Page 1

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center UTHSC College of Pharmacy awards more than 350 scholarships! See page 36.

Fall 2015

The

Collaboration Issue

Education, page 22

Public Service, page 24

Clinical Care, page 26

Research, page 28


In May, the UTHSC College of Pharmacy held its graduation ceremony in Memphis. See pages 20 and 21 for more photos from the event.

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center

As Tennessee’s only public, statewide, academic health system, the mission of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) is to bring the benefits of the health sciences to the achievement and maintenance of human health, with a focus on the citizens of Tennessee and the region, by pursuing an integrated program of education, research, clinical care, and public service. Offering a broad range of postgraduate and selected baccalaureate training opportunities, the main UTHSC campus is located in Memphis and includes six colleges: Dentistry, Graduate Health Sciences, Health Professions, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy. UTHSC also educates and trains cohorts of medicine, pharmacy and/or health professions students -- in addition to medical residents and fellows -- at its campuses in Knoxville, Chattanooga and Nashville. Founded in 1911, during its more than 100 years, UT Health Science Center has educated and trained more than 57,000 health care professionals in academic settings and health care facilities across the state. For more information, visit www.uthsc.edu. Follow us on Facebook: facebook.com/uthsc, on Twitter: twitter.com/uthsc and on Instagram: instagram.com/uthsc.

About the UTHSC College of Pharmacy

All qualified applicants will receive equal consideration for employment and admissions without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, pregnancy, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, physical or mental disability, or covered veteran status. Eligibility and other terms and conditions of employment benefits at The University of Tennessee are governed by laws and regulations of the State of Tennessee, and this non-discrimination statement is intended to be consistent with those laws and regulations. In accordance with the requirements of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, The University of Tennessee affirmatively states that it does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, or disability in its education programs and activities, and this policy extends to employment by the university. Inquiries and charges of violation of Title VI (race, color, national origin), Title IX (sex), Section 504 (disability), ADA (disability), Age Discrimination in Employment Act (age), sexual orientation, or veteran status should be directed to the Office of Equity and Diversity (OED), 910 Madison Avenue, Suite 826, Memphis, Tennessee 38163, by telephone at (901) 448-2112 or (901) 448-7382 (V/TTY available). Requests for accommodation of a disability should be directed to the ADA coordinator at the Office of Equity and Diversity. 2

The College of Pharmacy, founded in 1898, was the first pharmacy school established in the state of Tennessee. The only ranked school of pharmacy in the state, it has been listed in U.S. News & World Report’s Top 20 colleges of pharmacy for more than two decades. With more than 6,600 graduates, the UTHSC College of Pharmacy has campuses in Memphis, Knoxville and Nashville. Additionally, the college has more than 300 sites across the state where students gain experience through community, clinical and institutional practice. Plus, the college offers international pharmacy experiences in 11 countries.

Vision

To serve as a model for pharmacy education, practice, research and outreach in Tennessee and beyond. Front and back cover photos by Adam Brimer / The University of Tennessee


UT Health Science Center Administration

Chancellor STEVE J. SCHWAB, MD College of Pharmacy Administration

Dean MARIE CHISHOLM-BURNS College of Pharmacy PharmD, MPH, MBA, FCCP, FASHP Associate Dean STEPHANIE J. PHELPS Academic Affairs PharmD, BCPS, FAPhA, FCCP, FPPAG Associate Dean GLEN E. FARR, PharmD Continuing Education

Associate Dean BERND MEIBOHM, PhD Graduate Programs FCP, FAAPS and Research

Associate Dean PETER A. CHYKA Knoxville PharmD, DABAT, FAACT

Associate Dean TRACY HAGEMANN, PharmD Nashville FCCP, FPPAG

Associate Dean DEBBIE C. BYRD, PharmD, MBA Professional Affairs BCPS

Associate Dean BRADLEY A. BOUCHER Strategic Initiatives PharmD, FCCP, MCCM, BCPS and Operations

Associate Dean JENNIFER WILLIAMS, PharmD Student Affairs

Assistant Dean BILL PRIGGE, PhD Adminiatration

Interim Chair BERND MEIBOHM, PhD Department of FCP, FAAPS Pharmaceutical Sciences

Chair RICHARD A. HELMS, PharmD Department of FPPAG Clinical Pharmacy

Director of Admissions ANGELA FINERSON and Alumni Affairs PharmD, MBA

Features Education

22 Big data + pharmacy

UTHSC Colleges of Pharmacy and Health Professions partner for joint-degree program

Public Service

24 ASP + SNPhA

Professional organizations provide clinical and wellness services

Clinical Care

26 Old becomes new again

Collaborative practice returns

Research

28 Lab partners

“Through TEAMwork, everyone achieves more.” Departments Incoming Students............................................ 4 Letters............................................................... 5 UTHSC News.................................................... 8 College of Pharmacy News............................. 12 Alumni News and Notes.................................. 30 Giving and Receiving....................................... 36 In Remembrance............................................. 42

Office of Development and Alumni Affairs

Vice Chancellor RANDY L. FARMER, EdD for Development and Alumni Affairs

Associate Vice Chancellor BETHANY GOOLSBY, JD for Development

Associate Vice Chancellor KRIS PHILLIPS for Alumni Affairs

Senior Director of Annual JADA WILLIAMS Giving and Advancement Services

Senior Director of CONNIE HARRIS Philanthropy Communications

Directors of MICHELLE NIXON Alumni Programs CHANDRA TUGGLE Director of MICHELLE GILCHRIST Development

www.uthsc.edu

PHARMACY, FALL 2015 Produced and published by the UTHSC Communications and Marketing Department MA DAVID MEYER SHEILA CHAMPLIN, JANE PATE, MA TIM BULLARD, MA Editor and Designer AMBER CARTER PEGGY REISSER WINBURNE JACKIE DENTON THURMAN HOBSON Contributing writer and editor – Debbie Byrd, PharmD, MBA, BCPS Contributing writer – Connie Harris ©2015 by UTHSC. PUB# EO73606(2016-001wo#160451) For address changes or corrections, please contact the Office of Alumni Affairs at utalumni@uthsc.edu or phone (901) 448-5516 or (800) 733-0482, or fax (901) 448-5906. UTHSC College of Pharmacy - Fall 2015

3


Incoming Students

Student Body Profile Class of 2019 PharmD Students

Students

197

Median PCAT score

70

Median GPA

3.35

In-state Students

134

Out-of-state Students

63

Minorities

27.4%

Female

57.4% Male

42.6% Age range

19-39

States represented

23

Tennessee counties represented

40

4

First Day!

On Monday, Aug. 10, the 197 members of the Class of 2019 met for the first time and started their week-long orientation activities. The morning’s activities were planned and led by members of the Student Government Association and the College of Pharmacy Office of Student Affairs. The day began with a number of ice breakers and team building exercises.


From the Dean

In

Marie Chisholm-Burns PharmD, MPH, MBA, FCCP, FASHP Editors note: It has been an award-winning year for Dean Chisholm-Burns. Her dedication to Pharmacy education and research has been recognized during the year with the following accolades: American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Paul R. Dawson Biotechnology Award http://news.uthsc.edu/marie-chisholm-burnsdean-of-the-uthsc-college-of-pharmacyreceives-prestigious-health-servicesresearch-award/ National Pharmaceutical Association Chauncey I. Cooper Pharmacist Leadership Award http://news.uthsc.edu/dr-marie-chisholmburns-uthsc-dean-college-pharmacyreceives-highest-award-nationalpharmaceutical-association/ ASHP Research and Education Foundation Pharmacy Practice Research Award https://dbyrd4.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/ chisholm-burns-receives-ashp-researchaward/ American Society of Transplantation Clinician of Distinction http://news.uthsc.edu/marie-chisholm-burnsdean-of-the-uthsc-college-of-pharmacyreceives-prestigious-health-servicesresearch-award/ American Society of Health-System Pharmacists/Association of Black Health-System Pharmacists 2015 Joint Leadership Award To be presented in December at the ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting

collaboration with others, as dean I am charged with envisioning and implementing for the College of Pharmacy what has come to be known in the business world as “the long view.” This involves working with intangibles, something that we in our profession may find a bit difficult, since our professional training revolves around precise measuring and monitoring of the tangible. However, the long view requires one to assess and visualize a future based on our hopes and fears, and our beliefs and dreams. It is through the ability to project different kinds of futures, to dream big, that we chart our course for excellence. As I do this, I am increasingly impressed with the need for and importance of partnerships and collaborations. When I look at the most successful endeavors undertaken at the college, I see that many strong alliances have been built. Life, work, and progress are dependent on strong relationships and collaborative efforts. Therefore, this issue of our Pharmacy Magazine spotlights collaboration. Some collaborations are obvious. To effectively and efficiently educate the next generation of pharmacists, it takes dedicated administration, faculty and staff working together. Here at the college, we have built this cooperative environment. One example of successful partnerships is the newly-realized dream of our Nashville campus. Strong relationships among alumni, administration, faculty, staff, students, friends and other stakeholders are crucial to our success. We work together to create an exceptional learning environment for our students. As the dean, it brings me great pleasure to witness the formation of new collaborations at the beginning of each academic year as we greet a new class of student pharmacists. Nothing brings me greater joy than welcoming students and their families into the College of Pharmacy’s family! Looking further, I find that collaboration is alive and well in our research labs. You can read about a fine example of this starting on page 28 where two researchers have partnered to advance science and improve health. In addition, state of the art labs on the 5th floor of the College of Pharmacy building in Memphis are now complete and the 6th floor will undergo construction soon; this is the result of hard work by many – thank you! Representing further collaboration, I see our student organizations working together in partnership with communities across the state to provide outreach and patient care. Colleges within the Health Science Center are joining us to offer cutting-edge programs such as the new dual Doctor of Pharmacy/Master of Health Informatics and Information Management featured on pages 22 and 23. Lastly, and of no less importance than the examples mentioned above, I want to acknowledge the many generous ways the College of Pharmacy and our alumni and friends continually work together. I see this relationship as collaboration at its finest. Since I have been here, we have established several new student scholarships, as I have this big dream that all students in the college who want a scholarship will have the opportunity to obtain one. Achieving this dream will certainly require collaboration and generosity. Thus, through your gifts of time and treasures, I see us building a great, big, bright future for the college. This is just a portion of my long view. I invite you, our alumni and friends, to join with us as we bring this vision to life. Our collaboration is important. Thank you for all you do to partner with the UTHSC College of Pharmacy.

Memphis Business Journal Health Care Heroes Finalist http://news.uthsc.edu/health-care-heroesaward-winners-reflect-uthscs-commitmentexcellence-health-education-researchdelivery/ UTHSC College of Pharmacy - Fall 2015

5


From the UTHSC College of Pharmacy Alumni Association President

F

all brought the harried schedules of a new school year, fall sports events and even thoughts of upcoming holidays. As with the spring months, it’s a

great time to reflect and plan for great things to come.

And as you reflect, I encourage you to take a moment in the midst of this

busy time to reach out to UTHSC in some way. No matter where you are, opportunities are more numerous and closer than ever. With our statewide presence now on three campuses—Memphis, Knoxville and Nashville—our reach to alumni and prospective students is expanding. The educational and high-tech buildings on all three campuses are amazing, and a personal tour is

Martha Shepard, BS ʼ73

available for the asking. As the visibility of our high-quality programs increases, and I reflect on the professional advancement my education has provided, my sense of pride grows. I am so glad to be actively involved with UTHSC College of Pharmacy. Our college needs us, and as I wind down my own career, there’s nothing more

UTHSC COP Active* Alumni Profile

rewarding than helping enable future generations to continue our tradition of excellence. Whether you volunteer, visit or make a gift, I invite you to get involved. You will find the benefits are well worth the effort. Volunteerism keeps us in touch with the college and, in turn, with progress in our field. We also have the chance to be in touch with current students and faculty. The similarities (and differences, of course) from one generation to the next are fascinating. Speaking of volunteering, I am keeping my pharmacy license current as long as I can so I can take part, as a pharmacist, in medical mission trips. That may not sound like it helps UTHSC College of Pharmacy, but I sure can spread great PR to the team members! Opportunities to toot UT’s horn are everywhere. Giving is a great way to help, as well. Our support funds scholarships, research and educational opportunities that attract quality students to our programs and enhance our profession by graduating some of the most qualified pharmacists in the country. If you had a student attending the UTHSC College of Pharmacy in the past several years, you know about the knowledge these students have. Where would you be without UTHSC College of Pharmacy? No matter your

Total number of alumni

5,426

Number of states represented

All 50 + District of Columbia and Puerto Rico Number of foreign countries represented

China...........................1 Egypt...........................2 Mexico.........................2 Saudi Arabia................1 South Africa................2

age, your engagement is invaluable to our college. Number of alumni living in Tennessee

3,945

*Active alumni are those living alumni for whom the UTHSC Alumni Office has current contact information. To reconnect with the UTHSC Alumni Office go to uthscalumni.com.

6


From the UTHSC Chancellor

W Steve J. Schwab, MD

UTHSC Enrollment Fall 2015 College of Dentistry

441

College of Graduate Health Sciences

276

College of Health Professions

582

College of Medicine

671

College of Nursing

423

College of Pharmacy

683

hen this issue of Pharmacy magazine reaches you, we’ll be on the cusp of winter in Memphis. But we’re pleased to report that since my last letter, activity at UTHSC has never been hotter, and there’s no sign of a cooling-off period. The contents of this issue showcase the many accomplishments of the Pharmacy team – alumni, faculty, students and staff. As industry needs evolve, the college continues to expand its academic offerings to meet them, exemplified by the recent launch of its new dualdegree option in partnership with the Health Informatics and Information Management team in our College of Health Professions. (See page 22.) The collaborations under way in and through the college are incredibly impressive, and, most appropriately, this issue’s theme. We know you will take pride in reading about the difference our Pharmacy team is making in the industry, in academe and in the lives of so many. To hit a few chronological highlights, we’ll start in late February. With the UT Board of Trustees winter meeting in Memphis, we took another step to extend our relationship with our largest hospital partner, Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare. Methodist University Hospital added the UT initials to exterior signage, reframing the name as Methodist UT Hospital. (See page 9.) This step reflects the convergence of the UTHSC and Methodist missions and visions. More than 300 physicians are currently in training in Methodist facilities and since our partnership began, more than 1,865 medical and surgical specialists have been trained in Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare locations. In April, we announced the addition of Lori S. Gonzalez, PhD, as the new vice chancellor for Academic, Faculty and Student Affairs. Then in early June, Steven R. Goodman, PhD, was appointed to our leadership team to serve as vice chancellor for Research. (See page 8.) Each brings vision, dedication and a wealth of talent to their positions at UTHSC. They have already begun to make a positive difference for our statewide organization, and we look forward to the many contributions they are certain to make in the future. On June 11, we learned our application for independent SACS accreditation had been approved by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC). UTHSC is now an independently accredited entity within the UT system, separate from the “Big Orange” conglomerate. Read more about what this means for our institution on page 9. Transformation remains a maxim on the Memphis campus as space continues to morph according to plan. On page 11, the snapshots of the Feurt building in deconstruction mode are yet another reflection of our commitment to fulfilling our Campus Master Plan. This fall, the empty footprint began its recasting process. It will eventually rise into the new Multi-Disciplinary Simulation building, where students from every college will have the opportunity to work and learn together. That’s the most effective way to build real-world health care teams that recognize the distinct contributions and inherent value of every welltrained health professional. Also this fall, the process of constructing and equipping our GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices) facility began. Plus in November, we plan to celebrate with our Methodist Healthcare and West Clinic partners on the opening of the newly remodeled building in Germantown that will become headquarters for the UT-West Cancer Center (WCC). Formed three years ago, WCC is a comprehensive cancer center committed to leading-edge treatment, clinical trials and research. In closing, we wish you and your families all the best in the coming holiday season. Many thanks for all you do to support UTHSC.

UTHSC College of Pharmacy - Fall 2015

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New UTHSC vice chancellors named

Welcome Drs. Gonzalez and Goodman

After extensive nationwide searches, UTHSC Chancellor Steve J. Schwab named Lori S. Gonzalez, PhD, vice chancellor of Academic, Faculty and Student Affairs, and Steven R. Goodman, PhD, Drs. Gonzalez and Goodman at their Welcome vice chancellor for to UTHSC reception held on Aug. 18. Research. Both positions report directly to Chancellor Schwab. Dr. Gonzalez joins UTHSC from the University of North Carolina General Administration, the North Carolina higher education authority, where she served as special advisor to the chief academic officer. She began work at UTHSC on July 1. “With more than 27 years of experience in higher education at the university-wide, division, department and college levels, Dr. Gonzalez brings a wealth of experience and insight to this position,” said Dr. Schwab. “We look forward to the many contributions she is sure to make to our statewide campus community.” As vice chancellor of Academic, Faculty and Student Affairs, she is responsible for setting policy and procedure for all academic programs as well as for the development and execution of strategic initiatives to promote these programs. Her office will be responsible for the vision, leadership, policy, and monitoring of academic, faculty and student affairs for UTHSC. Vigorous advocacy for the academic programs and the intellectual life of the university community is essential. To accomplish this, Dr. Gonzalez will work closely with the deans and other vice chancellors to set academic priorities and to allocate funds to move these priorities forward. She will collaborate with the deans and lead academic planning, policy, curriculum and program development efforts; provide for meaningful faculty and academic staff development activities; and establish academic budgeting priorities. In this role, Dr. Gonzalez will also serve as the primary academic officer for the interface with the Faculty Senate and academic officers in all colleges. Prior to joining the University of North Carolina administration in October 2014, Dr. Gonzalez served for three years as provost and executive vice chancellor at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina. Before that, she spent 20 years at the University of Kentucky, taking on roles that grew in both levels of responsibility and leadership including assistant professor, associate professor, associate dean for Academic Affairs, and then dean and professor for the College of Health Sciences. Her first 11 years in academia included varied teaching, research and clinical 8

roles that laid the foundation for her successful forays into expanded teaching and administration positions. Dr. Goodman began his work at UTHSC on Aug. 1, coming to UTHSC from the SUNY (State University of New York) Upstate Medical University where he was the vice president for Research, dean of the College of Graduate Studies, and professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and the Department of Pediatrics. “We are pleased to welcome Dr. Goodman to our campus. He will play a central role in managing, maximizing and expanding our institution’s research portfolio,” said Chancellor Schwab. “Each year our faculty and staff receive, on average, nearly $100 million in research funding from federal institutions and private foundations. Through vision, collaboration and innovation, we anticipate Dr. Goodman will increase that funding to significantly higher levels.” The vice chancellor for Research is charged with building strong teams of scientists who will accelerate the growth of research in all UTHSC colleges and at all major locations. Dr. Goodman will direct the development and implementation of UTHSC’s comprehensive research strategy, in keeping with its mission to move into the ranks of the top biomedical research institutions. This includes responsibility for creating innovative research opportunities and a cutting-edge infrastructure to meet the needs of our researchers while positioning them to compete successfully for extramural funding. Dr. Goodman will represent UTHSC to external funding organizations, government agencies and partner institutions; will advocate for research and related activities to lay audiences; and will administer all facets of our growing research program. He will be responsible for the research infrastructure, ensuring the operational and performance effectiveness of the centrally funded support units; for developing and implementing strategies to continuously improve the infrastructure and services provided by central administration; and for leading, managing and holding institutional responsibility for the research infrastructure and services. Plus, Dr. Goodman will advise the chancellor on matters of university research policy, vision, strategic planning and long-range budgeting. He will work closely and collaboratively with the university’s deans to integrate the research and educational missions of UTHSC. He will also work closely with the University of Tennessee Research Foundation to facilitate the discovery, protection and commercialization of intellectual property. Prior to his work at SUNY, Dr. Goodman spent seven years with the University of Texas at Dallas, serving as the C. L. and Amelia A. Lundell Professor of Life Sciences; professor and head of the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology; director of the Institute of Biomedical Sciences and Technology, and director of the Sickle Cell Disease Research Center. Dr. Goodman has received national and international honors. He has served as principal investigator or coinvestigator on approximately $20 million in extramural grant funding.


UTHSC News

UTHSC receives independent university accreditation During its meeting held on June 11, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) Board of Trustees approved the accreditation of UTHSC as a separate university. UTHSC is now independent from the “Big Orange” conglomerate, which had previously included UTHSC. SACSCOC is the regional body charged with accreditation of degree-granting higher education institutions in the southern states. “Big Orange” still consists of UT, Knoxville; UTIA (Institute of Agriculture); UTSI (Space Institute) and UTIPS (Institute for Public Service); and is itself accredited by SACSCOC. Several years ago, in examining the governance structure, resources available, annual budget, geographic location, and relative autonomy from UT, Knoxville, SACSCOC leadership determined that UTHSC should be a separately accredited institution within the UT System. “For several years, UTHSC has been working toward independent accreditation as a stand-alone university, and we are extremely pleased that the extensive SACS peer review process resulted in no adverse findings or recommendations,” Chancellor Schwab said. “The

UT + Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare In recognition of the successful and growing partnership between UTHSC and the Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare system, the bright orange UT icon was added to new exterior signage at Methodist University Hospital. The hospital is now referred to as Methodist UT Hospital. Methodist UT Hospital, the largest and most comprehensive hospital in the Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare system, is a core teaching hospital for UTHSC. Faculty members from UTHSC make up a significant complement of the physicians and clinicians who provide care at the hospital while teaching the next generation of health care professionals in the clinical and hospital setting. The hospital is also home to UT Methodist Physicians,

completion of this process to independent university status in a rapid and efficient manner is both a remarkable and laudable achievement.” As an independent university, UTHSC will be required to complete its first reaccreditation compliance certification in five years. Thereafter, the university’s accreditation mist be evaluated and reaffirmed every 10 years. “We remain an integral component of the UT System of universities overseen by President DiPietro and governed by the board of trustees of the University of Tennessee,” the Chancellor said, noting, “I want to thank the leadership of the institution and all those who contributed both directly and indirectly to this strategic effort. The independent institutional accreditation of UTHSC reflects the ongoing high level of activity and myriad contributions of UTHSC faculty, students and staff.” With some 3,000 students enrolled annually, 1,200 residents and fellows in training across Tennessee, more than $200 million in sponsored program revenue (allsource external grants, contracts and awards) and nearly 4,000 faculty and staff on four major campuses (Memphis, Knoxville, Chattanooga and Nashville), UTHSC has a statewide economic impact of more than $2.7 billion each year. UTHSC is also responsible for more than 26,700 jobs across the state of Tennessee.

an academic physician practice group created in 2013 as an outgrowth of the partnership between the university and the hospital. The partnership was announced, and the new signage unveiled during the UT Trustees meeting held at UTHSC in February.

At separate ceremonies hosted by the deans of the six UTHSC colleges on May 15, 22 and 29, UTHSC graduated a total of 698 health care professionals. During each of the ceremonies, UTHSC Chancellor Steve J. Schwab, MD, conferred the degrees and gave the charge to the graduates. This year’s graduating class included 68 African-Americans, 12 Latino-Americans, and 145 graduates who came from out of state to study at UTHSC. In addition, this graduating class comprised 410 women and 288 men. • Dentistry – 116 • Graduate Health Sciences – 38 • Health Professions (formerly Allied Health Sciences) – 142 • Medicine – 149 • Nursing – 78 • Pharmacy – 175 Turn to pages 20 and 21 to see our 2015 graduates. UTHSC College of Pharmacy - Fall 2015

9


UTHSC News

Going,

The first graduating class of the reactivated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program achieved a 100 percent pass rate on the NCLEX (National Council Licensure Examination). The inaugural class graduated in December 2015, and 35 of 35 students passed on the first attempt. By comparison, the average pass rate for the state of Tennessee is 87 percent and the national average is 81 percent.

UTHSC named one of the Top Workplaces in Memphis by The Commercial Appeal for 2014.

The distinction, given to a total of 50 large, medium and small workplaces, is based solely on surveys completed by employees. The newspaper partnered with WorkplaceDynamics, an employee survey firm in Philadelphia, to identify the best places to work based on factors including training, direction, retention, motivation, benefits and pay. The survey also measured how employees feel about their jobs.

Going,

Gone

Progress continues on the overhaul of the Memphis campus. As a part of the master plan, the Feurt Pharmacy Research Building, named for Seldon Dick Feurt, PhD, College of Pharmacy dean from 1959 to 1975, was demolished to make way for the new Multi-Disciplinary Simulation and Health Education Building. The process began in mid-January when the sidewalk was closed. In mid-April the demolition was well under way. By May, the building was down, and the cleanup was under way. In June, the building was completely gone. Once constructed, the new facility will train students from all six colleges in cutting-edge simulation settings. Medical simulation provides the ideal opportunity for teaching health care teams to learn how to diagnose and treat patients. Students work under supervision and are able to make mistakes without endangering the health of their patient.

Dr. Ken Brown, executive vice chancellor and chief operations officer at UTHSC, spoke at the recent meeting of the Association of American Medical Colleges. He addressed the theme of “Moving From an Incidental Campus to an Intentional Campus for UTHSC,” putting a spotlight on our Campus Master Plan and how it outlines our future growth.

The University

of Tennessee

e Center Health Scienc UTHSC College of Pharmacy awards more than 250 scholarships! See page 36.

Fall 2014

are providing

How we ble dable, accounta accessible, affor education in

Nashville pharmacy

Now

Public Service

Boo Flu Page 22

Clinical Care

Pharmacy’s future Page 24

Research

Tracking a killer Page 26

The UTHSC Communications and Marketing Department was recognized with three awards in two recent international competitions. The LIVE! Just As We Are Breast Cancer Awareness and Action Campaign, and the Fall 2014 issue of the College of Pharmacy alumni magazine earned gold awards in the Hermes competition. LIVE! won in the Making A Difference category of the Communitas Awards. UTHSC College of Pharmacy - Fall 2015

11


Faculty news

Appointments, Elections and Awards

Rex Brown, PharmD and Roland Dickerson, PharmD, BCNSP, FCCP, FASHP, FCCM, professors of Clinical Pharmacy,

have received the designation of fellow of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (FASPEN) this year. ASPEN annually awards fellowship status to those Brown members who have exhibited exceptional achievement in practice or research and service to the organization. This honor recognizes individuals who have made substantial contributions to ASPEN and the field of clinical nutrition. Criteria for consideration of fellowship status include current membership of ASPEN with active membership of at least 10 years in duration; involvement in clinical nutrition for a minimum of 10 years; national or international reputation in clinical nutrition and/or a sustained record of substantial service to ASPEN; consistent commitment to excellence in the field of Nutrition Support as a practitioner, scientist, educator, advocate, or administrator; and contribution to the body of knowledge of nutrition. Michael L. Christensen, PharmD, BCNSP, FPPAG, was recently appointed

to a three-year term on the Board of Pharmacy Specialists (BPS) Specialty Council on Nutrition Support Pharmacy. Dr. Christensen previously served on the Nutrition Specialty Council for two Christensen terms from 2003 to 2008. Since 1990, Dr. Christensen has been a member of the Parenteral Nutrition Service at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and is currently a professor of Clinical Pharmacy and Pediatrics. Dr. Christensen has also been elected to the Board of Directors of ASPEN. His term is June 1, 2015 through April 30, 2017. Bradley A. Boucher, PharmD, FCCP, BCPS, received the honorary title of Master

of Critical Care Medicine (MCCM) at the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) Convocation in January, 2015. MCCM candidates are selected among the current fellows of ACCM, and are elected by a Boucher majority vote of the ACCM Board of Regents with approval by the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) Council. Dr. Boucher’s selection as an MCCM reflects his status as a fellow of the American College of Critical Care Medicine for the past 15 years. Dr. Boucher is one of only six pharmacists to have received this honor out of the 64 total MCCM honorees to date.

12

12

Duane D. Miller, PhD, Van Vleet Professor and former chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, was honored as a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). Dr. Miller has been working through the UT Research Foundation to protect and promote his discoveries. He has designed new Miller drugs to treat disease areas from oncology to ophthalmology, has founded two start-up companies, been a senior part of the research and development team in a third, and has licensed compounds to three other companies. He holds 54 issued U.S. patents and more than 100 international patents. More than 100 U.S. and international applications are still pending. Election to NAI Fellow status is a high professional distinction among academic inventors. Tao Lowe, PhD, associate professor of

Pharmaceutical Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, has been elected to serve as the chair-elect of the Nanotechnology Focus Group of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS). Nanotechnology’s main concept is the control Lowe of matter on a scale smaller than 1 micrometer, focusing on the design of drug and gene delivery devices and diagnostics on this same scale of length. The goal of the Nanotechnology Focus Group is to introduce the concepts, approaches, issues, controversies, and current research progress of nanotechnology to the AAPS membership. Bernd Meibohm, PhD, FCP, FAAPS,

Meibohm

associate dean for Research and Graduate Programs and interim chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, is the current American College of Clinical Pharmacology president and presided over the 2015 meeting held in San Francisco, California.

Dr. Roland Dickerson received the 2015 American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Clinical Practice Award at the Annual ACCP Global Conference in October in San Francisco, California. This award is given to an ACCP member described as having, “developed an innovative clinical Dickerson pharmacy service, provided innovative documentation of the impact of clinical pharmacy services, provided leadership in the development of cost-effective clinical pharmacy services, or shown sustained excellence in providing clinical pharmacy services.” Dr. Dickerson is the clinical coordinator and clinical pharmacist for the Nutritional Support Service for Regional One Health (formerly Regional Medical Center at Memphis). His research focuses on the metabolic support of the critically ill patient.


College of Pharmacy

More ACCP News

Mason Bucklin, PharmD, BCPS,

assistant professor in the Department Bucklin Hudson McFarland of Clinical Pharmacy currently serves as secretary and treasurer of the Emergency Medicine Practice and Research Network, while Joanna Hudson PharmD, BCPS, FASN, FCCP, FNKF, associate professor of Clinical Pharmacy, serves as chair of the Credentials Committee for the ACCP fellowship program. M. Shawn McFarland, PharmD, FCCP, BCACP, BCPS,

associate professor of Clinical Pharmacy, is serving as Award Committee chair. Currently

Tracy M. Hagemann, PharmD, FCCP, FPPAG,

associate dean, and Chris Wood, PharmD, BCPS, associate professor, are both serving on the ACCP Board of Regents. As a member of the ACCP Leadership and Management Academy faculty, Debbie Byrd, PharmD, MBA, BCPS, professor and associate dean, traveled to Riyad, Saudia Arabia, in March. She made presentations on leadership and management as a part of the certificate program that develops these skills for practitioners and faculty members. Hagemann

Wood

Byrd

ACCP Fellows Inductees

2015 - Chris Finch, PharmD, BCPS; Carrie Oliphant, PharmD, BCPS. 2014 - Kristine Crews, PharmD, BCPS; Bill Greene, PharmD, BCPS; Casey Laizure, PharmD, BCPS; Dr. Shawn McFarland

ACCP fellowship status is awarded in recognition of continued excellence in clinical pharmacy practice or research. Nominees must have been full members of ACCP for at least five years, must have been in practice for 10 years since receipt of their highest professional pharmacy degree, and must have made a sustained contribution to clinical pharmacy.

Franks

Howard-Thompson

Several members of the College of Pharmacy faculty are now serving in leadership positions for American Association of College of Pharmacy (AACP). Dr. Debbie Byrd was installed as chair for the

Pharmacy Practice Section, and Andrea Franks, PharmD, BCPS, was installed as chair for the Women Faculty Special Interest Group. Amanda Howard-Thompson, PharmD,

BCPS, is the chair-elect for the Self Care Therapeutics/NonPrescription Medicine Special Interest Group. Dr. Tracy Hagemann completed her term as chair for the Pediatric Special Interest Group. Justin Gatwood, PhD, MPH, assistant professor

of Clinical Pharmacy, has been selected as one of two recipients of a UTHSC Translational Research Award funded by the Institute for Research Innovation, Synergy, and Health Equity (iRISE) and UTHSC. The research supported by this award will be in collaboration with the Gatwood Veterans Administration, using its national electronic health record database to examine outcomes in veterans with diabetes. The goal is to understand not just if, but where, disparities exist across the country. These differences will be mapped to suggest regional similarities or variations in outcomes. The research of Anita Airee, PharmD, BCPS; Dr. Debbie Byrd; Dr. Amanda HowardThompson; and former faculty members

Michelle Farland, PharmD; and Katie Suda, PharmD, was highlighted in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Practice-Based Research Network’s (PBRN) Airee Resource Center. The UTHSC COP faculty research featured was entitled, “Pharmacistphysician collaboration for diabetes care: cardiovascular outcomes.” The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of a pharmacist-physician collaboration on attainment of cardiovascular-related goals in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Retirements

Dr. Duane Miller, retired on Aug. 31. He joined the College of Pharmacy faculty in 1992 and since has received numerous awards, including recently being named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (see story on page 12). In retirement, Dr. Miller plans to continue several research projects at the college and is looking forward to spending more time with his family. David K. Solomon, PharmD, FASHP, professor of Clinical Pharmacy, former associate dean for Veterans Administration (VA) and Hospital Affairs, and chief of Pharmacy Services at the VA Medical Center in Memphis, retired Dec. 31, 2014. At a reception celebrating his 24 years of Solomon service, Dr. Solomon said his best career move was to return to Memphis and the UTHSC COP. As a part of the UTHSC COP faculty, he led efforts to develop and grow residency programs and resident positions across Tennessee.

UTHSC College of Pharmacy - Fall 2015

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Dr. Marie Chisholm-Burns with husband John Fitzgerald Burns and son John Fitzgerald Burns, Jr., at the AACP awards ceremony.

An extraordinary year

Because of her dedication to transplant research and pharmacy education, Dean Marie Chisholm-Burns has been honored with several prestigious awards during the past year, including both the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Paul R. Dawson Biotechnology Award and the Chauncey I. Cooper Pharmacist Leadership Award from the National Pharmaceutical Association (NPhA) – the highest recognitions given by these national organizations. The Dawson award is given to an active scientist within the ranks of pharmacy education who is a leader in the broad range of research related to health services delivery affecting patient outcomes. It was presented to Dean Chisholm-Burns in August. “Those who know me know I am committed to the pharmacy profession, education, and to improving health care for all,” Dr. Chisholm-Burns said in accepting the award. “Dean Chisholm-Burns’ work is so deserving of recognition, especially as the Dawson award criteria have been broadened to encompass a more diverse scope of research,” said Lucinda L. Maine, PhD, executive vice president and CEO of the AACP. “Certainly her work has transformed lives and health care delivery systems.” The Cooper award, bestowed at the 68th annual meeting of the NPhA held in Orlando, recognizes sustained and distinguished service to the profession of pharmacy. In addition to these honors, the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Research and Education Foundation presented her the Pharmacy Practice Research Award for her work “Improving Outcomes of Renal Transplant Recipients with Behavioral Adherence Contracts: A Randomized Controlled Trial.” And, at the 2015 American Transplant Congress, Dean Chisholm-Burns received the 2015 Clinician of Distinction Award from the American Society of Transplantation. In this award-winning year, Dean Chisholm Burns has also become a sought-after speaker. In January, she was the keynote speaker at the University of Michigan’s 25th Annual Health Sciences Martin Luther King Day lecture and was also a part of the Deans Leading by Example lecture series. She served as keynote speaker at the University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy graduation in May. Dean Chisholm-Burns founded and directs the Medication Access Program in Georgia, which helps to provide medication to more than 830 solid-organ transplant patients. The statewide network facilitates medication adherence as well as interdisciplinary care and support for transplant patients.

“Certainly her work has transformed lives and health care delivery systems.”

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Shaun Rowe, PharmD, BCPS, assistant

professor of Clinical Pharmacy, was honored with the Neurocritical Care Society (NCCS) Presidential Service Rowe Award. The award was presented at the 13th Annual NCCS meeting on Oct. 6. Each recipient is selected by the president of the society for providing outstanding service. This distinction is held by only a few members of the society. According to NCCS President Romer Geocadin, Dr. Rowe received this award in recognition of his role as co-chair of the External Ventricular Drain Management Consensus Statement Subcommitee, and his “hard work, dedication and tireless contributions” in support of the organization over the past year. He is the only pharmacist author on the consensus statement, which should be published in the next three to six months.

Dr. Andrea Franks is a co-investigator for the Recovery Based Interprofessional Distance Education (RIDE) program, supported by a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration. The RIDE program is a collaboration among University of Tennessee graduate students in psychiatric mental health nursing, nutrition, exercise physiology and pharmacy in learning to provide recovery-focused care to individuals with mental health needs as part of an interdisciplinary team. RIDE begins with a series of weekly online modules on interprofessional practice and the recovery model, and culminates in a three-day intensive clinical immersion experience at the Helen Ross McNabb Center in Knoxville. During the clinical immersion, student teams assist clients living with multiple chronic conditions to identify recovery goals and develop individualized wellness plans. Student pharmacists participating in the second cohort of the study include Katie Ziegler, Cherish Bowman, Garrett Trusler and Torrey Smith.


College of Pharmacy

Grants The UTHSC College of Pharmacy was awarded a $20,000

grant from the National Association of Chain Drug Stores Foundation Pharmacy Partners Program for a proposal entitled, “Operation Access: A Four-Part Effort to Expand Access to Community Pharmacy Services Across the State of Tennessee.” This grant was achieved through the combined efforts of co-principal investigators Drs. Ken Hohmeier and Christina Spivey and Dean Chisholm-Burns. Junling Wang, PhD, a professor in the Department of

Clinical Pharmacy, has received a $987,562 grant from the National Institute on Aging, one of the National Institutes of Health, that will be funded over the next three years. Dr. Wang’s research has shown that Medicare medication therapy management (MTM) eligibility criteria may be contributing to disparities in health care, because AfricanAmericans and Hispanics overall use fewer drugs and are less likely to qualify for MTM. The purpose of the grant is to research more equitable and effective eligibility criteria for MTM for Medicare beneficiaries. Murali M. Yallapu, PhD, assistant professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, has received a three-year grant totaling $480,000 from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health to investigate the role of prostate specific membrane antigen targeted docetaxel loaded magnetic nanoparticles for prostate cancer therapy. Docetaxel has been used since its approval by the FDA in 2004 for metastatic prostate cancer, a disease that is widespread and a source of high morbidity and mortality among men in the United States. With the inadequate alternative therapies currently available for patients with metastatic prostate cancer, Dr. Yallapu’s research has turned to the use of docetaxel loaded magnetic nanoparticles to increase the effectiveness of this medication. Coinvestigators for this project include Drs. Subhash C. Chauhan, Meena Jaggi, Duane Miller, Daruka Mahadevan, and Stephen W. Behrman. Subhash C. Chauhan, PhD, professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, was awarded a $600,000 three-year grant from the Department of Defense to investigate the role of ormeloxifene for prostate cancer prevention and treatment. The current role of ormeloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator is as a once weekly contraceptive. The drug is currently available in India and 28 other countries, but not the United States. This research has the potential to produce a novel therapeutic modality for advanced-stage prostate cancer treatment. Dr. Chauhan will be the primary investigator for the study and Dr. Meena Jaggi, associate professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, will be his co-primary investigator. Other coinvestigators for the project are Dr. Murali Mohan Yallapu, assistant professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nadeem Zafar, and Jim Wan.

Purple Night

Members of the Pancreatic Cancer Research team moved out of the lab and into the kitchen on Sept. 12. The team of 17 cooked up traditional Indian cuisine favorites and then served the food to the more than 50 in attendance at Purple Night. The guests included pancreatic cancer patients and those who support them, along with members and staff of the Herb Kosten Foundation. “The evening was a social time for the patients, our researchers and the members of the [Kosten] foundation. This was our second time to do this, and the event has grown quite a bit,” said Subhash Chahuan, PhD, the primary investigator for several pancreatic cancer research grants and director of the pancreatic cancer research lab. “We may have to find a larger place next year.” In addition to the dinner, the guests heard an update from researchers about progress that has been made in the labs. The Herb Kosten Foundation, based in Memphis, seeks to provide an informative, compassionate and human approach toward improving the quality of life for those afflicted with pancreatic cancer and their families. Purple is the color of the ribbons worn to raise awareness for the disease.

UTHSC College of Pharmacy - Fall 2015

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Preceptors of the Year

Graves

East Tennessee Dr. Camille Graves received her PharmD from Creighton University. During her student experiential learning, she completed four APPEs at Methodist Medical Center in Oak Ridge (MMCOR), Tennessee. After graduation, she was hired by MMCOR and currently coordinates the anticoagulation clinic there. She has been a UTHSC COP preceptor in ambulatory care since 2008.

East Currie

West Tennessee Dr. Kristi Currie received her PharmD from the University of Mississippi. She has spent 13 years in community practice, with 10 of those years at Target Pharmacy in either Memphis or Germantown, Tennessee. She has been a UTHSC COP preceptor in advanced community and introductory community since 2008.

West

Johnson

Middle Tennessee Dr. Dan Johnson received his PharmD from the UTHSC COP. After completing a two-year pharmacotherapy residency, he was hired by Centennial Medical Center in cardiovascular pharmacy. He moved over to the area of cardiology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in 2007. Dr. Johnson precepts APPEs in the area of cardiology and has been the course director for the cardiology elective in Middle Tennessee. He has been a UTHSC COP preceptor since 2002.

Middle Mills

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IPPE Preceptor of the Year Dr. Chad Mills received his PharmD from the UTHSC COP. He and his wife, Dr. Rebecca Mills, own Mills Family Pharmacy in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Dr. Chad Mills offers APPEs in advanced community and always participates in the IPPE Community Program. He has been a UTHSC COP preceptor since 2008.

IPPE

New Faculty Nancy Hart, PharmD, BCPS Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, Nashville Dr. Hart, a University of Florida College of Pharmacy graduate, completed a residency in ambulatory care at Nova Southeastern University. Her experiences include teaching, Hart compounding and coordinating clinical trials. She has worked in family medicine, with underserved patients, and in community pharmacies. Her research interests include diabetes, immunizations, over-the-counter medication use, outpatient management, and women’s health. She joined the faculty in June. Glen Palmer, PhD Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, Division of Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics, Memphis Dr. Palmer earned a BSc in Genetics at the University of Sheffield and a PhD in Genetics at the University of Leicester Palmer in the United Kingdom. He completed postdoctoral training at Georgetown University and later at Louisiana State University, where he was most recently an assistant professor in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology. He joined the faculty in March and his research centers on mechanisms of anti-fungal drug resistance, the discovery and development of a new class of anti-fungal agents that target the fungal vacuole. He has NIH R01 and R21 funding for the development of an entirely novel chemical-genetic approach to drug discovery using yeast-based platforms. Brian Peters, PhD Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, Division of Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics, Memphis Dr. Peters earned a BS degree in Microbiology at Penn State University before earning a PhD at the University Peters of Maryland in molecular microbiology and Immunology. He conducted postdoctoral work at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center (LSUHSC) from 2011-2013 and began his career as a research-track assistant professor in 2013 while at LSUHSC. Dr. Peters joined the faculty in June. James Wheeler, PharmD, BCPS Director of Continuing Professional Development, Nashville A UTHSC COP graduate who joined the faculty in June, Dr. Wheeler completed the college’s 24-month PGY1-PGY2 Pharmacotherapy Residency at the UT Wheeler Medical Center in Knoxville. He previously served as an assistant professor of Pharmacy at Wingate University in addition to maintaining a pharmacy practice site in pulmonary medicine at Novant: Presbyterian Hospital in Charlotte, North Carolina. During this time, he served as a preceptor for third- and fourth-year student pharmacists.


College of Pharmacy

Students

P.S. Shantanu Rao, PhD, received the UTHSC Postdoctoral Association Summer Travel Award to attend the third International Conference on HIV/ AIDS, STDs and Rao STIs. He made an oral presentation of his research entitled, “Role of cytochrome P450s in mediating the effects of alcohol on HIV pathogenesis.” Seven postdoctoral candidates competed for this award; Dr. Rao was one of three winners. Dr. Rao received his doctorate in medicinal chemistry from the University of Toledo. Currently, he is a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Santosh Kumar’s research lab in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Alaina Darby, P2, was awarded a $5,000 TYLENOL® Future Care Scholarship for the 2015-2016 academic year. Of the hundreds of applications Darby submitted, she is one of 40 students selected for the scholarship nationwide. According to the TYLENOL® Future Care Scholarship website, the recipients have displayed academic excellence, exemplary leadership, community involvement, and dedication to a career of caring for others. “I am so grateful to receive this scholarship and to be recognized for my achievements,” said Darby. “I have applied for this scholarship several years in a row, and it is great to finally receive a response that begins with ‘Congratulations!’”

Imhotep Ali and Parker

Dina Ali, P4, and Robert Parker, PharmD, professor of Clinical Pharmacy, were awarded a oneyear American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Research Institute Futures Grant Student/Resident Award worth $5,000 for the project titled, “Mechanism of altered clopidogrel metabolism in diabetes.” “I have enjoyed working under Dr. Parker’s mentorship for the past year and a half, as it has greatly enhanced my interest in pursuing a career in clinical research,” said Ali. “I am grateful for the ACCP Research Institute for recognizing the importance in providing support for students interested in developing skills needed to succeed in this exciting field.” In April, the 2015 Rafael Dodd Graduate Scholarship Award was presented by the National Black MBA Association, Inc., to Kenneth Sykes, P1. The scholarship is for Sykes students enrolled in a business or management program and is awarded based on a student’s academic achievement, community service, letters of reference, verbal skills, and resume. Sykes represented both the UTHSC COP and the University of Memphis Fogelman College of Business and Economics in receiving this award.

In May, student pharmacists were inducted into the Imhotep Society. Named after the ancient Egyptian god of medicine, the campus-wide organization recognizes students who have significantly contributed to student life at UTHSC. While the principle objective of the society is to reward and recognize student leadership on campus, a secondary goal is to inspire students to continue leadership and service roles as alumni of the university. The 2015 inductees are: Jide Anyigbo Janet Kha Wesley Brandon Ashley Elizabeth Arrison Kwasigroh Bethany Babinski Brandon M. Ladd Adam Beeler Morgan Elizabeth Michael Bolin Lepley Brandi Bowlin Christine W. Li Adam N. Boucher Lance R. Lineberger Bernard Andrew Erin K. Luippold Alexander Britton Justin Macklin Natalie Elizabeth Jennifer E. Miller Brown Hannah Mohammad Monroe Crawley Mary Alyssa Jacqueline Curry Musgrove Kaylyn Alyse Alissa Marie Nathans Dougherty Sara Neil Carmen Lindsay Esch Kembral Nelson Ezra G. Gabre Emily Pahde John Tyler Haller Gerald Lee Phillips III Crystal Lo Harrison Alicia Sanchez Jonathan Lloyd Lindsey Caitlin Hartmann Schobert James Brendon Sydney Selby Henderson Lauren Smiley Drew Holmes Kane Stafford Lauren M. Hoth Nancy Tran Molly Elise Hunt Julia N. Wiggers Jordan Johnson Rebecca Wong Kimberly Keller

The annual White Coat Ceremony took place in Memphis on May 1. The event is held at the end of the P1 year to celebrate the successful completion of the first year of the curriculum. Ted Morton, PharmD, associate professor of Clinical Pharmacy and a clinical pharmacy specialist in Internal Medicine at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Memphis, gave the charge to the students.

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Students APhA-ASP

American Pharmacists AssociationAcademy of Student Pharmacists

National Meeting Notes

For the past year, Nick Capote, PharmD ’15, who served as the APhA-ASP national president, represented student pharmacists and UTHSC across the country as he spoke with students about how to “discover your voice” in the profession of pharmacy. The UTHSC COP APhA-ASP Chapter was recognized at the annual meeting with the following awards: • Region 3 Generation Rx Winner • National Second Runner-up for Operation Diabetes • National Second Runner-up for Operation Self-Care • Division A Chapter Award winner At the annual APhA-ASP Meeting held in March in San Diego, California, Lauren Bode, P4, was one of four students nationwide to receive the APhA Student Leadership Award. Each year, schools and colleges Bode of pharmacy from across the country with active APhA-ASP chapters may nominate students who demonstrate great academic achievement and leadership ability to receive the award. Also, in an exciting race, Bode was elected to serve as the 2015-2016 APhAASP National Speaker of the House. This election follows Bode’s year of service as Region III Delegate.

On the rise!

ASP student leaders attending MRM shown from left to right, back row: Jean Phillips, Lance Lineberger, Monroe Crawley, Catherine Corley, Nadine Majaj, Josh Newell, Christina Rickman, Sarah Darby, Tanner Sheilds, Sara Fletcher. Front row: Molly Hunt, Sara Adams, Katlyn Krug, Leslie Hamilton (advisor), Alaina Darby, Lauren Ladd, Nancy Hart (advisor), Julie Farrar

2015 Regional Meeting Accolades In October, Nashville was host to the APhA-ASP Midyear Regional Meeting (MRM) for Region 3. More than 100 UTHSC student pharmacists were in attendance. UTHSC’s own Monroe Crawley served as the Region 3 Member-at-Large for this MRM. The UTHSC chapter’s hard work and dedication towards the APhA-ASP patient care initiative, GenerationRx, Chapter Events

Race for the Summitt The first Knoxville Race for the Summitt 4-Miler, held on Nov. 8, 2014, was organized by the UTHSC COP APhAASP chapter as a benefit for the Pat Summitt Foundation for Alzheimer’s Research. The course featured a 4-mile tour of the UT, Knoxville campus, where Summitt established her legacy as one of the best women’s basketball coaches of all time. More than $5,000 was raised. The race was held again in Knoxville on Oct. 31, 2015.

In August, 15 collegiate chapter members and three alumni of the Omega chapter of Phi Delta Chi attended the 70th Grand Council meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Josh Caballero, PharmD ’01, facilitated the professional development roundtable sessions, while Kirk Hevener, PharmD ’05, served as the Omega chapter alumni delegate. The Omega chapter received several accolades for their efforts over the past year, including a fifth place ranking in brotherhood and a second place ranking in chapter publication. Competing against more than 80 chapters nationwide, Omega placed eighth overall, a 12 point rise from the previous year. This is the first time the chapter has climbed into the top 10 since 2010.

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was recognized. While at the meeting, the UTHSC student pharmacists discussed policy, and as a group they supported a resolution regarding the FDA Expanded Access/Compassionate Use of Investigational New Drugs for patients that are terminally ill or suffering from debilitating chronic conditions over the use of recently introduced “Right to Try” legislation. This resolution passed in the meeting’s business session. Knoxville “PARscription” Golf Tournament APhA-ASP hosted the second annual Knoxville “PARscription” Golf Tournament in April at Green Meadow Country Club. The funds raised assist the chapter in serving the community. A second tournament was held in Memphis on Oct. 15, 2015.


College of Pharmacy

SNPhA

Student National Pharmaceutical Association

Chapter Highlights

The UTHSC COP SNPhA chapter won the Shot@Life national competition sponsored by the United Nations Foundation which advocates for global immunizations. During the challenge, each SNPhA team held an in-house district meeting and contacted a minimum of five state representatives by phone to raise $300. As a part of its winning effort, the UTHSC COP chapter also sent multiple letters to representatives in East, Middle, and West Tennessee and set up tables in both Memphis and Knoxville with computers for students to use to send emails to the representatives. More than $400 was raised, and the chapter won the competition. The donation was matched, bringing the total contribution to $800.

student pharmacists made the trip to Orlando, Florida, to participate in the 68th Annual National Convention for the National Pharmaceutical Association (NPhA). The chapter was awarded the Large Chapter Membership Award, which is given to the chapter with the most registrants for the national meeting. In addition to this achievement, the chapter received second place in the Scrapbook Competition. Several UTHSC student pharmacists received awards and scholarships totaling nearly $5,000 at the conference: • Rite Aid Academic Scholarship ($2,000) – Cathlyn Chan, P4 • Dr. Gayle Tuckett Book Award ($200) – Laken Bush, P3 • Dr. Bobby Price Book Award ($200) – Laken Bush, P3 • Walmart/Sam’s Club NPhA Future Leaders Scholarship Region 2 ($2,000) – Lindsey Schobert, P3 • 3rd Place Rite Aid Community Leader of the Year ($500) – •

Cathlyn Chan, P4

UT Book Scholarship –

Jerry Phillips, P3

National Meeting Wrap-up

In July, Dean Marie Chisholm-Burns, advisors Dr. Joanna Hudson and Laverne Williams, along with 29

Accepting the Shot@Life honor are shown left to right: Malcolm Earle, Chelsea Butler, Lindsey Schobert, Kara Loveday, Laken Bush, Gerald Phillips

Loveday, shown left, and Schobert with Dean Chisholm-Burns, center, after the Clinical Skills Competition.

Regional Meeting Accolades

In February, 32 SNPhA members, including two national officers, attended the Region 1 and 2 Meeting in Atlanta, Georgia. While at the meeting, Kara Loveday and Lindsey Schobert placed first and second, respectively, in the Clinical Skills Competition hosted by Kroger. This is an opportunity for students to showcase their clinical abilities by demonstrating exemplary patient interaction and communication skills, along with professional knowledge. The chapter also won the “InstagramA-Thon” Competition for the second year in a row. The purpose of the contest, held via social media, is to build excitement in the days leading up to the 2015 SNPhA Regional Conferences and to build relationships among chapters. SNPhA members posted over 800 photos to Instagram over a two-week period prior to the meeting.

Students give back

The Class of 2015’s giving efforts yielded $3,410 for the college’s scholarship fund. This was the third year for a student giving campaign. Presenting the check to Dean Marie Chisholm-Burns (far left) at commencement were class representatives (left to right) Amy Sparkman, Erica Schumacher and Nathan Owen.

UTHSC College of Pharmacy - Fall 2015

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Graduation 2015 The College of Pharmacy hosted the first of the six UTHSC graduation ceremonies on Friday, May 15. The 175 graduates, along with their families and friends, gathered in Memphis for the event and reception that followed. Joseph T. DiPiro, PharmD, dean, professor, and the Archie O. McCalley Chair at the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy, was guest speaker. After the degrees were conferred by UTHSC Chancellor Steve Schwab, academic, service and leadership awards were presented. Samantha Caprise Adams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Southaven, Mississippi Abdulrahman Mhdi Alamri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Metab Faleh Alanazi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Brooke Elizabeth Allen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Germantown, Tennessee Clark Allen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trenton, Tennessee Lyndsey Michelle Almon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brentwood, Tennessee Jason Warren Anders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Corbin, Kentucky Sarah Marie Anders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jackson, Tennessee Margaret Arnold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Madison, Alabama Hisham Ahmedbadraldeen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riyadh, Saudia Arabia Ellawyn Jean Baker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bullard, Texas Likeselam Asres Bantu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Jennifer Reed Beavers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shelbyville, Tennessee Yousef Ali Behbahani . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clarksville, Tennessee Sean-Paul Bergeron. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cleveland, Tennessee Scott Christopher Berry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lakeland, Tennessee Carla Delvina Bornsztejn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Lauren Tucci Boswell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Collierville, Tennessee Jarred E Bowden. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lawrenceburg, Tennessee Hilary Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Farmington, Arkansas Daniel Morgan Bradley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville Emily Perry Brandl. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cordova, Tennessee Ihuoma Franca Brooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riverdale, Georgia Kristin Michelle Brown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Collierville, Tennessee Michael Allen Brown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Nathaniel Lee Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rives, Tennessee Cortney Ellen Brugal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bartlett, Tennessee Bradley Gage Burk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baton Rouge, Louisiana Joanna Marie Buxkemper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lenoir City, Tennessee AhYoung Byun. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Van Buren, Arkansas Lauren MeShon Caldwell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chattanooga Nicholas Armando Capote. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . San Antonio, Texas Lindsey Brooke Cardosi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Horn Lake, Mississippi Anwesa Chakrabarti. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nashville 16 20

Rachel Leigh Childers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tullahoma, Tennessee Ijeoma Vivian Chimezie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lebanon, Tennessee Mythili Chunduru. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Murfreesboro, Tennessee Christin Crawford. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oakland, Tennessee Richard Matthew Crawford. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville Christopher Thomas Colanero. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cordova, Tennessee Penelope Lorraine Cronk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Eric Scott Cunningham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville Freda L Cunningham. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oakland, Tennessee Rachel Allison Curtis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spring Hill, Tennessee Camellia Rose Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seymour, Tennessee Erin Elizabeth Davidson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Germantown, Tennessee Brooke R Defosse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Milan, Tennessee Lindsey Allison DeLoach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Humboldt, Tennessee Kishan Desai. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cleveland, Tennessee Susan Elizabeth Dickey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cordova, Tennessee Tyler Scott Dougherty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville Hannah Eberle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville Meagan DeShea Eley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lebanon, Tennessee Nicholas Timothy Elliott. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bartlett, Tennessee Kelsey Erin Finnell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Emily Kyer Foster. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roanoke, Virginia Ryan Louis Fowler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Laura Allyce Fuller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bartlett, Tennessee Cameryn Lane Gaines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ripley, Tennessee Elizabeth Richardson Gallimore. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Emma Ruth Gant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Kyle Jonathan Garrett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Griggsville, Illinois William Chase Garrison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stantonville, Tennessee Travis Taylor Goodwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harrison, Tennessee Alison Rebecca Grigsby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lebanon, Tennessee Phillip James Guidry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thompsons Station, Tennessee Katherine Elise Habkouk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bartlett, Tennessee Jared Keegan Hamar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nashville Brian Thomas Henderson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lebanon Danielle N. Henley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moscow, Tennessee Michelle Amanda Herbert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brentwood, Tennessee Glenn Ryan Hernandez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nashville Ashley Nicole Holland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kennesaw, Georgia Joseph Michael Hollenbeck. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hendersonville, Tennessee Timothy Howze. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Treston Douglas Humphreys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hohenwald, Tennessee William Stone Ireland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Sumer Itayem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Southaven, Mississippi John Landon Jackson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lookout Mountain, Tennessee Shein Jassim Jacob. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missouri City, Texas Joellen Jarrett Jamison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Kelley Kathleen Johnson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville


College of Pharmacy

Patrick Earl Jones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Jack Tyler Joyner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bethel Springs, Tennessee Aleia Lynne Judd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tampa, Florida Michelle Lorraine Jue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Nausheen Karim. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nashville Brandon Scott Kee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville Jessica Burkhart Keen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cordova, Tennessee Mitchell Haynes Keen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Portland, Tennessee Courtney Alicia Kennemore. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nashville Kimberly Anne Khoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Germantown, Tennessee Tommie Jo Kinney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brighton, Tennessee Mary Margaret Kinsella. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Sara Elizabeth Knoll. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bartlett, Tennessee Svetlana Arkadyevna Lapova . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Fern Ellen Lawson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oak Ridge, Tennessee Sheila Annette Liddell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jackson, Mississippi Nicholas Randall Lockhart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Signal Mountain, Tennessee Sandra Elsa Lowe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gallatin, Tennessee James Michael Mace. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Franklin, Tennessee Morgan Leigh Machen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kingsport, Tennessee Vinh Le Mai. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nashville Katherine Leigh March. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nesbit, Mississippi Nicholas Preston Martin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soddy Daisy, Tennessee Zanetta A Mason . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville Tiffany LeAnn McConnell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Munford, Tennessee Chelsey Morgan McPheeters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville Parks Wayne Miller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lebanon, Tennessee Jenna Mincavage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Caitlyn Mary Murphy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manchester, Tennessee Lindsey Narramore. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whitwell, Tennessee Son T. Nguyen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antioch, Tennessee Ryan Lee O’Neal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Smyrna, Tennessee Ekarshi Neel Ojha. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antioch, Tennessee Nathaniel Paul Owen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harrison Township, Michigan Pranvi Parekh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chattanooga Stephanie Leigh Parker. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Collierville, Tennessee Jason Randall Parks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bartlett, Tennessee Dustin Craig Parrott. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville Kevin Suresh Patel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manchester, Tennessee Punam Jagadish Patel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Megan Rose Peek Monteen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Athens, Tennessee Rachel Perry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Jamison Phillips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dayton, Tennessee Elizabeth Brooks Pickren. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Peyton Brooks Plummer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Franklin, Tennessee Ryan Christopher Pratt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryville, Tennessee Kathryn Elizabeth Qualls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baxter, Tennessee

Whitney Dawn Ralph. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Greenbrier, Tennessee Raidel Redondo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tucker, Georgia Nancy Rejoub. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville Rachel Calkins Renwick. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Old Hickory, Tennessee Victoria Walker Reynolds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brentwood, Tennessee Aleisha Eileen Richards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Owingsville, Kentucky Rosie A. Riley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Canton, Mississippi Derrick Randall Rinehart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville Kristy Mader Robertson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Robert Leander Rutschman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Joshua Cody Sanders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Savannah, Tennessee Jonathan Taylor Schmidt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Germantown, Tennessee Erica Rae Schumacher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brentwood, Tennessee Faisal Aqeel Sehli. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Bethlehem Kassu Sene. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Rebecca Anne Shaffer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville Ana Khalid Shaikh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nashville Brian Alexander Shook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mount Juliet, Tennessee Thomas Matthew Sellhorn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Vata Sitimascharoen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . La Vergne, Tennessee Allison Smith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville James Edward Smith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vicksburg, Mississippi Amy Elizabeth Sparkman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Union City, Tennessee Jade Nicole Stearnes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Buchanan, Tennessee Amanda N. Stevens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cordova, Tennessee Richard Stevens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lakeland, Tennessee Judson Brooks Stoltz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lewisburg, Tennessee Scott M. Sullins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Woodbury, Tennessee Thanh Quang Ta. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Jade Nichole Taylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lynnville, Tennessee Amber Moss Toulson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cordova, Tennessee Melissa K. Tsiu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bartlett, Tennessee Brittney Patrice Turner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Okoia Karen Uket. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cordova, Tennessee Dagny Lorraine Ulrich. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Jonathan Richard Van Cleve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Covington, Tennessee Katelyn McKinsey Wassell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Memphis Amber Ryan Watson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Highland, Arkansas Troy Adam Watson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hendersonville, Tennessee Benjamin Paul White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jackson, Tennessee Kelsey Rae White. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lafayette, Tennessee Irina Beregovsky Whitten. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cleveland, Tennessee Ashley Deslauriers Williams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Knoxville Christine Anna Wong. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warren, New Jersey Jessica Dawn Wooster. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eads, Tennessee Kevin Wu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Germantown, Tennessee Jamie David Ziebarth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cordova, Tennessee UTHSC College of Pharmacy Fall 2014 UTHSC College of Pharmacy - Fall 2015 21

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Big data+pharmacy

UTHSC Colleges of Pharmacy and Health Professions partner for joint degree program

L

Laboratory test results, immunization records, radiology reports, personal statistics, records of medications and allergies – all these data and more are currently available in digital formats collected and considered part of a health care or treatment plan. As digital technology advances and is integrated into health care organizations, this information routinely becomes a part of a patient’s electronic health record. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Health Informatics and Information Management (HIIM), the field that works with the acquisition, storage, analysis, use and dissemination of these data, is one of the fastest-growing professions in the country. The continued development and assimilation of technology into health systems will further expand the roles of pharmacists in health informatics as they contribute to health care organizations of all sizes. Pharmacists in this area of practice frequently work in multidisciplinary teams for the planning, development, implementation and maintenance of new health carerelated technologies such as computerized practitioner order entry, bar code medication administration, clinical decision support, robotics, automated dispensing cabinets, intelligent infusion devices, and telepharmacy.

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However, working with these data and the accompanying technology to achieve its best use will require skill sets outside those traditionally taught to pharmacists or health information management professionals. Thanks to the forward-thinking collaboration of the UTHSC Colleges of Pharmacy and Health Professions, student pharmacists now have another degree option available that trains students to work in this rapidly expanding area, and an online certificate program is offered as an option for those students who do not wish to pursue a master’s degree. The dual degree of Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) and Master of Health Informatics and Information Management (MHIIM) was introduced this spring and several PharmD students began the required coursework in mid-August. “Recognizing the need for pharmacists in this area and the uniqueness of our programs to offer this dual degree served as a catalyst,” said Marie Chisholm-Burns, MPH, MBA, FCCP, FASHP, dean of the UTHSC College of Pharmacy. “This dualdegree program was made possible through the hard work of many individuals, and I am very excited about the program, as well as the high quality of its curriculum and


Education

“Recognizing the need for pharmacists in this area and the uniqueness of our programs to offer this dual degree served as a catalyst.” Marie Chisholm-Burns Dean, UTHSC College of Pharmacy

faculty,” she said. “Dean Noma Anderson of the College of Health Professions and the Department of Health Informatics and Information Management are great to work with. Our two colleges collaborate on a variety of successful projects.” Student pharmacists who graduate with a dual PharmD/MHIIM will be ideal candidates for positions in the rapidly growing HIIM field. Even though it is less comprehensive, the HIIM certificate option provides basic skills needed to practice in an electronic health care environment. Since the MHIIM and HIIM program offerings are 100 percent online, students are able to participate, even when they are outside the greater Memphis area at our Nashville or Knoxville campuses. The online aspect of the programs is particularly important and beneficial to our statewide student body. For more information about the dual PharmD/MHIIM degree or certificate, please contact Stephanie Phelps, associate dean of Academic Affairs for the College of Pharmacy at (901) 448-8780, sphelps@uthsc.edu; or Rebecca Reynolds, chair of the Department of HIIM in the College of Health Professions, at (901) 448-6486, rreynol5@uthsc.edu.

UTHSC College of Pharmacy - Fall 2015

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+ SNPhA

ASP advocacy events include painting the rock at UT, Knoxville; sponsoring transit ads and billboards for American Pharmacists Month, and participating in World AIDS Day events.

ASP

At the close of each academic year, the College of Pharmacy’s two professional student organizations submit reports on the clinical and wellness services they have provided. The numbers for the collaborative efforts of American Pharmacists Association Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP), commonly known as ASP, and Student National Pharmaceutical Association (SNPhA), are in, and as you can see, they are impressive. SNPhA, whose membership is “dedicated to the pharmacy profession and serving the underserved,” participated in all six of the organization’s national initiatives. Over the course of the year, it hosted 190 events and provided information or health services to approximately 7,690 individuals. Members of ASP spent 8,760 hours conducting 256 events, meetings and projects. Of this total, 166 were patient care events at which 11,504 patients received clinical or wellness services. These activities supported the organization’s mission to be the “voice of student pharmacists, to provide opportunities for professional growth, to improve patient care, and to envision and advance the future of pharmacy.” UT Lady Vols Head Basketball Coach Holly Warlick supported Race for the Summitt in Knoxville. Hosted by ASP in both Memphis and Knoxville, the race raised close to $10,000 for the Pat Summitt Foundation which funds research and care for those with Alzheimer’s disease.

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SNPhA members provided diabetic counseling and education to 680 patients. ASP provided the same services to 670 patients through Operation Diabetes, resulting in a combined total of 1,350.


Public Service

ASP and SNPhA participated in Operation Immunization, Boo Flu and other events. Working together, a total of 8,197 patients were immunized, including members of the faculty staff and student body at the Memphis, Nashville and Knoxville campuses. An additional 411 were reached through education efforts.

PARscription Golf Tournaments held in both Memphis and Knoxville, netted greater than $8,000 for ASP chapter operations. Other fund raisers brought in an additional $7,800 for operations.

Through Operation Heart, members of ASP screened 1,383 patients for hypertension, 60 for hyperlipidemia, 266 for overall cardiac risk and provided diet and lifestyle modification education to 363 patients.

SNPhA hosted Shot@Life that raised more than $300. ASP took part in the Back the PAC campaign and raised more than $500 for APhA-PA. Through SNPhA’s Remember the Ribbon initiative to raise awareness for HIV/AIDS, information was distributed to 400 people. On any given Saturday, you might find student pharmacists offering health screenings. The one shown below took place in the entrance to Kroger on Highland Avenue in Memphis.

Information on chronic kidney disease was distributed to 1,654 individuals by SNPhA members. Community service events at which student pharmacists provided a variety of services to the underserved took place throughout the year. The one shown above was held at Idlewild Presbyterian Church in Memphis. 1,200 were served as a part of SNPhA’s Power to End Stroke programs, one of the organization’s national initiatives.

Student pharmacists braved the cold to help man the Walgreens tent and provide information at the Memphis Heartwalk in November.

In addition to those served in SNPhA’s six national initiatives, an additional 2,006 patients were seen at community service events held across Tennessee.

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Old

becomes new

again

Collaborative practice returns

“I never thought of my pharmacist as somebody other than a person who could provide medications and give recommendations on over-the-counter products. I now see my pharmacist as a provider of health and wellness.”

Anonymous corporate executive from a point-of-care testing manufacturer

Community pharmacists in Tennessee are finding that what was old is now new again as more and more patients are turning to them for front-line care. At the turn of the 20th century, people looked to their pharmacists first for treatments. Throughout the years, the gap between health care services and providers widened and was reinforced by legislation and patient perceptions. Now, as medicine and nursing practices have become more complicated, the pharmacists’ role in health care is changing and growing. This change has become a part of the ongoing national health care conversation and presents great opportunities for the pharmacy profession. The dialog is taking place in many important and even surprising ways. In a recent continuing education webcast from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Public Health Grand Rounds entitled, “How Pharmacists Can Improve Our Nation’s Health,” it was stated:

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The expanded role of 21st century pharmacists will position them to have greater impact in the shifting landscape of health care and public health. Beyond the dispensing of medications, pharmacists also provide a spectrum of prevention services to help improve health outcomes. In the United States, people with chronic conditions account for 91 percent of all prescriptions filled. By 2020, it is estimated that 157 million Americans will have at least one chronic non-infectious or infectious medical condition. By understanding and maximizing the role of pharmacists, opportunities exist to better use their knowledge and skills to improve our nation’s health. Additionally, the National Governors Association (NGA) addressed pharmacy’s evolving role in its January 2015 NGA Paper, “The Expanding Role of Pharmacists in a Transformed Health Care System.”


Clinical Care

Pharmacists practice in a variety of health care settings. Although they are most often associated with dispensing medications in retail pharmacies, their role is evolving to include providing direct care to patients as members of integrated health care provider teams. Pharmacists have the professional expertise to address key challenges facing the health care system, including the prevalence of people who have multiple chronic conditions and the increased use of more complex medications to manage those diseases. So why is this shift taking place? The numbers help tell the story. • Currently, there are approximately 67,000 pharmacies in the United States. Almost half (33,000) are located within drug stores, grocery stores, hospitals, department stores, medical clinics, surgery clinics, universities, nursing homes, prisons, and other facilities. • According to the Department of Health and Human Services, there are 13 billion pharmacy visits in the United States each year as compared to 470 million physician visits. • 95% of Americans live within five miles of a pharmacy. When these facts are considered together, the picture becomes clear. Few, if any, other health care professionals have this much access or opportunity for interaction with patients. Immunizations Case  Study The shift in pharmacy’s role is reflected in the data documenting the way people Ê Approach   to  this   study  guided   the  access, receive their flu shots. It showsby   how coupled with enhancedrtraining and community   pharmacy’s   ecent  growth  as   a   certifications, make a huge impact. vaccination  provider Influenza Vaccines Provided at a Pharmacy U.S.  Influenza   Vaccine  Provided  at  a   Pharmacy  

30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 1995

2000

2005

2010

2015

Pharmacy’s renewed role is supported by recent change in Tennessee law. Signed by Governor Bill Haslam on April 29, 2014, and effective on July 1, 2014, the Collaborative Pharmacy Practice Law (CPPL) “allows Tennessee-licensed

pharmacists and prescribers to enter into a voluntary collaborative pharmacy practice agreement, and assigns ultimate authority on the scope of pharmacist-provided services to the authorizing prescribers. The law also allows pharmacists to provide patient care services and activities for groups of patients, including prescribing drugs or ordering laboratory tests, if put in writing by the prescribers as part of a signed collaborative pharmacy practice agreement.” With this change in legislation, major point-of-care testing (POCT) manufacturers are looking at how they will partner with pharmacists and acknowledge that community pharmacies can become an enormous market for diagnostics. This has been an interesting side effect of the new legislation. Previously, POCT manufacturers have excluded pharmacies as a major player in POCT diagnostics because of their inability to act on results to create a prescription. With the new law, these manufacturers are now looking at novel ways to approach patient care. Prior to the legislation being passed, community pharmacies in Tennessee had been collaborating with prescribers on POCT services. Kroger pharmacies across Tennessee use POCT to screen and test patients and employees for chronic conditions like diabetes and high cholesterol. However, treatment was often delayed due to communication difficulties between pharmacist and physician. Now with the new law in place, pharmacists can act immediately on results. Presently, the UTHSC College of Pharmacy is collaborating with community pharmacies across Tennessee to prepare current and future pharmacists to take advantage of this new paradigm in patient care. During their first year of post-graduate residencies in community pharmacy, our graduate pharmacists are participating in and helping to grow patient services in the community pharmacy setting. At Blount Discount Pharmacy in Maryville, Tennessee, and at Reeves-Sain in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, residents are helping establish diabetes self-management programs. In Knoxville at Mac’s Pharmacy and Belew Drug, residents are using pharmacogenomic testing to assist in treatment decisions. And, at Kroger pharmacies in Memphis and Nashville, residents have become an integral part of the pharmacy team providing POCT, disease state management and coaching programs. And this is just the start. As the community pharmacist’s collaborative practice role evolves, so will the college’s place in providing education and training opportunities.

In 1231, Frederic II of Hohenstaufen, the Emperor of Germany and King of Sicily, issued the Edict of Palermo that created a clear distinction between the responsibilities of physicians and apothecaries. The edict defined the professional practices of medicine and pharmacy and laid down regulations for each. To prevent the exploitation of the sick, it banned physicians and apothecaries from entering into a business relationship. It also established government supervision of the practice of pharmacy. From here, the idea of the separation of diagnosis and treatment spread across Europe.

Since 1998, the UTHSC College of Pharmacy has trained its students to give vaccinations. Now our pharmacy students receive immunization training and earn their immunization certification in the second semester of their P1 year.

UTHSC College of Pharmacy - Fall 2015

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Lab pa r t ners T

“Through TEAMwork, everyone achieves more.”

wo researchers – one established, one starting his career. Each joined the UTHSC College of Pharmacy faculty in the fall of 2014. Each has a question related to HIV/AIDS. While one is taking a clinical approach and hopes to find a better delivery of drugs to treat the disease, the other is looking for better medications to treat those living with HIV/AIDS who abuse alcohol, tobacco and drugs. Both have set up research laboratories at the college, and through collaboration, are achieving faster and better results. This is due in part to the interrelated core values that guide the two research teams that work in the lab. The values are spelled out on small signs that are visible at several locations in the lab – GOOD (go on for original discovery) science, TEAM (together everyone achieves more) work, BPNS (be predictable, no surprises) Action and EEO-LEO (empower each other, learn from each other) Attitude. This mindset enables the researchers’ cooperation and defines their laboratory practices. “We need to be a model lab, not just in our science and in terms of safety, but

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also in our courtesy to people,” veteran researcher and Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences Santosh Kumar, PhD explained. “Our research interests are similar enough so that we can help one another, but dissimilar enough so that we are not competing. We have our own avenues and research objectives,” said Theodore (Ted) Cory, PharmD, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy, who is in his first year of research at UTHSC and is partnering with Dr. Kumar in his research projects. The researchers have identified several ways that working together has assisted each of their projects. First, experiments are jointly reviewed and questions about research designs are identified. Group critiques that strengthen projects take place during joint lab meetings. By sharing information and resources, particularly patient recruitment, redundancies are reduced. Through this synergistic approach, each researcher is further along in their respective activities. Dr. Cory is looking at the places where HIV hides in the body, also known as reservoir or sanctuary sites. In these


Research

“Teaching is one of my passions,”

sites, drug concentrations are not effective. He seeks to find a way to increase the effectiveness of drug concentrations inside of sanctuary sites, thereby reducing the presence of the virus. To do his research, Dr. Cory works with a technician and a P3 student. As part of his and Dr. Kumar’s project, he is working with Regional One Health (formerly TheMed) to collect blood samples of those who are HIV positive and are also alcohol and drug abusers. The cells are analyzed for molecules that neutralize antiretrovirals. “We’ve gotten a lot done in the last year,” Dr. Cory said. He has results that are now being prepared for publication. He continued, “Amazing strides have been made in HIV/AIDs research in the last 10-15 years. Having AIDS is no longer a death sentence, but a disease you can live with. There is still a ton of work to do before we have a cure for the disease. Hopefully what I am doing is a small piece that will lead to the long-term goal of a cure.” The blood samples collected and subjects recruited by Dr. Cory’s lab are also used by Dr. Kumar in his research that is primarily focused on the effects of alcohol and tobacco consumption on long-term surviving patients with HIV-1 who are receiving antiretroviral therapy. A prolific researcher and publisher, Dr. Kumar started a new lab to study HIV six years ago. “I saw that this prominent disease was exploding. I took the position of ‘What was coming?’ and used my basic science training to begin my research,” he explained.

“We are now seeing the maturation of the disease [HIV/AIDS] and have started studying neuroAIDS and HIV-associated dementia. Those who have lived 10-15 years with the disease are now showing cognitive disorders like memory loss, lack of attention, and shaking hands. This is a hot topic for NIH [National Institutes of Health],” said Dr. Kumar. The HIV-associated dementia problem is compounded in aging HIV/AIDS survivors as drug, tobacco and alcohol abuse is prevalent in this population. “In some cases, addictions caused the infections, for example using contaminated needles. Now we see that all these addictions interact to make problems worse – HIV/AIDS; drug, tobacco and alcohol abuse. Then, these long-term survivors must face the onset of diseases associated with aging like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s,” Dr. Kumar continued. His research seeks to develop novel drugs and treatments of the cognitive disorders now seen in long-term HIV/AIDS patients who abuse substances. “The drug therapies do not work as well when you are drinking or smoking. Of course, the first choice would be to change the habit. This would be best. But for those who can’t, we hope to find a novel drug solution or change their treatment plan. This population of patients will continue to grow as more people are living with the disease.” Funded by an NIH grant, Dr. Kumar’s research team comprises two postdoctoral trainees, three graduate students, a research assistant, a summer student and a volunteer. Members of the research team include, from left to right: Namita Sinha, BS; Benjamin Patters, BS; Santosh Kumar, PhD; Narasimha Midde, PhD; Theodore Cory, PhD, PharmD; Mohammad Rahman, MS; Hui He, PhD; Sabina Ranjit, MS.

said Dr. Santosh Kumar. The breadth and depth of his commitment to both pharmacy education and research is evident from the awards he has received. In 2014, the President of India, Pranab Mukherjee, presented him the “Mahatma Gandhi Pravasi Samman” or the “Mahatma Gandhi Non-resident Indian Honor.” The award is given by the Non-resident Indian (NRI) Welfare Society of India to a handful of NRIs every year. The advisory committee that selects the recipients comprises many eminent personalities, including current central government ministers, former prime ministers of India and state governors. Dr. Kumar was recognized for his teaching and mentoring students, for his national and international service and recognition, for inspiring others’ for his outstanding service along with his contribution, and for his achievements in research with HIV-1 and substance abuse. He has inspired numerous students and children through teaching and mentoring, and is passionate about inspiring and bringing out the best in “Gen iY” (members of the generation who were born in the internet age after 1990). Additionally this past April, Dr. Kumar was awarded the Society of Neuroimmune Pharmacology (SNIP) Outstanding Service and Support Award, given to an individual who has shown extraordinary service in facilitating the operation of the society’s initiatives. This annual award recognizes SNIP members who have demonstrated excellence in research and service to the society. Dr. Kumar has served as SNIP’s Chair of the Early Career Investigator Committee for the past six years and has been instrumental in completing work considered “behind the scenes.” In 2013, while a member of the faculty at the University of Missouri, Kansas City, he was named Teacher of the Year.

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Congratulations! Micah Cost, PharmD ’08, has been named the Tennessee Pharmacists Association (TPA) executive director. He has been a member of TPA since 2008 and has served as the executive resident in Association Management and Health Policy and the director of Professional Affairs. Dr. Cost has served TPA and its members in a variety of ways during his time with the association, including delivering education and training programs for pharmacists and student pharmacists, assisting members with questions and practicebased issues, developing and implementing grants and programs to improve the quality of care for patients, and working to promote the profession of pharmacy to valued association partners.

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Tracy McDowd, PharmD ’09, has been named chair of the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP) Schools of Pharmacy Relations Committee. She joined the academy in 2010 and in April 2012 and was selected to serve on AMCPS Schools of Pharmacy Relations Committee (SOPRC). The SOPRC committee chair attends the annual AMCP Winter Leadership Meeting along with the AMCP board of directors, elected officers and committee chairs. As a part of this role, she serves as the national diplomat director in which she oversees the AMCP Diplomat Program. She most recently presented an educational session at the AMCP Nexus meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, in October 2014 titled, “The ABCs and Stars of Quality Measures” as part of the Fundamentals of Managed Care Pharmacy Certificate Program. Her session reviewed health plan accreditation, quality measures related to medication use, and an overview of the Medicare Star Ratings program.

William A. Humphrey, DPh ’82, MBA, was appointed to serve on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Pharmacy Compounding Advisory Committee. The committee is made up of 12 voting members and two non-voting members. They are responsible for providing advice on scientific, technical, and medical issues related to drug compounding under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act sections 503A and 503B. Dr. Humphrey is currently the director of Pharmacy Operations at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis. He joined St. Jude and became an adjunct faculty member at UTHSC COP in 1985 after completing two years of residency at Methodist Hospital and receiving an MBA from the University of Memphis.

Joshua Caballero, PharmD ’01, BCPP, was recently named to the American Society of HealthSystem Pharmacists (ASHP) Board. He is the primary editor for ASHP’s book “Get the Residency.” Dr. Caballero is currently an associate professor at Nova Southeastern University with a practice site at Nova Southeastern University Geriatrics Clinic. His professional interests are psychiatric pharmacy and pharmacy education. He is a preceptor for students in their advanced pharmacy practice experiences and coordinates one of the therapeutics sequences and a pharmacy residency elective course. Dr. Caballero primarily lectures on psychiatric topics in various populations. He has been a past recipient of the yearly Golden Apple Award (2008, 2012), given to the best professor in the College of Pharmacy and the SGA Student Advisor of the Year Award in 2013.


Alumni Recognitions

Randle Williams BS ’77

UTHSC College of Pharmacy In February, Corry Johnston, PharmD ’11, BCPS, BCNSP, CNSC, was awarded the American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) New Practitioner Award on behalf of the Pharmacy Practice Section. She received the award for her research project titled, “Nutrition Support Service-Guided Intravenous Potassium Therapy for Hypokalemic Critically Ill Trauma Patients.” This award recognizes achievements of a new practitioner pharmacist or student pharmacist member of ASPEN who is involved in research to further the science and practice of nutrition support. This is the fourth time in the past five years that a UTHSC COP trainee has received this award. When asked about receiving the award, Dr. Johnston replied, “I was honored to be chosen as the recipient of the award this year. I would not be here without the support of my friends and family and the incredibly talented faculty and clinical pharmacists at UT who gave me the opportunity to learn from them and mentored me along the way.”

Jonathan Bain, PharmD ’11, is a critical care pharmacy specialist at the Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California. Dr. Bain was recognized for his outstanding work in critical care pharmacy in the May 2015 Member Spotlight report of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP). In the article, on the organization’s website, Dr. Bain credits the influence from his UTHSC College of Pharmacy mentors: G. Christopher Wood, PharmD, FCCP, BCPS-AQ ID; Bradley Boucher, PharmD, FCCP, FCCM, and P. David Rogers, PharmD, PhD, for his initial decision to join ACCP. Dr. Bain also noted, “I hope it stresses the importance of professional mentors, I have only gotten this far by surrounding myself by them and always striving to be more like them. If you shoot for the stars and miss, at least you will land among the stars.”

Outstanding Alumnus Dr. Randle Williams considers himself an “in-the-trenches”

pharmacist, having practiced community pharmacy his entire career. He has served as the pharmacy manager at Fred’s in Fairview since 2000 and enjoys getting to know his patients and their families on a personal level. Inspired to pursue a pharmacy career by his brother-inlaw and a lifelong friend, both community pharmacists, Dr. Williams began his career and discovered a personal love for community pharmacy at Walgreens, first in Memphis and then Nashville. He co-owned and managed an independent pharmacy in Fairview for 17 years before joining Fred’s. His dedication to service is exemplified by an interest in influenza immunization, which has been rewarded by Fred’s with recognitions as top flu immunizer in his district, in part through off-site clinics. For Dr. Williams, his role in the community extends beyond his job. He previously served as a member of the board of directors of North Middle Tennessee Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Boy Scout leader, Master of Fairview Masonic Lodge, and president of Dickson County Shrine Club. A dedicated supporter of UT, he has served on the UTHSC COP Alumni Board and the UT Alumni Association Board of Governors. He encourages fellow alumni to support their college through service and charitable giving. Professionally, he has been an active member of the Tennessee Pharmacists Association (TPA) for 38 years. He chaired the TPA Awards Committee for eight years, has been a member of PharmPAC, and is currently a member of the PharmPAC Contribution Board of Directors. He is also a member of the Tennessee Society of Chain Pharmacists. Dr. Williams lives in Burns, Tennessee, with his wife Elissa. He is an avid hunter of waterfowl, collector of antique decoys, fan of UT sports and Titans football, and season ticket holder to the Tennessee Performing Arts Center. He has one son, Robert, also a UT graduate, who lives with wife, Courtney, in Lebanon, Tennessee.

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Congratulations!

The 128th Annual Tennessee Pharmacists Association Convention and Expo was held on July 13-16 in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Many faculty and alumni presented at the conference; several received awards. •

Rob A. Lucas, PharmD, BCPS, FASHP, received the 2015 Health-System Pharmacist of the Year Award.

Jeanne R. Ezell, DPh ’78, MS, FASHP, received the 2015 Distinguished Service Award.

Ronnie Felts, DPh ’74, received the 2015 Cardinal Health GenerationRx Champions Award.

W. Shannon McCool, DPh ’72, received the 2015 Excellence in Innovation Award.

Jim Eoff, PharmD ’69, ’70, received the 2015 Barbara McAndrew Herald Award for sustained service.

Mac Wilhoit, DPh ’77, received the 2015 Bowl of Hygeia Award.

Le Conte Medical Center Pharmacy Department Director of Pharmacy Claudia Ogburn, DPh ’74, was awarded the 2015 Innovative Health-System Pharmacy Practice Award to a Pharmacy Practice with 100 Beds or Less.

Veterans Administration Tennessee Valley Healthcare System Pharmacy Service Director of Pharmacy, Diane D. Shackelford, PharmD, MHA ’83, ’84, received the 2015 Innovative Health-System Pharmacy Practice Award to Other Pharmacy Practice Types.

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Harriet Behm, PharmD ’75, was selected as one of the eight best college professors in Lane County, Oregon. Candidates for the award were chosen from The University of Oregon, Lane Community College, and Northwest Christian University. The recognition comes from an article published by Eugene Magazine, which occasionally writes about the most highly regarded people in various professions in the area. As an adjunct professor of chemistry at Lane Community College, she was the only one of the eight chosen who teaches science. She also was honored previously with a Faculty Recognition Award. Dr. Behm says that she puts in a lot of extra hours and works very hard to make chemistry “interesting, fun, non-scary, and accessible.” She does say, however, that students have to work very hard in her classes but are always rewarded if they are willing to put in the time and effort.

Med Communications, Inc., recently announced the promotion of Beth Miller, PharmD ’97, to vice president of Medical Communications. Dr. Miller has been employed with Med Communications for the past 10 years. She began her work with the company as a medical information specialist and medical writer. She was promoted to director, Medical Information in 2010, and has served as senior director, Medical Information for the past three years. Med Communications, Inc., President and CEO J. Allen Scoggin, PharmD ’71, was a UTHSC College of Pharmacy faculty member for 30 years. Med Communications, Inc., is a medical information consulting and outsourcing company located in the Memphis BioWorks Foundation Building.

Chris Bradberry, PharmD ’72, was named interim president of Creighton University. Dr. Bradberry has been a faculty member at several institutions, including the University of Nebraska, the University of Texas, the University of Oklahoma and the University of Tennessee where he was professor, Departments of Pharmacy and Family Medicine, and chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Pharmacoeconomics. He served as interim vice president for Academic Affairs at Creighton University from January 2014 – August 2014. Dr. Bradberry serves as dean at Creighton University Medical Center School of Pharmacy and Health Professions, and he is an active member in several professional organizations.

On Sept. 5, the University of Tennessee Alumni Association hosted a Big Orange Tailgate Tour bash at BB King’s in downtown Nashville before the UT vs. Bowling Green game. Kris Phillips, associate vice chancellor of Alumni Affairs and Tracy Hagemann, PharmD, professor of Clinical Pharmacy and associate dean for the Nashville campus, spoke about the new UTHSC College of Pharmacy campus in Nashville, UTHSC’s partnership with St. Thomas Hospital, and how these collaborations boost the college’s presence in Nashville and the surrounding area.


Alumni Recognitions

Micah Cost

PharmD ’08

UTHSC College of Pharmacy

Fred Gattas, PharmD ’01, BCNP, and Susan S. Vos, PharmD ’03, BCPS, were named Fellows of the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) in March. Candidates for this designation are selected from members of either the APhA-Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management (APhA-APPM) or the APhA-Academy of Pharmaceutical Research and Science (APhA-APRS). To be awarded fellowship status, members must have a minimum of ten years professional experience and have demonstrated exemplary professional achievements and service to the profession through activities with APhA and other professional organizations. Dr. Gattas is an authorized nuclear pharmacist and the director for Quality and Safety with Triad Isotopes, Inc. He also serves as an assistant professor for the UTHSC College of Pharmacy, Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville, and St. Louis College of Pharmacy. He has been an active leader in APhA-APPM, taking on a variety of roles and leadership positions within the organization. Dr. Gattas said, “When the call came in from APhA that I was actually going to be recognized, I then felt a weight because I know many of the current APhA Fellows, and all they have done for the profession of pharmacy.” Dr. Vos is currently a clinical associate professor and director of the Professional Experience Program at the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy. She has been heavily involved in APhA throughout her pharmacy career, holding leadership positions and serving as the advisor for the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy chapter of the APhA-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP). When she learned she would be receiving the award, she said, “I distinctly remember as a student pharmacist seeing the original charter of the student branch of APhA. As I scanned the names of the people who signed the charter for the UT student chapter in the 1940s, I spotted my grandmother’s name and then my grandfather’s. Still today, I recall that moment and think about the vision of those students turning into the successful student organization at the UT APhA-ASP chapter is today.”

Distinguished Recent Alumnus Award

A second-generation pharmacist, Dr. Micah Cost currently serves as the executive director for the Tennessee Pharmacists Association (TPA). Prior to assuming this role, Dr. Cost completed an executive residency in association management and health policy with TPA and served for more than five years as TPA’s director of professional affairs. Since earning a Bachelor of Arts degree from Lipscomb University and Doctor of Pharmacy degree from UTHSC, Dr. Cost has practiced long-term care pharmacy, community pharmacy, and health-system pharmacy, and he recently completed a Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy through the University of Florida. He currently serves as a trainer for the American Pharmacists Association in the specialty practice areas of pharmacy-based immunization delivery, diabetes care, and delivering medication therapy management services. Additionally, Dr. Cost serves as a preceptor for APPE students from several pharmacy programs in Tennessee. Dr. Cost is the son of Dr. Terry Cost and Mrs. Gayle Cost, of Franklin, and he and his wife of nine years, Kyle, live in Thompson’s Station. A note: Dr. Cost is the first recipient of the College of Pharmacy Distinguished Recent Alumnus Award. The award was established to recognize those alumni who make significant accomplishments within 10 years of their graduation date. The honoree’s achievements have been significant to UTHSC, and the general welfare of his or her community and profession. He or she is considered an outstanding ambassador for UTHSC, exhibited by extraordinary service and contributions to alma mater, profession, community, state or nation.

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Congratulations!

Gov. Bill Haslam has appointed William E. Evans, PharmD ’73, ’74, to the University of Tennessee Board of Trustees. Dr. Evans is one of four executives from across the state appointed to the board. He served as Chief Executive Officer of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Dr. Evans is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP). He is also a past president of ACCP and the American Pharmacists Association – Academy of Pharmaceutical Research and Science. Dr. Evans has also served in roles with the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and as a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Cancer Institute.

Sam Davis, PharmD ’13, completed a two-year fellowship in Regulatory Affairs – Drug Advertising and Promotion at Purdue University in June 2015. During the fellowship, his time was split between Eli Lilly, Purdue University, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). While at Eli Lilly, Dr. Davis was a member of the regulatory review team and worked on several advertising campaigns for Lilly Oncology. At Purdue University, he worked on innovative initiatives in the Office of Engagement and lectured at the College of Pharmacy. While at the FDA, Dr. Davis assumed the role of a Regulatory Review Officer in the Office of Prescription Drug Promotion and was responsible for ensuring the truthful and non-misleading dissemination of multiple advertising campaigns.

An evening at the Orpheum

A UT orange bow tie and cummerbund accented his tuxedo as Dr. Jim Eoff, former executive associate dean at UTHSC College of Pharmacy, performed at the Orpheum Theatre on June 9, 2015. The opportunity to play the grand movie theatre organ was a retirement gift from the college in honor of his 45 years of faithful service. Guests, including two busloads of friends from Christ United Methodist Church, assembled in the historic theatre where they were treated to 11 sets of songs. Dr. Eoff’s fingers flew across the keys and his feet pumped the pedals of the ornate organ for more than two hours. The audience participated in a sing-along that included, of course, “Rocky Top.” Dr. Eoff said of the event, “This organ concert was one of the highlights of my career and meant so much to me personally. I was overwhelmed by the generosity of those who provided this experience for my retirement gift and equally overwhelmed by the number of colleagues, students and friends who attended. I had a fantastic time, and the thrill of the evening was on par with that of a win over Alabama in football.”

In September, UTHSC COP Alumni President Martha Shepard, BS ’73, and her husband David, BS ’74, created a scholarship that will provide assistance to students with demonstrated financial need. To be considered, students must be from Middle Tennessee, or pursue their education and training from the newly accredited Nashville campus. The Shepards, who live in Dickson, have worked throughout their careers to affect local and state health care legislation and policies. David serves as a state legislator. “David and Martha are wonderful examples of the difference UT alumni make in their community, in our state and as an integral part of our university family,” Dr. Chisholm-Burns said. “We greatly appreciate their support of and commitment to their alma mater. We will continue to work diligently to be worthy stewards of all the resources our pharmacy alumni so generously donate.” The Shepards were recently featured in the Spring 2015 issue of Tennessee Alumnus magazine. See http://alumnus.tennessee.edu/2015/05/health-care-providers/ to read more about them.

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Alumni Recognitions

Max Ray

Certifications Brandon Hale, PharmD ’11, became a licensed diabetes educator in Kentucky. The mission and purpose of the Kentucky Board of Licensed Diabetes Educators is to regulate the practice of diabetes education in Kentucky and to ensure safe and competent diabetes education to all people in the commonwealth. Corry T. Johnston, PharmD ’11, BCNSP, a clinical pharmacist at the University of Maryland Baltimore Washington Medical Center, earned the Certified Nutrition Support Clinician (CNSC) designation. The CNSC is a multidisciplinary certification from the National Board of Nutrition Support Certification established by the American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. It is the most widely accepted, visible nutrition support certification with recognition both nationally and internationally. Grishma Desai, PharmD ’11, assistant professor of Clinical Pharmacy, became a Certified Professional in Health Information and Management Systems (CPHIMS). Dr. Desai completed a PGY-1 residency at the Grady Health System of Atlanta, Georgia in 2012 and currently practices as an informatics pharmacist at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis.

Want to find a classmate or share news? To stay connected go to: http://uthscalumni.com/KeepinTouch We’re social! Keep up with the UTHSC College of Pharmacy online.

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UTPharmacy

Please join the UTHSC College of Pharmacy for an

Alumni Reception

in conjunction with the ASHP 50th Midyear Clinical Meeting and Exhibition Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2015 • 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. New Orleans Downtown Marriott at the Convention Center 859 Convention Center Blvd., New Orleans, LA 70130

MS ’66, PharmD ’69

UTHSC College of Pharmacy

Distinguished Service Award

Dr. Max Ray was honored with the 2015 Distinguished Service Award at the April meeting of the UTHSC COP Alumni Board for substantial contributions to the field of pharmacy and his alma mater. Dr. Ray’s distinguished career has encompassed pharmacy practice, education and positions in the pharmacy associations. He is currently Dean Emeritus of the College of Pharmacy at Western University of Health Sciences, and although enjoying semiretirement, he is still active in professional associations and continues to speak and write about this profession. He has presented at more than 400 national and international conferences and has published 90 professional and scientific papers. Dr. Ray also serves as a consultant to the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). But, for him, all roads seem to lead to one place — Memphis — as evidenced by his current commitment to students. He returns to campus often and recently served as an advisor at the university’s resume workshops to help students prepare to enter the job market. Even though he has received several awards and honors, he says, “I am most proud of the professional success of so many of the students and residents I have had the opportunity to work with over the past 50 years.” Dr. Ray also stood at the national forefront of establishing the PharmD degree as the entry-level pharmacy degree. He laid the foundation for specialty residencies within pharmacy during his tenure as director of accreditation services of the American Society of Hospital Pharmacists. Also, Dr. Ray was involved with planning and conducting the 1985 ASHP Hilton Head Conference, which resulted in consensus that “clinical pharmacy” is a mainstream role of all pharmacy practitioners, not a specialty.

Watch your email for more information!

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2015-16 College of Pharmacy Scholarship Recipients At scholarship presentation ceremonies held simultaneously on Aug. 28 in Knoxville, Memphis and Nashville, a total of 352

scholarships were awarded to UTHSC College of Pharmacy students. Many thanks to our generous alumni donors.

A few photos from the scholarship representations: at left, Knoxville; above, Memphis; at right, Nashville Alicia Stephens Scholarship Christine Handy

Charles R. and Henry C. Shapard Scholarship

Andy Holt Scholarship Julie Farrar, Lauren Ladd, Rachel Ness, Alexandra Punke

Chattanooga Area Pharmacists Society Scholarship Nisha Patel

Allen F. Taylor Memorial Scholarship Brandon Hawkins

Brandi Fields, Victoria Germinario, Samantha Lewis, Rebecca Moser, Meredith Newsom, Spenser Rohr, Elmer “Trey” Smith, Rachel Triplett

Anna and John Schurig, Sr. Scholarship Brandon Ladd

Connie Johnson Underwood Scholarship Tenley Ryan

Anna Belle and Tate Morgan Scholarship Lisa Hayes, Kenneth Atkins, Sarah Hawkins, Madison Iman, Ashlie Reagan, Robert “Kane” Stafford, Anderson Wade, Jessica Walker Baetenna McAdoo Black Scholarship Alicia Sanchez Bill & Betty Staggs Scholarship Robert “Monroe” Crawley

Bob Cates Memorial Scholarship Ashley Kwasigroh

Cardinal Health Pharmacy Scholarship Crystal Harrison

Cardinal Nuclear Pharmacy Scholarship Charles Johnson, Brandon Ladd, Whitney McKinney, Olabisi Olumuyiwa, Crystal Peters, Marcy Pilate, Matthew Strickland

Chancellor’s Diversity Scholarship Benjamin Afoakwa, Kassandra Bates, Sheena Bethea, Biancia Bolton, Terrence Brown, Charlease Cannon, Si-Ing Chen, Christina Chintanaphol, Elijah Choy, Antashara Davis, Reshuna Durden, Malcolm Earle, Cedric Foster, Brandon Gard, Charity Golden, Kashira Harris, Tam Hua, Louis Jackson, Cedric Jones, Deanna Joo, Heir Jordan, Krupa Kalaria, Christin Kilcrease, Da Kim, Jennifer Kundeti, Uyen Le, Jennifer Lee, Pinky Mahbubani, Courtney Manlove, Keyera McCoy, Whitney McKinney, Ashlee Mitchell, Dharaben Naik, Alissa Nathans, Tien Ngo, Benjamin Nguyen, Carol Nguyen, Bhavyata Parag, Rohith Parvathareddy, Bhumi Patel, Nesha Patel, Rima Patel, Sneha Patel, Ryan Payne, Crystal Peters, Avideh Ramezanifar, Jazzmine Redden, Muzammel Rizvi, Reginald Robinson Jr., Alicia Sanchez, Dennis Santiago, Jessica Smith, Jessica Some, Kenneth Sykes, Zeab Tadesse, Apana Agha Takwi, Angee Taylor, Hermon Tekie, Huy Vi, Sally White, Ashlee Williams

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Corley Family Scholarship Elizabeth Royal

CVS Pharmacy Scholarship Alaina Darby, Katlyn Krug, Rebecca Moser, Jean Phillips Dennis R. and Martha M. O’Dell Scholarship Amanda Cavness Dianne V. Duncan Scholarship Alissa Nathans

Dick and Greta Gourley Scholarship Michael Braud Dudley and Katherine Hoskins Scholarship Elise Abbas, Adam Beeler Eddie and Dot Rowe Scholarship Jessica Lyle Elizabeth Club Scholarship Janet Hanna J. W. Kirksey Memorial Scholarship Alix Andreaco, Brandon Gard, James Henderson, Kristin Summers James M. Holt Scholarship Cody Jacobs Jana L. Fuqua Scholarship Olabisi Olumuyiwa Jerry and Barbara Treece Scholarship Adam Wiss


Giving and Receiving

Kevin Lazarini Scholarship Sara Neil Kmart Scholarship Antashara Davis Larry and Sherry Hill Community Pharmacy Scholarship Lauren Bunch UTAA Legacy Scholarship Sara Baltensperger Leonard and Dottye Compton Scholarship Melanie Manis Linda Highers Scholarship Alexandra Blalock, Shelby Brooks, Robert Bruno, Nicholas Cohagen, Margaret Cothern, Carmen Esch, Courtney Grant, Drew Holmes, Kerri Horton, Daniel Jinks, Jessica Johnson, Kimberly Johnstone, Paige Kirby, Jeremiah Mooney, Jordan Perrine, Gregory Phelps, Haley Porter, Lindsey Schobert, Cori Shope, Joseph Stokes, Megan Thomas, Selena Warminski, Rebecca Whitehead, Megan Whitten Martha Ann Robinson Scholarship Torrey Smith, Elmer “Trey” Smith Melinda Rhea Garrett Scholarship Sara Fletcher Memphis Area Pharmacists Society Scholarship Ashley Weaver Mickey and Hilie Collins King Scholarship Brandon Tubbs Otha Bailey Swearingen Scholarship Kara Loveday, Jessica Smith Pharmacy Centennial Scholarship Lauren Bode, Hannah Donnelly Pharmacy Class of 1961 Scholarship Adam Beeler PharmD/PhD Scholarship Kayihura Manigaba Philip and Gaye Enkema Scholarship Nancy Tran Plough Scholarship Sara Baltensperger, Mary Barrett, Anna Birg, James Bolin, Sarah Burnette, Laken Bush, James Butts, Joshua Canter, Krystyna Clark, Mark Cole, Alexandria David, Bethany Doss, Margaret “Molly” Goggans, Morgan Gray, Cameron Haefele, Kimberly Hall, Steven Harrington, Lauren Hoth, Sarah Hunter, Austin Ing, Karen Jaslow, Weston Keen, Anna Kegley, Dylan Knox, Ashley Kwasigroh, Haley Leach, Bethany Leachman, Morgan Lingerfelt, Peyton Lucas, Keegan Mattox, Christopher McCown, Amy Metcalfe, Mostafa Moarefian, Cody Murrell, Sara Neil, Daniel Neu, Sara Nimer, Ethan Odineal, Mary Pakkala, Emily Pahde, Samantha Peykoff, Gerald Phillips, Joseph Pittman, Christina Rickman, Katherine Robinson, Jillian Schmidt, Sarah Schuman, Sara Shelton, Steven Skovran, Sophia Smith, Karlie Taylor, Stephanie Terry, Roxanne Warrelmann, Colton Whiteside, Christopher Wilson, Timothy Zaske, Aaron Zuller

Scholarship listing continued on following page.

Legacy Scholar Sara Baltensperger “I’m excited to dive in! I have known my whole life that this is what I wanted to do, and I’m excited to learn and be a part of the community at UT.” First-year student Sara Baltensperger is UTHSC COP’s 2015-16 Legacy Scholar, pursuing a career in pharmacy and following in her father’s footsteps. However, her entire family — mother, father and four siblings — are dedicated to helping others through work in health professions. Her father, Joseph, PharmD ’89, and mother, Tina (Kudla), BSN ’85, have spent their careers as care providers. Her two brothers are training to be a paramedic and a physical therapist. One sister is pursuing a degree in nursing, and another is exploring the World Race, an 11-month mission trip to 11 countries. “We were never pressured by our parents to go into nursing or pharmacy or health care. They just wanted us to be happy,” Sara said. A Millington native, she never wanted to leave the Memphis area. She pursued undergraduate studies at the University of Memphis and chose UTHSC COP above any other option for pharmacy school. “I admire all my father has done in his pharmacy career, and it all started here,” she said. Baltensperger speaks at length about her admiration for her father and credits her work ethic to him as her role model. She views the scholarship award as a testament to all he and her mother have accomplished. “This scholarship makes me even more proud to come here and shows how much pride there is among alumni,” Baltensperger said. She is keeping an open mind for now about her career path. Hoping to stay connected to patients, Baltensperger also has an interest in pursuing research, inspired by a documentary of the history of cancer, “The Emperor of All Maladies.” To her, there is no better place to define and pursue her career interests than UTHSC and Memphis. After graduation, she plans to stay closeby and make a difference in her own community.

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Leave your legacy

Scholarships continued from previous page Raymond McCullough Scholarship Mineka Bridges, Celestino Zayas Morales Reeves-Sain Scholarship Jon Golden Robert and Thelma Dodson Scholarship Sarah Hodge, Emily Longaker, Christopher McCown Roger W. Price Scholarship Kimberly Keller Sammie and Doris Arnold Scholarship Walter Spence

Have you thought about the legacy you will leave behind?

Planned giving can fulfill your wishes, simplify your estate for your family, and reduce the tax burden applied to your assets, all while benefiting causes you hold dear. The special nature of these gifts deserves a special honor, and UTHSC offers membership in its Hershel P. “Pat” Wall Legacy Society. Arguably the most recognizable figure in UTHSC’s history, Hershel P. “Pat” Wall, MD ’60, has dedicated more than 50 years to the University of Tennessee as a student, and then a pediatrician, faculty member and administrator. He currently advises UTHSC leaders as special assistant to the chancellor. His passion for the missions at UTHSC is unsurpassed, and it is the inspiration for our recognition society to honor our donors who make planned gifts. Donors are able to share a part of their lives by joining this society. As a member, you can join Dr. Wall in making an impact on the lives of students. For more information about making a planned gift to UTHSC and Legacy Society membership, contact Bethany Goolsby at (901) 448-8212 or bgoolsby@uthsc.edu. Thank you to our Legacy Society members! Alan B. and Mary L. Corley James C. and Anne B. Eoff III Don C. and Sandra H. Fancher Glen E. and Kathy B. Farr Robert Fink Dick R. and Greta A. Gourley David Huntley Rose S. Laffoon L. Steve Lubin Ben S. Moore Tommy W. and Stephanie Page Stephen H. Powell James R. and Nancy Price Martha and David A. Shepard Michael G. and Ann N. Swaim James W. and Phyllis Taylor

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Taylor Family Scholarship Bernard Britton Tennessee Diversity Scholarship Lauren Andrews, Sara Atyia, Brittany Bailey, Robert Banks, Bryan Bell, Joshua Bell, Natalie Bohanon, Bernard Britton, Queenetta Brown, Chelsea Butler, Justin Chai, Cathlyn Chan, Candace Cox, Ezinwanne Emelue, Colins Eno, Alexis Ewah, Ezra Gabre, Elizabeth Goodwin, Christine Handy, Crystal Harrison, Tien Huynh, Alexis Jones, Seongjung Kim, Brandon Ladd, Christine Li, Thomas Lovingood, Megan Lowe, Lexie Ly, Katie Ma, Xuan Anh Ma, Justin Macklin, Dharakunvarba Mahida, Briana Malone, Kayihura Manigaba, Suzette Mills, Dviti Mody, Kembral Nelson, Maily Nguyen, Mimi Nguyen, Jennee Nickleson, Yasmeen Odeh, Gerald Offei-Nkansah, Anu Patel, Ekta Patel, Nisha Patel, Radha Patel, Hinaben Patel, Auriel Person, Jasmine Reedus, Javier Rodriguez, Alicia Rogers, Sydney Selby, Mariatou Sisay, Raven Tate, Brittany Taylor, Nancy Tran, Stephen Turner, Charnesa Tutwiler, Kimberly Van, An Vo, Erica Washington, Kristen Wilhite, Raghad Zarkani, Samuel Zhao University Scholar Scholarship Hec Manuel Alonso, Jiderechukwu Anyigbo, Kaia Boatner, Mineka Bridges, Juliet Chijioke, Richard Fincher, Vlad Gamalie, Hecmarie Alonso Gill, Brittney Hall, Jillyan Harlan, Jonathan Hartmann, Swati Jain, James Johnson, Chantler Jones, Luella Jones, Jalisa Keyes, Janet Kha, Eun Ho Lee, Cassandra Lewis, Lynne Lynch, Misha McCleary, Angela McClendon, Mary Beth McConnell, Jasmine McElroy, Carlvin Jon Metra, Gizalali Mistry, Joseph Moon, Harriet Muthondu, Jonathan Naylor, Olabisi Olumuyiwa, Dolly Patel, Jasmina Kunverjibhai Patel, Krishna Patel, Neha Patel, Nikesh Patel, Pratikkumar Patel, Riya Patel, Soniya Patel, Marcy Pilate, Jessica Quinn, Roslyn Ratcliff, Matthew Reddin, Victor Rivera, Melanie Shelton, Harsimran Singh, Daniel Teberg, Shirin Tharakan, Khori-Ann Willis, Kevin Wong, Rebecca Wong, Celestino Zayas Morales, Qian Zhao Vic and Lucille Freels Scholarship Lisa Hayes Virginia Eoff Scholarship Dina Ali Walgreens Scholarship Mark Cole, Tien Huynh, Justin Macklin, Carlvin Metra, Hinaben Patel, Melanie Shelton Wal-Mart Scholarship Kyle Herndon, Haley Rice, Tanner Shields William P. Purcell Scholarship Molly Hunt


Alumni News and Notes

In April, the UTHSC COP Alumni Board of Directors held its two-day spring meeting at the College of Pharmacy in Memphis. On Thursday evening, board members enjoyed dinner together at the Majestic Grill where Max Ray was presented the Distinguished Service to Pharmacy award at the close of the meal. On Friday, the board members participated in a full day of planning. During lunch, Chancellor Schwab spoke to the group.

Former Dean John Autian 1924 – 2015

2014-2017 Board of Directors Officers

PRESIDENT...................... Martha Shepard PRESIDENT ELECT.......... Paula B. Hinson AREA VICE-PRESIDENTS West – Jackie Bundy, Middle – David Brown, East – Larry Shepherd

Board of Directors

PAST PRESIDENTS Tara Moore Billy J. Regel Vicky A. Shelton Leonard I. Compton Alan B. Corley Steven B. Peggs Phonzie W. Brown, Jr. WEST TENNESSEE REPRESENTATIVES Mark Wilson Richard Brown Rick Chambers MIDDLE TENNESSEE REPRESENTATIVES Richard Randolph Ron Felts Marcus Dortch EAST TENNESSEE REPRESENTATIVES Mac Wilhoit Aaron “Brent” Dunlap Eric Lee REPRESENTATIVES-AT-LARGE Marty Gentry Marilyn Lee Betty Hazlewood Tim Tucker Josh Regel Curtis Petty Dianne Duncan OUT-OF-STATE REPRESENTATIVES Carleton Maxwell Eddie Underwood, Jr.

Appointed Positions TPA REPRESENTATIVE Jim Bundy TSHP REPRESENTATIVE Casey H. White

APPOINTED ALUMNI David F. Black Sandra H. Fancher W. Shannon McCool Wayne D. Mitchell Lindsey Wells APPOINTED NON-ALUMNI Bob Fink Scott A. McKillop Carl A. Merideth

Ex-Officio Members Chancellor Steve Schwab

Dean Marie A. Chisholm-Burns Asso. Dean Jennifer Williams Asso. Dean Peter Chyka TPA Exe. Dir. Micah Cost State Rep. David Shepard State Sen. Ferrell Haile State Sen. Randy McNally Chancellor Emeritus Hershel P. Wall UT Found. Pres. and CEO Rickey N. McCurry V. Chan. Randy L. Farmer Asso. V. Chan. Development Bethany Goolsby Blankenship Asso. V. Chan. Alumni Affairs Kris Phillips Sr. Dir. Annual Giving and Adv. Services Jada Williams Dir. Alumni Programs Michelle Nixon Dir. Development Michelle Gilchrist

On Sept. 4, 2015, John Autian, PhD, passed away at the age of 91. Dr. Autian was a native of Philadelphia. He earned a BS in Pharmacy at Temple University and a MS and PhD at the University of Maryland. He arrived at the UT College of Pharmacy in 1967 from the University of Texas and established the Materials Science Toxicology Laboratories. The laboratories reached a level of national and international prominence and helped establish new federal regulations on medical devices. In 1973, Dr. Autian was named the first recipient of the UT National Alumni Association Public Service Award. He served as president of the UTHSC Faculty Senate and was chair of the Department of Molecular Biology. Named dean of the College of Pharmacy on Aug. 1, 1975, Dean Autian pushed for approval of the PharmD degree as the entry-level degree in pharmacy. He served as a dean until 1982, when he was named dean of the UT Graduate School of Medical Sciences and vice chancellor for Research, serving until his retirement in 1985. During his career, Dr. Autian authored or co-authored numerous articles in the fields of pharmacology, toxicology and biomedical materials. After retirement, he worked tirelessly as an international humanitarian and health science educator. He was a proponent of the Memphis Biomedical Research Zone.

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UTHSC in the Media

Clean House

The Plough Center for Sterile Drug Delivery Systems, which has been in the works for about five years, breaks ground.

Multidisciplinary

Memphis Business Journal Memphis Daily News highgroundnews.com pharmaceutical-technology.com UB Daily University Business

Action

The Commercial Appeal

Strep in the Right Direction

The Commercial Appeal

Memphis Business Journal Memphis Daily News

As the UTHSC Multi-Disciplinary Simulation Center moves forward, it catches the attention of the media.

An invention by Dr. James Dale aims to combat an age-old ailment.

Memphis Business Journal WHBQ-TV WREG-TV Memphis Daily News Pharma News Today Global News

Pressure Management

A UTHSC physician’s search for at-risk cells may lead to new ways to protect against glaucoma.

The Commercial Appeal Memphis Business Journal WREG-TV WYPL-FM

Groundbreaking research, first-class education, superior clinical care, and dedicated public service – UTHSC is making news 24/7, and the world is helping us tell our story. For a look at what the local, national and international media are saying about UTHSC, go to news.uthsc.edu/in-the-media. 40


Alumni News and Notes

Golden Graduate Weekend

Above: Members of the College of Pharmacy Class of 1965 received their Golden Graduate medallions. Shown from left to right, front row: Dr. Dianne Vest Duncan; Dr. Jerry W. Hickerson; Ann Crockett Richardson; Dr. Barbara Guthrie Wells. Back row: William Morris Elliott, Sr.; Robert E. Phillips; Dr. Darrell A. Raber; Phonzie W. Brown, Jr.

Alumni from all six UTHSC Colleges, including 13 from the College of Pharmacy, traveled to Memphis to attend Golden Graduate Homecoming held Oct. 14-16. Events included dinner at the Rendezvous, breakfast with the chancellor, Open Houses at the various colleges, and the Golden Graduate Medal Ceremony and Dinner held at the Pink Palace. UTHSC College of Pharmacy - Fall 2015

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In Remembrance Jimmy F. McDonald, BS ’49 Cordova, Tennessee

Dr. James Frank “Jimmy” McDonald, of Memphis, died Dec. 9, 2014, at the age of 86. Dr. McDonald attended South Side High School, Memphis State University and UTCOP, graduating in 1949. He then worked as a retail pharmacist and was drafted into the U.S. Army during the Korean War. In 1966, he purchased Highland Heights Pharmacy and worked there until he retired.

Dr. McDonald helped establish the Seldon D. Feurt Memorial Endowment at UTHSC COP, which supports students, faculty and efforts in the college. An accomplished professional, he was the recipient of many pharmacy-related awards and served on numerous professional committees. He was appointed by Gov. Winfield Dunn to a five-year term on the Tennessee Board of Pharmacy and served as president of the Tennessee Pharmacists Association and the Memphis Area Pharmacists Society.

Al H. Nobles Jr., BS ’39, Memphis Martha D. Huddleston, BS ’45, Brentwood, Tennessee Garland E. McCain, DPh, BS ’48, Memphis James W. Warner III, BS ’48, Nashville R.H. Willis, BS ’49, Memphis Chester Owen Graves, BS ’50, Alcoa, Tennessee Charles Loren Tait, BS ’52, Charlotte, North Carolina Olin E. Westmoreland, BS ’55, Knoxville Harold Clement Murrell, BS ’57, Atoka, Tennessee C. Eugene Watkins, BS ’57, Monroe, Louisiana Edgar W. Keelin, BS ’59, Kenosha, Wisconsin Samuel G. Townsley Sr., BS ’59, Foley, Alabama John A. Kinard, BS ’61, Murfreesboro, Tennessee Jack W. Lindsay, BS ’54, MD ’61, Crossville, Tennessee Thomas E. Lowe, BS ’61, Morristown, Tennessee George D. Deal, BS ’62, Brentwood, Tennessee Lynn H. Holt, BS ’62, Knoxville Douglas Edward Wilson, BS ’65, Ten Mile, Tennessee Barry L. Bates, BS ’70, Ripley, Tennessee Bobby G. Bryant, BS ’70, PharmD ’71, Birmingham, Alabama Dannye R. George, BS ’70, McMinnville, Tennessee Neal D. Presley III, PharmD ’74, BS ’73, Nolensville, Tennessee Warren C. Jackson, BS ’74, Memphis Lisa D. Weir, BS ’83, Jackson, Tennessee Gerald Dwayne Bentley, PharmD ’02, Memphis Please note: The College of Pharmacy and the Office of Alumni Affairs have worked to provide an inclusive and accurate listing. This listing is current through Oct. 29, 2015. Please inform the UTHSC Office of Alumni Affairs of any errors or omissions at (901) 448-5516, (800) 733-0482 or utalumni@uthsc.edu If you would like to make a donation in memory or honor of a classmate or friend, please contact Michelle Gilchrist, director of Development, using the contact information above or at mgilchrist@utfi.org.

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You can make a difference through membership in the 1911 Society.

UTHSC honors its loyal donors who make gifts of at least $100 every year. In the College of Pharmacy, these gifts are used to support the recruitment and enrichment of our students, fund research leading to better treatment for common illnesses, and help attract top faculty to train the next generation of leaders. Did you know… • Tuition covers only about 48 percent of the cost to educate a student; • UTHSC COP awards more than $300,000 in scholarships and aid annually.

Join the 1911 Society today to support our growth and provide greater opportunities for our students. Give now-uthscalumni.com/give Learn more-uthscalumni.com/1911


Alumni Recognitions

Carleton Maxwell, ʼ06 “I met my wife, along with some lifelong friends, here in Memphis, so I don’t have any idea where I would be without UTHSC. I can’t even give an answer to that because UTHSC has been such an integral part of my life.”

From left, Crystal Maxwell, MD ʼ03, Kaitlyn Maxwell, Carleton Maxwell, PharmD ʼ06

Current Hometown Fort Mill, South Carolina Family Wife – Crystal (Smith), MD ʼ03 Daughter – Kaitlyn Specialty Cardiovascular Clinical Pharmacy UT Volunteer Positions The UTHSC COP Alumni Board What is your favorite UT memory from your time as a student? Man! I have so many that it’s tough to pick one! If I had to choose, it would have to be our graduation. We were the last class to graduate in the Mid-South Coliseum, and a car hit a light pole that morning so all our ceremonies were in the dark. It didn’t matter to us because we were so happy to celebrate the culmination of our hard work. Why did you select UTHSC COP? There was an emphasis on diversity in the student body. Everyone knows that the pharmacy school is one of the best in the country, but it also has the highest percentage of minority students of any non-historically black college or university pharmacy school. That, to me, is a testament to the forward vision of the UTHSC COP.

What are the highlights of your professional career? I have accomplished many things, but my current position as president of the National Pharmaceutical Association is one that I’m very proud of. I am the youngest president in the 68-year history of the organization, and I’m privileged to continue in the lineage of many great pharmacy leaders. How are you currently engaged with UTHSC as an alumnus? I currently serve on the Alumni Board of Directors for UTHSC COP. We work with Dean Chisholm-Burns to advance the mission of the college and improve student recruitment and retention. I have thoroughly enjoyed the opportunity.

Why did you get involved in the alumni association? It’s important given the budget issues that all state governments are facing. Alumni involvement and giving is emphasized now more than ever. It is imperative that we are able to give back to the college that gave many of us a great foundation to be competent and knowledgeable practitioners. I want other students to have the same great experience that I had, and the best way to ensure that is involvement in the alumni association. What is your advice to other UT Alumni about getting involved? We need you! Whether it’s time, talent or money, we are looking forward to you connecting with us.

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The University of Tennessee Health Science Center Office of Development and Alumni Affairs 62 S. Dunlap, Suite 500 Memphis, Tennessee 38163

Photo by Adam Brimer/ The University of Tennessee

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It’s flu shot time in Tennessee! UT President Joe DiPietro rolls up his sleeve on Sept. 24 to get his flu shot from UTHSC College of Pharmacy student pharmacist Amy Veracco, a member of APhA-ASP. In 2014, a total of 8,197

flu shots were administered by student pharmacists. See pages 24-25 to learn about more ways members of the College of Pharmacy professional organizations have joined together and served the community.

University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Pharmacy Magazine Fall 2015  
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