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HASLAM MAGAZINE

WINTER 2017–2018

Keeping ProMBA All in the Family The Gold Standard of Finance Ninth Annual Alumni Awards Gala

CABE

at the Pinnacle of Success Haslam Magazine is the alumni publication of the Haslam College of Business at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.


Haslam College of Business building, by Mike C. Berry.

We are the Volunteer Difference. #HaslamPrepared

#1

fastest growing public institution in the US for executive education

#5

#26

among publics in the US, custom executive education

best return on investment in business education (MBA) among publics

#27

among publics, undergraduate business programs

The Financial Times, 2017

Forbes Magazine, 2017

U.S. News & World Report, 2017

Haslam.utk.edu/rankings


CONTENTS

CABE AT THE HELM OF FINANCIAL BEHEMOTH PINNACLE BANK COVER STORY

18 FEATURED

HASLAM’S PROMBA: ONE FAMILY’S TRADITION

DEPARTMENT NEWS | 3

STUDENT NEWS | 22

GIVING REPORT | 28

ALUMNI NEWS | 38

Thought Leadership

News

People

People

4 Haslam College of Business

22 Bloomberg terminals

28 George and Peggy

38 Haslam celebrates its

People

23 Haslam students

32 Cindy Joyce supports

News

Philanthropy

44 Alumni Update 47 In Memoriam

faculty are cited and featured by global news sources

are the gold standard of finance

6 Haslam College of Business

achieving great things near and far

10 Mary Goss joins the college

People

welcomes ten new professors

as director of the Haslam MBA program Research

8 Matt Harris explores the

effects of transferring military gear to local police

24 Patrick Nkurunziza and Melissa Hall: Adventurous spirits flourish at Haslam

Melton encourage studentfaculty interaction students with scholarships

30 Development and

ninth annual Alumni Award recipients

Giving Report

36 Newly Established Endowments Numbers

37 Sources and Uses of Funds

HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 1


LETTER

HASLAM

FROM THE DEAN

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Haslam Magazine is the alumni publication of the Haslam College of Business at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

HASLAM COLLEGE OF BUSINESS EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP STEPHEN L. MANGUM Dean

BRUCE K. BEHN

Associate Dean for Graduate and Executive Education

MICHAEL “LANE” MORRIS

MUCH OF THE SECRET TO SUCCESSFUL

business endeavors rests on accurately assessing opportunity and determining reasonable risk. These, in turn, come down to sensing when to say yes and when to say no. Saying yes to the entrepreneurial spirit and confidence in his own expertise led Rob McCabe to join with partners in forming a new financial institution that has grown, in just over 17 years, to one of the 50 largest banks in the United States. Saying yes brought newsman George Coleman to the Professional MBA program, where he was able to build a case for bringing an aging paper into the digital world. When Coleman’s daughter, Sandra, and son-in-law, Jason Neal, decided to say yes to new opportunities in their respective fields, Coleman’s positive experience meant that Haslam’s ProMBA became a family tradition. Cindy Joyce, an accountant turned interior designer, said yes to a sense

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of calling within herself and is giving back through scholarships to deserving students. Our alumni often see the seeds of greatness in our students and make one of the most impactful decisions anyone can when they choose to share their successes by giving back to the young people coming behind them. George and Peggy Melton’s launching of the Melton Scholars program, in partnership with the college’s Business Analytics and Statistics faculty, is already creating meaningful research and professional opportunities for undergraduate students. The college recently honored several such distinguished alumni and partners at its annual gala. These awards, and the evening’s festivities, are one small way Haslam shows its pride in those who not only succeed, but thrive, one decision, one investment, one yes at a time. Thank you for your continued interest in, and support of, the Haslam College of Business, its students, faculty, staff, and connections. May the new year bring you many chances to say yes to meaningful opportunities. With gratitude,

Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs and Student Affairs

CHARLES NOBLE

Associate Dean for Research and Faculty

BETSY ADAMS

Assistant Dean of Finance and Administration

HASLAM MAGAZINE TANYA G. BROWN

Executive Director of Marketing and Public Relations | Editor-in-chief

SETH REAGAN

Executive Director of Development and Alumni Affairs

MEREDITH HULETTE

Senior Director of Stewardship and Alumni Affairs

JESSICA LEIGH BROWN Writer

JILL KNIGHT

Design and Production

CHARLES BROOKS Photographer

GERHARD SCHNEIBEL AND KATIE WILLIAMS

News Lists and Compilations

Haslam Magazine is published twice a year by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Haslam College of Business and is printed by University Printing & Mail.

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Haslam College of Business 408 Haslam Business Building Knoxville, TN 37996 - 4140 (865) 974-5061 | haslam.utk.edu Fax: (865) 974-1766 | email: tgbrown@utk.edu FACEBOOK.COM/ HASLAMCB

Stephen L. Mangum Dean and Stokely Foundation Leadership Chair Haslam College of Business

HASLAM COLLEGE OF BUSINESS INSTAGRAM.COM/ HASLAMUT TWITTER.COM/ HASLAMUT


DEPARTMENT & FACULTY NEWS

Mary Brow, with Masood Parang and Lane Morris.

COLLEGEWIDE

Neeraj Bharadwaj

MARKETING AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

RANDY BRADLEY SECURED A DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GRANT WORTH $100,000. Faculty have produced an interactive multimedia textbook, “Leveraging Supply Chain Management to Drive Organizational Success,” for use in teaching. A group of faculty, students, and alumni are participating in a multi-year project focused on last-mile delivery. The project will utilize the new “Advanced Analytics Lab, IBM Enabled,” a joint resource of the Tickle College of Engineering and the Haslam College of Business.

A group of marketing faculty led by Alex Zablah and Neeraj Bharadwaj have begun to construct a marketing biometrics lab that is generating research on how the human body reacts to marketing stimuli.

2nd The supply chain graduate program was ranked second nationally by Gartner, and the undergraduate program was ranked second among publics by U.S. News and World Report.

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Chad Autry was named FedEx Corporation Endowed Professor.

Melissa Bowers, Mary Holcomb, and Adam Petrie published “Unleashing the Potential of Supply Chain Analytics” in the MIT Sloan Management Review. They also presented at the Haslam College of Business 2017 Supply Chain Forum.

David Miller, Pam Fansler, Russell Crook, and Dean Steve Mangum.

MANAGEMENT David Gras conducted research in South Africa and rural Mexico during the summer. He had research accepted for publication in the Academy of Management Review. Terry Leap was quoted extensively in The Scientist for an article on sexual harassment in higher education.

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Neeraj Bharadwaj was named among the Top 40 Undergraduate Business Professors by Poets & Quants.

Mary Brow joined the Haslam College of Business and the Tickle College of Engineering as director of the new Integrated Business and Engineering Program.

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Russell Crook was named to the newly endowed First Tennessee Foundation Professorship.

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IN THE NEWS

THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

BizEd

March 25, 2017

“Consumers want to know where a product came from, all the way to the cashmere goat herd on the slopes of the Himalayas.” Mike Burnette Lecturer and associate director of

the Global Supply Chain Institute, on the importance of transparency in the supply chain.

Logistics Management August 29, 2017

“While we found a majority of companies ‘strongly agree’ that transportation is a strategically important function, a significant percentage have not organizationally aligned transportation in a manner that supports their goals.” Mary Holcomb Gerald T. Niedert Professor,

discussing her 26th annual study of logistics and transportation trends.

Spend Matters March 10, 2017

“I really think we’ve got to work on what isn’t our strength. Because everyone will tell you, oh you’re very nurturing, you’re very compassionate, you’re very passionate, you’re great on teams, whatever. But maybe those are not the skills we need.”

Racked

May 11, 2017

Wendy Tate Professor of supply chain management and Cheryl Massingale

Faculty Research Fellow, on how women can succeed in a male-dominated field.

“Mapping the origins of each piece, and the conditions under which they were assembled, is a necessary next step in improving accountability, but it isn’t a standard practice because it’s difficult and defeats some of the cost effectiveness of outsourcing.” Chad Autry Head of the marketing and supply chain

The Tennessean

July 9, 2017

management department and FedEx Corporation Endowed Professor of Supply Chain.

“Less job stability in lower-income sectors and lower home values in minority neighborhoods can contribute [to constraints in lending]. We can’t say there is anything discriminatory going on.” Tom Boehm SunTrust Professor of Finance, on the slow recovery of black home ownership in Tennessee since the Great Recession.

Bloomberg Markets

May 16, 2017

MIT Sloan Management Review

August 23, 2017

Professor, in an excerpt of their research on the potential of supply chain analytics, with Adam Petrie lecturer of statistics.

Wallet Hub

July 6, 2017

Marianne Wanamaker Associate professor of

“To gain competitive advantage from supply chain analytics, companies need to reduce the time it takes to act on the insights those analytics generate.” Melissa Bowers Beaman Professor in Business and director of the Master of Science in Business Analytics and Mary Holcomb Gerald T. Niedert

“Large racial differences in economic mobility, conditional on parents’ status, continued into the post-World War II era despite the Great Migration and the passage of Civil Rights legislation.” economics, Boyd CBER Faculty Fellow, and Kinney Family Faculty Research Fellow, on the racial wage gap.

Wallet Hub

August 17, 2017

“Local officials in Tennessee can make their cities more attractive to young families by investing in green areas like parks, promoting kid-friendly events like farmer’s markets and fireworks displays, and encouraging dog-friendly events.”

“Decreases in corporate tax rate will clearly benefit corporations and their shareholders. However, such actions will also impact the government deficit in a negative manner. In my opinion, the effect of tax reform on long-term stock prices depends critically on how these changes will affect the overall financial health of the United States government.” Andy Puckett Paul and Beverly Castagna Professor in Investments and HCB Endowed Faculty Research Fellow, on how tax reform might impact stocks in the short run.

Suzan Puhl Murphy Distinguished lecturer of finance and assistant head

of the Department of Finance, on the best places to raise a family in Tennessee.

The Economist August 31, 2017

“Militarization reduces assaults on officers and complaints against them.” Matt Harris Assistant professor of economics, assistant research professor in

the Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research, and Stahl PEMBA Fellow, on the effects of police using military gear.

Call Miner

July 26, 2017

“Time series analysis is an important part of the marketing analysis toolkit. From time series models we can (1) glean information from the history of the process (2) have an accurate baseline to evaluate the impacts of promotions and other intentional interventions and (3) have the quantified data necessary for developing a supply chain strategy for dealing with variation.” Ken Gilbert Emeritus professor of business analytics, on the most important algorithms for marketing data analysts to understand.

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USA Today

August 4, 2017

“That 9¼ percent I saved is minuscule in terms of ‘savings.’ The stores would be giving a much better discount if they had a sale. Back-to-school sales would have been like 25 percent off, not 9 percent, and people would have saved more.” Bill Fox Director of the Boyd Center for Business and

Economic Research, Chancellor’s Professor, and Randy and Jenny Boyd Distinguished Professor, on the value of tax holidays for customers.


DEPARTMENT & FACULTY NEWS

FACULTY AND STAFF AWARDS

The Haslam College of Business recognized outstanding accomplishments by its faculty and staff during an annual celebration in April.

Celeste Carruthers received the Vallet Family Outstanding Researcher Award at the Haslam College of Business Annual Awards celebration.

ECONOMICS Bill Nielson at his retirement party in the West Wing.

Bill Nielson retired as head of the Department of Economics, and an endowment was established in his honor. Christian Vossler succeeds him.

ECONOMICS

COLLEGE STAFF AWARDS Shelia Wolford

Enda Hargaden was selected to be a junior scholar at the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.

TIM WILLIAMS STAFF AWARD FOR PROFESSIONALISM

Celeste Carruthers and Marianne Wanamaker published a paper in the Journal of Labor Economics showing that school quality contributed to the black-white wage gap in the South prior to World War II.

Tanya Brown, Charlie Cantrell, Gerhard Schneibel, Sara Whitt, and Katie Williams

Juliana Troxler

SUPERIOR CUSTOMER RESPONSIVENESS AWARD

INNOVATION AND CREATIVITY AWARD

COLLEGE FACULTY AWARDS Celeste Carruthers

VALLET FAMILY OUTSTANDING RESEARCHER AWARD

CELESTE CARRUTHERS AND BILL FOX ACQUIRED A GRANT TO STUDY TENNESSEE’S “DRIVE TO 55” EFFORT TO RAISE COLLEGE COMPLETION RATES.

Marianne Wanamaker

Marianne Wanamaker was named among the Top 40 Undergraduate Business Professors by Poets & Quants. She was elected as a research associate in the National Bureau of Economic Research’s program on the development of the American economy, as well as appointed a senior economist on the President’s Council of Economic Advisors. Christian Vossler published in the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists new standards of practice guidelines for conducting stated preference studies to estimate the monetized benefits of public programs. He was awarded the Martin and Carol Robinson Excellence in Teaching, Research, and Service Award at the Haslam College of Business Annual Awards celebration.

Alex Zablah

RICHARD C. REIZENSTEIN AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING COMMITMENT TO STUDENTS

Neeraj Bharadwaj

ALLEN H. KEALLY EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING AWARD

Christian Vossler

In August, the Tennessee State Data Center, part of the Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research, hosted a two-day free conference for more than 70 census data users.

MARTIN AND CAROL ROBINSON EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING, RESEARCH, AND SERVICE AWARD

Jim Wansley

BANK OF AMERICA FACULTY LEADERSHIP AWARD

Chuck Noon

RICHARD D. SANDERS AWARD FOR LEADERSHIP IN EXECUTIVE EDUCATION

FINANCE

Department of Accounting and Information Management DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION AWARD

David Maslar received the Sharon Miller Pryse Outstanding Teacher Award and his research was accepted for presentation at the Stern Microstructure Conference in New York.

Laura Cole

VOLUNTEER SPIRIT AWARD

PROGRAM AWARDS Angel Norman

OUTSTANDING FIRST YEAR MBA FACULTY AWARD

Matthew Serfling’s research was presented at the Society of Financial Studies Cavalcade Conference and accepted for publication by the Journal of Financial Economics.

Lloyd Rinehart

OUTSTANDING SECOND YEAR MBA FACULTY AWARD

David Ecklund

MBA INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS’ APPRECIATION AWARD

Russell Zaretzki

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ANALYTICS’S OUTSTANDING COMMITMENT TO STUDENTS AWARD Continued on page 9.

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PEOPLE

NEW FACULTY

A cohort of 10 new faculty members from the United States, Korea, Mexico, and China joined the Haslam College of Business at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in the fall. Spread across all departments at the college, these new faculty bring some 46 years of combined industry experience and 87 years of teaching pedagogy to Haslam.

Melinda Micheletto has joined Haslam as a lecturer of marketing. Previously a professional specialist at the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, Micheletto holds a PhD in marketing from the University of Tennessee.

Ashleigh EldemirePoindexter joins the Department of Finance as an Lance instructor. She Saunders previously is an assistant worked at the professor in the Department of University of Marketing and Supply Chain ManageSouth Carolina’s ment. Most recently, he was an assistant Darla Moore School professor of supply chain management of Business. Eldemireand analytics at Virginia Commonwealth Poindexter’s research University, where he specialized in teaching interests include empirical operations management. Saunders has published in the corporate finance, capital International Journal of Logistics Management and the structure, and fixed Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, among income securities. others. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees, as well as his MBA at UT, before completing his PhD at Virginia Tech in 2013.

María Padilla-Romo joins the Department of Economics as an assistant professor. She hails from Texas A&M University, where she completed her doctorate. Padilla-Romo has applied her research background in applied microeconomics, public economics, and development economics to topics including Mexico’s drug war and the effects of full-time schools on academic performance. Her work has appeared in English and Spanish publications, including the Cato Research Briefs in Economic Policy. She also has been quoted in Time magazine and Newsweek. 6 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

Wei Zheng, whose major research interest is experimental design, comes to the Department of Business Analytics and Statistics as an associate professor. He joins Haslam from Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, where he was an assistant professor. Zheng’s research has recently appeared in publications including: Annals of Statistics, Statistics and Probability Letters and the Journal of Statistical Computation and Simulation.


DEPARTMENT & FACULTY NEWS

Chung Eun Lee is an assistant professor in the Department of Business Analytics and Statistics. She comes to Haslam from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she wrote her dissertation on “Statistical Inference of Multivariate Time Series and Functional Data using New Dependence Metrics.” Lee has published in the Journal of the American Statistical Association (Theory and Methods) and the Journal of Business & Economic Statistics. Her research interests include: dimension reduction, functional and nonlinear time series, multivariate analysis and robust statistics.

LaTonya Jordan h a s joined the Department of Accounting and Information Management as a lecturer. She Sara Williamson has comes to Haslam from the Oak joined the Department of Ridge National Laboratory, where she Management as a lecturer. was a project implementation manager. She previously was an adjunct Jordan holds a bachelor’s degree in professor of business and manageaccounting from UT and a master’s in ment at Pellissippi State Community public administration from Tennessee State University. College and Roane State Community She also was an accountant and auditor for the College. Williamson holds a master’s degree Tennessee Department of Transportation. in management and leadership from Webster University in St. Louis, Missouri, a master’s degree in public administration from Barry University in Miami Shores, Florida, and a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Flagler College in St. Augustine, Florida.

Dana Parks is now a lecturer in accounting. Prior to joining Haslam, she worked in fraud investigation and dispute services for EY in Atlanta and also was a dispatcher and crime analyst for the Anderson County, Tennessee, Sherriff’s Office. Parks holds bachelor’s degrees in sociology and business administration, as well as a master’s degree in accountancy, all from UT. ­ GERHARD SCHNEIBEL

Mark Taranto is now a clinical professor in the Department of Finance. He previously served as a visiting assistant professor at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business. Taranto’s career in finance began in 1986. He got his start in academia in 1996. Currently, his working papers include, “Employee Stock Options and the Underpricing of Initial Public Offerings,” “Why Investment Banks Underprice IPOs: Because They Can,” and “The Effects of Existing Capital Structure on Equity Offerings.”

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RESEARCH

MATT HARRIS

THE EFFECTS OF TRANSFERRING MILITARY GEAR TO LOCAL POLICE POLICE MILITARIZATION IS A HOT-BUTTON ISSUE,

and Matt Harris and his co-authors wanted to tackle it without bringing any preconceived opinions to the table. “We were struck by images on the news of heavily armed police and mostly unarmed protesters,” Harris, assistant professor of economics at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s Haslam College of Business, says. “Once we realized some of the equipment came from the federal government, it became a policy relevant question that we were interested in pursuing.” Harris, a research assistant professor of the Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research, and his co-authors wanted to identify the effects, if any, of giving military hardware to local police. Since its inception in 2006, the United States Department of Defense Law Enforcement Support Officers 1033 program has transferred more than $5.2 billion in military gear such as small caliber weapons, grenade launchers, optics, armored vehicles, and aircraft to local police departments. “We had many conversations with the Defense Logistics Agency, which oversees the program, and were able to gather data from them as it became public,” says Harris. “Then we sought data on outcomes that we cared about related to this, such as crime rates, arrests, and assaults on officers.” Some of the information was fairly easy to obtain through annual reports on crimes, arrests, and assaults on officers. “But data on complaints and potential adverse outcomes were very difficult to get,” Harris says. “They were not collected or reported in a systematic way, and often were not included in the annual reports.” What did the data reveal? “The causal effects of this program were largely consistent with its stated objectives,” Harris says. “The tactical items led to decreased complaints and fewer assaults, and they enhanced the efficacy of drug intervention.” However, Harris emphasizes that the results are only valid for departments for which proximity to the distribution centers affects whether or not they

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ONCE WE REALIZED SOME OF THE EQUIPMENT CAME FROM THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, IT BECAME A POLICY RELEVANT QUESTION THAT WE WERE INTERESTED IN PURSUING.”

acquire tactical equipment, or have departmental cultures that are fairly indifferent to using military equipment. “Some departments will never acquire this stuff because they’re not into it,” he says. “There are other places that are always going to acquire it if it’s available. Our results talk about the departments that are sufficiently close to the indifference point.” The study’s results should be viewed as a starting point for future research, says Harris, rather than a referendum on police militarization. “Because of the limitations of available data, we made a call in the paper for greater transparency,” he says. “We believe public policy should be informed by quality research. We need better data to conduct better research, and transparency is key in that.” Harris and his co-authors (Jinseong Park, Don Bruce, and Matt Murray) published the paper, “Peacekeeping Force: Efforts of Providing Tactical Equipment to Local Law Enforcement,” in August 2017 in American Economic Journal: Economic Policy. ___________________________ TO READ THE PAPER IN ITS ENTIRETY, PLEASE VISIT TINY.UTK.EDU/POLICEGEAR.


DEPARTMENT & FACULTY NEWS

FACULTY AND STAFF AWARDS

Robert Mee published in Statistica Sinica and Technometrics.

The Haslam College of Business recognized outstanding accomplishments by its faculty and staff during an annual celebration in April.

Melissa Bowers published in Business Horizons and OR/MS Today. She also was chair of the first meeting of analytics program directors at the INFORMS Spring Analytics Meeting in Las Vegas. Jim Schmidhammer at his retirement party in the West Wing.

BUSINESS ANALYTICS AND STATISTICS HAMPARSUM BOZDOGAN DELIVERED A KEYNOTE AT THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMPUTATIONAL AND STATISTICAL METHODS IN APPLIED SCIENCES DURING A NOVEMBER CONFERENCE IN SAMSUN, TURKEY. HE HAS BEEN INVITED TO SERVE ON THE PROGRAM COMMITTEE OF THE SYMPOSIUM ON DATA SCIENCE AND STATISTICS IN RESTON, VIRGINIA, DURING MAY.

PROGRAM AWARDS Michel Ballings

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ANALYTICS’S EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING AWARD

Paolo Letizia published in Production and Operations Management.

Timothy Munyon

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT’S OUTSTANDING FACULTY AWARD

Wenjun Zhou published in ACM Transactions on Intelligent Systems and Technology. She also presented at the INFORMS 2017 Business Analytics Conference, and was among the top five finalists of the Syngenta 2017 Crop Challenge in Analytics.

Pat Postma

GEORGE MILLER AWARD FOR LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT IN EXECUTIVE EDUCATION

Jennifer Hicks

GRADUATE AND EXECUTIVE EDUCATION OUTSTANDING SERVICE AWARD

Peggy Jarrett

GRADUATE AND EXECUTIVE EDUCATION OUTSTANDING RESULTS AWARD

Jim Schmidhammer, senior lecturer of statistics, retired.

Mitch Addis

GRADUATE AND EXECUTIVE EDUCATION OUTSTANDING INNOVATION AWARD

Sean Willems published in Interfaces and the International Journal of Production Economics. He also became deputy editor of Interfaces.

Tom Brown

GRADUATE AND EXECUTIVE EDUCATION OUTSTANDING TEAMWORK AND COLLABORATION AWARD

Jim Wansley

AEROSPACE AND DEFENSE MBA OUTSTANDING FACULTY AWARD

Left to right: Pedro Gonzalez, Johnathan Harvey, Nancy Scott, and Ben Skipper

Michael McIntyre

EXECUTIVE MBA FOR STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP OUTSTANDING FACULTY AWARD

Don Lighter

GRADUATE AND EXECUTIVE EDUCATION

EXECUTIVE MBA FOR HEALTHCARE LEADERSHIP OUTSTANDING FACULTY AWARD

Chuck Noon

PHYSICIAN EXECUTIVE MBA OUTSTANDING FACULTY AWARD

Matt Harris was awarded the Michael Stahl Physician Executive MBA Faculty Fellowship. PEMBA alumni have provided this fellowship to support outstanding faculty who contribute to advancing knowledge in their field, raise the prominence of the college, and teach effectively.

Mandyam Srinivasan

OUTSTANDING FACULTY AWARD FOR BOTH THE PROFESSIONAL MBA AND EXECUTIVE MBA FOR GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN

Several new hires have joined Graduate and Executive Education, including: Pedro Gonzalez as director of career management for graduate education, Jonathan Harvey as executive director of the leadership division, Nancy Scott as director of the leadership development program, and Ben Skipper as executive director for aerospace and defense.

Bruce Behn

PHYSICIAN EXECUTIVE MBA OUTSTANDING TEACHING AWARD

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STAFF SPOTLIGHT

MARY GOSS

ON TOP OF THE WORLD AN AVID GOLFER, TRAVELER, AND GARDENER, MARY GOSS

brings her infectious zest for life—and more than 30 years of experience in education—to the Haslam College of Business as the new director of the full-time MBA program. Goss began her career in Los Angeles in 1982. “It was my first job out of college,” she recalls. “I moved to LA and found a job at the Fashion Institute of Design Merchandising.” After a year, a friend told Goss about a job opening at Pepperdine University, where she ultimately spent five years. “Meanwhile, I got an MBA and married my husband, Eric.” In the late 1980s, Eric’s company transferred him to Hong Kong, and the couple spent a year living abroad. When he landed a position in North Carolina, Mary became associate director of admissions at Wake Forest University. The Gosses spent the next decade in the area, where their sons, Ryan and Michael, were born. The University of Notre Dame recruited Mary in 2003,

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IT’S ABOUT GETTING THE BEST PEOPLE IN AND THE BEST PEOPLE OUT, AS FAR AS WORK EXPERIENCE AND DIVERSITY OF THE CLASS.”

and she enjoyed leading their graduate business programs for the next 14 years. Yet the family never intended to stay in the Midwest permanently. “My husband and I were raised in Illinois, but we fell in love with the South while we were living in North Carolina,” she says. “Our goal was to end up in this area. We consider it home.” Mary relishes the fresh challenge of taking the full-time MBA program at Haslam to the next level. “I think we’ve got all the right elements to raise our rankings,” she says. “It’s about getting the best people in and the best people out, as far as work experience and diversity of the class.” She appreciates and supports the college’s focus on integrity and values. When she’s not on campus, Mary heads to the golf course to unwind. “I love to golf with my girlfriends,” she says. “I love it for


DEPARTMENT & FACULTY NEWS

Terry Neal has succeeded Joe Carcello as department head. Carcello, who stepped down for health reasons, has been named professor emeritus.

ACCOUNTING Alycia Winegardner won the Faculty Advisor of the Year award. Linda Myers’s work was cited by the chairman of the SEC in his remarks before the annual Life Sciences Accounting and Reporting Congress. Myers is now editor of Auditing: A Journal of Practice and Theory and associate editor of Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance. Myers’s recent publications have appeared in the Review of Accounting Studies, the Journal of Business, Finance & Accounting, and others.

the social aspect. It’s an essential skill to have in business, because lots of deals are done on the golf course.” Today, the Gosses are often spread around the globe: Eric spends half the month in Alaska working as a pilot, Ryan trains sled dogs in the Italian Alps, and Michael attends college in Indiana. “We all love to travel,” Mary says. “Around Christmas every other year, we plan an international trip with just the four of us.”

IZABELA VANDEEST ORGANIZED “MEET THE FIRMS,” AN ANNUAL INTERNSHIP AND JOB FAIR, WITH 35 PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRMS, CORPORATIONS, AND GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES. MORE THAN 400 STUDENTS ATTENDED. Lauren Cunningham and Bruce Behn served on the American Accounting Association– Deloitte Trueblood Seminars Planning Committee for the 2016–2017 academic year. Bruce Behn was appointed to the International Accounting Education Standards Board. He published in the Journal of International Accounting Research. James Chyz chaired the 2017– 2018 American Tax Association/ KPMG Doctoral Consortium Committee and had research conditionally accepted for The Accounting Review.

James Chyz was awarded the Pugh & Company AIM Faculty Excellence Award; Lauren Cunningham the Rhea & Ivy Excellence in Teaching Award; Robert Fuller the Decosimo Faculty Leadership Award; and Jama Summers the Pugh & Company AIM Faculty Excellence Award. Lauren Cunningham is serving on the editorial boards of Accounting Horizons and Auditing: A Journal of Practice & Theory. Her dissertation was accepted for publication in Accounting Horizons, and she received an Excellence in Reviewing award from the American Accounting Association. Robert Fuller was awarded best paper in IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication. He has served as a minitrack chair for the 2017 Americas Conference on Information Systems and associate editor for MIS Quarterly.

LeAnn Luna was honored by Taxation with the 2016 Outstanding Author Contribution. Kathleen Powers had research accepted for presentation at the American Accounting Association’s ATA Midyear Meeting. Jama Summers and Robert Fuller had a paper accepted for the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, which Fuller presented.

Tyvi Small

Tyvi Small, executive director of talent management, diversity, and community relations, participated in the Marine Corps Key Educators and Key Leaders Workshop. Tanya G. Brown, executive director of marketing and public relations, was recognized by the Pulliam School of Journalism at Franklin College of Indiana with its Young Alumni Award.

STAFF AND SUPPORT Juliana Troxler, administrative specialist, received the Superior Customer Responsiveness Award at the Haslam College of Business Annual Awards celebration. Sherri Pinkston, administrative support assistant, received the Wellness Warrior Award in recognition of her effort to lead by example when it comes to making healthier choices.

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ROB McCABE At the Pinnacle of Success

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S

ince its inception

in 2000, Pinnacle Bank has become one of the largest financial institutions in Tennessee and one of the fifty largest banks in the US, with over $20 billion in assets. At the helm of this financial behemoth stands chairman and co-founder Rob McCabe (HCB ’72, ’78). A man of quick wit, intelligence, and action, McCabe has built a successful company and established a clear commitment to bettering his community, city, and state.

M

cCabe grew up in west Knoxville, taking an early interest in UT sports. “I went to campus mainly to attend sporting events, especially football,” he says. “My father did advertising work for the programs that were distributed at the football games, and I would sell those programs in the stands.” When McCabe graduated from Knoxville Catholic High School, he only applied to one university. “I’d earned a scholarship from UT and knew I wanted a background in business,” he says. “Picking a major was nothing more than happenstance. I considered finance, but settled on economics.” McCabe excelled at his studies and graduated first in his class in 1972, with a grade average of nearly 4.0. Before he had time to launch a career in finance, McCabe answered the call of duty. “I had a very low number in the draft lottery during the Vietnam War,” he says. “I went back into ROTC

14 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

and spent four years on active duty, three of them in Germany.” When the war ended and McCabe returned home to Knoxville, he decided to take advantage of the GI Bill’s provisions for education. “I pursued a master’s in business administration at Haslam and worked part-time at Park National Bank (PNB), which eventually became Regions,” he says. “When I completed my MBA in 1978, I went to work full-time at PNB.” McCabe rapidly climbed the ranks, becoming executive vice president of corporate banking at PNB in 1982, when he was just thirty-six years old.

I

n 1983, First American Bank of Nashville purchased PNB, and McCabe got his first taste of life in the state’s capital city. “I worked in Nashville for two years, and then was sent back to become president of First American Bank

of Knoxville,” he says. “In that role, I oversaw all the banks in the region, including Knoxville, Atlanta, and the Tri-Cities.” After seven years in East Tennessee with First American, McCabe moved back to Nashville to become vice chairman of First American Corporation and president of First American Enterprises. “I was running all the non-bank businesses in Nashville, and later all the banking and non-bank businesses,” he says. AmSouth purchased First American in 1999, and as McCabe evaluated his options, he and several colleagues decided to take an entrepreneurial step. “A number of us left AmSouth and formed Pinnacle Financial Partners in 2000,” he says. “I’ve been the chairman since the bank’s inception.” Pinnacle began as a “Devoting commercial, private wealth bank time to in Nashville, but it soon expanded economic development, eastward. “The first place we health and elected to open an additional bank human was Knoxville,” McCabe says. services, “We started from scratch rather education, than buying another institution, and arts organizations because there were a lot of owner-managed businesses and is an vulnerable competitors, and we important part of had a number of people who came giving back from PNB and First American.” and a key As the years progressed, part of our Pinnacle’s success continued investment to stretch across the region as in the communities the company acquired banks in Chattanooga, Memphis, and we serve.” most recently, the Bank of North Carolina in Greensboro. Today, Pinnacle operates in four states: Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.


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McCabe and his colleagues take a unique approach to hiring, which has accelerated the bank’s growth. “With no exceptions, we have hired only bankers with at least ten years of experience in the markets that we want them to work in,” McCabe says. “We look for five years of experience from support people and tellers. This way, their communication skills and financial literacy are advanced, and they can operate independently from day one.” Pinnacle also strives to provide all the products, services, and advisory tools available in any major regional bank. “We want no gaps in our product and service line,” says McCabe. “We also have qualified specialists in each of those areas to support our bankers.” To streamline the loan qualification process, Pinnacle doesn’t use loan committees. “Instead, we use a series of signatures to quickly respond to the client’s need.”

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everal mentors influenced McCabe’s rise to leadership excellence, including Jimmy Smith, former president of Park National Bank and CEO of First American. “He gave me many opportunities in different business lines, allowing me to learn them, to make mistakes, and to build up more of a generalist view of the banking business,” says McCabe. “That experience has served me well, and Smith had a strong influence on my success and confidence.” According to Smith, McCabe’s diligence and good judgment earned him those opportunities. “He’s very smart, very knowledgeable, and a very hard worker,” Smith says. “As the oldest child in a large family, he

16 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

assumed a lot of responsibility early in life—and his hard work got good results.” McCabe’s father-in-law, Jim Haslam II (HCB, ’52), describes him as persistent and action-oriented. “He will make many calls on a person to get his or her business,” says Haslam. “He’s relentless.” Pinnacle’s rapid growth speaks for McCabe’s strengths as a leader. “You can judge a business by the value it creates, and Pinnacle now has a market cap of $5.1 billion. To build a value like that in fifteen years, starting from scratch, is tremendous, and Rob has been the developer of the customer base.” Wit and intelligence also play a vital part in McCabe’s success, according to Terry Turner, president and CEO of Pinnacle. “I’ve known Rob since 1978 and have watched him interface with all kinds of people over the years,” Turner says. “He’s extraordinarily bright, able to assess situations and respond to people quickly.” A sense of humor helps him, too, Turner adds. “He is so funny. Rob and I might look like staid bankers, but when we travel together, we’ve laughed so hard, we’ve had tears running down our cheeks.”

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side from leading Pinnacle’s ascent, McCabe is deeply involved in his city and community. He’s served on numerous boards, both commercial and nonprofit, including Boy Scouts of America, the Nashville Symphony, and the Nashville Electric Service. McCabe has worked hard to promote the growth of downtown Nashville, says Tom Turner, President and CEO of Nashville Downtown Partnership, a nonprofit organization. “From the start,

“He is so funny. Rob and I might look like staid bankers, but when we travel together, we’ve laughed so hard, we’ve had tears running down our cheeks.”

Pinnacle was committed to being downtown, and that was significant for us,” Turner says. “In 2000, it wasn’t as exciting to have downtown offices as it is today, so they were very much a leader from the business side. They expanded their footprint here with multiple branches and have a name on an office building.” As a member of Nashville Downtown Partnership’s board of directors, McCabe stays true to his action-oriented character. “He makes sure we have the resources we need to implement the plans we develop,” says Turner. “I don’t think he’d want to have dust settle on any project we were working on. He helps everyone do their best.” McCabe views his service to the community as a necessity. “Devoting time to economic development, health and human services, education, and arts organizations is an important part of giving back and a key part of our investment in the communities we serve,” he says. “I’ve always stayed involved.” Reflecting on decades of experience in the financial sector, McCabe says the best advice he could offer the next generation of bankers is to stay alert to opportunities and identify which ones best match their strengths. “There are many entry points to this business,” he says. “Once you’re employed, you have a vantage point from which to look and learn. Seek opportunity first, and then you’ll be able to identify mentors along the way.”


nce “O you’re

employed, you have a vantage point from which to look and learn. Seek opportunity first, and then you’ll be able to identify mentors along the way.”

HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 17


WRITTEN BY KATIE WILLIAMS


Growing with ProMBA The Professional MBA started nearly 20 years ago with a groundbreaking approach to integrated curriculum. It brought the real world to the classroom by teaching business disciplines in context and the classroom to the real world through a major project conducted at the workplaces of its students. For the Coleman-Neals, ProMBA’s integration took on a whole new meaning as it wove its way through their family.

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hen George Coleman graduated with his Professional MBA in the winter of 2008, the newspaper business was in upheaval. Online consumption had surpassed print for the first year ever, and two decades of declining readership were accented with the worst American economic slump in a generation. George, then a director of advertising for a daily newspaper in Kingsport, Tennessee, saw the writing on the wall in early 2007. He told his boss that to remain successful after 30 years in the industry, he needed to get training in a new perspective on how to market the paper. “Everybody seemed to be getting an MBA,” George says, “But I thought, once you got your degree, what did that mean? What did you learn?” The Professional MBA was designed for working professionals like George who want to put their learning to use as soon as possible. Identifying an improvement project at their

workplace and making a measurable impact through it lies at the heart of the program’s structure. For George, the project was to help his company make the change to digital printing by using computer-to-plate technology. “Proving that the digital process was better, faster, and cheaper wasn’t the issue,” George says. “The issue was the capital investment of $300,000. With my ProMBA, we were able to show that we would get a return on investment within three years, which we desperately needed at the time.” George’s projections held true, and he soon assumed responsibility for a group of weekly papers in the Tri-Cities that had struggled to turn a profit. Yet, within six months, George had completed an analysis, made changes, reduced costs, and turned the papers into moneymakers. This success led to the September 2015 transfer to the company’s Lebanon Tennessee newspaper group and greater responsibility.

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Newsman “The ProMBA does a good job developing the hard skills of analysis and the soft skills of making your ideas heard and getting your organization to buy into changes,” he says. “A lot of people might not care what George Coleman is saying, but if I can back my ideas up with data, those ideas will be considered more often and be more likely to be taken on.”

“ With

MY PROMBA, I WAS ABLE TO SHOW THAT WE WOULD GET A RETURN ON INVESTMENT WITHIN THREE YEARS.”

Administrator

Engineer

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hile George was getting his MBA, his daughter Sandra Neal was finishing up her undergraduate degree in business. Based on his experience and what he saw in the job market, he advised her to continue her studies and earn a master’s degree. “It is different than when I went to school,” George says. “Back then we were told to go to college and get a bachelor’s, and you’d get a job. That’s just to get in the pile now. My wife and I were adamant that if you want to stand out you really need to get a master’s.” Sandra says seeing how her father pursued his MBA while working gave her a unique perspective about how to make the most of a graduate degree.


“I saw how it paid off when he went through the project process and saved his company money,” Sandra says. “I thought a few years of work experience would give me a more concrete understanding of what is taught in an MBA and how to apply it in the workplace.” “I couldn’t argue with that,” says George. Getting that master’s degree came up again for Sandra a few years later when a supervisor challenged her to create a five-year plan. “That was one of the hardest, but the best things I ever did,” she says. “We looked at the timing together and decided that it was right for me to go back and get my degree.” While Sandra looked at several other programs, her father’s experience with the ProMBA and Haslam’s structure, which offered in-person Saturday classes, helped it rise to the top. She was able to keep her administrative job while pursuing the degree, and shifted to a role reporting to her company’s chief operations officer within a year and a half of graduating. In her new role she leads the training and development team at EMJ Corporation, a commercial general contractor based in Chattanooga. “The degree really changed my mindset and helped me think the way an executive would,” Sandra says. “I can speak the language, talk about the aspects of business that are important to our executives, and explain where certain assumptions were being made.”

Tennessee, that has a history of sending employees to Haslam’s programs for working professionals. After so much peripheral experience with the program, Jason says that he thought he had a solid understanding of what he was getting into when enrolling. “I had no idea when it came down to it,” he laughs. “I don’t think I realized the amount of

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effort that’s invested in us as students, how much the professors put into it.” Jason will graduate in December of 2018, exactly five years after his wife and ten years after his father-in-law. He’s already seeing dividends for his career projection. “It’s exciting to be involved in the long-term plan for the company, and being in ProMBA definitely made that possible,” Jason says.

andra graduated exactly five years after her father, and George likes to point out that she was valedictorian of the 2013 class. The legacy continued this year when Sandra’s husband, Jason Neal, joined ProMBA after examining his options at multiple programs “Three things convinced me,” says Jason. “It came highly recommended by two trusted sources. It’s conducted mostly in person, instead of online, and I like the company I work for. The action project is a unique opportunity to improve my company and my potential within it.”  Jason is a project manager at Kenco, a logistics and transportation company in Chattanooga,

“ The

ACTION PROJECT IS A UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY TO IMPROVE MY COMPANY AND MY POTENTIAL WITHIN IT.”

To learn more about the Haslam Professional MBA and how it can enhance your career, visit https://haslam.utk.edu/professional-mba.

HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 21


EXCELLENCE IN OPPORTUNITY

BLOOMBERG TERMINALS

THE GOLD STANDARD

FINANCE STUDENTS AT THE HASLAM COLLEGE

of Business gain firsthand investment experience before they leave campus, giving them an edge over their peers from other institutions. The college’s Masters Investment Learning Center (MILC) is ranked number one in the SEC and number five in the nation for the number of Bloomberg terminals available to students. The Department of Finance also recently introduced its fifth Torch Fund in the fall semester, giving students more ways to gain a working knowledge of investing. Individual Torch Funds focus on different investing strategies including stock picking, value investing, and wealth management. “The students learn about managing a portfolio and selecting securities in a real-world experiential environment,” says Deborah Harrell, Torch Fund director. Students working on Torch Funds must learn to use the Bloomberg terminals proficiently. “Bloomberg is a large database of current economic information,” 22 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

20 400

Harrell explains. “If you’re managing money, you need to find current information as well as historical information.” Learning to use the software and interpret the information is a challenging but essential task for students going into the world of finance. Senior Madison Hamilton is a second semester portfolio manager for the McClain Fund, one of two Torch Funds overseen by undergraduates. A member of the Greg and Lisa Smith Global Leadership Scholars Program, Hamilton decided to pursue finance after taking an honors course with Laura Cole, senior lecturer and director of the MILC. “It was a great experience for me and totally changed the

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STUDENT NEWS

trajectory of my college career,” Hamilton says. “I switched my major, and she nominated me to be on the fund.” Hamilton applied for a staff position at the MILC and dove headfirst into the Bloomberg training modules designed by Cole. “The chance to learn and have access to Bloomberg is amazing, because it’s the gold standard for any financial firm,” she says. “At the MILC, we have incredible support from Dr. Cole and peers who challenge us to learn. It’s opened doors to a lot of opportunities.” No matter which career path she chooses, Hamilton says she’s benefited from serving on a Torch Fund. “Learning how to work around people who are smart and competitive but also supportive and caring has been a great experience,” she says. “And knowing Bloomberg is definitely going to set me apart and be really helpful if I go into a financial services career.” Collin Thul, who took Bloomberg training during his first year in the Haslam MBA program, agrees. He then applied and was accepted to the Haslam Torch Fund, one of two graduate investment funds. “First, we shadow the previous team for a month, and then move into active management for a full year,” Thul explains. “Finally, we do a presentation for the investors. It’s a terrifying but invaluable experience—standing five feet in front of stellar individuals in the investment world—and defending our investment decisions.” Thul’s academic background is in plant sciences, so jumping into Bloomberg training and Torch Fund management was a challenge. “It was kind of a trial by fire, but that learning curve coming into the program was a great experience for me,” he says. “Being allowed to practice these skills gives you that leg up when you’re entering the field after graduation.”

Undergraduate students visited Memphis on a professional development trip.

COLLEGE-WIDE Twenty-nine diverse students participated in the annual PepsiCo Power of One: Diversity Leadership Development Program.

DIVERSE GROUPS OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS VISITED ATLANTA AND MEMPHIS ON TWO SEPARATE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT TRIPS IN THE SPRING. A new group of students was inducted into the Beta Gamma Sigma honors society.

New Beta Gamma Sigma inductees

BUSINESS ANALYTICS AND STATISTICS

HanesBrands’ analytics group challenge

Management students pose in Ireland.

MANAGEMENT A group of seniors in management spent 20 days in Ireland completing a capstone course. Another group studied a range of management styles during mini-term in London.

Jonathan Adams, Ashley Brooks, Kaitlyn Early, Courtney McCall, Preston Mitchell, Julian Swart, and Chase Billingsley won the HanesBrands’ analytics group challenge.

Doctoral candidate Wangcheng Yan was invited to present at the 2017 IEEE International Conference on Data Mining.

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STUDENT NEWS

ADVENTURE AHEAD GROWING UP IN THE SMALL EAST AFRICAN

country of Rwanda, Patrick Nkurunziza gained a sense of adventure and curiosity about the world from his parents. He put those traits to the test when he came to the United States in 2010. “I’d always wanted to come, but I knew it was going to be a difficult adjustment,” he says. “I was 16 years old, and all my friends were back home.” Nkurunziza embraced the new people and places he encountered. “I just kept challenging myself,” he says. “I’ve always loved adventure, no matter how hard it is. I had to get out of my comfort zone and try different things.” Since he’d grown up in French-speaking schools in Rwanda, Nkurunziza only knew a

little bit of English when he got to Knoxville. Today, he’s fluent. “I’d ask people to slow down and speak more clearly, and they would. Now, I tend to talk fast too,” he says, laughing. After attending high school and college in the area, Nkurunziza worked in banking for a short time before becoming an accountant at Fulton Bellows, a local metal manufacturer. “When I was there, I fell in love with the idea of manufacturing, from raw materials all the way to the customers,” he says. “I knew it was time to go back for my master’s degree,

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SINCE I WAS LITTLE, MY PARENTS HAVE ALWAYS ENCOURAGED US TO TRAVEL TO MEET DIFFERENT PEOPLE, EXPERIENCE DIFFERENT CULTURES, AND TRY DIFFERENT FOODS. IT REALLY SHOWS YOU THE HUMANITY OF PEOPLE. AT THE END OF THE DAY, WE ALL HAVE THE SAME NEEDS.”

and I decided to study supply chain management at UT because it’s one of the best programs in the world.” Nkurunziza has completed an internship at S.C. Johnson in Racine, Wisconsin, working on promotional packs. “I looked at things like

displays and color palettes, identifying what was working and what wasn’t.” After graduation, he plans to become a manager for a consumer packaging company. Long-term, he hopes to reach a senior executive position. In his free time, Nkurunziza enjoys traveling, spending time with friends, and sampling new foods. “I love experiencing different cultures,” he says. “I think at the end of the day, if you’re having fun and learning, you’re doing something right.”

Patrick Nkurunziza (MBA, December ’17)


STUDENT PROFILES

PATRICK NKURUNZIZA AND MELISSA HALL

WHY NOT? MELISSA HALL HAS NEVER SHIED AWAY

Melissa Hall (Supply Chain Management, ’20)

I'VE LOVED MY TIME HERE AT HASLAM AND HAVE MADE AN EFFORT TO REACH OUT­—GETTING TO KNOW PROFESSORS, EATING LUNCH WITH THE MASTER'S STUDENTS ON THE SIXTH FLOOR. BEING ABLE TO APPROACH A DEAN MAKES YOU REALIZE HOW SMALL THE SCHOOL REALLY IS.”

from adventure. In high school, she spent a year as an exchange student in Brazil. Later, when a friend traveled to the Netherlands as an au pair, Hall thought, I could do that. “I wasn’t in a rush to make a decision at 18 about what I wanted to do for the rest of my life,” she says, “so I took a gap year.” Using an online site, Hall connected with a friendly couple in Australia. “I clicked with them, and I didn’t want the opportunity to pass me by,” she says. “I’m a very spontaneous person and I thought, Why not?”

Australia, Hall was ready to plunge into college life. “I chose UT mainly because it’s nearby, but I’ve loved the Haslam College of Business,” she says. An outgoing sophomore, Hall is a peer career advisor, an active member of Alpha Kappa Psi Business Fraternity, and a member of the inaugural cohort of students chosen for the Integrated Business and Engineering Program. Hall participated in a Haslam study abroad trip to Costa Rica last year,

Hall spent the year looking after the family’s three children, driving the older two back and forth to school and other activities, and caring for the youngest, a toddler, during the day. In her time off, she explored the country with friends. “A lot of families who hire au pairs know each other, so I was already set up to have a bunch of friends, and we’d take weekend trips together.” Meanwhile, Hall’s dad landed a job at Y-12 National Laboratory in Oak Ridge and moved the family from Ohio to Tennessee. When she returned from her year in

motivating her to pursue a major in supply chain management. “Eventually, I see myself in purchasing,” she says. “I’d love to be a chief procurement officer for a company.” When she’s not studying or participating in campus events, Hall is on the go. “Whether it’s hiking, boating, shopping, or coffee shop hopping, I love to get out and explore.”

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ACCOUNTING AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

Selin Anitsal

Selin Anitsal

Selin Anitsal was awarded Best Paper at the Academic Business World International Conference in Nashville this summer for her research into the 10-year effectiveness of the “Ollie Otter” seat belt and booster seat education program. Marketing students in Australia

Undergraduate marketing students visited Barcelona with Kelly Hewett and Randy Rose to study marketing strategy in an international context. Another group of students visited Australia with Dan Flint and John Bell.

Intermodal champs

Emma Bexon, John Robinson, and Zachary Thress won the annual Intermodal Association of North America’s logistics and supply chain case competition.

The Haslam Professional Sales Forum was launched under the leadership of Tom van Dorselaer and Dan Flint. Winners of the forum’s sales competition included: Carter Greene, Madison Barton, Wiley Stidham, Will Carter, Brett Dockery, and Allison Dillard.

Masters of Accountancy students Kylie Reed, Rebekah Damron, Katie Robirds, and Kelly Schroeder took second place in the American Taxation Association’s “Why Tax?” video contest. Michelle Harding and Justin Short received a departmental PhD student research award, and Steven Hawkins received a PhD student teaching award.

Michelle Harding

Michelle Harding was one of four PhD students invited to attend the University of North Carolina’s Tax Symposium in April 2017. Student participants in the Haslam Professional Sales Forum.

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1

& st Haslam students finished seventh in the nation and first in the state of Tennessee among public institutions in 2016 CPA exam pass rates. gs

MARKETING AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

UT’S BETA ALPHA PSI CHAPTER ACHIEVED SUPERIOR STATUS FOR THE 2016–2017 REPORTING YEAR. BETA ALPHA PSI ALSO WAS AWARDED THE HONOR OF HASLAM COLLEGE OF BUSINESS STUDENT ORGANIZATION OF THE YEAR FOR 2016–2017.

in

SOME 100 STUDENTS ENROLLED IN A PILOT OFFERING OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MARKETING AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT’S FIRST FULLY-ONLINE CORE BUSINESS COURSE.

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nk

The Department of Accounting and Information Management hosted approximately 90 high school students for a one-day program about the accounting major and career path as part of the Discover Accounting program. Doctoral candidate Justin Short presented his working paper “CFO Outside Directorships: What Happens to the Home Firm?” at the American Accounting Association’s Auditing Midyear Meeting in Orlando, Florida. The paper was co-authored with Lauren Cunningham, assistant professor and director of research at the Neel Corporate Governance Center.


STUDENT NEWS

MBA students Chase Carroll, Jordan Ralph, and Trey DeLong­—the “Rocky Top Riders”­—won Haslam’s first internal case competition this semester, sponsored by Pilot Flying J.

Graves Business Plan participants

Kelsey Duncan and Ryan Cunningham took top prizes of $5,000 each in the high growth and lifestyle business categories of the Graves Business Plan Competition.

MBA students James Munoz, Katelyn Bethmann, Steven Rogus, and Tony Geist competed in the 2017 SEC MBA Case Competition at the University of Florida, Gainesville.

Students visit Wenco facility in Chile

HASLAM EXECUTIVE MBA STUDENTS VISITED THE WENCO FACILITY IN SANTIAGO, CHILE.

GRADUATE AND EXECUTIVE EDUCATION

Florin Matei, Matthew Young, and Sushmitha Vijaya Kumar placed in the Vol Court Pitch Competition. Vol Court winners

Caroline Conley, a junior in economics, won second place in the high growth category in the Graves Business Plan Competition.

ANDERSON CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION PhD student Bongkyun Kim, along with professors Celeste Carruthers and Matthew Harris, published a paper in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization.

ECONOMICS Justus Bell, Isaac Edmiston, William Gabelman, Morgan Hartgrove, and Avanti Rangnekar won third place in the Baker Center Public Policy Challenge.

ECONOMICS UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR AVANTI RANGNEKAR WORKED OVER THE SUMMER AS A RESEARCH ASSISTANT IN THE LONDON SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND TROPICAL MEDICINE. The Economics Club received the “Event of the Year” award from the Haslam College of Business for organizing a trip to meet with professional economists and politicians in Washington, DC.

2017 SEC MBA Case Competition

FINANCE Quinnipiac Global Asset Management Education Forum

Students from UT Investment Group, “Glazed and Confused,” helped raise $1,000 by participating in the Dunkin’ Donut Dash to benefit Volunteer Ministry Centers. Peter Dixon, PhD candidate, co-authored the paper, “Do Investors Use Options and Futures to Trade on Different Types of Information? Evidence from an Aggregate Stock Index,” which is being published in the Journal of Futures Market.

Haslam and LaPorte Torch Fund managers attended the Quinnipiac Global Asset Management Education Forum in New York. Chris Morris served as a panelist.

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LEADERS IN PHILANTHROPY

GEORGE AND PEGGY MELTON

MOVING AHEAD WITH MELTON SCHOLARS AFTER SPENDING HIS CHILDHOOD IN

Maryville and Chattanooga, George Melton found his way to the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, as a freshman in 1964. He originally pursued engineering, but quickly switched gears to statistics in order to focus on his natural affinity for math. Melton settled into his studies, met his future wife, Peggy, and emerged with a solid foundation for his subsequent career in business. He started work as a computer 28 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

programmer, but after only three months his number came up in the draft and he served in the United States Army for the next three years. When he returned, Melton rejoined the same company in a different capacity. “They moved me to the business office to work on a financeoriented project,” he says. “I stayed in that side of the business, climbing the ranks, and went off into management.” Over the next four decades, Melton

enjoyed a successful career as an executive in the aerospace and defense industry. Among other roles, he served as an executive at Allied Signal and British Aerospace, and as CEO of EG&G Technical Services, Inc. and Wyle, Inc. As Melton reflected on his college years, he wanted to improve the experience for today’s students. “I wanted to do something to foster more interaction between faculty and students,” Melton


DEVELOPMENT & GIVING REPORT Left to right, from opposite page: Peggy and George Melton, Melton Scholars Nick Brown, Nainika Sudheendra, Elizabeth Nichols, and Joe Trice, program director Adam Petrie, and Melton Scholar Thao Tran. The Melton Scholars Program has specific application in Business Analytics fostering research collaboration between the scholars and Professors Michel Ballings, Bogden Biceschu, Wenjun Zhou, and Sean Willems.

I WANTED TO DO SOMETHING TO FOSTER MORE INTERACTION BETWEEN FACULTY AND STUDENTS.” explains. “I always felt in school that there wasn’t enough interface with the faculty outside the classroom, and it would be so beneficial for education.” Melton also wanted students to gain a big-picture perspective on their education, seeing how courses fit together instead of viewing them as separate entities. Melton had several conversations with Chuck Noon, department head of business analytics and statistics, and Regal Entertainment Group Professor of Business, about

creating a new program to achieve these goals. Plans for the new Melton Scholars Program began to emerge as they talked. “The idea is to pair individual undergraduate seniors with individual faculty members to work toward undergraduate research,” Noon says. “We’re starting the program with five students per year.” Thao Tran, part of the inaugural group of Melton Scholars, was majoring in mathematics when she decided

to pursue a second major in business analytics. Now a senior, Tran looks forward to gaining hands-on experience through the scholars program. “It will be a great opportunity for me to understand the scientific process, from beginning an experiment to collecting data and analyzing results,” she says. “It’s also a wonderful chance to network and learn from faculty and other students who share the same interests.” The program dovetails with the department’s overall goal to present an elite program, says Noon. “For the last five years, our program in business analytics has been the fastest-growing major on campus. Rather than allow the numbers of students to continue to grow, we’re focusing on being more selective, only admitting students who can handle the rigors of the major.” Competition to gain admittance to the Melton Scholars Program will be stiff, but Melton is looking forward to watching the results. “I’m really focusing on the student aspect of it,” he says. “If this can help make the experience more rewarding for students, that’s my goal.” Peggy Melton appreciates the uniqueness of the program. “It’s novel, and something that I hope will shape future scholarships,” she says. “Getting involved with this project is very important to us. By creating this opportunity, we hope to positively impact every student in the major.” HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 29


FISCAL YEAR 2017

DONORS

Regal Foundation William & Kay Stokely III Telluray Foundation

LISTED ON THE FOLLOWING

pages are those individuals, organizations, corporations, and foundations whose gifts of $250 or more were received by the Haslam College of Business in fiscal year 2017 (July 1, 2016, through June 30, 2017). Each and every gift, regardless of amount, is sincerely appreciated. The generosity of our alumni and friends allows the college to provide the best possible educational opportunities for our students. Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy and completeness of our list of contributors, we acknowledge that the following list may contain inadvertent errors; please contact us with any corrections.

OVER $500,000 Anderson Family Haslam Family Ralph & Janet Heath Norman H. Post David & Deborah Stevens

$250,000-$499,999 Charles & Moll Anderson Jr. Chris & Donna Kinney Greg & Lisa Smith R. Andrew Taylor

$100,000-$249,999 BB&T John H. Boll Randal & Jenny Boyd Larry & Vivian Carroll FedEx Corporation First Tennessee Foundation Jerry & Kay Henry Ray & Joan Myatt Jr. Gerald T. Niedert Martha Butler Rector

30 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

$50,000-$99,999 James B. Baker DHG LLP EY LLP Farm Bureau Insurance Companies of TN Home Federal Bank of Tennessee Joyce Family Foundation Jack M. Miller III Joseph & Barbara O'Donnell P&G PwC Foundation Dane Scism SouthEast Bank Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc.

$25,000-$49,999 Michael & Connie Andres Thomas & Jennifer Bell Jr. James & Patricia Bernal Bill & Melba Blevins Martin & Ann Brown James & Mira Craine Cummins Business Services Deloitte Foundation G. Mack & Nancy Dove L. Barry & Karen Goss John & Renee Hawkins C. Ken & Pamela Hendrix IBM Russell & Jennifer Lamb Cheryl S. Massingale Perry L. Miller Mondelez International Inc. Knaster Charitable Trust, Michael Lobel, Trustee PYA Pilot Flying J Pro2Serve Professional Product Services David & Sharon Ramsey Regions Financial Corporation Arthur & Hasseline Thompson Jr. Charles & Nancy Wagner III

$10,000-$24,999 John & Donna Adams Jr. Kevin & Sheryl Ault Averitt Express Inc. Bayer Healthcare Bruce Family Foundation Aubrey R. Burleson Burlington Northern & Santa Fe Corp. Bush Brothers & Company Charles & Dorothy Butler Ernest & Bonnie Cadotte Caterpillar Financial Services Corp. Caterpillar Inc. Chainalytics LLC Cintas Corporation Citizens Bank Tri-Cities Foundation Ltd Clayton Family Foundation

Consolidated Nuclear Security LLC George & Cheryl Cooper IV Cracker Barrel Stores Inc. Charles W. Duggan E2open Eastman Terry & Kathy Evans ExxonMobil Foundation Ezopen Inc. Joseph & Ruth Fielden Lyle & Rhonda Gardner Geodis Allen & Grace Halliday William P. Halliday III Douglas & Carla Harris Tom & Constance Hawkins Jr. W. Blaine & Robin Hawkins Kyle & Adrienne Hooker Douglas & Brenda Horne Hub Group Inc. Bob & Sharon Huette IBM Corporation Jerald & Kimberly Nine Jr. Family Foundation Johnson & Johnson Vision Care Robert & Beverly Johnson Bill & Janet Keith Kimberly-Clark Corporation Michael & Pamela Koban Jr. KPMG Foundation Jon & Toni Lawler La-Z-Boy Inc. Learning By Giving Foundation Primary Maine Pointe LLC Stephen & Troba Mangum A. David & Sandra Martin McCormick & Company Inc. Michael Burnette LLC Dan & Amy Miles John R. Moore Daniel & Karen Myers Jim & Kathy Newsome III Nissan North America Inc. Norfolk Southern Foundation Samuel & Cheryl Oakley F. Perry & Elaine Ozburn Jr. PepsiCo Foundation Inc. Richard & Deborah Perry Joseph & Sharon Pryse Radio Systems Corporation PetSafe Martin & Carol Robinson King & Judy Rogers III Ryder S. C. Johnson & Son Inc. Saks Incorporated Foundation Sears Holding Mgmt Corp Richard & Ann Smith Smithfield Foods David M. Snapp South Carolina Ports Authority Douglas L. Standifer Target Corporation Mark & Keri Tasman R. Marshall & Anne Taylor Tennessee Valley Authority Tetra Recycling Inc. The Bridgestone Americas Trust Fund Tractor Supply Company

William & Anita Vallett Jr. Lynn Atterbury Venrick Mark L. Venrick Walgreens Wal-Mart Stores Inc. Jan & Elaine Williams WWL Vehicle Services Americas Inc.

$5,000-$9,999 Edward A. Adams Jr. Rodney & Molly Adams Adrian & Robin Altshuler American Marketing Association Knoxville Chapter Glenn C. Andrews Jennifer Banner & James Schaad Becton Dickinson & Company James & Murray Benz Len & Laura Berlik Beverage Control Inc. David & Vanessa Birdwell Boeing Company Mark & Karen Bowling James & Diedra Brogan David A. Brown II & Kathryn Wolf Steven & Jill Brown James & Celeste Butler Samuel & Sharon Carter Jr. Kevin E. Clark Coca-Cola Foundation Corey & Allison Coggin Michael & Anna Coggin Cornerstone Foundation of Knoxville James A. Crossman Crowe Horwath LLC Marc & Kelli Davenport Jeffery S. Drummonds R. Todd Ervin David Myers Evans Alan Fan Don & Sandra Fancher Fidelity Investments Lester E. Finnell Jr. Brian & Heather Foley Ron D. Ford Jim & Marcia Foxworthy Kostyantyn & Karmen Grabovskyy Paul & Patricia Green Hanesbrands Inc. Ted & Nancy Helms Bob & Terri Hensley Damon & Carrie Hininger Hodges & Pratt Company PC Giles David Hollins Charles & Tonya Holmes IBM International Foundation David & Deborah Ingram Clayton & Deborah Jones David & Jeanne Claire Jones Dean & Laurie Jones Bob & Molly Joy Kinetic Force Consulting LLC Christopher & Quinita LaPorte Michael K. Littlejohn Alfred & Rebecca Lumsdaine Raffi Markarian & Diane Walker Steven & Annette McBrayer F. Wade & Mary McGregor Jack & Patricia Mills


DEVELOPMENT & GIVING REPORT

Chad A. Moore Edward & Karen Pershing PHD Consulting Pinnacle Financial Partners Pugh CPAs Will & Genetta Pugh Richard & Jane Ray Jr. Scott A. Roe William & Jane Salter Scripps Networks Interactive Scott & Kathy Selbach Silgan Containers Taylor & Jean Simonton Benjamin & Christy Stanga State Farm Mutual Auto Insurance Company Randolph B. Stephenson John & Leslie Stout Normand D. Turgeon VACO LLC Art Van Buren Frank & Jane Venable Jr. VF Foundation Watson Foundation Inc. Timothy W. Williams John R. Willis III

$2,500-$4,999 Ameriprise Financial Inc. James H. Atchley Bank of America Foundation Adam & Jamie Bean Allen & Karen Bell Douglas & Lori Blalock Boeing Company Foundation Thomas P. Brown Andrew N. Burns David & Gail Cannon Gary & Marsha Clayton Randall W. Clayton Michael & Kimberly Copperthite E. Terry & Juanita Cowles Timothy & Fia Cronin Jeffery & Janet Davis Kerry & Martha Dodd John & Melissa Doster Jr. David & Kathleen Ecklund James & Sharon Edwards ELD Associates L.L.C. Timothy & Karen Ellis Mark & Conchi Emkes EventBooking.com Robert & Catherine Ford Mary E. Garrett Nan M. Given Samuel & Leslie Grigsby Jr. W. Logan & Johnnie Hickman Jr. Andrew T. Holloway Elaine Hostetter & Larry Felts J. A. Fielden Co. Inc. J. Larsen & Adrian Jay Jenneen M. Kaufman William & Lisa Salmons Larry & Mary Jo Leahy Bill & Pamela Lee Buddy J. Lewis P.J. Martin & Danielle Casson Pat & Imogene McClary Sr.

Stephanie Morela John & Mitzi Platillero Patricia G. Pratt Howard & Agatha Ray Brett W. Rousch Eric M. Saul David & Jane Schumann James A. Schwab Eugene & Elizabeth Seymour Barrett & Betsy Simonis A. Dean & Ann Skadberg Sr. Aaron & Eva Snyder David & Beverly Stacey III Steiner & Ellis PLLC Matthew D. Stone SunTrust Bank East Tennessee Michael & Rebecca Sutton Sr. Herman & Karen Tallman Samuel & Linda Taylor Sr. T. Matthew & Laura Thipgen Trust Company of Knoxville UBS Foundation USA Inc. University of North Florida James & Connie Vavalides James & Candy Wansley Milburn & Sandra White Willis Towers Watson Morgan & Kathryn Zook

$1,000-$2,499 Ronald & Jean Alexander Jerome M. Allen Jr. Howard & Wendy Allenberg Anonymous Apache Corporation Todd & Periann Archer Theodore E. Arnold IV AstraZeneca Inc. Michael W. Ayres Hunter & Leigh Bagby John & Leeann Bailes Walter P. Baird Robert & Erin Bawcombe Orhan Bazna BB&T Corporation Bruce & Julianne Behn John & Tyra Behrens Stacey Berner Michael & Nancy Berry Sarah Bishop Dwaan & Ellen Black David W. Blackwell Michael & Cynthia Brady Christi M. Branscom Paul Broadbery & Shirley Pih Broadbery Michael L. Brookshire Joseph & Carmelita Brown Jr. Donald & Jennifer Bruce Andy & Shelia Bruner Chip & Kym Bryant Santiago Bulnes Leigh A. Burch III Laura K. Burgin Richard & Nancy Cardin Daniel & Diane Carter David & Penny Carver Caterpillar Foundation James & Melissa Charles III John & Carol Childress II

Robert E. Christopher James & Somer Chyz CIGNA Foundation Cirrus Insight Chip & Jessica Clark Robert L. Clark ConocoPhillips Thomas & Mindy Coulter Scott & Jill Craig John & Meg Crisp Jr. Michael & Helen Crotty Kendall B. Cyree Charles & Jennifer Dalch Matthew D. Dallas Scott & Stephanie Daniel Lynn & Diane Darby Clay & Anita Davis Jr. DeVry Education Group docQmed L.L.C. Martin S. Eaton Jon & Valerie Ellis Norman & Deborah Estep Christopher & Elizabeth Etheredge John & Stephanie Felker Fitch Ratings Emerson H. Fly Shirley A. Flynn Duncan & Karol Fort III James R. Foster William & Deborah Fox Ronald R. Franklin Keith & Tracy Frazier William & Lynn Freeman II Jeffrey A. Freyer J. Lee & Connie Fry III General Shale Brick Inc. Genesco Inc. G. Gregory & Mary Gilbert Susan Golicic Les Daryl Gray William & Edwina Greer Jefferson & Terri Gregory Ronald & Barbara Grubbs Jr. Hack Foundation Inc. Christopher M. Hadorn Landon Bryan Hair Gary & Vicki Hall Steven & Jane Harb Eric & Michelle Hardesty Melinda Culvahouse Hardy John & Harriett Harty Jason Hayes James O Hendrix Jr Rosalyn L. Hess Christopher & Jennifer Hillenmeyer Holly L. Hilsenbeck H. Jerry & Linda Holder Institute For Supply Management Glenn & Dottie Irwin Philip & Margo Jacobs Tyler & Kara Jacobs Lynne M. Jansons & Kurt Krushenski Don & Barbara Jett Kyle & Amy Johns Joseph & Patricia Johnson Mason & Emily Jones James & Ruth Keally

MEET SETH REAGAN SETH REAGAN (HCB, ’02, MBA, ’04)

is no stranger to the Haslam College of Business. In addition to earning both his degrees from the college, he previously spent three years (2007–2010) on the development team. For the past seven years, Reagan has served the University of Tennessee as its chief development officer for the Middle Tennessee region. In August 2017, he returned to Haslam as the college’s executive director of development and alumni affairs. “My wife and I were born and raised in East Tennessee, so we’re happy to be back home,” Reagan says. “As an alumnus, I’m honored to serve in this role.” During his undergraduate years, Reagan played on the UT Vols football team, including in his tenure 1998, when the Vols won a national championship. After earning his MBA from the college, he worked for an e-commerce company for a few years before joining the development team. Reagan’s own experiences as a scholarship recipient motivate him to help expand those opportunities for today’s student body. “It means a lot to me to be able to work with alumni to establish the opportunities for others that I was fortunate enough to have,” he says. “My hopes are to continue the positive momentum that the Haslam College of Business has experienced since the transformational naming gift.” HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 31


DEVELOPMENT & GIVING REPORT

Cindy Joyce with MAcc candidates and Joyce scholars (from left to right): James Griffin, Matt Henley, Daniel Gallman, and Craig Kiernan.

PREPARATION FOR SUCCESS CINDY JOYCE (HCB, ’85) KNOWS THAT AN

education at the Haslam College of Business prepared her for success not just in her career, but in all areas of life. “Despite the fact that there were 30,000 students at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, when I came, I felt it was a wonderfully small and supportive place to go to school,” says Cindy, who earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting. “The people were what made the program great. We had fantastic support from our professors, and the other students became some of my closest friends.” At her small high school in Brentwood, Tennessee, Cindy had felt like an average student, but the accounting program at Haslam introduced a new era of confidence. “Our professors invested in us so much along the way that I emerged with complete confidence in my skills as an accountant and an interviewee,” she says. “It was my time to shine.” Cindy’s confidence paid off. Upon graduation, she received eight job offers from various accounting firms. She chose a position at Ernst and Whinney, where she worked for the next three years. Meanwhile, she married and moved several times for her husband Jeff’s work in corporate finance. Over the next several years, she worked as an accountant for a financial institution and a commercial real estate firm. The couple had two children, Meghan and Patrick, and Cindy decided to step away from her accounting career to focus on raising them. Eventually, she resumed work for a certified public accountant, but realized her interests were leading her toward a new vocation. “I’m an accountant turned interior decorator,” she laughs. “I love it. One advantage to my accounting background is the ability to hand clients a spreadsheet and show them up front how much a project is going to cost.” Reflecting on her time as an accounting student, Cindy felt motivated to pass along that positive experience to a new generation. In

32 | HASLAM MAGAZINE


LEADERS IN PHILANTHROPY

CINDY JOYCE

2011, she and Jeff formed the Joyce Family Foundation, a nonprofit private charitable organization. “Students are our first priority in giving because I realized the importance of having a personalized experience at a large school,” she says. “Last year, we created five scholarships to go to people who, due to income or other challenging situations, wouldn’t be able to attend the university without funding.” She deliberately earmarked the scholarships for students who plan to enter the master’s of accountancy program. The Joyces’ gift is already making a difference. “Without this scholarship, I don’t know if I would be able to attend the University of Tennessee, let alone participate in the MAcc program,” says student James Griffin. “It means the world to me.” For David Gallman, the scholarship represents personal affirmation and support. “It has proven to me that the University of Tennessee and its alumni care about current students,” he says. “With this scholarship, I can focus on my academics and be the best student I can be.” Cindy looks forward to interacting with the Joyce Scholars in the years to come. “It thrills me to no end that there’s somebody getting to have the experience I had, who might not have been able to without these scholarships.”

HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 33


Jessica Paige Howard, a student who currently benefits from Join the Journey funding.

JOIN THE JOURNEY IN SEPTEMBER 2017, THE UNIVERSITY

of Tennessee, Knoxville, launched its campus-wide Join the Journey campaign with a well-attended kickoff event at Strong Hall. The $1.1 billion goal is the most ambitious fundraising in the university’s history. The campaign has already been up and running in a silent phase for the past few years. Chancellor Beverly Davenport recently announced that Join the Journey has raised $814 million since its inception in 2012. To date, 82,000 individual and corporate donors have given to the campaign, and Haslam alumni have led the pack. “The Haslam College of Business has benefited greatly from gifts received thus far during the campaign,” Chip Bryant, vice chancellor of development and alumni affairs, says. “The naming gift from the Haslam family, along with two center naming gifts, the Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research and the Neel Corporate Governance Center, have already made a significant impact on the college.” The campaign’s ultimate goal is to transform the Knoxville campus and change lives by enhancing the student experience. Backing from alumni plays an essential role in reaching that milestone. “Private support is what is going to take the university from being good to great,” Bryant says. “The investments our donors provide have a significant impact on the university and its students.” 34 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

George J. Keralis William & Kay Kimbrough Rufus & Rebecca King Jr. Mark & Lindy Kinser Eric & Rebecca Klindt Walter L. Lacy Barney L. Lane Tillman L. Lay Terry L. Leap Len & Laura Berlik Foundation David & Terri Lindsay Michael & Tina Lobel William & Brenda Locke Jeffrey & Sena Longmire David & M. Linda Love Zanda Jane Lynn Amanda B. Maples Frances Rickard Marbury Bob & LeaAnn Marshall Heather L. Martin Whitney Johns Martin Robert & Jennie McCabe Jr. Joseph & Penny McDonald Janet L. McKinley Robert Chandler McMahan Thomas & Ashley McManus Charles & Clara McNutt George & Margaret Melton Bob Mertz William & Lynda Middlemas Harry & Suzanne Miller Jr. Patrick G. Min Catherine Marie Moeller Sean C. Monaghan Thomas & Cynthia Monahan Karen J. Moore Thomas Moore Rock & Linda Morphis Mountain Commerce Bank Matthew & Allison Musso Daniel Myers George Charles Newcomer Jr. Kimberly & Angel Norman Michael E. Norwood Steven & Margarette Nussbaumer Orange County's United Way Jessica. H. Ownby Lamar & Debra Partridge Celeste Patterson Billy Everett Pearce Jr. Samuel Jason Perry Paul & Barbara Perutelli Heather R. Peterson Donald & Kimberly Pounders Tracy Powell J. Daniel & Allison Pressley Donald & Nancy Preston John W. Prugh W. James & Angela Pugh Jr. Thomas & Kimberly Quillen Michael & Julia Rafter Michael & Shannon Reeves Regional Engine MFG Regions Bank Russell B. Richards Louis & Victoria Riddle Jr. Jon & Mintha Roach Jack & Anne Robbins Gary & Donna Rose Ryman Hospitality Properties

Foundation J. Kevin & Nancy Sanders J. Scott Sandlin Robert & Anne Sandlin M. James & Susan Sayrs Louis & Sherlene Schumacher Belinda A. Sharp Shell Oil Company Foundation William & Laurie Shimp Ann T. Siewert Barry T. Silver James F. Smith Jr. Rick Smith Samuel & Lisa Smith Travis M. Smith & Deborah Stairs Kevin Reed Snyder Mandyam & Kanchana Srinivasan Keith & Josie Stanga Ted Stank & Lori Nash Aaron & Regina Steiner H. Virgil & Clara Stephens Katherine M. Stevens J. Gary & Temple Stevenson S. Blake Stinnette Michael T. Strickland Nancy T. Stuart Ron & Teresa Suedekum Edward & Carol Taylor Joe & Sheryl Teague Tennessee Valley Human Resource Association Joe Thomas Mark Thomas Lewis & Dorothy Thompson Melvin Tobias Neal & Cathy Townsend R.L. & Irene Townsend James A. Truitt Willie O. Turner Jr. William H. Vandergriff Andrew J. Venable Paul & Lorr Vetter Christian & Christine Vossler James & Lauri Waggoner Crawford & Cynthia Wagner William R. Walton Marianne H. Wanamaker Paul A. Warren Wells Fargo Foundation David & Joy Wiggins D. Brent Wilder Al Leonard Williams Willis North America Inc. Kenneth & Shari Wills Shane & Tracie Woidtke Bill & Jamie Woodson Joseph T. Wyrick David & Sarah Youngblood

$500-$999 AT&T Inc. Foundation Abbott Laboratories Jennifer Accolti-Gil America On-Line Inc. Carson Caine Anderson Steven A. Anderson James & Constance Arnold

Jean D. Arrants Thomas & Midge Ayres Thomas J. Babb Paul & Elizabeth Banick Colin & Rachel Barrett Jason & Katie Baxter Francis & Sandy Bedard Jody & Susan Begley Robert & Madeline Belcher John Edward Bell Maria R. Bellenger Gracie Bennett Michael & Lisa Berry William L. Bible Charles J. Blalock Andrew N. Blevins John H. Bond Nathaniel & Virginia Borghi Brent & Stephanie Bowker Larry G. Bray Joe & Jennifer Breunig D. Jimmy & Tammy Brinias H. Carey Brown Blaise & Pollyanna Burch Thomas J. Burke Annette Lynn Burrell George & Connie Burrus Jr. F. Alan & Kendra Cameron Jane E. Campbell A. Steven & Claudia Carmichael Robert & Amy Cathey Jr. Stanley M. Chervin & Barbara Richards Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LP Chipotle Peter V. Claussen III Hank & Crystal Cole Brian Cook Sharon Cooper & Mark Collins David W. Crippen Lauren M. Cunningham Don D'Anna Jr. Phillip & Bonney Daves Charles Edward Davis Molly Kinard D. Scott & Deborah Dawson Alex & Jennifer Devincenzo Shawn W. Devine John W. Dickson III Michael & Mindy Dixon Candice M. Doolan John & Diana Doss III Daniel H. Dougherty William & Janyce Dudney James G. Dugger Jr. Michael & Sallie Ehrhardt Joseph Kirby Ellis Michael & Kelly Faris Christopher & Shannon Farr Dave M. Fentress Fidelity Foundation Patricia Yvonne Flowers Timothy & Joelle Fox Marshall & Ashley Franklin Donald E. Garretson General Electric Foundation Charles A. Gillespie III Dustin Giltnane Robert J. Goodman Jeffrey & Lynn Gottke


DEVELOPMENT & GIVING REPORT

Joseph & Sandra Grant Howard & Diane Green Wesley H. Greene Robert & Sherry Grygotis Tami J. Gurley-Calvez F. Robert & Vicki Hall Hard Knox Pizza - Bearden Lee Francis Hardeman J. Tom & Pat Harper Charles & Janice Harrison Jared & Emily Hausfeld H. Robert & Edith Heller III Andrew & Sarah Henderson John & Erin Henry Joe Herring Lee Herring Brady & Mary Holcomb James & Sara Holladay Tallulah Holmstrom Benjamin D. Horn Marilyn A. Hughes Chad & Meredith Hulette Matthew D. Hutcheson Mel & Cynthia Jacobson Marilyn J. Jake John Deere Foundation Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies Kristin Johnson James Randall Johnston Korri Jones & Lydia McCoy Russell & Desiree Jones Joseph V. Kelly III Paul Cecil Kimball Kimberly-Clark Foundation Timothy & Renee Kovick Reuben Kyle III Tom & Karen Ladd Lauren N. Lange Michael Wayne Langenberg Jacob Sean Lariviere Kelsey Ann Lawrence Kai-yan Lee Scott Parks LeTellier Matthew & Julie Litfin Thomas Leonard Little W. Gage & Shelley Logan III Bin Long Steve & Kristi Maddox Richard & Patricia Mallicote Robin & Val Manley Jeff & Kimberly Maples Michael Robert Marks Margaret Jill Matthews Peter & Nancy Maynard James & Lynn McCallie David W. McMillan Donna Sue Meadows Camila Moreira Metchikoff Mark A. Moon Charles & Catherine Morris R. Jane Moser Eric & Barbara Moses Jonathan Chadwick Mullins Michael Vincent Mulloy George & Sue Munson Matthew N. Murray Thomas & Betty Neal Jr. Robert R. Neilson Jr. Megan Eileen Nixon Charles H. Noble IV

Oak Ridge Associated Universities Randy & Theresa Olswing Jack Parker & Esther Wong John & Bianca Parker Mitchel & Chris Parrott Skip Patton Jr. Roger & T. G. Peterson Bradley D. Petty Robert & Sheri Pfeil Phillips 66 Company Brian & Elizabeth Phillips Jeffrey & Rhonda Piland William & Pamela Pinkston Phillip & Kathy Jo Piper Henry M. Poss Jr. Thomas & Anne Power Gary Michael Pratt Walter & Meagan Puckett Frank Rambo R.S. & Larisa Rathinasamy Brian & Martha Rauch Edith Smith Rayford Amy Fischer Reavis Joel & Melissa Reeves Jr. Refreshments Inc. Michael & Amanda Respeto Farah Reynolds Darryl M. Richards Ronald & Marta Roberts Craig Middleton Rockett IV John & Nannon Roosa Sallie Mae Foundation Katherine J. Savage William & Tina Schmidt III George & Anne Schultz Shay D. Scott Richard W. Shepard Paul & Cheyenna Shimp Susan Griffin Shows Jeffrey & Mary Siegrist Stephen & Susan Silvers J. Frank & Deanna Slagle III Courtney & Angela Smith Anne D. Smith Lance & Monica Smith W. Frank Smith III Michael & Amy Spence Sidney T. Stanley Brenda Steakley Emily Blair Steakley C. Lee Steinhouse III Christopher Todd Stephens Robert & Dorothy Stewart Wade R. Stonebrook Justin C. Stringfield Michael L. Taber B. Lance Taylor Jane C. Taylor Norman & Wendy Templeton David R. Thomas William & Lori Tice Jr. Douglas & Catherine Traver TSCPA Michael & Jill Turner Charles & Julie Umsted Jamie R. Underwood Union Bank of California Foundation Dwight & Shelia Van Inwegan Douglas & Sherry Vaughn Jr.

Edward & Ann Vaughn Grainger Inc. Brian Douglas Wantling Thomas & Margaret Whittaker II Hugh & Rhonda Wiley David Warren Williams Hugh & Susan Williams Mark E. Willoughby Kelly Byrd Wilson Wanda L. Wisecarver Christine M. Womack Kelly Marie Woodruff Xcel Energy Inc. Zhou Yang Gillen & Michele Young Lynn R. Youngs Wenjun Zhou William Zotti

$250-$499 Mazhar Abbas David K. Adams AIG Franklin & Stellyne Albertson Hannah G. Alexander Christina Louise Alley Arthur C. Anthony Paige K. Atchley John Z. Autian Auto Owner's Insurance Company Howard & Amy Avery Daniel J. Aycock Jamie & Courtney Bach Christopher A. Bailey Edjuan D. Bailey Myron L. Bailey George William Ballenger James & Corinne Balthrop Cheryl Barksdale William & Courtney Barlar Chance Barron Rhonda Wilson Barton Austin Reed Baskin Todd L. Bassett Thomas & Janet Baudry Alex Beach David Paul Beard Robert H. Bebber Troy Richard Beeler James & Ann Begley Jeremy & Whitney Biggs Keith W. Bilbrey John J. Billingsley Robert F. Billue III & Jacqueline Sylvester Judy B. Birchfield Steven Michael Biss J.P. Bolick John & Mary Bolton Melissa Ann Bosi Edward & Patricia Bouwer Christina Boyer Jerelyne P. Brady Craig C. Brandt & Yetta Jager Carl Benjamin Brink Lori Wolfe Broome Richard C. Brower Jr. & Sharon Bailey James & Diane Brown Jr. C. Kenneth & Bettye Brumit

Daniel & Stephanie Buckner Robert Williams Bull John & Mary Bumpus John & Catherine Bunch Thomas Gardner Burk Jr. Thomas Robert Burkett Ryan & Andrea Burkhart J. Jay & Susan Bush James Robert Byrd Paul & Teresa Byrne C.H. Robinson Worldwide Thomas & Nancy Campbell Charles & Vicki Carlisle Jr. Tom & Julie Carpenter Brian Wallace Carver Kathy D. Cate Steve B. Chancey C. Edd Christopher Dennis C. Clabo F. Karen Clark Kristen Kaye Clark David & Molly Clark II Jennifer C. Claxton James Hershel Clement Jonathan Dean Clendenen Dylan Cobble Craig & Keri Cochran James Ruble Cody Timothy & Christine Coley Richard Consoli Wynn Cooper James C. Cope William Matthew Coulter Kathy Courtney Christopher Douglas Craft Robert L. Creighton Tony & Leah Cross Christopher & Susan Culley Bobby W. Damron Donald & Karen Davis Phillip Allen Davis Christopher Anthony Dean Harry T. Deisroth James W. Deitrick Dennis & Kim Denton Sean & Katie DeWitt Dickerson Investment Group LLC Patrick & Rebecca Dickson R. Scott Dixon David & J. Ann Dodson Thomas J. Dorich Jeffrey Blair Dortch James R. Doyle William August Dueker Jr. Julie A. Dukes Serge Dumay Walter W. Duncan James W. Eatherly Brian Edmonds Laura Jean Edwards Charles & Stephanie Edwards Eli Lilly and Company Foundation Paul & Pamela Emert Jr. Wesley A. Emison Thomas & Beth Engel Joseph & Andrea Engle William Fredrick Englert Mark & Pam Erath Jere & Linda Ervin Nathan Harold Etheridge Mary F. Evans

HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 35


FISCAL YEAR 2017

DONORS

NEWLY ESTABLISHED ENDOWMENTS List current as of October 23, 2017.

Larry W. Carroll Torch Fund Endowment Kevin E. Clark HCB Opportunity Scholarship Endowment FedEx Corporation Supply Chain Professorship Larry & Mary Jo Leahy Business Scholarship Endowment Patty J. Moore Accounting Scholarship Endowment Bill Neilson Economics Faculty Award Endowment Martha Butler Rector Fellowship Endowment

Larry & Merry Evans Exelon Corporation Qiyong Fan Kelsey Nicole Fautsch Phillip & Larisa Featherstone Neil & Suzanne Fischer Robb L. Fish Andrew R. Fisher Cory Robert Fisher Daniel J. Flint Justin & Kristen Follis Gilbert Herman Forness Jr. Oscar & Rebecca Fowler Jr. Randall & Ainsley Freshour Robert & Leigh Ann Fuller Rowland & Margaret Funk Tina M. Galloway Logan Wayne Garrett General Mills Foundation Matthew & Sara Gibbs Austin M. Gilbert Martin P. Gillespie Stephen Goepfert David & Martha Gordon Dana Miner Greenberg

36 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

Brandon James Gregg John & Maria Griffin Jr. Walter J. Groman Jr. Ted R. Habermann Tom & Terri Hale Ramzi J. Halim W. Kenneth Hall Christopher & Stephanie Halouma Daniel & Kathy Hamilton Ruby Jane Hancock Enda Patrick Hargaden Charles & Susan Harris Bill & Vikki Harrison James Hawkins Charles W. Haynie Robert J. Head William & Doris Heim Tabatha Lori Helm Ronald & Mary Helmhout John Thomas Henderson Roger & Alice Hendry William & Susan Henry J. Scott & Mary Ellen Herbert Kelly Sue Hewett John A. Hewgley Graham Hickling & Diane Mollenkopf Clark Thomas Higgs Zane Hitchcox Doyle & Cynthia Hodge Jr. Kristofer & Carrie Hoffman I. Gina Holt John William Hood Jerry G. Hornowski Matthew W. Horton Craig & Carol Houser Tyler & Jasmine Howard Roger & Karen Hudson Jeremy Andrew Huey Timothy Wayne Hughes Kevin & Julie Hunsinger John & Lynne Hunter Jr. Julianne Corley Isaacs Yemin Ji Kenneth & Gladys Johns Ronald & Cathy Joiner Charles B. Jones Jr. Clay Taylor Jones Jacqueline W. Jordan Mary Kauffman Darrell King Frank & Jo Ann Knies Frank A. Kocur II Paul A. Koza Jeffrey D. Kudisch Peter Lawrence Kulbaba Kent D. Kurkiewicz Jack & Cindy Kuykendall Michael & Ellen Lail Jude & Amy Lam Morton T. Larmore Hannah Lynn Lay Ronald & Ann Layne Howard H. Lee Michael W. Lister Jr. Jim Lloyd R. Bruce & Jill Long Michael Thomas Lowe Robert & Shannon Lowe Brady N. Majury Sarah M. Mallicote

Jordan & Julie Marshall Jesse & Karen Massengill Robert & Elizabeth Massey Monte & Marsha Masten Kenichi & Yuki Matsuno Brennen Matthews F. Stewart McCorkle Jr. Zachary D. McGinnis David & Nancy McKinney Mark & Nicole McLeod Heather Senseney McMillan Kelsie McNutt Mitchell & Laurel Mcpherson Dhaval Jitendra Mehta Stephen & Kimberly Merrill Microsoft Corporation Charles & Sue Milazzo Christopher C. Miles Jeffrey Martin Mills L. Virgil Mincy David & Rebecca L. Mink David Eugene Mirts Mizuho USA Foundation Inc. Aria Mohaghegh William & Karen Moles II Benita Harris Moore Noble & Betty Moore Jr. Bobby & Victoria Moore Morris Group Inc. Anthony Ray Mubarak Leonard Mucciaro Mark Joseph Mulloy Daniel & Suzan Murphy Rex C. Nanney Alan J. Natowitz Terry & Robin Neal William Stuart Neilson Stephanie Michelle Noble David Lynn Norris Ellen L. O'Blow Thomas & Lorrie O'Donovan Jr. Phillip Henry Omohundro Oracle Corporation Shana N. Owens Marty M. Ozburn Kimberly S. Padgett William Edwin Palmer Pearson Inc. Gary E. Peck David Paul Perrot Randal H. Pierce Samuel & Lindsay Pons Adrian L Potgieter Sabrina Erin Preston Camille Pruitt Cornell & Janet Radford Michael & Heather Ramey Greg Allen Ratcliff S. Seth Reagan Andrew M. Rector Jr. Melissa Kay Reese Stephanie Renner Stewart Ritchie Ricardo & Ann Maria Roa Scott & Jean Ann Robbins James & Martha Roberts Dick Rockenstein Joseph Romano Alfred Rosario Philip C. Roupas Milton & Patricia Russell

Dennis & Charla Sartain Richard John Schelp John & Cheryl Schmidt Jens Schubert Carol F. Schwenke Donald & Lisa Scott Dewayne & Kaye Scott DeWayne & Shelley Searcy Jennifer S. Shinpaugh Ronald & Anita Shuffield Charles & Kimberly Sims Todd B. Skelton Charles & Robin Skillern Bradford C. Smith Russell & Elizabeth Smith Revonna Joy Smith Rickey Andrew Snoddy Joan M. Snoderly Peter Kam-Wah So Haskel L. Stanback State Farm Companies Foundation Kristin O. Stone Shannon Noland Sumner Richard & Sharon Tannahill Wendy Lea Tate Jacob Michael Taylor Lawrence C. Taylor Jr. Tennessee Capital Company LLC Valentino E. Tesoro John Thomas Tester Samuel & Peggy Thompson Tommy Thompson John B. Tibe R. Jeff Tilley Rebekah Leigh Tompkins Lee Kennedy Toole Claudia Torres Tami K. Touchstone Richard E. Tumblin Stephen Ross Turbyfill Robert L. Turney Robert E. Tuttle Jr. United Technologies Corporation James & Teresa Vanfrank Jr. Tony Vaughn Natalia Vlasyuk Will & Kimberly Wade Christopher & Angela Wakefield James Russell Walton Kent & Amy Ward John & Jean Wernicki Jared & Nicole West Jerry & Gina Wey Robert Shelton Whitaker Adam B. White Rod & Karen Williams Tyler Cade Williams Samuel G. Wilson Thomas Lang Wiseman Matthew W. Wood Christopher & Melissa Wyatt Yazhen Xiao Jeffrey Ryan Yelkovich Miu Fan Yue


DEVELOPMENT & GIVING REPORT

6% 13%

SOURCES AND USES OF FUNDS

46% FY 2017 SOURCE OF FUNDS

RECENT INCREASES IN DIFFERENTIAL TUITION

revenues allowed the college to build increased infrastructure support in areas of career management, study abroad, and student services. Graduate and Executive Education revenues continue to improve. Private philanthropy remains an important funding source at 13 percent of the budget, while revenues from external grants and contracts continue a steady decline. Within the state allocation and standard tuition share category, increased reliance on student tuition revenue relative to state funding continues to be the trend. Salary and benefits also remain the largest expense category, reflecting the importance of human capability in delivering on our organizational mission. At the close of fiscal year 2017, the market value of the college’s endowment reached $138.8 million, a 14 percent increase over last year. Our total number of donors also continued to rise.

20%

15% 66%

FY 2017 USE OF FUNDS

4% 6% 10%

’07

’08

’09 ’10

’13

3068

2571

’14

2581

4379

3947

NUMBER OF DONORS

3701

’15

2787

FY Value ’17 $138,771,945 ’16 $121,686,981 ’15 $116,771,240 ’14 $98,782,233 ’13 $84,342,500 ’12 $74,081,913 ’11 $74,246,647 ’10 $60,762,937 ’09 $54,168,535 ’08 $73,415,806 ’07 $80,293,747 ’06 $66,881,222 ’05 $59,013,279

2277

’06

2101

’05

14%

’16

2025

MARKET VALUE OF ENDOWMENT

2259

’17

’12 ’11 FY FY FY ’07 ’08 ’09

FY ’10

FY ’11

FY ’12

FY ’13

FY ’14

FY ’15

FY ’16

FY ’17

HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 37


38 | HASLAM MAGAZINE


Left to right: Chris Kinney, Shelly Sun, Joe LaPorte, and Michael Greene were honored at this year’s gala.

2017 ALUMNI GALA THE NINTH ANNUAL alumni awards gala brought

together almost 400 students, staff, faculty, and alumni at the Knoxville Convention Center on Friday, November 3. The evening recognized three alumni and one corporation for their outstanding contributions to the college and to business in the state. The gala began with a cocktail reception and silent auction benefiting the College Fund for the Haslam College of Business. Dinner and an awards presentation followed, complete with an address from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville’s new chancellor, Beverly Davenport. Chris Kinney was honored as the college’s 2017 Distinguished Alum. Shelly Sun received the Entrepreneur of the Year award. Citizens Bank was recognized as Outstanding Corporate Partner, and Michael Greene was named Outstanding Young Alum.

HASLAM.UTK.EDU || 39 39 HASLAM.UTK.EDU


2017 ALUMNI GALA

AWARDS

OUTSTANDING YOUNG ALUMNI AWARD Top to bottom: Greg Smith with Global Leadership Scholars Avery Morgan and Ashley Roepke; Michael and Elizabeth Greene; David and Sandy Martin, and Diane and Daniel Carter; Judy and King Rogers; Rich and Patricia Mallicote.

40 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

ORIGINALLY FROM MORRISTOWN,

Tennessee, Michael Greene (HCB, ’01) transferred to the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, after two years at a smaller university. Greene earned a double major in finance and classical philosophy and met his wife, Elizabeth, along the way. When he finished his bachelor’s degree in philosophy in 2002, Greene faced a difficult job market. “I initially wanted to be a fund manager, but my father was ill and I needed to stay close to home,” Greene says. “Instead, I chose a career in banking.” Greene spent some time at the National Bank of Commerce, and then joined SunTrust’s real estate finance group as a credit analyst, where he enjoyed a great deal of success. The financial crisis of 2009 forced Greene to reevaluate his course. “Banking was in shambles and real estate even worse,” he says. “For a real estate banker, those were difficult times.” After many talks with his wife, his father, and mentors, Greene decided to return to the Haslam College of Business for an MBA. “I felt that I had a unique opportunity to raise my career ceiling,” he says. “Meanwhile, I decided to stay in real estate. I loved being able to see the tangible results of my work.” Two months before graduation, Greene’s father passed away. “He was a major force in my decision to pursue an MBA,” says Greene. “It was crushing not to have him there when I finished, but my classmates and professors were very supportive.”

In 2011, Greene became a commercial property affiliate broker at Wood Properties, Inc., where he works across the range of commercial property transactions but focuses on industrial warehousing and distribution centers. Since then, he’s also done financial consulting work for a development firm. “Consulting has been stimulating,” he says. “It allows me to use a lot of the analysis and Excel skills I took away from the MBA program.” In 2016, Greene created the David L. Green, MD, Memorial MBA Fellowship Endowment for Haslam students in honor of his late father. “I benefited from fellowships as a student and wanted to pay it forward,” he says. “I must be a good steward of the opportunities I’ve been blessed with.” In honor of his career achievement, generosity, and ongoing engagement with his alma mater, the Haslam College of Business is proud to name Michael Greene the Outstanding Young Alum of 2017.


ALUMNI NEWS

OUTSTANDING CORPORATE PARTNER AWARD FOUNDED IN 1934, CITIZENS BANK

became the only bank in Carter County, Tennessee, during the Great Depression. The late Joe LaPorte, Jr., began work there in 1956 and was promoted to president six years later. In 1983, Joe and his four sons purchased 100 percent interest in Citizens Bank. Under their leadership, the bank has received national recognition for its performance and growth.

Today, Joe LaPorte III (HCB, ’78) carries on as CEO and president of Citizens Bank. Since the early 1960s (when the institution’s assets were about $5 million), it has grown to an area-wide system that operates 12 branch locations in East Tennessee and is approaching $1 billion in assets. “We’ve grown from a tiny community bank to what we are today,” Joe LaPorte says. “Our greatest asset will always be our customers, and our partnership with the University of Tennessee is one way we’re investing in their future.” Joe III and his three brothers all attended the University of Tennessee,

Knoxville, and have remained involved with supporting the university. Chris (HCB, ’75) and Joe found their niche at the Haslam College of Business and have both served on the UT Foundation Board. “Chris majored in general business and I focused on finance,” says Joe. “It was a great education and a wonderful experience.” Through Citizens Bank and family foundations, the LaPorte brothers and their families have been consistent donors to the college for decades and also generously support the university’s athletics program and law school. Chris and his wife, Quinita, support the LaPorte Torch Fund, an investment portfolio managed by MBA students, and the brothers honored their mother by dedicating a classroom at the college in her name. Citizens Bank provided funds to enable the college to acquire 12 Bloomberg terminals, which are invaluable in preparing students for job opportunities in the investment world. The bank also established an endowment earmarked for Haslam undergraduates that provides partial scholarships for eight different students. “We’ve been blessed and are extremely fortunate, so we’re proud to give back,” Chris says. “It’s an opportunity for us to make a difference by assisting the university in achieving its goals. For us, it’s all about promoting education and helping the students.” For their service to the community and generosity to the Haslam College of Business, Citizens Bank is the Outstanding Corporate Partner for 2017.

Top to bottom: Ryan Stover, Stone Pinckney, Kyle Allen; Joe and Hope LaPorte, Steve and Elizabeth LaPorte, Chris and Quinita LaPorte, and Marlo and Sam LaPorte; Chancellor Beverly Davenport; Seth Reagan, Hope and Joe LaPorte; Quinita and Chris LaPorte.

HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 41


2017 ALUMNI GALA

AWARDS

ENTREPRENEUR OF THE YEAR AWARD KNOXVILLE NATIVE SHELLY SUN Top to bottom: David Barr and Shelly Sun; Tammi Brown Small and Tyvi Small; Greg Smith; Denise Hoomes, Teresa and Stan Hurt, Kylee Craig, and Hannah Craig; 2017 Alumni Award trophies.

42 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

(HCB, ’92) came to the Haslam College of Business in the late 1980s in pursuit of an accounting degree. Driven to succeed, Sun placed in the top 100 of the CPA exam within a year of graduation. “I was well supported through the Haslam accounting program with two amazing internships,” she says. “As a junior, I interned at DuPont in Wilmington, Delaware, and as a senior, I worked at EY’s Knoxville office.” Sun spent the first decade of her career in various corporate roles within the technology, food distribution, and insurance industries as an assistant controller. Her work in health insurance drew her to property and casualty insurance, but it was a personal experience that led her to become an entrepreneur. “I was looking for home care for a family member and didn’t find the options we needed or expected,” she says. “That experience influenced a passion for families looking for the best care for their loved ones. I realized there was an opportunity to provide that care.” In 2002, Sun started BrightStar Care, a Chicago-based premium healthcare company focusing on home care for homebound patients and medical staffing. The venture grew at a rapid rate, and in 2005, she decided to expand its reach through franchising. “My hope was to be able to help families everywhere by taking care of more mom and dads, grandmas and grandpas across the country,” she says. “Today, BrightStar Care is a large operation in more than 300 markets and $400 million in

revenue each year. We operate across the United States and Canada.” Sun’s vision for the company was to provide franchisees the opportunity to run the business on a local level and to select and hire the best caregivers. In 2012, she was featured on CBS’s Undercover Boss and decided to write a book to share her ideas and experiences with other entrepreneurs. “I wrote Grow Smart With Less in 2012 as a way to give back to the franchise industry,” Sun says. “The premise was to help those who might want to know how I was able to start BrightStar Care locally and scale it to a multi-million dollar business.” Along the way, Sun has surrounded herself with positive people. “I needed people who helped me believe I could do it, and I’ve continued to have that positive momentum around me,” she says. “Having great mentors and a board of advisors has been invaluable to my success as an entrepreneur.” For her career success, the Haslam College of Business is proud to name Shelly Sun the Entrepreneur of the Year for 2017.


ALUMNI NEWS

DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD AFTER LAUNCHING HIS CAREER

at a commercial bank in Knoxville, Chris Kinney (HCB, ’81) relocated to Atlanta to become a managing director at JPMorgan Chase from 1985–2001. He spent 18 years working in investment banking, eventually moving to New York. Kinney witnessed the events of 9/11 from the downtown window of his office at Barclays Capital in Manhattan. Two years later, Kinney and his family returned to Knoxville, where he became the city’s senior director of finance under new mayor Bill Haslam. In this role, Kinney had the opportunity to work with the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, administration on various projects, including the revitalization of the Second Creek greenway. “It was in pretty bad shape and we worked to get a beautification grant and design a project,” he says. “I enjoyed collaborating with university administration and from that point, I decided I would stay involved with the university as much as I could.” Kinney served the City of Knoxville for three years before starting a New York-based investment management business, SteelRiver Infrastructure Partners, in 2006. “We manage investments in utilities, pipelines, railroads, electric transmission companies and marine ports,” Kinney says. “Rather than investing in stocks, we purchase and operate entire companies.” Today, SteelRiver Infrastructure Partners has offices in New York and San Francisco, California, and their companies are

located in 23 US states. Over the past decade, Kinney and his wife Donna (HCB, ’82) have ramped up their involvement at the Haslam College of Business, establishing a fellowship for rising professors who want to spend more time on research projects, particularly in the summer months. The fellowship has continued to grow since its inception. “I’m happy Top to bottom: Dean Stephen Mangum; Kirk Swor, Logan Notestine, Lou Moran, Chris Kinney, Jon Reesman, Hayden Correll, and Tristan Ratcliffe; Karen and Ed Pershing; Charles Noble and Mary Goss; Anne Jackson, Lindsey Kinney, Phil Kinney, Chris and Donna Kinney, Liz Kinney, Daniel Murphy, Kiki and Rob Eldridge.

that it’s successful, and I’ve enjoyed getting to meet the recipients,” he says. “Some of our disciplines are high in the national rankings, and that’s a testament to the quality and dedication of these professors.” Kinney also serves on the Dean’s Advisory Council. To honor his far-reaching career, distinguished service to the university, and generous giving of talents and resources, the Haslam College of Business is proud to present its 2017 Distinguished Alum Award to Chris Kinney.

HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 43


ALUMNI UPDATE

Mondelez International

NETWORK

Ocra Coolers

CH EMTREAT

NAVIHEALTH American College of Emergency Physicians Envisions Innovation Group Harper University / Hutzel Women’s Hospital

Greenville Health System

NYU LANGONE

NAV IG AN T LA-Z-BOY

EATON

Random Acts of Flowers

Alumni Update

M CLAR EN HEA LT H C AR E The Was h in gto n Wi z a rd s

Rockwell Collins

KING FAISAL SPECIALIST HOSPITAL & RESEARCH CENTER

West Virginia University School of Medicine

To share your news with the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Haslam College of Business community, submit it along with any relevant images to Haslam@utk.edu. Please use “Alumni News” in the subject line. _______ This update reflects information known as of Oct. 10, 2017.

Affinity Group/Paramount Marketing Brow n J o rdan I n te r n ati o n a l

CSX

American College of Emergency Physicians

ADAMA USA

Veterans Affairs

Ortho Tennessee

PARKER BUSINESS CONSULTING

PATHWAYS BY MOLINA

M&T BANK

NEOTISS

B AYER CR O P SC I E N C E

T E A M HE ALT H

NEXTCARE URGENT CARE

TWB Company, Worthington CaroMont Health Industries

THE UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE

DENSO

ASCENSION

LeBonheur Children’s Hospital

44 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY


ALUMNI NEWS

’80s

Affinity Group/ Paramount Marketing promoted David Clark (HCB, ’82) to president. Donna Rose (HCB, ’87) joined Parker Business Consulting and Accounting as an accountant.

’90s

’00s

DeRoyal promoted Rebecca Harmon (ProMBA, ’02) to chief administrative officer. Pete Peterson (MBA, ’02) became chief operating officer of OrthoTennessee. S. Seth Reagan, (HCB, ’02, MBA, ’04) joined the Haslam College of Business as executive director of development.

their primary game analyst. She is only the second full-time color TV analyst in the franchise’s history, and one of the youngest and first female primary TV analysts for an NBA team Nat Ford (ProMBA, ’04) is now IT business architect with ADAMA USA in Raleigh, North Carolina.

John Wojcik (HCB, ’92) is now chief marketing officer at Brown Jordan International in the Jacksonville, Florida, area. Honeywell promoted Jim Schwab (HCB, ’97, MBA, ’01) to vice president of staffing for home and building technologies and software.

Stanley Zaslau (PEMBA, ’05) has been named chair of the new Department of Urology at West Virginia University School of Medicine.

Mark Epstein (PEMBA, ’07) received Albuquerque’s Business One C-Suite Award that annually recognizes New Mexico’s most outstanding business leaders. NextCare Urgent Care in Mesa, Arizona, named Richard Fleming (PEMBA, ’07) its new area medical director.

The Washington Wizards named Kara Lawson (HCB, ’03)

’10s Pat Hickey (ProMBA, ’08) was promoted to North America VP of sales and marketing for the Utility Segment with Eaton.

Kris Karnoupakis (ProMBA, ’05) was promoted to section leader at Denso in Maryville, Tennessee.

Darrell Edwards (ProMBA, ’03) was promoted to senior vice president and chief supply chain officer of La-Z-Boy. Kirk Jensen (PEMBA, ’03) and Envisions Innovation Group recently kicked off the Envision Physician Services Breakthrough Series, a crossdivisional program teaching healthcare professionals to make measurable improvements.

LeBonheur Children’s Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.

Jason Gundersen (PEMBA, ’07) became a health care consultant for NAVIGANT, a global professional services firm.

Jairy Hunter (PEMBA, ’08) accepted a position as medical director for naviHealth, a company that partners with health plans to manage post-acute benefits for Medicare Advantage participants. Peter Sanderson (PEMBA, ’08) was promoted to medical director of informatics and ambulatory regulation at ASCENSION Medical Group.

Barry Gilmore (PEMBA, ’09) was promoted to professor of pediatrics at UT Memphis and is also now the chief medical officer and vice president at

Otis Cosby (PEMBA, ’10) was appointed to division chief for occupational and environmental medicine within the Department of Medicine at Greenville Health System. Kerry Speth (MAcc, ’10) is now the chief financial officer at Ocra Coolers in the greater Nashville area. Phillip Blair (ProMBA, ’12) is now a project controls specialist at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The University of Louisville tapped Maxwell Boakye (PEMBA, ’12) to chair its Department of Neurology.

Russ Epting (EMBASL, ’12) was promoted to vice president at CSX.

HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 45


ALUMNI UPDATE

NETWORK

Ivy Estes (ProMBA, ’12) is now a banking officer in the bankwide transformation group of M&T Bank in Buffalo, New York.

Entrepreneur Magazine featured Larsen Jay, (EMBA-SL, ’12) for his non-profit, Random Acts of Flowers. Todd May (EMBASL, ’12) became vice president of sales and marketing with NEOTISS. Courtney Stewart (EMBA-SL, ’12) is now datacenter operations facility manager at Google. Abdulrahman Al Husaini (EMBA-GSC, ’13) was promoted to head of planning and inventory control with King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center.

Robert J. Cerfolio (PEMBA, ’13) joined NYU Langone as the chief of clinical thoracic surgery and the first director of its Lung Cancer Center.

46 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

James Lawson (EMBA-SL, ’13) is now director of strategic accounts at ChemTreat.

Andrew Adams (EMBA-HCL, ’15) is now pharmacy business manager at CaroMont Health.

Ray Lello (EMBA-SL, ’13) became product manager at Bayer Crop Science.

King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center promoted Hatton Alsedais (EMBA-GSC, ’15) to manager of pharmaceutical planning.

Thomas Tobin (PEMBA,’13) was recently elected to the board of the American College of Emergency Physicians. Mondelez International promoted Eduardo Delabio (EMBAGSC, ’14) to global factory of future transformation director. Shawn Hopper (EMBA-SL, ’14) is now a legal administrative assistant at Veterans Affairs.

Revonna Smith (PEMBA, ’14) launched the AnesthEZia Saf-T-Tray, a product aimed at reducing anesthesia medication errors by simplifying and standardizing workflow. JP Wood (ADMBA, ’14) was part of a team selected to receive the Robert T. Mason Award for Depot Maintenance Excellence for achievements relating to his organizational action project.

Jay Lown (EMBASL, ’15) became an international sales manager at Heatec Inc./Astec Industries.

Ali Idrees (EMBAGSC, ’16) was promoted to MEA manufacturing director for GCB and B categories with Mondelez International. Patricia WilkersonUddyback (PEMBA, ’15) received a promotion to chief medical officer of Detroit Receiving, Harper University, and Hutzel Women’s Hospitals. Rockwell Collins promoted Maya Murphy (EMBA-SL, ’16) to director, ATS manufacturing.

Brad Ranly (EMBA-SL, ’15) was promoted to director of operations and transformation at TWB Company, Worthington Industries. Michael Wiechart (EMBA-HCL, ’15) is now executive vice president and chief operating officer at TeamHealth.

Emran Rouf (PEMBA, ’15) discovered a link between rural living and hypertension, which he presented with his team at the 2017 American Heart Association’s Council on Hypertension meeting in San Francisco. Doug Steelman (ProMBA, ’15) is now VP of managed security services at Optiv in Atlanta, Georgia.

Issam Al Delaigan (EMBA-GSC, ’16) was promoted to corporate strategic sourcing specialist at King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center.

Robert Flora (PEMBA, ’16) is the newly appointed chief academic officer and vice president of academic affairs at McLaren Health Care.

Homere Al Moutran (PEMBA, ’16) published an article in KEVINMD, entitled “We Can No Longer Ignore Dr. Google.” Andres Oviedo (EMBA-GSC, ’16) is now Monterrey HUB ISC senior director, with Mondelez International.

Julianna Reece (PEMBA, ’16) coauthored a chapter in a book on collaborative care called Integrated Care: A Guide for Effective Implementation. Rick Smith (EMBAHCL, ’16) was promoted to vice president of operations in the south division at Pathways by Molina.


Whitespace, Header, Folio

IN MEMORIAM Whitespace

’40s Emily Granger Hinman (’44), died April 2, 2017, in Bolivia, NC. She worked for Tennessee Eastman Corp. and was an accomplished amateur artist. R. Harold Jenkins (’44, ’47), of Wilmington, DE, died April 21, 2017. He was a WWII Navy veteran who worked in managerial positions for Hercules, Inc., in the US and Europe. John G. Sample, Sr. (’48), was a WWII Navy veteran who worked 64 years at Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company. He was a member of the Tennessee Insurance Hall of Fame and died Sept. 2, 2017. Julius Frantz Hudson (’49), died March 21, 2017, at age 93. Julius served in the US Army Air Corp during WWII and was a nuclear materials accountability manager who worked more than 30 years at Union Carbide. Walter Monroe Williams, Jr. (’49), age 95, died Sept. 20, 2017. During WWII he served as a pilot, flying Navy bombers in the Aleutians. He retired in 1984 from Union Carbide’s Y-12 plant.

’50s Ted Michael Chumley (’50) joined the US Army during WWII as a radio operations specialist, receiving the medal of Good Conduct and a Combat Ribbon. He was a real estate agent and founded the restaurant Boardwalk Billy’s. He died Sept. 20, 2017.

Vivian Williams Davis (’50) of Smyrna, GA, died March 22, 2017. She was a real estate agent for more than 30 years, American Contract Bridge League life master playing duplicate bridge, and a Kentucky Colonel.

Commission under President Ronald Reagan. He also worked as president and CEO of Global USA and helped found the Red, Hot and Blue, Memphis Barbeque chain.

Content

George Thomas McGuire, Jr. (’50) died Sept. 21, 2017. He was a WWII US Army veteran whose experiences were recorded for a BBC documentary series. His career as a salesman with Reynolds Aluminum Company spanned more than 40 years. He wrote four historical novels and founded McGuire Publishing Company. Edgar “Big Ed” Watson (’50) of Rome, GA, died April 15, 2017, at age 88. He was a veteran who served in the Army Corps of Engineers. Katherine May Lee (’51), enrolled at UT for an aviation program discontinued at the close of WWII. A Torchbearer, she graduated with a degree in transportation and worked for several airlines, including Northeast Airlines in Boston where she regularly checked in President John F. Kennedy. She died March 17, 2017. William Harrell Morris, Jr. (’51), a Korean War veteran, died Sept. 20, 2017. He served as deputy commissioner of economic development in Tennessee and was instrumental in bringing the Nissan assembly plant and the World’s Fair to the state. He was appointed assistant secretary of the US Department of Commerce and US delegate to the United Nations Industrial Development

Mary Francis Dodd “Pan” Eimon (’52), was an artist and journalist who died Sept. 20, 2017. Pan wrote and edited for radio stations and magazines and exhibited her paintings. Her last international show, in 1996, was at the Mongolian National Modern Art Gallery. Linda Rust Hale (’52) was an insurance claims adjuster, Girl Scout leader, and avid gardener. She died on Sept. 12, 2017. Walter Ogilvie (’53) attended the College Grove School and Battle Ground Academy in Franklin, TN, before UT. A US Navy veteran, he died March 18, 2017. William Starnes (’53) died on May 1, 2017. He served in the US Army at Fort Jackson from 1954–56. Pearce Cann Ray (’56) died Sept. 20, 2017. A veteran of the US Navy, he worked nearly 40 years in the transportation industry with several corporations, including Yellow Trucking. James Wilfred “Bill” Sutton (’58) died March 13, 2017, in San Diego, CA. He served in the US Air Force and worked for Haskins and Sells before founding a private accounting practice. Edward Steele Clayton III (’59), age 80, died Aug. 30, 2017. He served in the US Marine Corp.

Jack Terry McNew (’59), a Navy veteran from Hartsville, SC, died April 9, 2017. He worked as director of transportation for Sonoco Products Company until retiring in 1989.

’60s Bill Anderson (’60), “the other voice of the Vols,” died April 18, 2017. He color commentated UT football games for 31 years. His football career included playing for UT, being named rookie of the year for the Washington Redskins, and a visit to the Super Bowl with the Green Bay Packers. He was a member of the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame and the Knoxville Sports Hall of Fame. Albert S. Lyons III (’60), was a CPA who worked mostly for manufacturing companies. He taught accounting at Pellissippi State. Charles Oliver Mann, Jr. (’60) began his medical sales career with V. Mueller, later founding Specialty Surgical Instrumentation. He served 14 years on the Tennessee Certificate of Need Board and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission and was a captain in the Maury County Sheriff’s Department. He died Sept. 1, 2017. Billy Nicks “Chicken” Raymond (’61) died Sept. 3, 2017. He was an avid Vols fan who took on multiple entrepreneurial endeavors, including Robo Taxi, Robo Carwash and Market, and Robo Rentals.

HASLAM.UTK.EDU | 47


IN MEMORIAM

Robert Neal Culver (’62), a US Army veteran, died Aug. 22, 2017. He worked at Bank of America before becoming president of Valley Fidelity Bank and Trust in Knoxville and starting his own financial investment firm. Neal was on Coal Creek Company’s board of directors for 30 years and was a chancellor’s associate of UT.

James Crispin “Cris” Ashworth (’74) died April 24, 2017. He became CFO of Nashville Gas before age 30 and later senior vice president and CFO of Medical Economics. In 1999, he purchased United Record Pressing in Nashville, which he sold in 2008 after tremendous growth.

William Ronald “Ron” Walton (’66) died on Sept. 28, 2017. Ron spent his entire career with PwC, ultimately leading the company’s national risk management division. He also served on Haslam’s advisory board.

Brian J. Cartwright (’75), a US Army veteran from Coleman, MI, died March 30, 2017.

Thomas “Tommy” R. Dykes Sr. (’67) died on March 29, 2017. He served in the US Air Force and worked 30 years at Eastman Chemical Co. An accident in 1978 left him paralyzed, but he continued to work, travel, fish, and golf. Richard “Dick” Grey Wright III (’67), a lifelong resident of Knox County, died April 22, 2017. He was a decorated US Marine who served in Vietnam. Wright was president of the family business, Dick Wright Hardware, until he retired in 1999. William “Bill” Charles Williams (’68) died Sept. 26, 2017 at age 74. He was a US Air Force veteran.

’70s Donald R. Henderson (’72), a US Army veteran, died Dec. 25, 2016. He worked for House Hasson Hardware as manager of transportation for more than 25 years.

48 | HASLAM MAGAZINE

Steven L. Hembree (’76), graduated from UT with highest honors and was a CPA for more than 40 years. He died April 9, 2017. George L. Gee III (’78) died on April 25, 2017. He served in the US Navy and worked for several Oak Ridge government agencies. Judson G. George (’78) worked for Schaad, Witt, and 84 Lumber and owned George’s Building Supply. He died Aug. 31, 2017.

’80s Landon Butler (’81) of St. Petersburg, FL, died March 26, 2017, at age 58. Melissa Morgan Hutcheson (’81) died on April 24, 2017. She strengthened many corporations through her nationally recognized work in marketing and business development. Charles R. Leonard (MBA ’81) worked at Eastman Chemical Co. for 32 years before traveling the world as consultant for Life Cycle Engineering. He died April 16, 2017. Randy Marks (’83) was a manager with K-Mart for 31 years and Hobby Lobby for three. An avid Vols fan, he died May 2, 2017.

’90s

Linda Rust (MBA ’78) worked for the Exxon Corporation in Houston, TX, as an accountant. She died April 6, 2017.

Mark Lee Gray (’90, MBA ’92) worked for Kimberly Clark and Y-12 and died April 2, 2017, at age 50.

William “Bill” Thomas Ratliff, Jr. (’79) former owner of Tennessee Asphalt Co., died Sept. 9, 2017, at age 61.

’00s

Robert “Bob” David Taylor (’79), an avid Vols fan, died April 7, 2017. He worked for Liberty Mutual Insurance Company before operating a Nationwide Insurance Agency for 25 years.

Mechele M. Peterson (PEMBA ’14), a Mace Braxton Scholarship recipient, died on April 3, 2017. She was a pediatrician and deputy chief medical officer in Aberdeen, SD.

If you have an obituary for a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Haslam College of Business alumnus, please submit it to us at Haslam@utk.edu using “In Memoriam” in the subject line. _______ This update reflects information known as of Oct. 10, 2017.


Erinn Brown (Economics, ’19), Nnadozie Ibe (Accounting, ’21), and Jasmen Grant (Marketing, ’19)

Erinn, Nnadozie, and Jasmen are recipients of the Tennessee Pledge Scholarship. Donations from UT alumni and friends interested in bringing opportunity to all qualified students made their college educations possible.

Join them, and Join the Journey.

journey.utk.edu


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This publication was funded in part by private contributions from the alumni and friends of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Haslam College of Business. The University of Tennessee is an EEO/AA/Title IX/Section 504/ADA/ADEA institution in the provision of its education and employment programs and services. Publication #E01-1410-001-18.

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