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HASLAM MAGAZINE WINTER 2016–17

FOUNDER & CEO OF JEGI

Haslam Magazine is the alumni publication of the Haslam College of Business at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.


OUR

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SUPPLY CHAIN GRADUATE PROGRAM NATIONALLY (Gartner, 2016)

SUPPLY CHAIN UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM NATIONALLY (U.S. News & World Report, 2017)

HIGHEST 2015 CPA PASS RATE NATIONALLY AMONG PUBLICS (National Association of State Boards of Accountancy, 2016)

SUPPLY CHAIN UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM NATIONALLY (U.S. News & World Report, 2017)

WE’RE ON THE RISE.

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MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ANALYTICS (The Financial Engineering Times, 2016)

BEST UNDERGRADUATE BUSINESS SCHOOL, AMONG PUBLICS (U.S. News & World Report, 2017)

BEST FULL-TIME MBA PROGRAM, AMONG PUBLICS (U.S. News & World Report, 2017)


CONTENTS WINTER 2016–17 SUMMER 2016

INVESTING IN THE FUTURE, CONSERVING THE PAST COVER STORY

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FEATURED

THE SCISMS RISING WITH CELLULAR SALES

DEPARTMENT NEWS | 3

GIVING REPORT | 29

THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

NUMBERS

4 Haslam College of Business faculty

28 Sources and Uses of Funds

are cited and featured by global news sources PEOPLE

6 Haslam College of Business

welcomes eight new professors

10 Sara Easler, new director of

PHILANTHROPY

9 Development and Giving Report 2 34 New IBM, Tickle Engineering, Haslam Partnership

35 Newly Established Endowments

international programs and study abroad

PEOPLE

RESEARCH

generations of commitment to UT

30 Kelvin and Sheryl Ault and three

8 Kelly Hewett gives insight into

32 Larry and Vivian Carroll support

another way to think about negative press on social media

accounting and finance programs with fellowships

STUDENT NEWS | 22

ALUMNI NEWS | 38

NEWS

EVENTS

23 Haslam students are achieving

38 Haslam celebrates Alumni Awards

great things near and far

at its eighth annual Gala

24 Freshman Students Become

NEWS

“Haslam Engaged” PEOPLE Cover photo: Dan Bigelow Photography

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22 Elite athlete Kate Zeigler turns

44 Alumni News 8 In Memoriam 4

her focus toward an MBA

26 Colby Dorcely plans to bring Haslam degree back to Haiti with nonprofit HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 1


FROM THE DEAN

IN THE BUSINESS WORLD, no venture

gets off the ground without the proper investment. The necessary investment takes many forms, and all investment requires foregoing near term benefits for the promise of greater benefits later. In any venture, the “time, talent, and treasure” adage rings true. In this issue of Haslam Magazine, we explore the myriad ways in which our alumni, faculty, staff, and students invest in their workplace passions and in the world around them. Our cover subject, Wilma Jordan, has brokered more than 600 major merger and acquisition transactions and also invests her time in land conservation and management. Her commitment to the East Tennessee hills that shaped her character and work ethic will help ensure that others may enjoy the splendor and beauty of the area for many years to come. Dane and Meg Scism dedicated themselves to a fledging business in the burgeoning field of cellular electronics. Their perseverance and investment paid off with a close-knit company (many members of which are Haslam grads) that has grown to be the largest authorized Verizon Wireless retailer in the country. High quality scholarly research also involves commitments of time, talent, and financial resources. In recent research 2 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

that is making headlines in the national media, Professor Kelly Hewett has shown why companies should invest more time in addressing negative concerns voiced by consumers on social media. According to Hewett’s work, listening and reaching out can head off bigger problems down the road. The Haslam College of Business also is investing in its own community, by reaching out to our committed freshman in their first year. For the first time ever, our undergraduate offices hosted a class-wide event for this year’s freshman class, focusing on team building exercises aimed at creating a sense of belonging for our students. These same students will continue to have touch points throughout the years as they prepare to take classes within their major. The first “Haslam Engaged” event set these students off on an adventure that will last through the next four years with friendships that may last much longer. We also recently honored some of our alumni at this year’s annual Gala, recognizing their accomplishments and those of our greater Haslam community. Our Journey to the Top 25 Campaign is on track and shows in literal terms the investment that our alumni, friends, and corporate partners continually make in the Haslam College of Business. We appreciate all that you do to invest in your college and your community, and we hope that you will be inspired by these great stories of others who are doing the same. With admiration and thanks,

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Haslam Magazine is the alumni publication of the Haslam College of Business at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

HASLAM COLLEGE OF BUSINESS EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP STEPHEN L. MANGUM Dean

BRUCE K. BEHN

Associate Dean for Graduate and Executive Education

MICHAEL “LANE” MORRIS

Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs and Student Affairs

CHARLES NOBLE

Associate Dean for Research and Faculty

BETSY ADAMS

Assistant Dean of Finance and Administration

HASLAM MAGAZINE TANYA G. BROWN

Executive Director of Marketing and Public Relations | Editor-in-chief

WILLIAM R. “CHIP” BRYANT

Executive Director of Development and Alumni Affairs

MEREDITH HULETTE

Senior Director of Stewardship and Alumni Affairs

JESSICA LEIGH BROWN Writer

JILL KNIGHT

Design and Production

CHARLES BROOKS Photographer

GERHARD SCHNEIBEL AND KATIE WILLIAMS

News Lists and Compilations

Haslam Magazine is published twice a year by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Haslam College of Business and is printed by University Printing & Mail.

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

Stephen L. Mangum Dean and Stokely Foundation Leadership Chair Haslam College of Business

Haslam College of Business 328 Haslam Business Building Knoxville, TN 37996 - 4140 865-974-5061 | haslam.utk.edu Fax: 865-974-1766 | E-mail: tgbrown@utk.edu FACEBOOK.COM/ HASLAMCB HASLAM COLLEGE OF BUSINESS INSTAGRAM.COM/ HASLAMUT TWITTER.COM/ HASLAMUT


News from the faculty, departments, centers, and programs of the Haslam College of Business.

DEPARTMENT & FACULTY NEWS COLLEGE WIDE

Doug Hawks, assistant dean of finance and administration, accepted an offer from the University of Central Missouri to be their vice president for finance and administration.

KEN BOUYER, DIRECTOR OF INCLUSIVENESS RECRUITING FOR THE AMERICAS AT EY, VISITED IN APRIL TO SHARE KNOWLEDGE AND BEST PRACTICES AROUND DIVERSITY INITIATIVES.

Tim Williams, co-founder of 21st Mortgage, and Frederick W. Smith, founder of FedEx, delivered the Haslam College of Business’s 2016 commencement addresses.

The college hosted the Innovations in Data-Rich Environments research workshop in June. Bloomberg Businessweek ranked Haslam fortieth among undergraduate business schools at public universities nationwide.

The Haslam College of Business and the College of Nursing partnered with Healthy Tennessee to host a free symposium in April entitled, “Why Businesses Value a Healthy Community.”

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Charlie Noble was named associate dean for research and faculty.

DEAN STEVE MANGUM PARTICIPATED IN THE JOINT CIVILIAN ORIENTATION COURSE, THE US DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE’S OLDEST AND MOST PRESTIGIOUS ORIENTATION PROGRAM FOR AMERICA’S TOP BUSINESS AND COMMUNITY LEADERS.

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THE HASLAM COLLEGE OF BUSINESS WON “BEST PARTICIPATION BY LARGE UNIT” IN THE CAMPUS-WIDE BIG ORANGE FAMILY CAMPAIGN. NEARLY 97 PERCENT OF FACULTY AND STAFF CONTRIBUTED.

BILL ECONOMICS FOX WAS THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT AN EVENT HOSTED BY THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENTS OF EGYPT.

Lane Morris, associate dean of undergraduate programs and student affairs, represented the college in front of more than 500 young professionals at the Knoxville Chamber of Commerce’s Endeavor event in August.

Jean Gauger retired after thirty years of teaching macroeconomics and monetary economics. Christian Vossler was appointed to the new Gerber/ Taylor Endowed Professorship.

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The recession hit independent living communities the hardest, perhaps because older adults delayed selling their homes.”

It’s critical for investors in the US market that the PCAOB is able to inspect Chinese audit firms.”

A reference to research conducted by MATTHEW HARRIS, assistant professor of economics, on the national senior cost of living.

JOE CARCELLO, accounting and information management department head, EY and Business Alumni Professor, and executive director of the Neel Corporate Governance Center, on the US’s ability to vet auditors of Chinese companies listed on American exchanges.

—The Wall Street Journal, Aug. 18, 2016

The best companies realize that by working collaboratively and transparently with their suppliers in the short term—even at terms that would seem less advantageous from a revenue perspective at first—they can make greater long-term profits. Supplier performance management is an important component, but it’s only one part of the larger picture.” CHAD AUTRY, head of the marketing and supply chain management department and Taylor Professor in Supply Chain Management, on Target’s increased supplier penalties.

—Forbes, May 31, 2016

—Forbes, March 21, 2016 We knew that there should be a sharp difference in 1972 [the year of the study’s revelation], and we knew there should be a difference between black men and any other peer group.”

—The Atlantic, June 17, 2016

Students’ motivation and retention of learning a particular tool increases when provided the opportunity to deal with real problems, real data, and a real industry client.” Business and head of the Department of Business Analytics and Statistics, on practical training for students.

—DataInformed, Nov. 2, 2015

MARY HOLCOMB, professor and Gerald T. Niedert Supply Chain Fellow, on optimizing transportation networks.

—The Washington Post, Sept. 7, 2016

As best I can tell from the numbers that were reported, we are only receiving about a third of the supply that we ordinarily would have.” MARY HOLCOMB, professor and Gerald T. Niedert Supply Chain Fellow, on the Southeastern gas shortage due to a burst pipeline.

—Marketplace.org, Sept. 23, 2016

If a family has $2,000 or less each year to set aside for education for a loved one, [Coverdells] are a great choice. These plans are simple, with low fees, and offer a great deal of investment flexibility.”

A reference to research conducted by KELLY HEWETT, associate professor of marketing, on the interconnected nature of modern media.

—Media Street, May 17, 2016

MARIANNE WANAMAKER, assistant professor of economics, on the effects of the Tuskegee Study on the health of African Americans.

CHARLES NOON, Regal Entertainment Group Professor of

Analytics can also help shippers find the best option to move goods at the last minute. That’s what brokers do, but the spot market is very fragmented and it’s not real time.”

Negativity feeds on itself. News articles with a negative tone lead to an increase in negatively toned tweets— and vice versa. Negative news articles breed more of the same, and negative tweets prompt more negative tweets.”

When institutions had a small amount of NCAA violations, alumni donations went up significantly. Those that had a high emotional connection to the college increased their support. Now, if you cheat a lot, however, even the alumni will begin to turn on you.” RHONDA REGER, Nestle USA Professor of Management, on how alumni loyalty is affected by NCAA infringements.

—Inside Higher Ed, June 7, 2016

Our research shows that while some host cities have grown after the games, so have the cities that bid to host the Olympics and lost. There is no evidence that hosting the games is associated with economic or population growth.” J. SCOTT HOLLADAY, assistant professor of economics, on the impact of the Olympic games.

—WalletHub, Aug. 1, 2016

Every day goods are in transit adds a cost equivalent to a tariff of between 0.6% and 2.1%. Countries therefore trade most heavily with close neighbors.”

It’s now undeniable that to survive, companies will need to better optimize inventory. If you’re selling against big e-commerce players, then you cannot have this asset be unproductive.”

LEANN LUNA, professor of accounting, on making the most of Coverdell savings accounts.

A reference to research on European trade conducted by GEORG SCHAUR, assistant professor of economics, cited in a piece on Britain’s exit from the European Union.

SEAN WILLEMS, professor of business analytics and statistics and Haslam Chair in Supply Chain Analytics, on inventory optimization.

—U.S. News & World Report, May 11, 2016

—The Economist, March 30, 2016

—The Washington Post, Sept. 9, 2016

THOUGHT

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LEADERSHIP


DEPARTMENT & FACULTY NEWS

FACULTY AWARDS The Haslam College of Business announced its annual Business Awards during a celebration in April to recognize outstanding accomplishments.

ACCOUNTING AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Alycia Winegardner, Amanda Warren, Somer Chyz, and Randy Johnston were hired to the faculty.

James Chyz was promoted to associate professor with tenure.

THE FORTYFIRST ANNUAL WARREN SLAGLE ACCOUNTING DAY WAS HELD IN SEPTEMBER.

John Anderson

Department of Management OUTSTANDING SECOND YEAR FACULTY AWARD

Cheryl Barksdale

Graduate and Executive Education OUTSTANDING FACULTY AWARD

Bogdan Bichescu

Department of Business Analytics and Statistics OUTSTANDING FIRST YEAR FACULTY AWARD AND MASTERS IN BUSINESS ANALYTICS AWARDS, OUTSTANDING COMMITMENT TO STUDENTS AWARD

Missie Bowers

Admiral Harry Harris, Jr., commander of the US Pacific Command, was an Aerospace and Defense Business Institute guest speaker.

TOP5 According to the Financial Times, Haslam is among the top five public universities offering custom executive education in the United States.

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GRADUATE AND EXECUTIVE EDUCATION

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Kate Vitasek was named to the National Outsourcing Association’s A-List for her work in creating collaborative supply chain partnerships.

BRUCE BEHN GAVE THE KEYNOTE ADDRESS AT THE JAPAN ACCOUNTING ASSOCIATION’S SEVENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL MEETING IN SHIZOUKA, JAPAN. Bill Peterson published an article on the Association for Manufacturing Excellence website.

Larry Fauver published in the Journal of Financial Economics.

Eric Kelley was published in the Review of Financial Studies.

Thomas Boehm was published in the Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics.

Department of Business Analytics and Statistics ALLEN H. KEALLY EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING AWARD

Laura Cole

Department of Finance SHARON MILLER PRYSE/TRUST COMPANY OUTSTANDING FINANCE FACULTY AWARD

Jody Crane

Physician Executive MBA Program PHYSICIAN EXECUTIVE OUTSTANDING TEACHING AWARD

David Ecklund

Graduate and Executive Education INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS’ APPRECIATION AWARD

Larry Fauver

Department of Finance HOME FEDERAL BANK SCHOLAR AWARD

Don Lighter

Physician Executive MBA Program PHYSICIAN EXECUTIVE MBA OUTSTANDING FACULTY AWARD

Robert Mee

Department of Business Analytics and Statistics MASTERS IN BUSINESS ANALYTICS AWARDS EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING AWARD

Diane Mollenkopf, Wendy Tate, and Mary Holcomb

Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION AWARD

Terry Neal

Department of Accounting and Information Management MARTIN AND CAROL ROBINSON EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING, RESEARCH, AND SERVICE AWARD

Jim Reeve

Department of Accounting and Information Management RICHARD D. SANDERS AWARD FOR LEADERSHIP IN EXECUTIVE EDUCATION

Elaine Seat

Department of Management AEROSPACE AND DEFENSE MBA OUTSTANDING FACULTY AWARD

Mandyam Srinivasan

Department of Business Analytics and Statistics PROFESSIONAL MBA OUTSTANDING FACULTY AWARD

ANDERSON CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP & INNOVATION

$1 MILLION GRAVES UNDERGRADUATE BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION

Anonymous donors gave $1 million to endow the Undergraduate Business Plan Competition in honor of Tom Graves.

John Wachowicz

Department of Finance RICHARD C. REIZENSTEIN AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING COMMITMENT TO STUDENTS

Marianne Wanamaker

Department of Economics VALLET FAMILY OUTSTANDING RESEARCHER AWARD

Priscilla Wisner

Graduate and Executive Education EXECUTIVE MBA OUTSTANDING FACULTY AWARD

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PEOPLE

NEW FACULTY

THE NEW CLASS THE UNIVERSITY OF Tennessee, Knoxville, Haslam College of Business

welcomes eight new professors this fall. The cohort will join the departments of Accounting and Information Management, Economics, Management, and Marketing and Supply Chain Management. The new hires bring sixty-four years of combined teaching experience with an additional fourteen years of experience outside the classroom within industry. They carry diverse perspectives, with backgrounds representing Spain, Ireland, China, and across the United States.

times. The joint research he conducts with his wife, Linda, has been awarded the Notable Contribution to the Auditing Literature Award, the American Accounting Association’s Financial Accounting and Reporting Section Best Paper Award, and an award for Outstanding Accounting Review Article of the Year. He earned his doctorate from the University of Michigan. LINDA MYERS is a distinguished

DAVID GRAS ��������������������������������� joins Haslam as an assistant pro-

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fessor in the Department of Management. He holds a doctorate in entrepreneurship from Syracuse University, a master’s in marketing from Clemson University, and a bachelor’s in management from Texas A&M University. His research focuses on the antecedents of business performance and competitive advantage. Within these areas, Gras explores the financial impacts of corporate social responsibility, new venture diversification, strategic decisions, and entrepreneurial characteristics. ENDA PATRICK HARGADEN is an assistant

professor of economics with a joint appointment in the Department of Economics and the Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research. Hargaden is an applied microeconomist with a focus on taxation and public policy. He earned a doctorate in economics from the University of Michigan in 2016 and previously studied at University College, Dublin, and Trinity College, Dublin. JAMES MYERS is the Dennis Hendrix Distinguished

MYERS

Professor of Accounting. His research focuses on valuation, earnings management, and auditing. He has published in top journals including the Accounting Review, the Journal of Accounting and Economics, Journal of Finance, and Review of Accounting Studies, and his papers have been cited more than 3,500

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professor of accounting and holds the Haslam Chair of Business. She also serves as director of Haslam’s doctoral program in accounting. Myers’s research interests include audit markets, corporate disclosure, and financial reporting quality. She has published in a number of top accounting journals, and her work is regularly cited by the business press, as well the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board and the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. Myers has been invited to present her research at more than twenty universities in the US, Canada, England, Estonia, France, Hong Kong, Italy, Korea, the Netherlands, Scotland, Slovenia, and Taiwan. She earned her doctorate from the University of Michigan. KATHLEEN POWERS is an assistant professor in the

Department of Accounting and Information Management. She obtained her doctorate from the University of Texas at Austin and prior to that worked as a tax manager with PwC in Washington, DC, and Zurich, Switzerland. Her undergraduate degree is in business and accounting from North Carolina State University, and she has a Master’s of Accountancy from the Ohio State University. Powers’s research interests include the effect of corporate governance on firms’ tax policy, investors’ use of tax disclosures, and tax-related frictions in capital markets.


DEPARTMENT & FACULTY NEWS

ROBERTO RAGOZZINO joined the

Department of Management as the Haslam Professor of Entrepreneurship and Innovation. His research focuses primarily on corporate strategy, entrepreneurship, and international management looking at business phenomena through an economic lens. His work has been published in several journals, including Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice, Organization Science, Journal of Management, Journal of International Business Studies, and Strategic Management Journal. Before joining Haslam, Ragozzino spent three years in Barcelona, Spain, working at ESADE Business School and earned his doctorate at the Ohio State University. CODOU SAMBA is an assistant profes-

sor in the Department of Management. She obtained her doctorate in business administration from the University of Houston, and her primary research lies at the intersection of strategic leadership and organizational decision processes. Samba holds an MBA from the University of Houston and a bachelor’s in chemical engineering from the University of Tennessee. Prior to pursuing her doctoral degree, she worked as a chemical engineer for five years at Rohm and Haas Company (now Dow Chemical Company).

Kevin Harris, of Russell Reynolds Associates, was named a fellow of the Global Supply Chain Institute during the Executive MBA residency period in Shanghai, China.

Gerry Niedert was recognized with an honorary Global Supply Chain Institute Fellowship for his contributions to the field and the university. See story on page 47.

GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN INSTITUTE

THE GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN INSTITUTE’S ADVISORY BOARD MET IN JULY AT THE HASLAM COLLEGE OF BUSINESS.

BOYD CENTER FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH

SOPHIE XIAO is an assistant professor of

marketing. She earned her doctorate in marketing from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and her primary research interests include firms’ innovation strategies and consumers’ adoption and resistance to new products. Her research has been published in the Journal of Service Research, Journal of Business Research, Journal of Business Ethics, and International Marketing Review.

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ECONOMIC FORECAST

During the Boyd Center’s first economic forecasting luncheon in September, Director BILL FOX and Associate Director MATT MURRAY told a group of nearly 200 business members that the Tennessee economy is expected to continue to grow in 2017. L

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RESEARCH

KELLY HEWETT

WHY COMPANIES SHOULDN’T IGNORE MEAN TWEETS BY: KATIE WILLIAMS THE TWITTERSPHERE ERUPTS almost

daily into firestorms of complaints about companies. Most public relations professionals advise anyone who gets caught in this situation not to “feed the trolls,” but a new study by Kelly Hewett, an assistant professor of marketing at the Haslam College of Business, suggests a better course of action. Ignoring mean tweets actually often results in a negative feedback loop in the media that affects branding and profits. “Bank of America, the firm in the study that subdued these firestorms best, used Twitter more for customer service than advertising,” Hewett said. “More consistent, moderately toned tweets and press releases led it to be much more effective than a firm that sent out one fifth the tweets with a much more positive tone.” Hewett, and her co-authors at the University of Maryland and Massey University, examined how the interdependence of media affects brands. The study relies on one of the most comprehensive datasets in brand communications literature, incorporating more than 60,000 news articles, 18 million tweets, and 5,000 press releases. The researchers found online word of mouth to be the greatest influencer in what they call the ‘echoverse.’ They analyzed the volume and tone of messages in top newspapers, tweets, press releases, and ads for the financial industry from 2007-2013 and measured their effect on consumer sentiment and business outcomes. “Modern media is intensely interconnected,” said Hewett. “The only corporate communications tool that stood outside the echoverse in our study was advertising.” While it increased deposits, advertising had no significant effect on traditional media coverage, social media tone or volume,

or brand perception. However, press releases— which many public relations professionals believe are dying a slow death—were surprisingly effective. Positive press releases softened customer tweets and increased business outcomes. The discovery that media negativity feeds on itself confirms leading viewpoints in the field, but the authors also demonstrated that these negative spirals led to fewer deposits at the banks, which was their proxy for business outcomes. And, while Twitter predictably had a strong effect on how consumers felt about brands, consumer sentiment and business outcomes had little influence on the Twitter conversation. The media has not always been stuck in a negativity loop. Researchers found that in the early days of Twitter, positive messages had a more virulent tendency than negative ones and impacted consumer sentiment more strongly. In 2010, negativity started to take precedence and correspondingly the volume of company tweets began to be more important.

Illustrated by Carolina H. O’Neal, student designer and illustrator.

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SUMMER SCHOLAR RESEARCH AWARDS

DEPARTMENT & FACULTY NEWS

BUSINESS ANALYTICS AND STATISTICS

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TFE Times ranked Haslam twentysecond for the master of science in business analytics in program. nk

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THE SEMIANNUAL BUSINESS ANALYTICS FORUM WAS HELD IN SEPTEMBER TO DISCUSS HOW TO LEVERAGE DATA FROM NEW SOURCES, INCLUDING THE INTERNET OF THINGS.

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IN OCTOBER, THE WOMEN IN ANALYTICS GROUP PARTICIPATED IN THE STRIDES AGAINST BREAST CANCER WALK IN KNOXVILLE. Michel Ballings published in the Annals of Operations Research.

Missie Bowers and Chuck Noon published in Interfaces. Their work also was selected to appear in Editor’s Cut, a public-access online collection of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences.

Frank Guess published in the Journal of Quality Technology along with former student Yan Zeng.

Paolo Letizia published in Production and Operations Management.

Hamparsum Bozdogan published a chapter in the book Data Science, Learning by Latent Structures, and Knowledge and Discovery. He published a paper in Knowledge-Based Systems and Tutorials in Operations Research. He also contributed to the Joint Statistical Meetings in Chicago and gave a tutorial at the INFORMS-2016 conference in Nashville.

UT will receive grant funding to teach technology entrepreneurship, perform research, and foster innovation through the National Science Foundation’s Innovation Corps (I-Corps) program.

BESTVALUE

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The business analytics graduate programs were named among the nation’s top fifty best values by Value Colleges, a website that examines in college affordability. nk Ra

The Haslam Summer Scholars Research Awards program bestowed sixteen faculty members with nearly $300,000 in June for high quality research in the Haslam College of Business.

John Bell

Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management WILLIAM B. STOKELY FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

Hamparsum Bozdogan

Department of Business Analytics and Statistics ED BOLING FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

Celeste Carruthers

Department of Economics and the Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research JOE JOHNSON FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

James Chyz

Department of Accounting and Information Management JEFF AND JANET DAVIS FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

Russell Crook

Department of Management CHERYL MASSINGALE FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

Lauren Cunningham

Department of Accounting and Information Management KINNEY FAMILY FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

Tim Munyon

Department of Management RAY AND JOAN MYATT FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

Andy Puckett

Department of Finance KINNEY FAMILY FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

Georg Schaur

Department of Economics STEWART BARTLEY FAMILY FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

Matthew Serfling

Department of Finance WILLIAM B. STOKELY FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

Wendy Tate

Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management CHERYL MASSINGALE FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

Christian Vossler

Department of Economics CHERYL MASSINGALE FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

Marianne Wanamaker

Department of Economics KINNEY FAMILY FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

David Williams

Department of Management KINNEY FAMILY FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

Alex Zablah

Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management CHARLES AND DOROTHY DUGGAN FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

Wenjun Zhou

Department of Business Analytics and Statistics R. STANLEY BOWDEN II FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW

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SARA EASLER WAS born in Great Britain, but her parents

soon settled in South Carolina. “I grew up hearing about their travels and seeing pictures of their time abroad in the Air Force,” Easler recalls. “My grandparents had also lived in Turkey in the 1960s, and their house was filled with pictures and memories.” The constant exposure to travel mementos sparked a desire in Easler to explore the world. “I was a student athlete as an undergraduate, so I never studied abroad,” she says. “It was something I always wanted to do, but I never had the chance.” After earning a bachelor’s degree in journalism and mass communication from the University of South Carolina, Easler landed a job at the institution’s school of medicine coordinating an international medical scientific society. “That was my first dive into international education,” she says. Five years later, she joined the business school and later became the director for their top-ranked international business program. “In that role, I found my passion in working with students and being part of their new experiences.” During her time at USC, Easler traveled frequently with students, accompanying groups to New Zealand, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Costa Rica. She also journeyed throughout Europe and often visited Hong Kong and China.

In 2016, she came to the Haslam College of Business to serve as the director of international programs and study abroad. “Business schools are realizing the benefit of an internal office for international study abroad,” she says. “The needs of business students are very different from those in other disciplines, and we’re leading the way. Approximately one third of UT students who go abroad are business majors.” One of Easler’s goals in her new role is to create a common space where Haslam students can learn about study abroad opportunities. “Up to now, our programs have been grassroots and departmentally-driven, with faculty having to do a lot of the legwork,” she says. “We want to centralize the study abroad programs at this office and become a helpful resource for students and faculty. Ultimately, my goal is to see more students heading out the door on international programs and deliberately connecting their experience to their degree and career goals.”

SARA EASLER STAFF FOCUS

A PENCHANT FOR TRAVEL

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DEPARTMENT & FACULTY NEWS

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Gartner, a leading industry research company, ranked Haslam’s graduate programs in supply chain management second in the nation. The college’s undergraduate supply chain management programs n ki were ranked third. an

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Chad Autry and Mark Moon co-edited a book on business integration published by the Financial Times Press. It included the work of TWENTY-TWO HASLAM FACULTY MEMBERS.

The Haslam undergraduate supply chain management program was ranked third in the nation by U.S. News and World n Report. ki

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TYVI SMALL, ALONG WITH TWENTY-SEVEN UT FACULTY, STAFF, AND STUDENTS, VISITED CHINA FOR AN ENGLISH IMMERSION SUMMER CAMP.

FRANK CRESPO, VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF PROCUREMENT OFFICER OF CATERPILLAR, WAS THE SUPPLY CHAIN FORUM KEYNOTE SPEAKER IN APRIL.

Ernie Cadotte and Tom Van Dorselaer were given an award by Proctor and Gamble Corporation for their “Hands Across the Water” service learning initiative.

Mary Holcomb published The Road to Profitability is a Web Service Connection, a white paper, in April. Dianne Marshall published in the Supply Chain Management Review.

Dan Flint was invited to serve on the executive advisory board of FedEx E-Commerce. Kelly Hewett published in the Journal of Marketing. Alex Zablah published in the Journal of Applied Psychology.

Ted Stank was a featured presenter on a Sloan Management Review webinar based on an article he co-authored with Diane Mollenkopf and Wendy Tate.

MANAGEMENT Anne Smith was selected as a University of Tennessee Undergraduate Faculty Research Mentor of the Year, a distinction awarded to four faculty members during the 2015-2016 academic year.

Russell Crook and other special editors at the Journal of Management Studies held a conference at Haslam on meta-analysis methodology in May.

Rhonda Reger was named QUEST Scholar of the Week in April by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She also was named the Nestle USA Endowed Professor of Business Administration.

Lois Welch received the Tim Williams Staff Award for Professionalism in April. Ronald “Red” Gibson was named Facilities Services Employee of the Month for April by the university. Sherri Pinkston received the Superior Customer Responsiveness Award in April.

Stephanie Noble gave interviewing tips to doctoral students in a talk sponsored by the American Marketing Association’s Academic Placement Center. She also co-authored two papers that are forthcoming in the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science.

Senior lecturers John Anderson, John Hoffman, and Kathy Wood announced their intent to retire.

Kaitlyn Wray received the Innovation and Creativity Award in April.

Lori Hickok, chief financial officer at Scripps Networks Interactive, visited campus in April.

Cat Financial’s Jim Duensing and Brogan Financial’s Jim Brogan and John Kerrigan spoke to an audience of students and faculty on campus. The finance department hosted scholars from around the nation at the inaugural University of Tennessee “Smokey” Mountain Finance Conference in April in Asheville, North Carolina.

Cathy Russell, of the Accounting and Information Management office, announced plans to retire in December of 2016. Destiny Sirivong (HCB ’15) joined the Office of Diversity and Community Relations as the coordinator of precollegiate programs.

FINANCE Phillip Daves was named faculty advisor for the Tennessee Capital Markets Society, a new student organization that focuses on moving finance students into high-profile jobs and providing members the skills required for a career in capital markets. John Wachowicz, professor emeritus of finance, retired after serving on the faculty for nearly forty years. Matthew Serfling published in the Journal of Corporate Finance and the Journal of Finance. He has a forthcoming publication in the Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis.

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Photo by Dan Bigelow Photography

INVESTING IN THE FUTURE, CONSERVING THE PAST 12 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

WILMA JORDAN (HCB ’71), AT COLUMBUS CIRCLE NEAR HER OFFICE IN MANHATTAN


WILMA JORDAN DIVIDES HER TIME BETWEEN TWO WORLDS, MAKING HER HOME ALTERNATELY IN FAST-PACED NEW YORK CITY AND PASTORAL HALLS, OUTSIDE KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE.

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14 | HASLAM MAGAZINE


WHILE JORDAN’S THIRTY-YEAR CAREER IN NEW YORK HAS YIELDED TREMENDOUS SUCCESS, HER HEART AND ROOTS REMAIN IN THE FORESTS AND FARMLAND OF EAST TENNESSEE. JORDAN’S PARENTS MOVED from

South Knoxville to Halls while she was growing up, transitioning from suburbia to farm life. “My parents bought a small sixty-five-acre farm when I was twelve,” she says. “My mother in particular wanted to have a farm experience.” Jordan spent her teenage years enjoying a rural lifestyle just outside Knoxville and when she graduated from high school, her choice of college was clear. “In this area, it was sort of expected that if you were going to college, you would go to the University of Tennessee,” she says, “and I did.”

liberal arts requirements. She also soaked up enthusiasm for creative business ideas and ventures from faculty members and fellow students. “There was an environment even then that I think reflects the East Tennessee culture, where lots of people started their own businesses,” she says. “We didn’t call it entrepreneurial culture at the time, but if you look at this area’s history, we have produced so many successful and famous entrepreneurs. As I look back, having that ethos of entrepreneurialism and being surrounded by families who have started businesses was very helpful in my career.”

professor had a great sense of humor.” Jordan relished her undergraduate years, gaining a wide variety of skills within her business major and from

21 percent on revenues of $80 million. “I moved to New York when we purchased Esquire Magazine Group,” she says. “In 1985, 13-30 was

Encouraged Toward Encouraged Toward Entrepreneurship From Knoxville Entrepreneurship to New York ENTERING THE HASLAM College From Knoxville of Business in the late 1960s, Jordan IN THE EARLY 1970s, Jordan joined to New found that she York was one of a few female a Investing group of fellow Haslam graduates in People students. “I was the only woman in my in starting the 13-30 Corporation, a Investing industrial management class,” she media company that grew to be one of Investing in People recalls. Despite some good-natured the 100 largest in the country over the teasing, Jordan remembers feeling next The fifteen years. During her time as in Planet Investing welcome in the class. “That was a the company’s chief financial officer, course I reallyPlanet enjoyed,” she says. “The 13-30 generated a profit margin of in The

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“WE DIDN’T CALL IT ENTREPRENEURIAL CULTURE AT THE TIME, BUT IF YOU LOOK AT THIS AREA’S HISTORY, WE HAVE PRODUCED SO MANY SUCCESSFUL AND FAMOUS ENTREPRENEURS. AS I LOOK BACK, HAVING THAT ETHOS OF ENTREPRENEURIALISM AND BEING SURROUNDED BY FAMILIES WHO HAVE STARTED BUSINESSES WAS VERY HELPFUL IN MY CAREER.” bought out, and I sold my stock.” Jordan also was the chief operating officer and principal negotiator at Esquire, which sold in 1986. With her schedule cleared, Jordan jumped at the chance to forge a new entrepreneurial path in the late 1980s. “I loved business models and understanding how companies successfully operate and had worked with advisors and bankers, so opening an investment advisory boutique seemed a pretty natural place for me to start a business,” she says. “We incorporated Jordan Edmiston Group (JEGI) in June 1987. Time has flown by since then.” Because of her background in mass media, Jordan focused JEGI on the marketing, media, and information and technology sectors. It’s become the most successful independent investment bank for those sectors since its inception, with Jordan overseeing more than 600 mergers and acquisitions transactions for clients throughout the years. Jordan has served on the boards of several privately- and publicly-held companies, including Lin Broadcasting, Clayton Homes, and iBehavior. She also is a trustee of Guideposts, Inc., publisher of Guideposts magazine and a director of Fenimore Asset Management.

Encouraged Toward Entrepreneurship From Knoxville to New York Investing in People FOR JORDAN, GIVING back is a Investing natural response to her career success. in The Planet She supports a number of charitable 16 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

organizations with time and finances, including the Red Cross, World Vision, and Central Presbyterian Church in New York. “I am a trustee there and it’s close to my heart,” Jordan says. “The church had dwindled over the past twenty years, but we have an extremely talented young pastor who has taken it from almost no members to five to 600 attendees per week. A number of Knoxville families attend when they visit New York.” When her alma mater decided to name the Neel Corporate Governance Center, Jordan jumped on the bandwagon. “Fundraising for the center was something I cared a great deal about because of Warren and his contributions to the university,” she says. “He and his wife, Annelle, are very close friends of mine.” Joe Carcello, EY and Business Alumni Professor and head of Haslam’s Department of Accounting and Information Management, says Jordan is one of two people who played the biggest roles in funding the center. “She’s also helped us by making calls to others to convince them to play a role, and she’s spoken at the center a couple of times, sacrificing her time to share her thinking with our students and faculty.” Carcello, executive director of the Neel Center, also appreciates Jordan’s willingness to serve on the Dean’s Advisory Council despite her busy schedule. “She’s running a very, very demanding business in New York, and for her to give up that time to come a long way to be on the advisory council is also a tribute to her,” he says. “She’s very committed to Haslam and to the university.”

Encouraged Toward Entrepreneurship From Knoxville to New York Investing in People Investing in The Planet

IN ADDITION TO her investments in education and charitable work, Jordan harbors a passion for land conservation. She was driven to act on her concern about deforestation as she watched land being cleared near her family’s farm in Halls. “In the midst of the climate change debate, I believe deforestation is the main issue,” she says. “In my opinion, it’s unnecessary for retailers to take rural land and construct buildings that are likely going to end up empty in ten years,

given the presence of the giant e-commerce companies.” For the past decade, Jordan has supported the Foothills Land Conservancy, a nonprofit group that works with landowners in seven Southeastern states to create conservation easements. “Interestingly, East Tennessee has been a little behind in the whole sustainability

“IN MY OPINION, IT’S UNNECESSARY FOR RETAILERS TO TAKE RURAL LAND AND CONSTRUCT BUILDINGS THAT ARE LIKELY GOING TO END UP EMPTY IN TEN YEARS, GIVEN THE PRESENCE OF THE GIANT E-COMMERCE COMPANIES.” movement,” Jordan says. “What we all hope is that these conservation easements are in perpetuity.” Jordan approached Bill Clabough, executive director of the Foothills Land Conservancy, to create an easement for the original tract of her family’s land, called Valley Dream Farm. “Since then, we’ve done two more conservations with Wilma as she’s purchased more land around her farm,” Clabough says. “We’ve appreciated her insight into that particular area of East Tennessee and her passion to stop urban sprawl from drifting that way. She’s a very conservation-minded lady who loves that part of the world and wants it protected.” Clabough says Jordan has supported the organization with her finances, time, and effort. “Somebody in that general neighborhood wanted to do a conservation easement and she helped provide the funds for it,” he recalls. “She not only talks the talk but walks the walk, too.” While financial investing is the main focus of Jordan’s career, she sees conservation as an investment, too. “My business success has certainly provided the financial resources to support land conservancy,” she says. “It’s really a big investment—an investment in our planet’s future. I believe that with all my heart.”


Conserving Tennessee’s Forests JORDAN IS PASSIONATE ABOUT HELPING OTHERS MAKE WISE INVESTMENTS, BOTH IN THE FINANCIAL MARKET AND IN THE ENVIRONMENT. GROWING UP ON A FARM in East Tennessee inspired Jordan to promote land conservation and forest preservation, specifically in her home state. She sees a natural connection between deforestation and climate change. “To understand the link, visit one of the ‘old growth’ forested coves in East Tennessee during the summer,” Jordan says. “When the temperature is ninety degrees everywhere else, that cove will be at least ten degrees cooler.” Since 1982, some 778,700 acres of agricultural land has been developed in the state of Tennessee, according to the Farmland Information Center. Lamenting the loss of many natural areas to unnecessary development, Jordan has joined forces with the Foothills Land Conservancy (FLC) to fight for conservation. SINCE ITS INCEPTION IN 1985, THE FLC HAS:

• Preserved more than 65,900 acres in twenty-eight Tennessee counties and six surrounding states, includ ing conservation easement partner-

ships, fee simple properties, land conveyance projects, and additional land projects. • Expanded its organizational reach outside of Tennessee with land preservation projects in the six states of Alabama, Kentucky, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. • More than doubled the amount of acreage preserved through conser vation easement agreements within the past five years, compared to all the years prior to 2011. TO LEARN MORE ABOUT LAND CONSERVATION AND DEFORESTATION, INCLUDING WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP, PLEASE VISIT:

Farmland Farmland Center Information farmlandinfo.org/statistics/tennessee Information Center Foothills Land Foothills Land Conservancy Conservancy foothillsland.org


18 | HASLAM MAGAZINE


ON THE RISE WITH CELLULAR SALES HASLAM.UTK.EDU || 19 19 HASLAM.UTK.EDU


IN 1990, DANE SCISM (HCB ’97) TOOK A SALES JOB IN THE EMERGING CELLULAR TELEPHONE INDUSTRY, NOT KNOWING HOW GREAT AN IMPACT THE MOVE WOULD HAVE ON HIS CAREER. A NATIVE OF HENDERSONVILLE, TENNESSEE, DANE HAD ALWAYS WANTED TO ATTEND THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, KNOXVILLE. “MY FATHER WAS A BUSINESSMAN, SO I WAS ALWAYS ATTRACTED TO BUSINESS AND KNEW I’D END UP MAJORING IN ECONOMICS OR BUSINESS,” HE SAYS. “BUT I WAS NOT A SERIOUS STUDENT WHEN I CAME HERE INITIALLY.” EARLY DAYS RESTLESS, DANE WORKED

several restaurant jobs during his undergraduate years and left school only fifteen credit hours short of graduating from the Haslam College of Business. That’s when he took a job at Cellular One, joining a few close friends and fraternity brothers at the company. “Both those guys had entrepreneurial experience, and they started a local agency to sell cellular phones,” Dane says. “They rented an office on Baum Drive for $90 per month and recruited me to help. We had 20 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

no idea what we were doing.” In those early days, Dane found himself sitting in a sparsely furnished office with a telephone and a phone book, making sales calls to potential customers. “It was hard work, and we weren’t very successful,” Dane says. “I still worked at restaurants in the evenings.” Meanwhile, he started reading about sales and began to see better results from his efforts. “We got the idea that if we are going to make phone calls, why don’t we sit in malls where people might come up and talk to us as well?” says Dane. “So we set up our first kiosk in Knoxville Center mall.”


“We came up with all these unique systems where the salespeople were empowered to make all the decisions without managers, essentially eliminating the need for managerial staff at the store level—and it worked.” By late 1992, Dane’s friends wanted to sell their company. “Meg and I were dating at the time, and while we were driving home for Thanksgiving to her parents’ house, we started talking about buying the assets,” he says. “I was making a good income and wanted to see where we could take it.” So the pair purchased the company and created a fresh business plan with Dane at the helm, aiming to sell 100 phones per month. “We tripled our projection that very first month and sold 300,” Dane says. “All the salespeople stayed.”

STEADY GROWTH MEANWHILE, DANE

worked to create new structural policies. “We came up with all these

unique systems where the salespeople were empowered to make all the decisions without managers, essentially eliminating the need for managerial staff at the store level—and it worked.” Meg (HCB ’92), who holds a degree in finance, took over the bookkeeping while Dane steered the company and gathered feedback from the sales staff. “We were very conservative with the way we grew the business, without any debt,” he says. “After a few years, we became more legitimate and were able to prioritize renting high-quality storefronts.” At around the same time, Dane began to hire more personnel, choosing them from among his friends. “I was able to start recruiting some of my college friends,” he says. “Today, the original ten or so of those hires are executives in the company and are still in our inner circle. Many of them are UT graduates, and they’re all dear friends of ours.” By 1997, Dane’s company was ready to expand. “We wanted to reward those folks who had stayed with us, so we began sending them to different regions to open new stores,” he says. “We went to Asheville, North Carolina, first and were very successful. Kentucky was next, and then Alabama and Virginia.” Meanwhile, Dane decided to take on an

additional challenge. “He went back to Haslam in the midst of all this to finish his degree,” Meg says. “It was tough going back after ten years, and he went to night school while working full-time, but he made all As in his last few classes.”

SOLID SUCCESS OVER THE NEXT TWO

decades, Cellular Sales continued to grow, eventually becoming the largest authorized Verizon Wireless retailer in the United States with more than 600 stores across the nation. Associates say Dane’s unique leadership style sets him apart and has contributed to the company’s success. JT Thome, who helped to start WebMD and served as senior vice president at Jewelry Television before coming to Cellular Sales as chief operating officer in 2010, has observed Dane’s values and tactics through the years. “Dane’s vision for the company is centered on the empowerment of front line sales representatives and their ability to delight the customer,” says Thome. “Customer experience has always been the theme as we’ve had discussions, evaluated opinions and made decisions. I’ve spent time with some phenomenal entrepreneurs in my career, and Dane

is right up with the best because of his vision for our business. He’s stayed true to his values, and that’s a nice grounding force for us.” Dane says the company is built on a pool leadership model. “Every system in our company is set up to empower our salespeople to make the right decisions, not to be micromanaged,” he says. “Give people the dignity to make their own decisions, and they’ll almost always make the right ones if the incentives are correct.” Dane also places a high value on the customer experience. “Everybody has to win in every transaction,” he says. “You can only do business with a customer once if you win and they lose. Our goal is to make them never want to do business with anyone else.” Morgan Thomas, president of commercial insurance at TIS Insurance, Knoxville, has handled the company’s insurance needs for twenty-five years. He says the Scisms have hit upon a sure outline for achievement. “Because they hired their friends, the business is like one big family,” Thomas says. “I think the combination of Dane’s leadership and the close-knit atmosphere at the company has led to their success.”

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STUDENT PROFILE

BEYOND THE POOL

COMPETITIVE. FOCUSED. DEDICATED. Kate Ziegler,

KATE ZEIGLER

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a full-time MBA student at the Haslam College of Business and a competitive swimmer since age six, embodies such attributes. Ziegler raced at the 2008 and 2012 Olympic Games and is the former worldrecord holder in the 1500-meter freestyle. She came to the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, almost two years ago. “I was looking for an innovative and fresh perspective as I trained for the 2016 Olympic Trials,” she says. “And as I approached the end of my swimming career, I wanted to prepare for the next step in life.” Ziegler enrolled in the MBA program after visiting the college and feeling it was a good fit. “I started researching and realized what a great program it is and that it aligns with my needs and desires for where I am going,” she says. “The academics are really strong, especially in analytics, the alumni network is great, and I love Knoxville.” Prior to her time in Knoxville, Ziegler’s life was a whirlwind of swimming competitions, international travel, and academics. She grew up in the Washington, DC, area and quickly rose to success in her teen years. “I made my first world championship when I was sixteen, was double world champion by the time I was seventeen, and broke my first world record when I was eighteen,” she remembers. Ziegler pursued competitive swimming until 2013, when she decided to take a break. “I’d just finished my undergraduate degree and was mentally, physically, and emotionally exhausted,” she says. “I knew I needed time away from competing.” She frequently traveled abroad over the next two years, partnering with several companies and nonprofit organizations. “I ran a swim camp for military kids in Spain, helped organize send-off events for military personnel in Europe, and did public speaking and swim clinics,” she says. “Later, I served as head coach for a team at the International Children’s Games in Australia.” When Ziegler returned to competitive swimming, she had gained a new sense of self. “I learned a lot about who I was as a person and who I wanted to be as an athlete as I approached the sport again,” she says. Ziegler’s concentration is in marketing analytics and she plans to pursue a marketing career in consumer packaged goods or the health and wellness sector. “That’s something that I’m very passionate about as an athlete.”


To share your news with the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Haslam College of Business community, submit it along with any relevant images to Haslam@utk.edu. Please use “Student News” in the subject line.

STUDENT NEWS Twenty rising high school juniors from across Tennessee participated in the Accounting & Information Management (AIM) Academy in July.

WAYNE TAYLOR AND JALEN BLUE WERE NAMED UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE TORCHBEARERS.

Haslam students and alumni organized the 2016 Barefoot Benefit. The race was held in October in Sequoyah Hills Park to benefit Samaritan Place, an emergency shelter for senior citizens.

A group of Haslam students traveled to Australia’s Sunshine Coast in June and July.

COLLEGE WIDE

A group of nineteen Haslam students were in London this summer learning about global business. Thirty-nine high school students from around the southeast learned about majoring in business on campus as part of the Business Education for Talented Students (BETS) program in June.

Orientation for 1,012 incoming business students consisted of more than thirteen sessions where students heard from thirty Haslam faculty members and twelve current students. The eight corporations that sponsored orientation were: PepsiCo, DHG, Caterpillar Financial, Pilot Flying J, PYA, Axle Logistics, International Paper, and Georgia Pacific. The student orientation fair took place in August with all first-year business students required to attend.

A group of twenty-two diverse undergraduate students traveled to Nashville in February late last month on a professional development trip exposing them to area corporations.

Fourteen Haslam College of Business students spent three weeks studying international business and management in Castiglion Fiorentino, a small walled city perched on a hilltop in Tuscany, Italy.

Approximately 54 percent of the senior class made gifts during the Senior Impact campaign, raising nearly $17,000.

Dimitriy Petrov and Zach Issacs won second place in the high growth category of the Graves Undergraduate Business Plan Competition for their startup, Amerus Enterprises.

A group of Haslam students spent a month in Freiburg, Germany, this summer. They also visited the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, where they listened to parliamentary debates.

The Office of Diversity & Community Relations held an open house in September to expose students to academic resources, professional development programs, and leadership opportunities.

54%

Students hosted the Tour de Knox bike rally in April to benefit Knoxville’s Legacy Parks Foundation.

Mario Grant received the May 2016 Courage to Climb Award from the Division of Student Life.

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FRESHMAN STUDENTS BECOME “HASLAM ENGAGED” ON SEPTEMBER 9, the Haslam College of Business hosted the first

“THIS EVENT REALLY REVOLVES AROUND INCLUSION, WHICH LEADS STUDENTS TO BECOME MORE ENGAGED— AND THAT’S JUST GOING TO CONTRIBUTE TO OUR OVERALL SUCCESS AS A GROUP.” —Braden Cole

Haslam Engaged, an event designed to help freshmen business students feel welcomed, included, and valued. “Pulling the freshman class together for a college-wide event has been a dream for a long time,” says Lane Morris, Skinner Professor of Management and associate dean of undergraduate programs and student affairs. “We want to send the message to our students that their engagement with us matters, and the college is interested in building a relationship with them. This is a way for us to do that at the beginning of their college experience.” More than 500 first-year students, greater than 50 percent of the freshman class, attended this year’s event at Thompson-Boling Arena in Knoxville. The activities began with group icebreaker games, followed by teambuilding games in smaller groups led by seventy-five juniors and seniors who had undergone a full day of training prior to the event. Laura Trainer, advising coordinator for undergraduate programs, said the event was designed to help students reach beyond their already established groups of friends. “The idea was for the freshmen to be in groups of other business students but not necessarily people they already knew,” she said. “It encouraged them to step outside their comfort zone and get to know some other people.” Sammi Richards, a senior in business management with a collateral in international business, volunteered as a group leader. “I wanted the opportunity to express to these freshmen how important it is to meet other people and get involved,” she says. “It makes a huge difference in your college experience.” Freshman Braden Cole enjoyed the chance to interact with other business students in a relaxed atmosphere. “This event really revolves around inclusion, which leads students to become more engaged— and that’s just going to contribute to our overall success as a group.” The college plans to make Haslam Engaged an annual event, bringing together the new freshman business cohort each fall as an introduction and welcome into Haslam.


STUDENT NEWS Twelve Haslam students studied in Spain in May, seeking out marketing opportunities for consumer products during a joint program with the University of South Carolina.

Li Cheng, a doctoral student, won the 2016 Academy of Management’s Hahn Best Paper award. THE SCHOLARS OF DISTINCTION PROGRAM WAS LAUNCHED TO HELP COMPANIES RECRUIT NEW TALENT MISSING FROM THE SUPPLY CHAIN INDUSTRY. THIRTYSEVEN UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS HAD BEEN SELECTED AS OF MARCH.

MARKETING AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

A team of Haslam students won the Intermodal Association of North America’s Logistics and Supply Chain Case Competition in April for the third time.

CLOUD LOGISTICS PARTNERED WITH THE COLLEGE IN MARCH BY DONATING ITS AWARD-WINNING TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS TO THE COLLEGE FOR USE BY STUDENTS.

gs

Haslam accounting graduates ranked fourth nationally among public universities for Certified Public Accountant exam pass rates, according to the National Association of in State Boards of Accountancy. nk Ra

ACCOUNTING AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Jeff Maier accepted a job as an auditor for EY in Nashville and was featured in a news story about recent graduates receiving job offers.

The 2016 Master of Accountancy graduating class raised $46,800 to aid future students through scholarships.

Fellipe Gomes Raymundo and Andrew Doucet joined the department as doctoral students.

MICHELLE HARDING, A DOCTORAL CANDIDATE IN ACCOUNTING, WAS ONE OF TWENTY-FIVE STUDENTS IN THE NATION SELECTED TO ATTEND THE EARLY CAREER PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP AT OLIN BUSINESS SCHOOL, WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN ST. LOUIS.

Tripled

The number of Haslam business analytics students doing graduate assistantships at the Y-12 National Security Complex has tripled from two to six since 2014.

Taylor Adkins tied for second place in the high growth category of the Graves Undergraduate Business Plan Competition for his startup, SilkOps. SilkOps also received funding through Launch Tennessee’s Statewide University Venture Challenge. Courtney McCall received the Impact Internship scholarship through UT’s Center for Career Development for her internship in the health and wellness department at Kimberly-Clark.

A team of master’s students created a markdown strategy for HanesBrands’ sales to consumers through its website and outlet stores as part of their capstone course. The strategy employed an engine based on historical sales that recommends which products to mark down each week.

A team of master’s students utilized the sales histories of Coca-Cola Refreshment’s customers to identify customers with growing or shrinking purchasing as part of their capstone course. They sought to identify the root causes behind these trends.

BUSINESS ANALYTICS AND STATISTICS

Nathan Parmeswar did an internship at Nielsen to hone his data insight skills. GRAVES UNDERGRADUATE BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION

Kevin White won first place in the lifestyle category of the Graves Undergraduate Business Plan Competition for his startup, Gameday Weekenders.

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STUDENT PROFILE

LIVING BY FAITH

AT AGE ELEVEN, Colby Dorcely was already dreaming

COLBY DORCELY 26 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

of one day coming to the United States from his native Haiti. “My father had faith that I would have that opportunity,” Dorcely says. “He believed it would happen even when it seemed impossible.” After a devastating earthquake rocked Haiti in 2010, the idea of becoming an international student seemed less likely. Miraculously, Dorcely’s entire family survived the disaster, but the setbacks for the community where Dorcely’s father served as a pastor were enormous. “I thought it was the end of the world,” Dorcely recalls, “but I remember talking to my dad and he said, ‘We live by faith. It will still be possible for you to go.’” A leader from Grace Baptist Church in Knoxville visited Haiti in the aftermath of the earthquake and met with local pastors, including Dorcely’s father. “He offered to sponsor me if I wanted to come here to study,” Dorcely says. “I couldn’t believe it.” It took nearly two years and reams of paperwork, but Dorcely received his visa in 2012 and moved to Tennessee, where he enrolled at Pellissippi State Technical Community College. In 2014, he transferred to the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s Haslam College of Business, where he chose to major in supply chain management and international business. “It’s a phenomenal program,” he says. “I like the diversity at UT and the fact that I can meet people from all around the world. I’ve learned a lot here.” Dorcely says the supportive community and business perspectives he’s gained as a student at Haslam have encouraged and shaped his future plans. After he graduates in December 2016, he plans to return to his home country. “My long-term goal is to start an organization in Haiti centered around community development, and get involved in politics,” he says. “Since I’ve begun to understand politics in Haiti, I see that we’ve received a lot of short-term international aid, which doesn’t necessarily lead to empowerment. I want to help provide more education, invest in human capital, and aid development.” When he’s not immersed in business studies, Dorcely enjoys delving into books on philosophy, including the Bible and Plato’s writings. “I’ve always been on a quest to find the meaning of life,” he says. “Life is so short. How can I live for something durable, something that lasts? Whatever I do, I want to do it passionately and wholeheartedly.”


STUDENT NEWS Executive MBA students traveled nationally and internationally as part of their fall

industry trips. EMBA for Healthcare Leadership students visited Washington, DC, in December to meet policy-makers. EMBA for Global Supply Chain students traveled to Germany and Hungary in September to visit Airbus, Reyher and GE facilities. EMBA for Strategic Leadership students traveled to Chile and Peru in August to visit Wenco Plastics, FASA, Mondelez International, and Neptunia. The Aerospace and Defense MBA program spent its third residency period in St. Louis in June. Additionally, EMBA for Global Supply Chain students traveled to China in May for a residency period.

Physicians from around the country gathered in April for a symposium leading into the Physician Executive MBA program’s residency period.

GRADUATE AND EXECUTIVE EDUCATION

The MBA class of 2017 started the fall semester with twice as many veterans as in previous years. Veterans now account for nearly 13 percent of the class.

A panel discussion attended by Aerospace and Defense MBA students in April included panelists with ties to the United States Air Force and Army, NASA, and Northrop Grumman Aerospace.

Brent Johnson, president and CEO of Intalere, spoke to students in the Executive MBA classes for healthcare and strategic leadership in May.

MANAGEMENT

Haslam Physician MBA students visited the Adam Brown Social Media Command Center in the College of Communication and Information in August to learn about tools available for communications work in social media.

1st

A team of five MBA students won first place in the Medtronic Collegiate Business Case Competition in Memphis in March.

4,624 HOURS

Haslam MBA students contributed 4,624 consulting hours to area nonprofit and governmental organizations as part of the Innovation in Practice capstone course.

$30,000

Debbie Mackey’s management course held a panel in September during which representatives from UT Athletics, the a3Athletics Agency, Proton Power, Zoo Knoxville, the Knox County Health Department, the Emerald Youth Foundation, FranklinCovey, and the USI Consulting Group shared expertise with students.

Haslam MBA students spent some of the last days of summer volunteering their time to a Habitat to Humanity build, marking the program’s thirteenth consecutive year of volunteering.

Haslam undergraduate students administered $30,000 in grants to local charities in Alex Miller’s Leadership in Nonprofits and Social Entrepreneurship course.

The UT Management Society supported Mobile Meals with a donation of nearly $3,200. In addition to funding meals, some members made deliveries to home-bound seniors.

Brittney Parker was awarded the Joseph P. Goddard scholarship to pursue her graduate studies at Haslam by the Tennessee Society for Human Resource Management.

FINANCE Ryan Caveney received the CFA Society of East Tennessee’s 2016 Outstanding Finance Student Award.

HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 27


16%

SOURCES AND USES OF FUNDS INCREASES IN DIFFERENTIAL

tuition revenues reflect rising demand for business education. The existing Haslam College of Business differential tuition rate was increased to $95 per credit hour beginning in the fall of 2016. The increase helps fund the college’s strategic goals for entering the ranks of the Top 25 public business schools. The college will improve student access to its 100-level courses and enhance its career management services and co-curricular activities, which will include more study abroad opportunities and additional course technology. Executive education revenues continued to steadily improve. Private philanthropy remains an important funding source at 16 percent of the budget while revenues from external grants and

19%

FY 2016 Source of Funds

contracts declined for 15% the third straight year. Within the state allocation and standard tuition share category, increased reliance on student tuition revenue relative to state funding continues to be the trend. Salary and benefits also remain the largest expense category, reflecting the importance of human capability in delivering on our organizational mission. At the close of fiscal year 2016, the market value of the college’s endowment reached $121.7 million. Gifts to the endowment during the fiscal year totaled $13 million. Concurrently, the college also witnessed a 7 percent increase in the total number of donors.

State Allocation and Standard Tuition Differential Tuitions Executive Education Private Monies Grants & Contracts

7%

43%

10%

12%

9%

FY 2016 Use of Funds

6%

Salaries & Benefits Executive Education Student Support Program Infrastructure Reinvestment

63%

2015

FY ’09

3947

2011 2010

2006 2007

2008

2009 FY ’07

28 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

FY ’08

3701

2012

2787

Number of Donors 2277

2013

2101

2005

$ 121,686,981 $ 116,771,240 $ 98,782,233 $ 84,342,500 $ 74,081,913 $ 74,246,647 $ 60,762,937 $ 54,168,535 $ 73,415,806 $ 80,293,747 $ 66,881,222 $ 59,013,279

2025

Market Value of Endowment

2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005

2259

FY Value

—DEAN STEPHEN L. MANGUM

3068

2581

2014

2571

2016

IT IS NO SECRET THAT FINANCIAL GIFTS ARE VITAL TO OUR COLLEGE. PRIVATE FUNDS LEND SUPPORT TO ACADEMIC PROGRAMMING, FACULTY, STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS, FACILITIES, AND NEARLY EVERY ASPECT OF OUR MISSION.”

FY ’10

FY ’11

FY ’12

FY ’13

FY ’14

FY ’15

FY ’16


DEVELOPMENT & GIVING REPORT LISTED ON THE FOLLOWING pages

are those individuals, organizations, corporations, and foundations whose gifts of $250 or more were received by the Haslam College of Business in fiscal year 2016 (July 1, 2015, through June 30, 2016). Each and every gift, regardless of amount, is sincerely appreciated. The generosity of our alumni and friends allows the college to provide the best possible educational opportunities for our students. Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy and completeness of our list of contributors, we acknowledge that the following list may contain inadvertent errors; please contact us with any corrections.

OVER $500,000 Anderson Family Randy & Jenny Boyd Haslam Family

$250,000-$499,999 Anonymous R. Andrew Taylor

$100,000-$249,999 BB&T Edward J. Boling John Harrigan Boll George J. Green & Wilma Jordan Jerry & Kay Henry Earl Ray Leinart Ray & Joan Myatt Jr. Gerald Thomas Niedert Mary Lucretia Parks Regal Foundation Telluray Foundation William B. Stokely Jr. Foundation

$50,000-$99,999 James B. Baker R. Stanley Bowden II DHG LLP EY LLP Foundation Farm Bureau Insurance Companies of TN

First Tennessee Foundation Ralph & Janet Heath Home Federal Bank of Tennessee George & Margaret Melton Norfolk Southern Foundation Joseph & Barbara O’Donnell PricewaterhouseCoopers Howard & Barbara Sherrod Jr. Gregory & Lisa Smith SouthEast Bank

$25,000-$49,999 Thomas & Jennifer Bell Jr. Bill & Melba Blevins Martin & Ann Brown Larry & Vivian Carroll Caterpillar Financial Services Corp. Caterpillar Inc. Coca-Cola Foundation G. Mack & Nancy Dove Charles W. Duggan Enterprise Integration Terry & Kathy Evans L. Barry & Karen Goss Philip & Margo Jacobs Russell & Jennifer Lamb Knaster Charitable Trust— Michael Lobel, Trustee Frank & Elaine Ozburn Jr. PYA Pro2Serve Professional Product Services Dave & Sharon Ramsey Regions Financial Corporation William & Kay Stokely III Arthur & Hasseline Thompson Jr. Mark & Lynn Venrick Charles & Nancy Wagner III Rod & Karen Williams

$10,000-$24,999 John & Donna Adams Jr. Alcoa Inc. Armour-Eckrich Meats LLC Kelvin & Sheryl Ault Bayer Healthcare James & Patricia Bernal Berry Plastics Corporation Boeing Company Brother International Corp Don & Joan Bruce Aubrey R. Burleson Burlington Northern & Santa Fe Corp. Bush Brothers & Company Ernest & Bonnie Cadotte Caterpillar Foundation Cintas Corporation Citizens Bank Tri-Cities Foundation Ltd Clayton Family Foundation Cracker Barrel Stores Inc. Deloitte Foundation Duraline Eastman ExxonMobil Foundation FedEx Express

Brian & Heather Foley FY16 Grants-UTK Genco I Inc. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company James & Donna Harlan II Douglas & Carla Harris HAVI Global Solutions Tom & Constance Hawkins Jr. W. Blaine Hawkins Jay & Meredith Hollomon Douglas & Brenda Horne Hub Group Inc. Robert & Sharon Huette IBM Corporation International Paper Company Foundation Jerald & Kimberly Nine Jr. Family Fdn. Johnson & Johnson Vision Care Bob & Molly Joy Kimberly-Clark Corporation KLA Tencor Corporation Michael & Pamela Koban Jr. Christopher & Quinita LaPorte La-Z-Boy Inc. Legacy Supply Chain Services Lennox International Inc. Stephen & Troba Mangum A. David & Sandra Martin Martin-Bower Company Cheryl S. Massingale McCormick & Company Inc. Michael Burnette LLC Dan & Amy Miles Mondelez International Inc. John R. Moore Neovia Logistics Services Jim & Kathy Newsome III Nissan North America Inc. Samuel & Cheryl Oakley Kiran & Jocimara Patel PepsiCo Foundation Inc. Pilot Flying J Procter & Gamble Fund Joseph & Sharon Pryse Will & Genetta Pugh Radio Systems Corporation PetSafe Regal Entertainment Group Martin & Carol Robinson Ryder Truck Rental Inc. S.C. Johnson & Son Inc. Saks Incorporated Foundation William & Jane Salter Scripps Networks Interactive Sears Holding Mgmt Corp Richard & Ann Smith John W. Snow South Carolina Ports Authority Mark Edward Tasman Tetra Recycling Inc. Tractor Supply Company Trust Company of Knoxville William & Anita Vallett Jr. VF Services LLC Walgreens Wal-Mart Foundation Jan & Elaine Williams WWL Vehicle Services Americas Inc.

$5,000-$9,999 American Marketing Association, Knoxville Chapter Bank of America Foundation Jennifer S. Banner Becton Dickinson & Company James & Murray Benz Leonard & Laura Berlik David Birdwell Mark & Karen Bowling BPV Capital Management James & Diedra Brogan Steven & Jill Brown Thomas P. Brown Charles & Dorothy Butler James & Celeste Butler Joseph & Terri Carcello Samuel & Sharon Carter Jr. Corey & Allison Coggin George & Cheryl Cooper IV Cornerstone Foundation of Knoxville James A. Crossman Marc & Kelli Davenport Jeffery S. Drummonds Michael D. Easterly Timothy & Karen Ellis David Myers Evans Alan Fan Kevin & Tracy Ferguson Fidelity Investments Joseph & Ruth Fielden Lester E. Finnell Jr. Ronald David Ford James & Marcia Foxworthy Nan M. Given Kostyantyn & Karmen Grabovskyy Paul & Patricia Green Halliburton Foundation Inc. Allen P. Halliday William P. Halliday III John & Renee Hawkins Robert & Terri Hensley Damon & Carrie Hininger Hodges & Pratt Company PC IBM International Foundation David & Deborah Ingram J.W. Outfitters Inc. David & Jeanne Claire Jones Cynthia Leigh Joyce KPMG Foundation Jon & Toni Lawler Richard & Pamela Lee Michael K. Littlejohn Michael & Tina Lobel Raffi & Diane Markarian Jeffrey & Caroline McCamy Frank & Mary McGregor Jean Harrington Miller Jack & Patricia Mills Edward & Karen Pershing Pinnacle Bank Power & Telephone Supply Company Patricia G. Pratt Pugh CPAs Scott A. Roe King & Judy Rogers III Brett W. Rousch continued on p. 34 >

HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 29


THREE GENERATIONS OF BIG ORANGE LEADERS IN PHILANTHROPY

KELVIN AND SHERYL AULT

30 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

This page: Kelvin and Sheryl Ault outside Neyland Stadium. Opposite page: The Aults visit with recipients of their scholarship.


“IT WAS A SMALLER PROGRAM AT THE MASTER’S LEVEL AND VERY IMPACTFUL. WE WERE ABLE TO DEVELOP REALLY GOOD RELATIONSHIPS WITH OUR PROFESSORS.”

KELVIN AULT FALLS in the middle of three generations

of University of Tennessee, Knoxville, graduates. “My dad graduated in 1954 and taught engineering at UT for a brief period,” says Kelvin. “I grew up a UT fan and never really wanted to go anywhere else.” Kelvin’s oldest son, Ryan, graduated from the university in 2016 with a degree in supply chain management After starting his undergraduate education at UT, Kelvin completed his undergraduate accounting degree at Lipscomb University in Nashville. While attending college in Nashville, Kelvin met Sheryl, and they were married the summer after he finished. “That fall, we came back to Knoxville so I could attend graduate school at the Haslam College of Business.” Kelvin’s time in the master’s of accountancy program at Haslam left a deep imprint on his career. “It was a smaller program at the master’s level and very impactful,” he says. “We were able to develop really good relationships with our professors, and I served as a graduate teaching assistant for Lee Hendrick and Ellen Anderson.” The couple felt welcomed by students and faculty in the MAcc program. “We were a close knit group, and they also developed a relationship with Sheryl, which was cool,” Kelvin says. “It was almost a family atmosphere.” In 1990, Kelvin earned his MAcc and started a career at EY’s Nashville office, returning to his and Sheryl’s home city. “We’re both born and bred here in Nashville,” Sheryl explains, “except for that one eighteen-month period when we lived in Knoxville.”

Kelvin stayed at EY for twelve years, focusing on healthcare work while also serving real estate clients and a handful of entertainment clients. In 2002, he left EY to become vice president of tax at LifePoint Hospitals. Two years later, Vanguard Health Systems recruited Kelvin, where he worked for the next eight years. When Vanguard was sold to Tenet Healthcare, he decided to reenter the world of public accounting. —KELVIN AULT Recruited by fellow Haslam alum Ben Stanga, Kelvin joined Nashville’s PwC office as a tax partner in 2013 and leads the firm’s investor-owned healthcare tax practice. Meanwhile, the Aults raised two sons who both chose to pursue their undergraduate education at UT. “Our oldest son, Ryan, walked on the UT football team for three years,” says Sheryl. “We’re all football fans and season ticket holders.” The Aults’ younger son, Reagan, is currently a Haslam supply chain management major. Their daughter, Rachel, is a high school senior and an avid Vols fan. Over the past several years, the Aults have contributed to two scholarship funds for MAcc students at Haslam. “The first one is in memory of Casey Adams, daughter of one of my professional connections (Donna Adams and her husband, John) and a young staff member at EY who had just completed the MAcc at Haslam,” Kelvin says. “We joined with many other contributors who established a scholarship fund in Casey’s name.” Motivated to further giving, the Aults created a second scholarship fund in their own name a few years later. The family continues to invest their time and enthusiasm in Haslam, UT athletics, and the university as a whole. Recently, they had a chance to meet with Chancellor Jimmy Cheek. “We told him we’re pretty wed to the university,” Kelvin says. “He was glad to hear it.”

HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 31


LEADERS IN PHILANTHROPY

DEVELOPMENT giving NEWS

LARRY AND VIVIAN CARROLL

A LIFELONG PURSUIT OF LEARNING LARRY CARROLL (HCB ’78) came to the Haslam

College of Business because he wanted to work with one of the top accounting firms in the United States. “I’d attended a smaller school for my undergraduate degree, and I knew I needed a degree with a lot more credibility to open that door in my career,” says Carroll. “I had a great experience at Haslam and earned a master’s of business administration with a concentration in accounting.” Carroll passed the CPA exam while he was still a graduate student and interviewed with four of the “Big Eight” firms shortly after he completed his degree. He received job offers from all four, but decided to take a position in Charlotte with KPMG because it brought him back to his extended family. After two years with the company, Carroll started his own wealth management firm, Carroll Financial, in 1980. “The story of how I became interested in financial planning goes back to my time as a graduate student at Haslam,” Carroll remembers. “While we were living in Knoxville, my wife went to work for Kemp Fain, a financial planner who was one of the pioneers in the field. She’d come home at night and tell me about what Kemp did and I’d say, ‘I think I could do that.’” In 1980, Carroll drove to Knoxville to seek counsel from Fain about creating his own financial planning firm. “He told me I was crazy if I didn’t do it, so I drove home and started getting my ducks in a row to start Carroll Financial,” he says. “Today we have forty-six people in the office, including nineteen certified financial planners, and we manage $2.3 billion in assets. It’s grown at a

32 32 | HASLAM | TENNESSEE MAGAZINE ARCHWAYS

slow but steady rate over the years.” In 2016, Carroll appeared on Forbes’ list of the top 200 wealth advisors in America. As he looks ahead, Carroll takes a special interest in the future of financial planning. “Retirement income planning is the most important personal finance issue of the next two decades because so many baby boomers are on the verge of retiring,” he says. “My interest is in developing the next generation of financial advisors to meet the growing demand for competent advice.” Carroll and his wife, Vivian, share a deep concern for students and the importance of education. “We are firmly convinced that we are where we are because we got an education,” he says. “My wife was the first person in her family to ever go to college, and I was the first in my family to graduate from high school, much less go to college.” Because education made a lasting impact on their lives, the Carrolls want to share that experience with a new generation of students at their alma maters, including Haslam, Winthrop University, and Austin Peay State University. Last year, they agreed to support three Carroll Fellows. Students with an interest in the wealth management industry are selected from the Haslam MBA program. “I like to support good students in the accounting and finance areas, and I was really impressed with the quality of the students they’ve chosen for this,” Carroll says. “I hope to continue the program in the future.” SUMMER 2014


Larry Carroll in the Masters Investment Learning Center with (background, left to right): Yanrui Ma (MBA Class of 2017, 2016-17 Carroll Fellow, and 2016-17 LaPorte Torch Fund Manager) Ridge Carter (MBA Class of 2016, 2015-16 Carroll Fellow, and 2015-16 Haslam Torch Fund Manager) Thatiana Haddad De Carvalho (MBA Class of 2016, 2015-16 Carroll Fellow, and 2015-16 Haslam Torch Fund Manager), and (foreground, left to right) Colin Campbell (MBA Class of 2016, 2015-16 Carroll Fellow, and 2015-16 Haslam Torch Fund Manager) Tanvi Hukerikar (MBA Class of 2017, 2016-17 Carroll Fellow, and 2016-17 Haslam Torch Fund Manager), and Daniel Pitcher (MBA Class of 2017, 2016-17 Carroll Fellow, and 2016-17 LaPorte Torch Fund Manager)

BUS.UTK.EDU | 33


Arnold Sain Scott & Kathryn Selbach Taylor & Jean Simonton Mike Sisk David M. Snapp Benjamin & Christy Stanga State Farm Mutual Auto Insurance Co. Randolph B. Stephenson David & Deborah Stevens R. Marshall & Anne Taylor Tennessee Valley Human Resource Association Normand Denis Turgeon Frank & Jane Venable Jr. VF Foundation Jerry W. Walker

Silgan Containers Barrett & Betsy Simonis Dean & Ann Skadberg Sr. Aaron Joseph Snyder Steiner & Ellis PLLC Matthew D. Stone Michael & Rebecca Sutton Sr. Herman & Karen Tallman TeamHealth Inc. T. Matthew & Laura Thipgen W. Grover Thurman Judi Vogt Tompkins Thomas & Traci Van Dorselaer Paul Andrew Warren Watson Foundation Inc. Wells Fargo Foundation Milburn & Sandra White Kenneth & Shari Wills

$2,500-$4,999

$1,000-$2,499

21st Mortgage Corporation Glenn C. Andrews James H. Atchley BB&T Corporation Adam & Jamie Bean Allen & Karen Bell Douglas & Lori Blalock Boeing Company Foundation Andrew N. Burns David L. Cannon David & Penny Carver Cirrus Insight Clayton Bank & Trust Gary & Marsha Clayton Randall W. Clayton Michael & Anna Coggin Michael & Kimberly Copperthite E. Terry & Juanita Cowles Jefferson & Jennifer Cross Crowe Horwath LLC Jeffery & Janet Davis Kerry & Martha Dodd John & Melissa Doster Jr. David & Kathleen Ecklund Mark & Conchi Emkes Don & Sandra Fancher First Horizon Foundation Michael M. Flanary Mark Scott Fleiner Emerson & Catherine Fly William & Deborah Fox Freddie Mac Foundation Michael & Elizabeth Greene Tim Patrick Hartnett Charkes & Pamela Hendrix W. Logan & Johnnie Hickman Jr. Giles David Hollins J.A. Fielden Co. Inc. Joseph & Patricia Johnson Mason & Emily Jones Jenneen Marie Kaufman Tillman L. Lay William & Pamela Lee Mudit M. Maheshwari Pat Allen McClary Sr. Timothy & Tracy McKeon Barbara Curtis Murphey Marty M. Ozburn Charles & Carolyn Pearson III James & Sandra Powell Sr. Howard & Agatha Ray Regions Bank Louis & Victoria Riddle Jr. Timothy & Barbara Rizer Gary & Donna Rose David & Jane Schumann James A. Schwab Eugene & Elizabeth Seymour

AT&T Inc. Foundation Jeffrey S. Abbott Olumuyiwa Olukayode Adeboye Franklin & Stellyne Albertson Ronald & Jean Alexander Howard & Wendy Allenberg Gregory Antoine Apple Inc. Todd E. Archer Theodore E. Arnold IV John & Leeann Bailes Barclays American Corporation William H. Barnett II Rhonda Wilson Barton Jason & Katie Baxter Dan & Mary Bechtol Bruce & Julianne Behn John & Tyra Behrens Lewis Rogers Belote III Michael & Nancy Berry Robert G. Berry John & Denise Billings Jr. David W. Blackwell Christy April Blalock Christopher & Pamela Bollinger Christi Michelle Branscom Paul & Shirley Pih Broadbery Michael L. Brookshire Joseph & Carmelita Brown Jr. Andy & Shelia Bruner Chip & Kym Bryant Jr. Leigh A. Burch III Laura K. Burgin Sharon Leigh Busse Richard & Nancy Cardin Howard & Debra Chambers James Wiley Charles, III Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LP John & Carol Childress II Aaron H. Childs Charlie & Dorothy Chitwood Robert E. Christopher James Anthony Chyz CIGNA Foundation Chip & Jessica Clark Kevin E. Clark Robert L. Clark Cloud Logistics ConocoPhillips Benjamin Ernst Cook Thomas & Mindy Coulter Woody & Judy Cozart Scott & Jill Craig John & Meg Crisp Jr. Timothy & Fia Cronin Angela M. Cross Michael & Helen Crotty Kendall Brian Cyree

> continued from p. 29

BIG DATA COMES TO THE FOREFRONT IN NEW IBM, TICKLE, HASLAM PARTNERSHIP IN AUGUST 2016, the University of Tennessee,

Knoxville, and IBM announced a new computational laboratory and education initiative devoted to enabling the university to store large amounts of unstructured data in a security-rich environment. Students and faculty will be able to use the “Advanced Analytics Lab, IBM Enabled” to analyze data and work together on projects. The lab also will serve as a teaching aid for faculty and students within the Haslam College of Business and the Tickle College of Engineering. Randy Bradley, assistant professor of information systems and supply chain management at Haslam, says the lab has several aims. “One goal is to be able to harness the massive amounts of data that we all utilize, whether from research perspectives or through some of the capstone or senior design projects that are ongoing over in the Tickle College of Engineering and here at Haslam,” Bradley says. “We felt like we needed an environment to ensure better security for our partners in the capstone projects.” Another goal Bradley highlights is for the lab to become a catalyst for collaboration between the two colleges. “We’re looking for ways to bridge the gap between engineering and business, and having a joint infrastructure is a way to make sure we collaborate across the colleges in the future even more than we do today,” he says. “We really need to make sure our students have access to state continued on p. 36 >

34 | HASLAM MAGAZINE


DEVELOPMENT & GIVING REPORT Christopher & Pamela Daugherty Clay & Anita Davis Jr. Mark & Darby Davis Eugene & Holly Davis James & Sharon Edwards Michael & Sallie Ehrhardt Jon & Valerie Ellis Enterprise Holdings Foundation Christopher & Elizabeth Etheredge Aaron T. Fausz John & Stephanie Felker First Tennessee Bank Neil & Suzanne Fischer Fitch Ratings Shirley A. Flynn Robert & Catherine Ford Duncan & Karol Fort III David Scott Freeman William & Lynn Freeman II J. Lee & Connie Fry III Scott & Tiffany Gardner General Shale Brick Inc. Genesco Inc. G. Gregory & Mary Gilbert Susan Golicic Grant Thornton Thomas & Florence Graves Les Daryl Gray Ray E. Greer Ronald & Barbara Grubbs Christopher M. Hadorn Gary & Vicki Hall Jason & Ashley Hamilton Lee Francis Hardeman Eric & Michelle Hardesty Glenn & Susan Hargreaves Roy Lee Harmon Jr. Jonathan Steven Harris John & Harriett Harty Jerre & Barbara Haskew Rosalyn L. Hess Christopher & Jennifer Hillenmeyer John George Hoffman III Ronald S. Holcomb Charles & Tonya Holmes Jack & Kimberly Honaker Elaine Hostetter & Larry Felts Daniel & Natalie Hudson Stanley & Teresa Hurt Glenn & Dottie Irwin Joseph & Kimberly Johnson H. Russell & Florence Johnston Jr. Clayton & Deborah Jones Kyle & Amy Jones James & Ruth Keally III Ruth Kellick-Grubbs William & Rachel Kelso James & Penny Keras Jr. Jack & Kathryn Kiger Kimberly-Clark Foundation Christopher & Donny Kinney Mark & Lindy Kinser Robert & Karen Ladd Barney Lewis Lane Willian & Laura Lane Terry Lee Leap David & Terri Lindsay William & Brenda Locke Jeffrey & Sena Longmire Zanda Jane Lynn Amy S. Hawkins Michael & Bethany Marks Bob & LeaAnn Marshall Martin & Company Whitney Johns Martin Steven & Annette McBrayer Robert & Jennie McCabe Jr. Janet L. McKinley Bob Mertz

Harry & Suzanne Miller Jr. Patrick G. Min Chad A. Moore Karen J. Moore Michael & Phyllis Moore Thomas Moore Stephanie Morela Charles & Sherry Morgan Melvin G. Moseley Jr. Thomas & Marie Mottern Matthew & Allison Musso Kimberly & Angel Norman Michael E. Norwood Ryan & Megan Parker-Peters Lamar & Dedra Partridge Celeste Patterson Samuel Jason Perry R. Paul & Barbara Perutelli Heather R. Peterson Jeffrey & Rhonda Piland Donald & Kimberly Pounders Tracy Powell & Deana Drewry Jeffery Scott Powers Donald & Nancy Preston John & Gail Prugh Thomas & Kimberly Quillen Michael & Shannon Reeves Michael & Amanda Respeto Russell B. Richards William E. Robinson Eneida O. Roldan Brad & Christine Rolland Rose W. Russell J. Kevin & Nancy Sanders Eric M. Saul M. James & Susan Sayrs George & Anne Schultz Clayton & Sarah Scott Gregory M. Sekelsky John & Bonnie Sensing Laurie R. Shimp Ronald Edward Shrieves Calvin & Patti Shuler Jr. Ann T. Siewert Jennifer Pentecost Sims Anne D. Smith James Forest Smith Jr. Henry & Margaret Smith Todd & Jodi Sneed Kevin Reed Snyder Joongwon Song William & Sheryl Spohn Mandyam & Kanchana Srinivasan Keith & Josie Stanga Theadore Stank & Lori Nash Aaron & Regina Steiner H. Virgil & Clara Stephens J. Gary & Temple Stevenson S. Blake Stinnette Dustin J. Stratton Michael T. Strickland Ron & Teresa Suedekum Aaron Michael Sullivan Pamela Cori Sullivan Shannon Noland Sumner Suntrust Bank East Tennessee Deborah S. Sutherland Jonathan Dwayne Swindle Samuel & Linda Taylor Sr. Joe & Sheryl Teague Mark Thomas Melvin & Hedy Tobias Neal & Cathy Townsend R.L. & Irene Townsend Willie O. Turner Jr. William H. Vandergriff James & Connie Vavalides David Carroll Verble William Ronald Walton James & Candy Wansley

NEWLY ESTABLISHED ENDOWMENTS

John J. Waskom D. Brent Wilder Al Leonard Williams Skip Williams Tyler Cade Williams Shane & Tracie Woidtke Joseph T. Wyrick Morgan & Kathryn Zook

List current as of September 1, 2016.

Molly & Rodney Adams GLS Travel Endowment

$500-$999 Abbott Laboratories Jeffery & Cindy Adair Edward A. Adams Jr. Kenneth & Ellen Anderson Anonymous James & Constance Arnold Jean D. Arrants Thomas & Midge Ayres James & Kathryn Badgley Walter P. Baird John V. Barker Robert & Phylis Baron Francis & Sandy Bedard Michael & Lisa Berry Dawn E. Bertsche William L. Bible William & Zora Bivens Andrew Nelson Blevins John H. Bond Berta Maria Briones Christopher A. Brown Roger S. Bush Jane E. Campbell Robert & Amy Cathey Jr. Stanley Chervin & Barbara Richards Chipotle Jessie Chou Nancy P. Church David & Molly Clark II Sharon Cooper & Mark Collins David & Barbara Crippen Lauren Marie Cunningham Matthew Donald Dallas Phillip & Bonney Daves Charles Edward Davis Molly Beth Davis Deborah Jump-Dawson T. Dick & Loretta Denson Alex & Jennifer Devincenzo Shawn W. Devine John W. Dickson III Nancy Sue DiFrancia Candice Michelle Doolan Thomas J. Dorich John & Diana Doss III Daniel H. Dougherty William & Janyce Dudney Astrid M. Emkes Gordon & Cynthia Ferguson Edwin B. Fort Marshall & Ashley Franklin Brett A. Fulford Tina M. Galloway Judith Carroll Gardner Lyle & Rhonda Gardner Donald E. Garretson Charles A. Gillespie III Robert J. Goodman William & Edwina Greer Patricia Ann Hackler David & Shannon Hammontree Jr. Addison Hurt Hansford John & Pat Harper Jared James Hausfeld H. Robert & Edith Heller III Andrew & Sarah Henderson Graham Hickling & Diane Mollenkopf

Dr. Ed Boling Business Faculty Endowment Martin D. & Ann R. Brown MAcc Scholarship Endowment Jim Crossman Endowed Business Scholarship Evans Family Endowed Business Scholarship Haslam College of Business Tennessee Undergraduate Business Scholarship Endowment Jonathan & Alana Harris Family Endowed Finance Scholarship C. Kennon Hendrix Endowed Business Scholarship Elizabeth Ingalls Endowed MBA Fellowship Earl R. Leinart Business Scholarship Endowment Nelson & Natalie Pratt Endowed Business Scholarship Leslie & Marilyn Schreiber Faculty Research Award Endowment Selbach Family Endowed Scholarship for Entrepreneurship Howard W. (Bud) & Barbara Sherrod MBA Fellowship Endowment The Richard L. Townsend Distinguished Accounting Professorship Endowment

continued on p. 36 >

HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 35


> continued from p. 35

> continued from p. 34 of the art technology and are exposed to the unstructured nature of real world problems.” To move the lab forward, Bradley and other faculty members needed additional academic partners. The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science had academic needs that correlated well with the concept. In addition to using the lab for capstone projects, Bradley anticipates wider instructional potential. “The capstone is only one example of how it will be used for teaching,” he says. “Our infrastructure now allows us to employ large-scale databases. It will become a teaching and homework platform by which you can give students assignments and exams where they can leverage real corporate data.” He hopes the lab also will facilitate further collaborative uses and university-wide interactions. “I know there have been inquiries from other faculty across campus,” he says. “Anyone else who can make use of the data we have can come and use it, which will foster better academic relationships across campus. At this point, we are only limited by our imagination with respect to what we can do.” “AT THIS Mark Dean, the John Fisher POINT, WE ARE ONLY Distinguished Professor in the LIMITED Tickle College of Engineering, BY OUR says his college will use the lab for IMAGINATION similar purposes. “Our students WITH will do projects and assignments RESPECT TO associated with classes in the area WHAT WE of analytics and visualization,” CAN DO.” he says. “We’ll also use it in our —RANDY BRADLEY research work, to pull insights out of data that is just too complex for a human to visualize. The lab allows us to engage with industry and help apply technology we’ve developed to solve problems they have.” Dean and Bradley envision an ongoing partnership between the two colleges, aided by the lab’s existence. “There’s a significant overlap in the technology that’s being developed for analytics and its use to support business,” Dean says. “The more we can learn about each other’s disciplines and the problems in them, the better we’ll be able to design useful technologies. The demand for students who have a cross-section of business and engineering skills is tremendous, and we hope to develop students who have that kind of cross-disciplinary capability.”

36 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

Benjamin D. Horn International Paper Company Tyler & Kara Jacobs Mel & Cynthia Jacobson Marilyn J. Jake Lynne Jansons & Kurt Krushenski Jacob & Adrian Jay Jeffries & Company Inc. John Deere Foundation Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies Monica M. Jones John V. Keenan David J. Kendall Orlando Cecilio Kirton Eric & Rebecca Klindt Ralph A. Korpman Reuben Kyle III Morton T. Larmore Lattimore Black Morgan & Cain PC Lisa Marie Lattimore Ronald & Ann Layne Leadership Cocke County TACL Fund Kai-yan Lee Thomas A. Lewis III Thomas Leonard Little R. Bruce & Jill Long Jeffrey & Kimberly Maples Frances Rickard Marbury John & Mary Marsh Jr. Heather L. Martin Kevin John Martin Margaret Jill Matthews Peter & Nancy Maynard James & Lynn McCallie Scott & Elizabeth McConnell Joseph & Penny McDonald Medtronic Foundation John Bennett Milnor Sean C. Monaghan Mark A. Moon Bobby & Victoria Moore Charles & Catherine Morris R. Jane Moser Matthew N. Murray William Stuart Neilson New York Life Foundation George Charles Newcomer Jr. Bernard Tze-Shun Ng Alyssa Suzanne Nimetz Charles Henry Noble IV Charles E. Noon Paulo Eduardo Oliveira Randy & Theresa Olswing Brian & Deborah O’Rourke David Ownby Skip Patton Jr. Bradley D. Petty Randal H. Pierce William & Pamela Pinkston William Steve Pittman Thomas & Anne Power Andrew M Pribish Mark & Cheri Proffitt W. James & Angela Pugh Jr. Victor & Annette Ranft Amy Fischer Reavis Joel & Melissa Reeves Jr. Refreshments Inc. Farah Reynolds David & Ibis Reynolds John P. Reynolds Gina Roach & Vivek Kamath Marta P. Roberts William Henry Rodgers John & Nannon Roosa Ryman Hospitality Properties Foundation Shay D. Scott Belinda A. Sharp

Shell Oil Company Foundation Ronald & Anita Shuffield Jeffrey & Mary Siegrist Kyle Alexander Smith Michael & Amy Spence Douglas L. Standifer Brenda Steakley Emily Blair Steakley Stacey Stec C. Lee Steinhouse III Wade Russell Stonebrook Justin C. Stringfield Nancy Tredaway Stuart Michael L. Taber Melanie Demotts Taosuwan B. Lance Taylor Jane C. Taylor Norman & Wendy Templeton Tennessee Technology Dev Corp David R. Thomas John & Rebecca Thomas Trent E. Thurman William & Lori Tice Jr. Tool Crib TSCPA Michael & Jill Turner Charles William Umsted Jamie R. Underwood Union Bank of California Foundation United Way Silicon Valley Dwight & Shelia Van Inwegan Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program Andrew J. Venable Grainger Inc. John M. Wachowicz Brian Douglas Wantling Hope Ashley Whaley Robert Shelton Whitaker Jack & Rhonda Wiley Darren A. Williams David Warren Williams Hugh & Susan Williams Mark Everett Willoughby Jeffrey & Jody Winslow Wanda L. Wisecarver Xcel Energy Inc. Douglas & Sara Yoakley Lynn R. Youngs Wenjun Zhou William Zotti

$250-$499 Mazhar Abbas Jennifer Accolti-Gil David K. Adams George & Sandra Adams Jr. Edward Sanford Albers Jr. Bradley W. Allen Sterling & Beth Ambrose Ralph & Merrill Ammons Jr. Carson Caine Anderson Steven A. Anderson John Z. Autian Nicholas John Averwater Edjuan D. Bailey Myron L. Bailey Larry Wayne Baker James & Corinne Balthrop Cheryl Barksdale William & Courtney Barlar Benjamin Slater Barnett Thomas & Janet Baudry Robert H. Bebber John Edward Bell Richard Neal Benson B. Monroe Berry III Allen & Deborah Bibeau Darian Bilski


DEVELOPMENT & GIVING REPORT Judy B. Birchfield Charles James Blalock Katie Blankenship Jay & Meg Bloomer J.P. Bolick David Joel Bolton John & Mary Bolton Nathaniel & Virginia Borghi Edward & Patricia Bouwer Thurman L. Boyd A. Wayne Branam John Haywood Braxton Thomas & Connie Bronson Hannah Marie Brown Paul & Patricia Brown Carol Stephens Bryant Daniel & Stephanie Buckner Robert Williams Bull John & Catherine Bunch Blaise & Pollyanna Burch Thomas J. Burke Thomas Robert Burkett Ryan & Andrea Burkhart Corey Alan Burkhart J. Jay & Susan Bush Lee & Suzette Bushkell James Robert Byrd Darel & Donna Callis F. Alan Cameron Kiki H. Caracostis Steven & Julie Carkeet Kaye R. Carney Robert Wallace Carney Jerry Upshaw Carter II Kathy D. Cate Kimberly Najeh Chalache Kristen Kaye Clark James & Lisa Clements III James Ruble Cody Kevin & Kristen Coffman Timothy & Christine Coley James & Carolyn Comella Lee & Jackie Congleton III Michael & Stacey Corley Layken Catherine Culver Michael D’Ambrosio Benjamin Davis Phillip Allen Davis James Walter Deitrick Dennis & Kim Denton Sean & Katie DeWitt D. Corry & Susan Dickerson Reed Barrett Doster Walter W. Duncan Taylor & Melissa Dunn Lawrence C. Eaton Michael J. Ebuna Brian Edmonds Christopher K. Edwards Charles & Stephanie Edwards Allen R. Elkins Joseph Kirby Ellis Paul & Pamela Emert Jr. Thomas & Beth Engel Nathan Harold Etheridge Bichaka Fayissa Dave M. Fentress Daniel T. Fleming Daniel J. Flint Patricia Yvonne Flowers Justin & Kristen Follis Oscar Fowler Jr. Caroline Jane Murphy Monty & Denise Fritts Ryo Fukami Rowland & Margaret Funk Kelly Laine Fusco Lynn Madison Galbraith Luther A. Galyon IV Logan Wayne Garrett

Jacob B. Gaston Christos Georghiou Scott & Decindria Gibson Austin M. Gilbert Martin P. Gillespie Jvene Jay Gingrich Charles Lynn Gobble P. Craig & Jena Golden David & Martha Gordon Bart L. Graham Daniel & Jennet Gray Howard & Diane Green Barbara A. Grobicki Harry & Laura Gross Jr. Gregory M. Guerin Derek Kurt Hagman Landon Bryan Hair Tom & Terri Hale Mark J. Halperin Daniel & Kathy Hamilton Thomas Ryan Hankins H.C. & Mary Harkleroad Jr. Andrea N. Harper Rebecca Dykes Harrell Charles & Janice Harrison Heather Gibbons Hartman Rebecca Ann Carter Douglas Verlyn Hawks Ronald & Mary Helmhout Allen & Ann Henderson Tracy H. Henderson Erin Emily Henry Kimberly K. Henry William & Susan Henry J. Scott & Mary Ellen Herbert Kelly Sue Hewett John A. Hewgley Mark & Barbara Higgins Clark Thomas Higgs Kristofer & Carrie Hoffman Brady & Mary Holcomb J. Byron Holder Anita Sawyer Hollander David & Kathy Holt Matthew W. Horton Carol B. Houser Timothy Wayne Hughes Kevin & Julie Hunsinger Brian David Hurst August & Lauren Husmillo Emmanuel Ige Zachary & Lisa Inman Kathy Ann Jackson Marcella Johnson David & Sherry A. Johnson Kyle & Yongi Johnson Drew Jones Douglas & Melissa Jones William Jared Kelley Joseph V. Kelly III Gary R. King Frank & Jo Ann Knies Knoxville HMA Holdings Paul A. Koza Kent D. Kurkiewicz Jack & Cindy Kuykendall Michael & Ellen Lail Emily Anne Lakeman Jude K. Lam Edward Augustine Langan III Lauren N. Lange Michael Wayne Langenberg Terry J. Laporte William & Linda Lawson Hannah Lynn Lay Lawrence & Mary Jo Leahy Thomas & Wallene Leek Steven & Irene Leonard Scott Parks LeTellier Betty Ann Lewis

Charles D. Little Craig L. Little Jim Lloyd Thom E. Lobe Andrew William Long Kim Harvey Looney Christopher & Renee Loope Michael Thomas Lowe Penny E. Lueckenhoff Kan Luk Zach Luze Sarah M. Mallicote Kimberly Raye Mallory Stephen Mallory Charles O. Mann Jr. Michael Robert Marks Jordan & Julie Marshall Kenichi & Yuki Matsuno Mary McAdams Teresa M. McCarthy Byrne Richard & Carmen McCoy James & Patricia McDonald Bryce W. McKenzie Reginald McKenzie David & Nancy McKinney Michael & Emaly McLean Robert M. McMahan Tommy Glen Meredith Stephen & Kimberly Merrill Charles & Sue Milazzo Christopher C. Miles Jeffrey Martin Mills L. Virgil Mincy David & Rebecca Mink Benita Harris Moore Charles & Leanne Morgan Mark & Nancy Morgan J. Steven & Cindy Morton Neal F. Morton Eric James Moses Adam Mouser Anthony Ray Mubarak Michael E. Mulliniks Michael Vincent Mulloy Alan J. Natowitz James L. Nicholson Marjorie Lang Niemann Stephanie Michelle Noble Karmyn Norwood Thomas & Lorrie O’Donovan Jr. Oracle Corporation Matthew & Juanita Orth Thaddeus G. Osborne William Edwin Palmer Jerry & Bernice Parker Christine M. Parsons PNC Financial Services Group David Paul Perrot Robert & Sheri Pfeil Phillips 66 Company Phillip & Kathy Piper David Stewart Pipkin John Thomas Pittman III Genia Ruth Patty Walter A. Puckett Cornell & Janet Radford Wesley Gray Ragsdale Frank Rambo Timothy David Rasmussen R.S. & Larisa Rathinasamy Brian & Martha Rauch S. Seth Reagan Andrew M. Rector Jr. James L. Reece Melissa Kay Reese Regions Financial Corporation Joseph L. Richardson Hunter David Ripley Scott Michael Robbins Dick Rockenstein

Charles & Clarice Rollins Joseph Romano Michael & Ruth Ross Mark S. Rutherford Elizabeth A. Salvati Tom Savady Katherine J. Savage Jeffrey S. Schard William J. Schmidt III Carol F. Schwenke Dewayne & Kaye Scott Laurence & Jennifer Secrest Travis Jacob Selleh Leslie Ann Shade Elizabeth Lou Shanton Daniel G. Shelton Michael Shelton Xinjie Shi Paul & Cheyenna Shimp Gary & Caroline Shockley Barry T. Silver Carl Newton Simpkins III William Douglas Singer Charless & Robin Skillern Courtney & Angela Smith Russell & Elizabeth Smith Revonna Joy Smith Rickey Andrew Snoddy Peter Kam-Wah So Ronald J. Solmonson J. Ryan Sowell Haskel L. Stanback Sidney T. Stanley P. Brent Starnes Diane Stefani Matthew & Katie Steier David Austin Steinmetz Suntrust Foundation Timothy K. Swain Jerry & Jonell Sweeney Ryan L. Talley Wendy Lea Tate David Leonard Tatum Myra Galloway Tatum Jacob Michael Taylor Sharon Mullinax Taylor Lucas & Terri Tennant John Thomas Tester Samuel & Peggy Thompson John B. Tibe Rebekah Leigh Tompkins Claudia Torres Tamera K. Touchstone Charles Hamilton Trivette Joshua & Brooke Trusley Richard E. Tumblin Robert L. Turney Laura D. Ullrich Un Hui Vandevander James & Teresa Vanfrank Jr. Tony Vaughn Verizon Foundation Michael Lee Vineyard Will & Kimberly Wade Adam & Martha Walls Marianne Hinds Wanamaker Harold & Patricia Warner Jr. John & Jean Wernicki Jared & Nicole West Western Digital Corp. United Way Program Katherine A. Williams Mark E. Williamson Priscilla W. Wisner Daniel R. Witt Yeak-Chong Wong Charles & Kathryn Wood Kelly Marie Woodruff David & Sarah Beth Youngblood Douglas R. Zink

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2016 ALUMNI GALA THE EIGHTH ANNUAL ALUMNI AWARDS GALA drew a crowd of 350 to downtown Knoxville on Friday, November 11. The annual gala benefits the College Fund for the Haslam College of Business. The evening kicked off with cocktails and a silent auction in the Knoxville Convention Center and was followed by dinner and the presentation of awards. Fifty student hosts were on hand for the black tie optional event, which was sponsored by Bandit Lights, DHG, PetSafe, Pilot Flying J, Pinnacle, PYA, and Regal Entertainment Group. During the awards portion of the festivities, Mike Masters was honored as the college’s 2016 Distinguished Alum, David Stevens received the Entrepreneur of the Year award, DHG was recognized as Outstanding Corporate Partner, and Laurie Shimp was named the Outstanding Young Alum. HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 39


LAURIE SHIMP

2016 OUTSTANDING YOUNG ALUMNI AWARD LAURIE SHIMP came to the Haslam College of Business in 1998 after earning an undergraduate degree in accounting from Florida State University. She completed her Master’s of Accountancy degree in 1999 with a concentration in tax and immediately joined EY full-time in their audit practice in Tampa, Florida. One of Shimp’s professors at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Dan Murphy, urged her to pursue tax rather than settling into audit. In 2000, Shimp transferred from EY’s audit practice to its tax practice. She began her tax career in federal tax and later completed rotations in EY’s state and local tax and quantitative services specialty practices. Shimp enjoyed working on large corporate taxpayers and in 2007, EY requested that she relocate to Atlanta to serve one of the firm’s largest global clients, The Coca-Cola Company. In Atlanta, Shimp worked as EY’s senior manager for Coca-Cola for the next four years. “That was a great experience,” she says. “I traveled extensively around the world.” After twelve years with the firm, Shimp became

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a partner at EY in 2012, transitioning onto several large multinational companies as EY’s tax account leader where she was responsible for delivering exceptional client service across all areas of tax. Today, Shimp is the deputy market leader for tax at EY’s Atlanta office and she continues to serve as a tax account leader. She also serves as one of fourteen members on EY’s southeast regional partner forum and is a graduate of the Kellogg School of Management Executive Leadership Program at Northwestern University. Shimp’s continued involvement with the Haslam College of Business includes serving on the Accounting and Information Management Roundtable since 2006, giving financially to the university, and spreading her love for the MAcc program. “My professors in the program at Haslam invested in me and believed in me,” she says. “They gave me the confidence to be successful and pursue this career, and they encouraged a balanced view of work and family life.” For her career excellence, the Haslam College of Business is proud to name Laurie Shimp the Outstanding Young Alumni for 2016.


DHG 2016 OUTSTANDING CORPORATE PARTNER AWARD

Alumni Gala photography by Patrick Murphy-Racey.

The evening included a cocktail hour and silent auction in addition to dinner and the presentation of awards.

DIXON HUGHES GOODMAN (DHG) has carried on a tradition of giving back to the Haslam College of Business for three decades. Based in Charlotte, North Carolina, the firm’s name evolved over the years but its commitment to the university has held steady. “We’ve been actively recruiting at UT for about thirty years, and we’ve hired well over a hundred Haslam grads,” says David Evans, regional managing partner for the South region. “We’ve had several people serve on the Accounting Advisory Roundtable, and one of our founding partners, Larry Evans, served on the Dean’s Advisory Council before he started winding down his career.” DHG also supports a number of initiatives at the college, including the Accounting and Information Management Academy and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s chapter of the National Association of Black Accountants. “There’s a need for more diversity in accounting, so Haslam has concentrated on diversifying at UT, and we’re working on that at our firm as well,” Evans says. “We’ve joined forces on that goal.” Representatives from DHG have spoken during classes and other events on campus, including Beta Alpha Psi meetings. Scholarships are another arm of DHG’s ongoing support. “We have a sizeable endowment called DHG Accounting Excellence endowment, which helps to fund faculty awards, undergraduate scholarships, graduate fellowships, visiting scholars and more,” Evans says. Additionally, the Haslam College of Business named its Master of Accountancy Classroom in honor of the firm. Evans emphasizes the compatibility of DHG’s values with the college’s goals. “I think we both place a high value on excellence,” he says. “We’re clearly both committed to diversity and to raising the bar. The university is trying to become a Top 25 institution, and DHG has become a top twenty-five accounting firm in the United States.” DHG also appreciates the college’s collaborative, helpful approach to teaching students. “One thing that sets Haslam apart is the quality of the faculty and how engaged they are in the success of the students,” Evans says. “It’s more than just teaching, but helping the students to be successful. Our firm shares a similar desire in making the people we’re investing in successful.” For its continuing commitment to serving the university and the college, the Haslam College of Business is proud to honor Dixon Hughes Goodman as our 2016 Outstanding Corporate Partner.

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DAVID STEVENS

2016 ENTREPRENEUR OF THE YEAR AWARD AFTER EARNING his bachelor of science in accounting from the Haslam College of Business in 1975, David Stevens went on to receive his MBA from Memphis State University in 1977. Meanwhile, he began a career in healthcare services at a for-profit hospital in 1975, where he served as comptroller while the hospital dealt with bankruptcy. Later, he worked for a large medical group practice in Memphis that also faced financial problems. Both times, Stevens helped turn things around. “I had the opportunity to take on significant responsibilities early in my career, and got a lot of exposure to healthcare accounting and finance,” he says. “I was extremely lucky that the two opportunities worked out well for the companies, for myself, and for the owners.” In 1996, after eighteen years serving in a dual role at Bonheur Children’s Medical Center and as the CEO for its related for-profit division, Stevens and his management team executed a buyout with a New York-based private equity firm for one of the for-profit’s entities, Accredo Health. He became CEO of Accredo, a leading national provider of specialty pharmacy services to the biopharmaceutical

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manufacturing industry. “Our pharmacists and nurses help manage care for chronic patients who had life threatening diseases,” Stevens says. “We were often able to get them back to work and help them live a high quality life.” Accredo grew quickly from fifty employees to more than 2,000 in nine years. Accredo’s revenue jumped from $150 million at the time of its public offering in 1999 to over $2 billion by the time it sold. Medco Health Solutions, Inc., acquired Accredo Health in 2005. Since then, Stevens has remained involved as an investor in private equity within the healthcare services industry. He continues to enjoy the healthcare industry as an entrepreneur. “It’s a fast-moving, fascinating business in that you have the opportunity to serve and help patients,” he says. “It’s a balance of running an ethical company that also can financially grow and continue to provide and improve its services for its customer base.” Stevens has remained involved with Haslam through his service on the Dean’s Advisory Council and, more recently, by funding an accelerator program through the Anderson Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation. For his career success and dedication to giving back, the Haslam College of Business is proud to name David Stevens the 2016 Entrepreneur of the Year.


AFTER EARNING a degree in finance at the Haslam College of Business, Mike Masters (HCB ’89) started his career in Atlanta as a retail salesman at J.C. Bradford, a member of the NYSE based in Nashville. He later worked for Oppenheimer, a New York City based stock brokerage, for a few years before starting his own hedge fund firm, Masters Capital Management, in 1995. Based in Atlanta, Masters Capital Management provides advisory and management services to pooled investment vehicles. “Our priority is to perform as well for our investors as we can,” says Masters. “Some of my early work when I was in the process of starting the firm came directly from what I learned at the Haslam College of Business about modern portfolio theory and other new ideas in finance at the time.” Preceding the financial crisis in 2008, Masters testified before the US Congress and various federal committees about questionable activities in the derivatives markets. His testimony grew into an idea for a non-profit. “I felt society needed a financial reform organization that advocated for the broad public’s interest instead of only in financial intermediaries’ interests,” Masters says. “At that time, there wasn’t a non-profit focused on the average citizen in financial markets. My goal was to start an organization that could effectively fill that watchdog role.”

Masters created Better Markets, a non-profit, non-partisan, and independent organization that advocates for financial reform. Representatives from the organization meet regularly with officials in various government agencies, including the Federal Reserve Bank, the SEC, the CFTC, and the US Department of the Treasury. “Better Markets promotes a point of view that contributes to fairness in markets,” Masters explains. “They’re looking for transparency in financial markets and to create a level playing field for all participants in markets, not just the largest players.” Crediting his education at Haslam, Masters says creative thinking has helped him achieve success. “In markets, success comes from your ability to have an edge,” he says. “Those advantages often come from thinking critically and differently from other investors. I believe that critical thinking is partly a product of one’s education, and my time attending UT certainly helped me to develop this skill.” For his career success, continued engagement and support of the college, and efforts to support the financial interests of all Americans, the Haslam College of Business is proud to present Mike Masters with the 2016 Distinguished Alum Award.

MIKE MASTERS 2016 DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD

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UT ALUMNI AWARDS HONOR HASLAM GRADS

’60s Kevin Janiga (HCB ’82, MBA ’86) became the chief revenue officer at R.L. Schreiber, Inc.

HASLAM COLLEGE OF BUSINESS alumni were well represented

at the UT Alumni Awards Gala on September 16, with winners in every category. ROBERT KIRKLAND (HCB ’60) received the Distinguished Alumni Award, the highest honor the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, bestows upon any alumnus, posthumously. The award recognized Kirkland’s business acumen in building the Kirkland’s chain of home décor stores that eventually expanded to 300 locations, as well as his charitable contributions to Obion County, Tennessee, through the Robert E. and Jenny D. Kirkland Foundation. BEN WEPRIN (HCB ’01), founder and CEO of AJ Capital Partners, received an Alumni Promise award for his work as a hotel developer specializing in refurbishing architectural gems. He has renovated numerous icons in the Chicago area including the Soho House and Hotel Lincoln, as well as historic hotels in New Orleans and Anguilla. His newest concept builds on the appeal of returning to an alma mater. He will open hotels in twenty university towns in the coming months. One of the four Alumni Service Awards went to MINTHA ROACH (HCB ’74), the first female president and CEO of the Knoxville Utilities Board. Roach has served in every capacity possible as an alumna at both the university and collegiate level. Among many other positions, she has been president of the UT Alumni Board of Directors and chair of the Chancellor’s Associates and the Alumni Board Awards Committee. She currently serves on the Haslam Dean’s Advisory Council. LARRY CARROLL (MBA ’78) received an Alumni Professional Achievement award. He established Carroll Financial Associates in Charlotte, North Carolina, with a simple approach to financial planning: “The best interest of the client is the only interest that matters.” His firm now manages and oversees nearly $2 billion in assets operating under that same core philosophy. Carroll has been included twelve times in Worth magazine’s listing of the nation’s most exclusive wealth managers and has served as national chairman of the Financial Planning Association. For more information on the UTK Alumni Board of Directors Awards Program, as well as a full list of recipients, please visit: TINY.UTK.EDU/16ALUMAWARDS 44 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

’90s Ralph Masengill, Jr. (HCB ’63) published his first book, Conquer Change and Win.

’80s

Eric T. Klindt (HCB ’93), a managing director for wealth management at Merrill Lynch in Nashville, Tennessee, was named to Barron’s 2016 Top Advisor Rankings.

Dugan J. McLaughlin (HCB ’80), managing director for wealth management at Merrill Lynch in Knoxville, Tennessee, made Barron’s list of 2016 Top Advisor Rankings.

Barron’s named Samuel H. Oakley (HCB ’80), a senior vice president and private financial advisor with the Oakley Group of SunTrust Investment Service, Inc., to its Top Advisor Rankings.

The Nielsen Company promoted Randall S. Beard (HCB ’81) to president of global innovation practice.

RidgePath Capital Management named Danny Pressley (HCB ’82) its president.

Tim Love (HCB ’94) opened a new restaurant, Lonesome Dove Bistro, in the Old City district of Knoxville, Tennessee.

Mary Celeste Beall (HCB ’99, MAcc ’00) took over her late husband’s role as the head of Blackberry Farms resort.

’00s

Matthew Horton (HCB ’01) became the director of advanced analytics at Major League Baseball Advanced Media.

Eastman Chemical promoted Lori Dawson (ProMBA ’02) to logistics business lead.


To share your news with the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Haslam College of Business community, submit it along with any relevant images to Haslam@utk.edu. Please use “Alumni News” in the subject line.

ALUMNI NEWS (ProMBA ’06) its managing director of institutional analytics.

Kelsan named Monty Kilburn (MBA ’02) its vice president of marketing.

Rob Carrico (HCB ’04) became the regional director of development at the University of Georgia.

Clint Stapleton (HCB ’04, MAcc ’05) became director of digital marketing for Relevance Advisors in Atlanta, Georgia.

Eastman Chemical promoted Jason Podvin (ProMBA ’06) to director of global benefits.

Knoxville-based shipping broker Axle Logistics, founded by Drew Johnson (HCB ’07) and Jon Clay, plans to expand its downtown headquarters and add about forty employees over the next year and a half.

Amgen promoted Charlie Gardner (ProMBA ’08) to training and development manager in its cardiovascular business unit in Thousand Oaks, California.

John Anderson (HCB ’05) joined Fleetcor Technologies as an IT compliance analyst. Meghan Blackwell (HCB ’09) is now a paralegal over labor and employment for Dollar General. Annette Dekanich (ProMBA ’05) is now a regional clinical specialist with Alexion Pharmaceuticals.

Sarah Bowman Brown (MSHRM ’09) competed in the Olympic trials for track under the training of coach and husband Darren Brown (MBA ‘13).

John Hunter (ProMBA ’09) became a client service leader with Barge Waggoner Sumner & Cannon.

Boyd Collar Nolen & Tuggle, an Atlanta-based divorce and family law firm, confirmed Katie Kiihnl Leonard (HCB ’06) as a named partner.

Charles Schwab in Lone Tree, Colorado, made Joshua Phoenix

Jennifer Leitman (ProMBA ’09) is now vice president of marketing for Francis Ford Coppola Winery.

Nancy Shuster (PEMBA ’09) is the medical director of Aetna’s National Accounts Care Management Solutions Team.

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, made Lance Taylor (HCB ’09) an associate campaign director.

Monty Fritts (ProMBA ’11) became operations director at Nuclear Fuel.

’10s Amanda Gamble (HCB ’11, ProMBA ’15) is now a financial analyst at Alcoa. Maggie Bates (HCB ’10, MAcc ‘11) is now an audit manager at Crowe Horwath LLP.

Corey Deye (ProMBA ’10) became manager of administrative spend at BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee.

Sunovion named J.J. Lovegrove (ProMBA ’10) its regional business manager in Tennessee, Alabama, and Arkansas.

Vince Sevier (PEMBA ’10) is the new vice president and chief quality officer at Methodist Hospitals in Northwest Indiana.

Indian River Medical Center made Richard Steinfield (PEMBA ’10) its chief medical officer.

Pyxl promoted Chad Elmore (ProMBA ’11) to creative strategy director for its Knoxville and Nashville offices.

Alcoa promoted Stephen Guerrette (HCB ’11, ProMBA ’15) to senior metal trader for risk management.

EmCare, an industry leader of physician staffing services, named Julianna Lindsey (PEMBA ’11) its divisional executive vice president.

Joseph Lengyel (ADMBA ’11) was promoted to four-star general and given command of the US National Guard Bureau, a role that makes him a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

The State of Tennessee made Stacey Nelson (ProMBA ’11) an executive leasing director.

HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 45


ALUMNI NEWS Lewis Career Center in the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s College of Law.

Damita Mason (ProMBA ’12) became a process engineer with Pantex.

Joel Keedy (ProMBA ’13) is now an associate HCM consultant with DayNine Consulting.

Arjun Bhowmik (EMBA-GSC ’14) became Mondelez International’s senior director of integrated supply chain for confectionary in North America. Ryan Ray (HCB ’14) became a staff consultant at EY in New York City.

Dini Shehu (PEMBA ’12) was named the chief medical intern for Metropolitan Hospital in Tulare, California.

Kenco promoted Hisham Khaki (EMBA-GSC ’13) to vice president of operations.

The Girl Scouts of the Southern Appalachians recently made Bill Curtis Boring (HCB ’14) its finance manager.

Ashley Brooks (HCB ’14) is now pursuing her Master of Science in Business Analytics at the Haslam College of Business. Dell Technologies promoted Rob McIntosh (EMBA-GSC ’13) to vice president of global logistics, fulfillment, and trade compliance based in Singapore. Sheppard Pratt Health System announced Harsh Trivedi (PEMBA ’12) as its new president and CEO.

Rhonda Barton (EMBA-SL ’13) joined the College of William & Mary as its executive director of business development in the Center for Corporate Education.

Keshab Paudel (PEMBA ’13) became the medical director for the Lovelace Medical Group’s hospitalist program.

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DePuy Synthes Companies of Johnson & Johnson named John Pracyk (PEMBA ’15) franchise medical director of spine.

Sergiy Prykhodko (ProMBA ’14) is now the project manager for capital assets in global chemicals with Thermo Fisher Scientific in the greater New York area.

Innovative Employer Solutions named Nicci Hollingsworth (ProMBA ’14) a junior business analyst.

Lily Otolorin (PEMBA ’14) was recently named a 2016 Baldrige Examiner. Stephanie Thrasher (HCB ’13) is now the key account manager at KidKraft Toys and Furniture.

Eric Byrnes (ProMBA ’13) became an outside plant engineer at Smithville Fiber.

Doug Gray (EMBA-GSC ’13) assumed responsibility for more than forty facilities around the world as Caterpillar’s general manager of global logistics operations.

Francisco Garcia (ProMBA ’14) is now an electrical engineer II with Mortenson Construction based out of Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Mondelez International made Cory Ann Holst (EMBA-GSC ’15) its director of global business services.

The American Academy of Emergency Medicine elected Thomas Tobin (PEMBA ’13) to its Board of Directors.

Clint Swires (ProMBA ’13) is now the maintenance manager of Lhoist North America’s Anderson Plant.

Naz Khan (PEMBA ’14) was selected to serve on the New York State Academy of Family Physicians Operations Commission.

Kerri Moore (HCB ’14) became a procurement associate at ExxonMobil.

Brad Morgan (PEMBA ’14) is the interim director of the Bettye B.

Tony Sabatino (PEMBA ’14) is the new executive medical director for Anthem BCBS of Georgia.

Eastman Chemical promoted Donna Deason (EMBA-GCS ’15) to director of global indirect procurement.  

Brandi Irwin (ProMBA ’15) was promoted to general manager of WestRock Company in Moreno Valley, California.


HASLAM PRESENTS TRIO OF ACCOMPLISHED ALUMNI AWARDS Matthew Lusk (ProMBA ’15) became the senior cost accountant at MasterCraft Boat Company.

SC Johnson promoted Svetlana Malik (EMBA-GSC ’15) to director of supply and demand in North America and relocated her from Kiev, Ukraine, to Racine, Wisconsin.

The University of Tennessee Medical Center promoted Sean Schoolcraft (EMBA-HL ‘15) to executive director of perioperative services.

Everick Spence (EMBA-SL ’15) is now corporate director of continuous improvement for Domtar.

D.J. Morrison (ProMBA ’15) is now an associate project manager with GE Healthcare.

Karmyn Norwood (ADMBA ’15) received a Special Recognition Award from Lockheed Martin for her leadership in executing multi-billion dollar military aircraft programs and for her STEM community outreach efforts.

East Tennessee Children’s Hospital promoted Kindall Aaron (ProMBA ’16) to coordinator of physician services.

The Jones Family of Companies promoted Scott Butler (EMBA-SL ’16) to vice president of operations.

Greg Gavrilets (ProMBA ’16) became general manager of Paoli Peaks Ski Resort.

Victoria Raleigh (ProMBA ’15) was promoted to CEO for the Red Cross in North Florida.

GE Power made Paula Restrepo (ProMBA ’15) its lead commercial proposals manager.

Emran Rouf (PEMBA ’15) joined Scott and White Health Plan in Temple, Texas, as a medical director.

Lutron promoted Brennen Matthews (EMBA-SL ’16) to director of commercial sales for the east coast.

The University of Tennessee Foundation made Patrick Powell (ProMBA ’16) director of development for the Atlanta region.

Eli McCord (ProMBA ’16) was promoted to program manager at Flex-N-Gate.

THE HASLAM COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

recently presented awards recognizing the outstanding professional accomplishments of four of its alumni. The college presented Accomplished Alumni Awards on behalf of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, to Wilma Jordan, Ken May, and Dave Clark. DAVE CLARK (MBA ’99), senior vice president of worldwide operations for Amazon, received his award on September 29. Clark is responsible for Amazon’s global supply chain and logistics operations. He also oversees the teams managing Amazon’s technology, including its robotics operations. WILMA JORDAN (HCB ’70), founder and CEO of the Jordan, Edmiston Group in New York, was honored on May 31. Leading one of the most successful independent investment banks for the media, information, marketing, software, and tech-enabled services sectors since 1987, Jordan has been instrumental in completing more than 600 merger and acquisition transactions. KEN MAY (MBA ’94) accepted his award on September 8. May is the CEO of Top Golf, a Dallas-based company operating golf entertainment complexes in the United States and the United Kingdom. Prior to his current role, May spent twentyfive years with FedEx and worked his way up to the position of CEO for FedEx Kinko’s in 2004. After leaving FedEx, May spent a year as president and chief operating officer Award winners (from top to bottom): Dave Clark, Wilma Jordan, Ken May, and of Krispy Kreme before joining Top Golf. Gerry Niedert. At the college’s spring Supply Chain Forum, the Global Supply Chain Institute bestowed an honorary fellowship on GERRY NIEDERT (HCB ’67) for his contributions to the field and the university. Niedert entered the family transport/logistics business, Black Horse Carriers, in 1971, and within fifteen years had helped expand the original business to more than 500 employees, six operating centers, and a fleet of some 1,200 vehicles. Niedert supports the supply chain department with both financial and professional contributions. Mary Holcomb holds the endowed professorship named in his honor and calls on him regularly as a source in her transportation research as well as on his company as a resource for student projects.

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IN MEMORIAM ’40s JANE PUCKETT (’43), a longtime resident of Tullahoma, TN, died on April 22, 2016. KATHRYN LEILA MACAULAY (’46), died on March 29, 2016, at age 90. A mother of four, grandmother of seven, and great grandmother of five, she was an avid reader and swimmer, a lifelong member of the Methodist church, and an active volunteer with the Girls Scouts of America.

’50s JAMES FRANK VAN CLEAVE (’50) grew up in Chapel Hill helping his father farm until serving in the US Army during WWII. In 1955, he began work at the Arnold Center in Tullahoma, TN, and retired in 1985. He was a pilot, avid reader, and accomplished woodworker who died on Aug. 15, 2016. SUE BAIRD (’51) died July 15, 2016. She was active in the Red Cross’s Gray Lady Service, various PTAs, and the Girl Scouts while her children were young. She later participated in neighborhood associations and served as a poll worker during elections. She had a passion for bridge and was an avid traveller to mountainous regions. WILLIAM “BILL” E. GASS, JR. (’52) aged 86, died on July 16, 2016. He opened a State Farm insurance office in 1962 and retired after 38 years. HENRY WALKER (’52) a resident of Palmyra, VA, died Jan. 11, 2016. He was a US Navy veteran with 29 years of service, retiring at the rank of captain.

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CHARLES FINLEY LOWE (’54), a WWII veteran, deacon, and church elder, died on April 1, 2016, at age 93. JAMES “JIM” SJOBERG WEBB (’55), was an attorney, former corporate executive, and US Air Force veteran. He served as Bradley County attorney for 25 years and was director of First Citizens Bank from 1978 to 2003. Webb also served as president of the Cleveland Chamber of Commerce and was a founder and the third president of Cleveland and Associated Industries. He died on Sept. 21, 2016. RAIFORD “RAY” PIERSON DEAN, JR. (’58), age 78, died Sept. 19, 2016. He served in the US Army Transportation Corps and worked most of his career in real estate and property management. ADRIAN OTTO DEW III (’59) died on Sept. 11, 2016. He was a US Army veteran and retiree from Allied Signal.

’60s WARREN C. JOYCE (’63) was a retired US Army lieutenant colonel decorated with the Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Medal with Oak Leaf Clusters, Air Medal with Oak Leaf Clusters, and the Army Commendation Medal. After his military service, Joyce became an exhibition director for a nationwide art gallery and later began his own business of wholesaling art prints to galleries and gift shops. He died on Sept. 9, 2016. CHARLES STANLEY DeLOZIER (’64), age 76, of Maryville, TN, died Sept. 9, 2016. He worked at the Knoxville News Sentinel for 34 years, and also was part of the Tennessee Air National Guard.

CAROL FRYE WADDELL (’64) died Aug. 17, 2016, at the age of 74. She was a skilled mathematician and taught the subject for many years. She also achieved a Silver Life Master designation from the American Contract Bridge League. JOHN M. BIDDLE, JR. (’67) was vice president and co-owner of C & S Laundry and Dry Cleaners and an active member of Fountain City Presbyterian Church for more than 42 years. He died Sept. 6, 2016, at age 73. SUSAN WORLEY SIMPSON (’69) died on July 21, 2016. She was an administrative assistant and taught distributive education in the Atlanta City and DeKalb County school systems. She worked for Harry Norman Realtors from 1973 to 2009, selling over one million dollars in residential real estate annually for more than 30 years.

’70s DAN TINDALL (’70), a retired lieutenant colonel in the US Army, died Aug. 11, 2016. He served his country for more than 20 years, then started a consulting business that helped companies do business with the Department of Defense. JAMES “JIM” WHITTLESLEY (’72) had many hobbies including golf, baseball, reading, woodworking, singing, bike riding, and cooking out. He had a career as a human resource manager, and became the neighborhood handyman in retirement. He died at age 66 on April 23, 2016. OLLIE MICHAEL “BEAU” SHADEED III (’74), 68, of Knoxville, TN, died July 12, 2016.

WILLIAM OLIVER WILSON, JR. (’74), age 72, died July 17, 2016, in Cape Cod, MA. Oliver served in the US Air Force. MARTHA RYAN SATTERFIELD (’79) of Oak Ridge, TN, died on, Jan. 28, 2016, at age 78. She was a member of the Lenoir City First Church of the Nazarene.

’80s JOHN SWANEY (’80) died July 16, 2016. He worked for CMC Metal Company as an accountant and enjoyed the stock market, UT football, spending time with family, and watching his daughter play softball. DIANE FULLER (’81) worked as a paralegal for more than 30 years at the law firm of Fisher Rushmer, P.A. and was a devoted Vols fan, despite living in Florida. She died Sept. 17, 2016.

’00s PAM MCDONALD HUBBARD (’00) died Sept. 12, 2016. She had a career in purchasing and was retired from Perkin Elmer and working at FLIR, in Oak Ridge, when she stepped down for health reasons. This update reflects information known as of September 30, 2016. __________________________

If you have an obituary for a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Haslam College of Business alumnus, please submit it to us at Haslam@utk.edu using “In Memoriam” in the subject line.


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