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M O O D Y M O N T H LY


N E W T O M O O D Y MOODY WRITING TIPS SUMMER PROGRESS As you head toward summer break, think of writing as you would a sport. Stay limber and grow stronger. If you run, you won’t take three months off just because it’s “summer break”. Baseball players have to keep their muscles stretched and cannot have long gaps between pitching or batting without those skills suffering. Writing is no different. So let’s consider a few ways you can work on your writing while you’re away from campus: 1.Reading fuels great writing. When you head to the backyard hammock or to the beach, take a book. Make a practice of reading something other than social media for at least 30 minutes per day. 2. Try to rewrite some of your old stuff. How would you improve it? If you want to be good, you cannot dismiss it as “no hope for that grade now.” 3. Identify your weak spots and devise a way to strengthen them. If you need to polish your grammar skills, review the Moody Writing Support Program videos and do some of the practice exercises recommended on our website. 4. Find writing you admire and analyze it. What makes you love that piece? Is it the way a scene is set or a passage is crafted? If it’s a wonderful quote, what questions could the writer have asked to get that kind of response? Isolate what you love, study it and be inspired to emulate it. Keep a file of the writing you admire and refer back to it for inspiration. 5. Pick one book from our Writers’ Self Help list to read this summer. 6. You have a break from assignments, so now you can write whatever you like. Keep a journal. Write letters. Read everything aloud to hear how it sounds. 7. Even though you may be heading to the beach or the mountains, the Moody Writing Support Program will be open and a limited staff will work throughout the summer. If you’re staying in Austin and would like to work on something, make an appointment and come in. If you’re out of town but motivated to work, email moodywriting@austin.utexas.edu and we’ll find a way to help.


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

We are at the end! We have some great stuff to cap off the year: Moody Humans, Moody Writing Center recommendations, an interview with the one and only Dr. John Daly, and a summer movie watch list from our favorite movie reviewer. Well, this is it. Thank you so much for continuing to support Moody Monthly for another wonderful year. I hope that you have found helpful information, interesting stories, and possibly new opportunities through this publication. This could not be possible without the help and support of an amazing production team. These are the people that have the drive to make this a reality, and I know that they have inspired me to push myself even further. It has been a wild ride, but I am leaving this publication in fantastic hands. Thank you for a wonderful year, a fantastic semester, and an amazing opportunity.

A LY S S A H O L L A N D E R EDITOR

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HUMANS OF MOODY BY AISHWARYA NOUBAD

“When I was a journalist or as a professor, I knew how lucky I was because I found what I wanted to do and didn’t care that I wasn’t going to make that much money. I knew my hours were going to suck, but I loved it and that makes all the difference. So, find what that is.”

R O B E R T Q U I G L E Y, JOURNALISM PROFESSOR


“I want to be able to communicate with actors effectively and understand where they’re coming from, the things that are challenging for them to convey what I need in a performance, so I know how to give them direction and sympathize with their position.�

K AT I E J A M E S O N , R T F

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N ATA L I E H E I N E M A N , JOURNALISM

“I think I like Texas and Ohio equally. I’m glad I grew up in Ohio, but I’m glad I live here now. I didn’t spend my whole life in one place and I think that’s good.”


“Don’t compare yourself to other people. I just find myself comparing myself to other people in CSD. These people are doing such amazing things. So, you feel like you’re not up to par, but everyone has their own journey and everyone’s going to find the right way to do what they want to do. Focus on what you’re doing, hone the skills, and be good at what you’re doing.”

ANDREA CHEE, CSD

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“I would want people to feel confident that they can edit, to realize how enjoyable it is, and to understand that it’s a life long artistic process. I feel like a lot of people are looking a vocation, not just a way to make money, but something to spend their creative lives on. So, I want them to walk away from class thinking that editing could be that way for them.“

D O N H O WA R D, INTRO TO EDITING PROFESSOR


NIC BONESTEEL, RTF

“Accept that you don’t know everything because that’s how you learn. You know what you know, but you have to realize what you don’t know. So, talk to people that do know it and accept their advice.”

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B E C K A B A P T I S TA , JOURNALISM

“Take it easy. It’s going to be really hard at times and really fun at other times and also a mix of both. Always take a breather. Whenever you get something that you think is too much for you, take a step back, look at the big picture, breathe, and say ‘I got this’.”


“Always keep learning because you never really finish learning going through life. Even the best people are always still trying to become even better�

TRUNG TRAN, RTF

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R O O PA R O O - V I E W S : S P R I N G S O F A R BY RO OPA NA GA RA JA N

SPLIT XXX: RETURN OF XANDER CAGE JOHN WICK 2 T H E L E G O B AT M A N M O V I E GET OUT LOGAN KONG: SKULL ISLAND RAW BEAUTY AND THE BEAST LIFE

Roopa Nagarajan is a second-year advertising student in the Moody College. A seasoned movie lover raised on the likes of Star Wars and The Land Before Time, Roopa averages 4 movies a week and judges solely on her “unbiased opinions” and quick wit. Note: she likes strong writing. Easily recognized by her curly 100% authentic™ Indian hair and devoted support of non-stereotypical minority representation in major Hollywood films, you can catch Roopa at the theater, participating in watch parties, or (most likely) nestled in bed on her laptop, watching the next film on her Excel spreadsheet movie list.


SUMMER WATCH LIST THE BEGUILED (JUNE 23RD) Academy Award winner Sofia Coppola returns to the screen with The Beguiled, a western psychological drama about a wounded Union soldier and the women at a girls’ school. BABY DRIVER (JUNE 28TH) Edgar Wright (writer, director) is one of the biggest names in comedy today, but if that wasn’t enough, the cast should be: Ansel Elgort, Kevin Spacey, Jon Hamm, Jamie Foxx, Jon Bernthal, and Lily James star. Premiering to incredibly positive reviews at SXSW, Baby Driver provides moviegoers with an exhilarating balance between comedy and thriller action. A GHOST STORY (JULY 7TH) Do not watch this trailer. But see this movie. Written and directed by David Lowery, A Ghost Story is an exploration of legacy, love, loss, and the enormity of existence. Casey Affleck, 2016 Best Actor Oscar winner, and Rooney Mara share the screen in this fantasy romance drama. DUNKIRK (JULY 21ST) From seasoned writer-director Christopher Nolan is his first attempt at war, based on the true WWII evacuation and battle of Dunkirk. Nolan has reliably cast from his network of favorite actors, so look forward to dynamic performances from Tom Hardy, Cillian Murphy, and Kenneth Branagh. Although Dunkirk will likely be critically well-received, note its PG-13 rating. ATOMIC BLONDE (JULY 28TH) If you watch one movie this summer, make it Atomic Blonde. From David Leitch, one of the co-directors of John Wick, comes this gritty action thriller about an MI6 agent tasked with the recovery of a list of double agents. Starring Charlize Theron as the titular Atomic Blonde, this movie seeks to pull no punches. Literally. WIND RIVER (AUGUST 4TH) Taylor Sheridan, Academy Award nominated screenwriter of Sicario (2015) and Hell or High Water (2016), makes his directing debut with Wind River, a detective-crime action thriller. Elizabeth Olsen and Jeremy Renner share the screen once again. LOGAN LUCKY (AUGUST 18TH) Get excited for the return of Steven Soderbergh (Ocean’s Trilogy, Side Effects), four years coming. An old hand at ensemble casts, Soderbergh directs the absolutely stacked, eclectic and compelling cast of Channing Tatum, Daniel Craig, Adam Driver, Hilary Swank, Katie Holmes, Brian Gleeson, Riley Keough, Seth MacFarlane, and Sebastian Stan.

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I N SI D E THE M IN D O F

J O H N D A LY BY REBECCA THARP

What inspired you to get into interpersonal communication specifically? Because everything depends upon that. Everything starts off with two people talking to each other. No matter what your field is, at its core, it’s still two people talking to each other. Even if [as a journalist] you’re writing about one person, you still need to converse with other people. Interpersonal communication is the core, most central aspect of human life, so that’s why I teach it.

We don’t think of the consequences when we talk sometimes. Words can hurt, but they can also inspire. We need to be more conscious of our words and how we use them.

What drives you to continue to teach every day? Students. And it’s fun. (laughs) It’s an honor. It truly astounds me. It’s amazing the people that are sitting there listening to me. I really want students to think that interpersonal communication is the most important thing in the world, and to build stronger relationships. I believe what I teach is the most vital thing in the world. It’s my passion.

Do you have an ongoing research project/projects? I am working on book on social savviness. (effectiveness). For example, always say “nice to see you” rather than “nice to meet you”. “Nice to see you” never gets you in trouble. [The book] revolves around practical skills like this you need to be more effective communicator. I’m working on another study looking at how when you’re managing someone from afar, you make them feel included. Imagine you’re a manager and one colleague works right next door to you and the other lives on the other side of the country. How do you make the person farther away feel like they’re part of the team? That kind of stuff.

What do you think is the most difficult aspect of communication? We’re too egocentric, we don’t think enough of the other person. We don’t take the time to talk well. It’s work to communicate. The texture of a conversation is important. There are things that can come across in an in-person conversation that don’t in an email.

If there was one thing you wanted your students to walk away with from you class what would it be? Two things. Talk matters. And communication is cool. One is for them, one is more PR. The majority of people taking my class are not communication majors. I want them to say that it really made a


difference in their life. I teach two classes, Interpersonal Communication (at UT) and the Archer program (in Washington DC). The Archer program is about politics and communication advocacy. The Archer program is the only system-wide class the university offers. We have students from UTEP, UTSA etc. all in the same room. Most of them are government majors who have never taken a communication course in college. I want anyone who’s not a major in communication to say this is really interesting stuff. Can you tell me a little about your work with the White House involving customer service and communication? I used to teach a course in customer loyalty and they bought me up (during the Clinton administration) to try to make the White House more customer friendly. It was a consulting thing, I spent 6 months going back and forth from Austin to DC to help them with internal communications within the White House. Fun stuff, I enjoyed walking into the West Wing every day. With the shifting political climate and the advancement of technology, what role do you see communication playing? What I know for sure is people still will talk. You have to have relationships to make the world work. Given the choice, most people are happy to talk face to face. Talking one on one will give you business forever. DC and all the political stuff shows you talk has consequence. It

proves that talk matters. That what Trump says has consequence. He probably should take a communication course at one point. And he’s very good at it, probably an excellent communicator. Communication is a tool; it can be used for good or bad. The best leaders in the world are great communicators and the evilest people in the world are also great communicators. Do you have any suggestions for people struggling to express their ideas? 1) One, just do it. It’ll get easier the more you do it. 2) Write it out sometimes. Writing it out helps you figure out how you want to say it. You can talk it out afterwards. 3) Don’t be afraid about what people are going to say. It’s easier for me to have a conversation with someone rather than “tell them something”. For tough topics, it’s better to write it out first. 4) Role play it. Practice it with someone. 5) People want to be too fancy when they talk. Simply relax and have a conversation. 6) Talking side by side more than face to face can help. You usually talk more with your parents when you’re driving or shopping, or going for a walk. Sometimes it’s better to talk side by side because it’s less pressure. It puts less pressure on you if I talk to you while walking down a hallway than if I say “We need to talk” and have a sit down conversation. Talking side by side makes it easier to talk it out, especially as a teenager.

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COMMUNICATION COUNCIL (IN A NUTSHELL) So maybe you’ve seen us hanging around inside–and sometimes outside when we want to give you things–the Student Leadership Suite, sponsoring events, and being the people behind this publication. But what actually is the Communication Council? For starters, we are the official student voice and governing body of the Moody College of Communication. This means that we participate in UT Senate and vote on legislation that impacts the entire college. We even have an entire position dedicated to being the Senate representative, and they have an entire committee of passionate people to help create legislation. But we go beyond just legislation. With over 80 members across every major in the college, there are opportunities for everyone to pursue their passions and make a difference. We have a student issues and advisory committee that focuses directly on making the Moody College a better place for students. You may see them asking your opinion about your major in return for a cookie, or you may come to the annual town hall where they bring together students and administrators to talk about what matters to you. Behind the scenes, this group meets with programs within Moody to ensure that they are working to make your college experience a productive one. A special events committee inside Comm Council works to host events across the university, and makes sure that UT as a whole knows how amazing and hardworking communication students are. From working with the next generation of future longhorns, to parents making sure UT is the perfect fit for their child, this committee does it all. You probably have seen the efforts of our outreach committee, which brings students and faculty together by hosting events all year to promote a motivating atmosphere for students. Stop and say hello when you see tabling outside the student leadership suite, we don’t bite! If you have ever been to a lecture sponsored by the Communication Council, that was hosted by our incredible career and alumni relations committee. Our long-running speaker series has provided students with invaluable knowledge about careers and has inspired many by seeing other’s paths to success. Our speakers usually tend to stick around after the formal talk, so stop by! Maybe you could be working on Survivor in the near future. (Yes, we brought in the producer of Survivor. Yes, he was incredible.) We have a committee dedicated to our media presence, both inside and outside of Council. If you see a fun video, spunky cover letter, or anything that has probably needed Photoshop (except us, of course), these are the people to thank! We love making an impact outside of the college as well! An entire committee dedicated to community service ensures that our organization is always thinking about how we can help others. Then there is us, the people behind the newsletter. We can let our work–and the usually too verbose editor’s note–speak for itself.


OUR T E AM

Alyssa Hollander

Alysse Mazakian

Aishwarya Noubad

Astrid Alvarado

Kirsten Kumar

Maya Haws-Shaddock

Rebecca Tharp

Roopa Nagarajan

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