuality, faith, and more."

"I chose to study in the School of the Environment because I have been an avid environmentalist since a very young age and wanted to learn more about the environment so as to figure out how I can make a difference for our planet in the future. I have absolutely no regrets!"

Major in Environmental Studies and English.

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Jaden Phillips, fourth year


STUDENT GROUPS EnvironmentaLÂ Students' Union - ENSU

ENSU exists to represent School of the Environment students to the University’s administrations. They also conduct a mentorship program for first and second year students. The union has a mandate to create and support initiatives that strive to increase sustainability and environmental awareness at the University of Toronto. This includes direct action through events, as well as education through collaboration with other organizations.

Graduate Environmental students' association - GESA

GESA represents graduate students enrolled in the School of the Environment Graduate Collaborative Specializations. They organize social and academic events to bring to light relevant environmental issues in an informal setting, to foster collaborative dialogue on a range of topics, and to liaise with other environmental groups on campus.

University of toronto environmental action - utea

UTEA works to raise awareness about pressing environmental issues (e.g. Indigenous water rights, sustainable energy, climate change) and advocates for more effective government policies to address these issues at the federal, provincial, and municipal levels. They also advocate for more sustainable campus policies at the University of Toronto. UTEA members at a climate protest. Other environmental student groups include: BikeChain, the Green Chemistry Initiative, Leap U of T, Veg Club, U of T B.E.E.S., Jane Goodall's Roots and Shoots, and more.

University of Toronto's environmental resource network - utern UTERN is a levy organization that provides funding and acts as a networking hub for any person, group or club within the university community interested in sustainability and environmentalism on campus.

Visit https://ulife.utoronto.ca/organizations for a full list.

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PROGRAM OVERVIEW CORE PROGRAMS

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

ENVIRONMENTAL Studies

Major: This core interdisciplinary BSc program can be taken with another BSc major or specialist such as Chemistry, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Physics, or Environment & Earth Systems. Add a minor in Environmental Studies to achieve a basic understanding of the social, political, policy, and ethical aspects of environment and sustainability.

Major: This core interdisciplinary BA program can be taken with a complementary BA program (e.g. Political Science, Philosophy, Economics, Forestry Conservation, Geography) or BSc program (e.g. Forestry Conservation Science, Environmental Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science). Program elective courses can focus on the sociopolitical aspects of environmental issues, on the ethical aspects, or can be a mix of both.

B.Sc. Major and Minor

Minor: This core interdisciplinary BSc minor provides a basic understanding of the emerging discipline of environmental science. It is a complement to other BSc and BA programs.

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B.A. Major and Minor

Minor: This core interdisciplinary BA minor provides a basic understanding of the social, political, policy, ethical and thought dimensions of environmental issues and how they can be addressed. The minor is a useful complement to a range of other BA and BSc programs.


Trinity One students at the Koffler Scientific Reserve at Jokers Hill, experiencing first-hand the work of conservation biologists. Photo by Prof. Michael Kessler.

Trinity one: Butterfield environment & Sustainability stream

The Margaret MacMillan Trinity One Program's Butterfield Environment & Sustainability Stream provides first year students with an excellent foundation for many of the programs offered by the School of the Environment. Students in the stream enrol in two year-long Trinity One seminar credits in their first year: TRN140: Ethics, Humans, & Nature, and TRN141: Environmental Science & Pathways to Sustainability. These seminar courses can replace the ENV221 requirement for our Environmental Studies major and minor. https://www.trinity.utoronto.ca/prospective/first-year-learning/environment.html

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PROGRAM PATHWAYS ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MAJOR

YEAR 1

Obtain a fundamental grounding in Biology (BIO120), Chemistry (CHM135 or CHM136) and Math (MAT135). Take any additional first year science courses required for a second BSc program. Consider taking a First Year Foundation (FYF) seminar course to explore an in-depth topic with one of our professors.

YEAR 2

YEAR 3

Consider taking a First Year Foundation (FYF) seminar course to explore an in depth-topic with one of our professors.

Take the required core courses – ENV221 and two from among CHM210, ENV234, PHY237/238, and ESS262. Take any elective courses that can count towards your minor and/or other programs you are taking.

Consider taking an ENV299 research opportunity course.

Consider taking an ENV299 research opportunity course.

Take the required core courses for the major – ENV316 and ENV337, as well as program electives.

Take one of the 400-level capstone courses for the major – ENV432, ENV440 (Professional Experience Course), or ENV452, as well as any remaining electives. Consider taking the ENV492 or ENV493 independent studies course.

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Obtain a fundamental grounding in Biology (BIO120), Chemistry (CHM135 or CHM136) and Math (MAT135). Take any additional first year science courses required for a second BSc program.

Take the required core courses for the major – ENV221, CHM210, ENV234, PHY237/238, and ESS262 and an introductory statistics course. Take any elective courses that can count towards your major and/or other programs you are taking.

Consider taking an ENV399 research opportunity course, and/or a Learning Abroad environmental course(s) for a summer term or a semester.

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ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Minor

Take the required core course for the minor – ENV337. Consider taking an ENV399 research opportunity course, and/or a Learning Abroad environmental course(s) for a summer term or a semester.

Take the program elective. Consider requesting one of the 400-level capstone courses – ENV432, ENV440 (Professional Experience Course), or ENV452. Also consider the ENV492 or ENV493 independent studies course.

Visit U of T's Academic Calendar to find out more information about available courses: https://fas.calendar.utoronto.ca/


ENVIRONMENTAL Studies MAJOR There are no required first year courses, but students can take ENV100 for an introduction to environmental studies. You may also take one or more of our three core program courses: ENV200, ENV221, and ENV222.

ENVIRONMENTAL Studies Minor There are no required first year courses, but students can take ENV100 for an introduction to environmental studies. You may also take one or more of our three core program courses: ENV200, ENV221, and ENV222.

TRN140 and TRN141 are a more extensive introduction to environmental studies, and are a substitute for ENV221.

TRN140 and TRN141 are a more extensive introduction to environmental studies, and are a substitute for ENV221.

Take the required core courses for the major – ENV200, ENV221, ENV222, and ENV223. Take elective courses for the major that fit with your chosen area of focus. These can also be selected to complement your other program(s), where relevant.

Take the required core courses for the minor – ENV200, ENV221, and ENV222. Take elective courses for the minor that fit with your chosen area of focus. These can be selected to complement your other program(s), where relevant.

Consider taking an ENV299 research opportunity course.

Take the required ethics & thought, and social, political, and policy courses for the program. Choose electives that fit with your chosen area of focus and/or complement your other program(s). Consider taking an ENV399 research opportunity course, and/or a Learning Abroad environmental course(s) for a summer term or a semester. Take one of the 400-level capstone courses for the major – ENV421, ENV440 (Professional Experience Course), ENV451 or ENV461 – as well as any remaining electives. Consider taking the ENV492 or ENV493 independent studies course.

YEAR 1

YEAR 2

Consider taking an ENV299 research opportunity course.

Take some electives for the minor that fit with your chosen area of focus and/or complement your other program(s).

YEAR 3

Consider taking an ENV399 research opportunity course, and/or a Learning Abroad environmental course(s) for a summer term or a semester.

Take any remaining electives.

YEAR 4

Consider requesting one of the 400-level capstone courses – ENV421, ENV440 (Professional Experience Course), ENV451 or ENV461. Also consider the ENV492 or ENV493 independent studies course.

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COLLABORATIVE PROGRAMS SPECIALIST: ENVIRONMENT AND TOXICOLOGY

These programs are offered in collaboration with other departments in the Faculty of Arts & Science, and combine the interdisciplinary focus of environment with a traditional social science, humanities, or science discipline.

MINor: Environment & Energy Jointly sponsored by the School of the Environment and the Department of Geography, this interdisciplinary program addresses the scientific, technological, environmental, and policy aspects of energy use and supply, with a focus on the reduction of environmental impacts.

MAJOR/minor: ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS

Jointly sponsored by the School of the Environment and the Department of Philosophy, these programs explore how value judgments and worldviews affect environmental decision-making.

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SPECIALIST/Major: ENVIRONMENT AND HEALTH

From air pollution and water contamination to climate change, the anthropogenic impact on our environment has significant repercussions on human health. A collaboration between the School of the Environment and Human Biology, the objective of the Environment and Health program is to provide students with instruction in fundamental biological sciences and to integrate a broad understanding of the environmental determinants of health.

In collaboration with Pharmacology & Toxicology, this interdisciplinary program spans the social, physical and life sciences. It integrates the study of the effects of chemicals not only on human health and behaviour, but on whole ecosystems. The program considers the adverse effects associated with therapeutic and environmental chemicals. It emphasizes the application of environmental toxicology and risk assessment, and prepares students for a variety of job opportunities following its completion.

Specialist: Environmental Chemistry Jointly sponsored by the School of the Environment and the Department of Chemistry, this program focuses on analytical theory, instrumentation and the methodological aspects of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, water, air and biological tissues.


MINOR: ENVIRONMENT AND BEHAVIOUR Jointly sponsored by the School of the Environment and the Department of Psychology, this program focuses on understanding issues of psychological motivation and attitudes that underlie environmental decision making. Little positive environmental change can occur in the absence of broad-based behavioural changes.

specialist: Environmental Geosciences Jointly sponsored by the School of the Environment and the Department of Earth Sciences, this program explains the interconnectedness within the Earth systems - the biosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and geosphere. It also focuses on measures and models related to groundwater and biochemical activities, and assesses the effects of human activities on our geological surroundings. Topics include earth materials, sedimentary geology, aqueous geochemistry, hydrogeology and biogeochemistry. Student retrieving samples on ENV316 field trip to Humber River.

Directed Environmental Minor Programs:

Environmental minor programs are offered by a number of departments. Three of these minors are in the sciences, and four are arts minors. These programs are intended for students interested in acquiring a hierarchical body of environmental knowledge in a specific discipline. They can also be a complement to one of the core or collaborative programs offered by the School. Environmental Anthropology (BA) Geographic Information Systems (BA) Environmental Chemistry (BSc) Physical and Environmental Geography (BSc) Environmental Economics (BA) Environmental Geography (BA) Environmental Biology (BSc)

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EXPERIENTIAL COURSES Env421 - Environmental research

In this course, senior undergraduate students work together in small groups to conduct research related to a broad environmental research theme for the class. "We developed our skills in how to conduct a literature review, develop a methodology, conduct interviews, and deliver oral presentations. The course also taught us how to work together as a group and individually, work efficiently to meet deadlines, and gave us the opportunity to work closely with Professor Yoreh in his area of expertise. All in all, ENV421 was an amazing experience that helped us to grow and learn in many ways." - Nicole Capicotto, Danielle Foppiano, Minjian Zhu

Env440 - Professional Experience Course

This course provides an opportunity for students to gain practical work experience in the environmental field through placements with organizations and agencies engaged in a wide range of issues from local to global scales. Previous placements include non-profit/charitable groups (e.g., High Park Nature Centre, Jane Goodall Institute), government agencies (e.g., City of Toronto Environment & Energy Division, Environment Canada), private sector companies (e.g, Triovest), and U of T organizations (Sustainability Office, Bike Chain).

Env461 - The U of T Campus as a Living Lab of Sustainability

This urban agriculture roof top garden was created by students in ENV461 with Prof. John Robinson in 2018. It is located on top of the North House of the Munk School of Global Affairs. Photo by: Hila Tastasa.

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Sustainability is a growing priority for universities all over the world. Many are developing strong operational sustainability goals and targets, yet few have committed fully to integrating academic and operational sustainability by treating their campus as a living laboratory of sustainable practices. This course explores and applies the living lab concept in the context of operational sustainability at the University of Toronto.

https://www.environment.utoronto.ca/undergraduate/course-list/


big Ideas courses

Students can focus their electives on a series of 'Big Ideas' courses. These courses bring together scholarship from a range of disciplines in examining the role of social media and the internet, or the importance of energy, in impacting the environment.

The internet These courses explore the relationship between digital technologies and the environment. ENV261 - Is the Internet Green? ENV361 - Social Media and Environmentalism.

Energy These courses explore how global demand for energy shapes our relationship with the environment. ENV262 - The Science of Energy in the Environment ENV362 - Energy and Environment: Transitions in History ENV462 - Energy and Environment: Economics, Politics and Sustainability

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LEARNING ABROAD

Summer abroad (Through Woodsworth College)

Australia program

ENV396 - Special Topics: Australian Environment, Wildlife and Conservation. June or July (2 weeks) The Summer Program in Australia (Darwin, Sydney and Cairns) provides a unique opportunity to consider human impacts on the natural environment, and measures to address these impacts, focusing particularly on protected conservation areas.

Ecuador Program

ENV395 - Special Topics Field Course: Ecology and Conservation in the Amazon, Galápagos, and Andes. May - June (4 weeks)

School of the Environment student Nie Tian on a Summer Abroad trip to Ecuador. The University of Toronto's Centre for International Experience (CIE) also offers a summer Student Exchange Program. https://learningabroad.utoronto.ca/summer/

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This course examines fundamental concepts in ecology, evolution, biodiversity, and conservation biology through lectures and fieldwork in highland, tropical and island ecosystems in Ecuador.


Term abroad

For those interested in a more immersive international experience, consider going on an exchange for a Fall or Winter term abroad. The University of Toronto has agreements with partner universities around the world, which allow you to pay your regular U of T tuition while studying abroad. There are also generous subsidies for qualified students to help with any additional costs such as airfare and room & board.

Partner Universities with environment programs Chinese University of Hong Kong City University of Hong Kong National University of Singapore University of Copenhagen University of Amsterdam Utrecht University Lund University

Important links https://learningabroad.utoronto.ca/ https://www.environment.utoronto.ca/ undergraduate/internationalopportunities/ https://www.studentlife.utoronto.ca/cie

School of the Environment student climbing Chimborazo Volcano in the Andes.

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GRADUATE PROGRAMS At the graduate level, the School offers collaborative specializations in Environmental Studies, and Environment & Health.

Collaborative Specializations

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Environmental Studies

Environment and Health

Graduate students admitted to a degree program offered by a graduate unit (also called “home” department) are eligible to apply to the Environmental Studies Collaborative Specialization and pursue course work and research in environmental areas. The School currently has graduate students from across the disciplinary spectrum, including anthropology, chemical engineering and applied chemistry, religious studies, law, management, geography and planning, chemistry, ecology and evolutionary biology, earth sciences, political science, global affairs, and forestry, to name a few.

The Environment and Health (EH) specialization complements the collaborative specialization in Environmental Studies, while adding a distinct focus on the interplay between the environment and human health. The health implications of human impacts on the environment cover a very broad range of issues including: air and water quality, contaminated land, and shifts in the distribution of vector-borne diseases (related to changes in land-use, climate and human migration). The EH specialization provides students in the health sciences with a broad environmental perspective while at the same time exposes Environmental Studies students to the health implications of environmental quality.

https://www.environment.utoronto.ca/graduate/specializations/


COMING SOON. Masters in Environment and Sustainability (MES) The MES is full-time 3-term program. The MES responds to the growing need for society to understand and develop solutions to the many environmental and human well-being challenges of the 21st century. The School will be accepting the first cohort for its thesisbased Masters in Environment and Sustainability (MES) in September 2020.

Dan Weaver conducting research at the Polar Environmental Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL).

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WHERE KNOWLEDGE MEETS Global environmental change Christian Abizaid Acting Undergraduate Associate Director, and Associate Professor • Environmental development • Indigenous populations • Social networks •

Environmental worldviews

Jessica Green Associate Professor • Climate policy • Carbon markets • Global governance • NGOs •

Njal Rollinson Assistant Professor • Animal life cycles • Ecology • Evolution •

Debra Wunch Assistant Professor • Earth's carbon cycle • Atmospheric greenhouse gases •

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Kate Neville Associate Professor • Resource governance • Land use and energy • Fracking and biofuels •

Scott Prudham Professor • Environmental justice • Political ecology • Capitalism-nature nexus •

Stephen Scharper Associate Professor • Environmental ethics • Worldviews and ecology • Liberation theology •

Tanhum Yoreh Assistant Professor • Religion and environmentalism • Wastefulness • Consumption • Simplicity •


ACTION Systems thinking

environment and health

Steve Easterbrook Director, and Professor • Climate informatics and modelling • Earth System Models • Softwareintensive systems •

Jessica D'eon Assistant Professor • Disposition of xenobiotic chemicals both in the environment and the body •

Building a sustainable society Douglas Macdonald Senior Lecturer Emeritus • Canadian climate and energy policy • Political resistance to low carbon transition •

John Robinson Professor, and Presidential Advisor on the Environment, Climate Change, & Sustainability • Sustainability • Urban design • Community engagement in sustainability • Behavioural change •

J. Alstan Jakubiec Assistant Professor • Sustainable design • Low energy design •

Hui Peng Assistant Professor • Environmental chemicals • Karen Ing Associate Professor • Environmental education • Ecosystem services and well-being •

Clare Wiseman Graduate Associate Director, and Associate Professor • Metal behaviour • Metal in urban environments • Metal bioaccessibility •

Beth Savan Senior Lecturer Emeritus, and Senior Fellow, Massey College • Sustainability • Active transportation (cycling) • Behavioural change • Environmental education •

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WHERE THE SCHOOL CAN Rachel Sutton, Environmental studies Major 2019

"Within the School of the Environment, I've had the chance to take courses from policy to physical sciences to urban planning, providing me with context for work in public, private, or not-for-profit sectors. Another appeal of studying in the School of the Environment was the diverse faculty who came from a wide range of academic and professional backgrounds. For me, the School of the Environment was a place that offered a truly interdisciplinary education and opportunities for applied research."

Princess Edogiawerie, Environmental science major 2019 "The School of the Environment is a very small community within the larger U of T. This means there were very small class sizes and many opportunities for students to get involved. I enjoyed developing close relationships to both my classmates and my professors. I had the same group of students in almost all of my classes throughout the four years, which allowed us to develop strong bonds and lasting memories."

Farida Abdelmeguied, environmental studies major 2019

"I'm really grateful for all the experiences I had at the School. Administrative staff and faculty were incredibly supportive, and I enjoyed being around so many like-minded students. Working to contribute a sense of community through my involvement with the Environmental Students' Union (ENSU) was definitely one of the best parts of my undergraduate career. I enjoyed most of my classes, especially the discussion-based ones like ENV451. Perhaps one of the most formative classes I took was ENV440, where I had the opportunity to intern at the Canadian Urban Institute."

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TAKE YOU Kady Cowan, Environmental Science major 2002

Occupation: Supervisor, Energy Business Partnerships at Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) "My Environmental Science degree helped me understand systems thinking and how to value the whole in addition to the component parts. Knowledge from nature and ecosystems, and concepts from sustainability connect the natural environment and the built environment so a clear big picture can emerge. This guides me to seek out different values and opinions on complicated and controversial topics."

David Berliner, Environment and health specialist 2009

Occupation: Co-founder and CEO of CoPower "My program gave me a scientific base to understand the pressing environmental challenges of our time, and allowed me to dabble in the legal, policy, and financial perspectives.   This helped me ultimately decide that the environmental policy/finance area is where I wanted to pursue my career."

Stephanie Cairns, environmental studies major 1986 Occupation: Consulting Principal, Wrangellia Consulting; Director, Circular Economy at Smart Prosperity Institute (University of Ottawa) "The University of Toronto introduced me to the very important network of people to keep in touch with. They provided valuable career suggestions and opportunities. My degree also sparked a passion for and interest in the field of environmental studies."

For information about career paths, visit: https://www.environment.utoronto.ca/about/environmental-careers/

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SCHOLARSHIPS The School of the Environment offers a number of scholarships and awards for students enrolled in our major or specialist programs. The School also administers the Catherine J. Riggall Award for Contributions to Sustainability, which is available to all U of T undergraduate students. These scholarships and awards are based on student academic achievement; some also require social involvement in environmental issues and demonstrated financial need.

Frances L. Allen Scholarship Awarded to an outstanding second or third year student.

Jane Joy Memorial Scholarship: Excellence in Environmental Sustainability

Chachra Family Scholarship in Environmental Science

Consideration is given to students who demonstrate financial need, and involvement in sustainability.

Awarded based on academic merit and financial need.

Douglas Pimlott Awards Dr. Stanley Cord Scholarship in Environmental Studies Awarded to a third or fourth year student based on academic merit.

Barbara Green Scholarship in Environmental Entrepreneurship Consideration is given to academic ability and involvement in extracurricular activities.

Consideration is given to students who have demonstrated a commitment to environmental issues. One award also requires demonstrated financial need.

Catherine J. Riggall Award for Contributions to Sustainability Recognizes accomplishments that enhance sustainability at U of T.

Jane Goodall Scholarship

Kathryn S. Rolph Scholarship

Consideration is given to students who are focusing on studies of environment and development.

Awarded to a student who has achieved a high mark in a course on environmental issues offered by the School.

Peter John Hare Memorial Scholarship in Environment Consideration is given to students who demonstrate financial need and social involvement in environmental issues.

Sidney and Lucille Silver Scholarship Awarded to an outstanding third year student in a specialist or double major program in Environmental Studies and/or Geography.

Robert Hunter Scholarship Consideration is given to students whose focus area is climate. Extracurricular involvement is also considered.

Rodney White Environmental Studies Scholarship Consideration is given to third year students studying topics relating to the environment and international development.

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Skip Willis Undergraduate Scholarship Consideration is given to students with an interest in climate change and market-based solutions.

https://www.environment.utoronto.ca/undergraduate/scholarships/


APPLICATION PROCESS Prospective Students

Apply using the online Ontario Universities' Application Centre (OUAC). Ontario students should use the OUAC 101 category, and all others should use the OUAC 105 category. If you wish to study Environmental Studies, use the OUAC code TAX (Social Sciences). If you wish to study Environmental Science, use the OUAC code TLG (Life Sciences). Note: Official direct enrolment in or applications for Programs of Study occur at the end of your first year.

First year students

Subject POSt (Program of Study) enrolment and applications occur at the end of your first year. Environmental Studies is a Type 1 program, meaning that you can automatically enrol after completing any 4 FCEs. Environmental Science is a Type 2 program, which has specific course prerequisites and has limited enrolment based on marks.

David Powell

Undergraduate Student Advisor & Placement Coordinator For information and assistance with undergraduate courses and programs, please drop by David's office, or email to book an appointment with him. Email: ug.office.env@utoronto.ca Office: Earth Sciences, ES1022

U of T's Arts & Science Calendar has important information about courses, program and degree requirements, student services and resources, and rules and regulations: https://fas.calendar.utoronto.ca/ Plan your course schedule using the Arts & Science online timetable application: https://timetable.iit.artsci.utoronto.ca/ For more information about the Arts & Science application process as a prospective student (including deadlines, English requirements, international student info), visit: https://future.utoronto.ca/apply/

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Cover photo by Patrick Moldowan, a PhD candidate in the School of the Environment and the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, pursuing research in the Rollinson Lab. The cover photo displays a juvenile Spotted Salamander caught inside a Northern Pitcher Plant in Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario. Patrick uncovered that these carnivorous plants trap and eat salamanders with a surprisingly high frequency. Twenty percent of surveyed plants captured salamanders, which provide essential nutrients to these unusual plants in their nutrientpoor bog environments. National Geographic Profile: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2019/06/salamanders-bogs-carnivorous-plants/

33 Willcocks St., Room 1016V Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E8 416-978-6526 environment@utoronto.ca http://www.environment.utoronto.ca

Profile for School of the Environment, University of Toronto

2019-2020 Viewbook: School of the Environment  

This book provides an overview of the School of the Environment's programs, courses, faculty, research, student life, and more. Download a...

2019-2020 Viewbook: School of the Environment  

This book provides an overview of the School of the Environment's programs, courses, faculty, research, student life, and more. Download a...

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