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Landstract Abscape 7 - 30 April, 2016


Landstract Abscape David Aspden, Liz Coats, Helen Eager, Christopher Hodges, Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Yukultji Napangati, Walangkura Napanangka, Angus Nivison, Ronnie Tjampitjinpa, George Tjungurrayi, John R. Walker

7 - 30 April, 2016

Š Utopia Art Sydney


LANDSTRACTION – a new art movement If there is one defining element that has preoccupied and identified Australian art it is without question our continent. The land is a constant reference to so many of our artists both Indigenous and not, and while some pursue a more literal, narrative approach, the real momentum is in the space between abstraction and reality. Our Indigenous painters have forged unique styles across the country. Each has at its core the land which has so much meaning for each artist. At face value its a non objective image and even though often encrypted with recognisable iconography, the surface we contemplate is far from a literal representation of nature. Similarly many non Indigenous painters have eschewed the traditional western view of landscape and followed a more poetic response to the land, forging new ground with a more essential, elemental view of place. Many were equally influenced by abstract expressionism coming out of America and some via a growing engagement with Asia.

Of course what is remarkable about this is the Indigenous artists formed their own abstraction with absolutely no reference or contact with outside precedents. But that’s not to say they weren’t interested. Emily Kngwarreye singled out Fred Williams at the AGNSW. Maxie Tjampitjinpa carefully studied David Aspden at the Araluen Art Centre and Rover Thomas legendarily felt Rothko painted like him! But this was too late for influence, they were already fully formed artists and it was really the commonality that they recognised. And thus, Australia has developed a unique art movement…Landstraction. But travel to an international art fair and the landscape is an almost non-existent subject. It might be we are out of fashion, could be the cultural cringe, or it could be the new is always difficult.


Ronnie Tjampitjinpa, 2010, Untitled, acrylic on linen, 153 x 122cm


George Tjungurryi, 2006, Untitled, acrylic on linen, 183 x 244cm


Ronnie Tjampitjinpa, 2005, Untitled, acrylic on linen, 183 x 153cm


John R. Walker, 2015, Burkes Hill Gully I, archival oil on polyester, 175 x 184cm


Liz Coats, 2014, Streaming #7, acrylic media and pigment on canvas, 110 x 89cm


Liz Coats, 2014, Streaming #3, acrylic media and pigment on canvas, 110 x 89cm


David Aspden, 1981, Wanderings, acrylic and charcoal on canvas, 153 x 244cm


Yukultji Napangati, 2014, Untitled, acrylic on linen, 122 x 153cm


Angus Nivison, 2015, Shine, acrylic on canvas, 244 x 183cm


Helen Eager, 1998, Angle - Dhaulagiri, oil on canvas, 142 x 106cm


Emily Kame Kngwarreye, 1994, Untitled, acrylic on canvas, 120 x 150cm


George Tjungurrayi, 2008, Untitled, acrylic on linen, 183 x 137cm


Christopher Hodges, 2016, Continental Shift, synthetic polymer on board, 270 x 180cm


Angus Nivison, 2016, Skirmish I, acrylic on paper, 150 x 102cm


Angus Nivison, Skirmish II, 2016, acrylic on paper, 150 x 102cm


John R. Walker, 2010, Pile, gouache on paper, 55 x 75cm


Walangkura Napanangka, 2001, untitled, acrylic on linen, 91 x 91cm


Helen Eager, 2015, Union Square, oil on linen, 213 x 137cm


Landstract Abscape David Aspden, Liz Coats, Helen Eager, Christopher Hodges, Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Yukultji Napangati, Walangkura Napanangka, Angus Nivison, Ronnie Tjampitjinpa, George Tjungurrayi, John R. Walker

7 - 30 April, 2016

Utopia Art Sydney 2 Danks Street Waterloo NSW 2017 Telephone: + 61 2 9699 2900 email: utopiaartsydney@ozemail.com.au www.utopiaartsydney.com.au Š Utopia Art Sydney


Profile for Utopia Art Sydney

Landstract Abscape  

7 - 30 April, 2016

Landstract Abscape  

7 - 30 April, 2016

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