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News

News Ivar Aasen The oil and gas discovery Draupne, located centrally in the North Sea, has been renamed Ivar Aasen. The name was chosen following proposals from the operator and feedback from the advisory committee on names. Sunnmøre-native Ivar Aasen was a leading democratic and national strategist in Norway during the 1800s. He was a poet and linguist, but first and foremost the man who formulated Nynorsk (New Norwegian, one of two official written forms of Norwegian), based on how Norwegians really spoke. The emergence of Nynorsk was part of the development of the Norwegian nation, and of Norway’s modernisation through the development of representative government. The decision by the Storting (the Norwegian parliament), in 1885 to place Danish-Norwegian (Bokmål) and Nynorsk on an equal footing gave Norway two official written forms of Norwegian. This step represented a radical innovation in 1885.

Edvard Grieg In the white paper An industry for the future – Norway’s petroleum activities, the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy stated that the procedure for naming petroleum fields on the Norwegian continental shelf would be amended. Among the initiatives was the appointment ofan advisory committee on names, which currently comprises Karsten Alnæs (chair), Kristin Clemet, Per Egil Hegge and Marit Hauan. “The names of large, independent developments have a signal effect beyond the continental shelf. In this case, the view was taken that the Ivar Aasen discovery should mark and remind us that Norwegian representative government is based on linguistic diversity, and that linguistic diversity has long been a characteristic of our democracy,” says Minister of Petroleum and Energy Ola Borten Moe. The Ivar Aasen discovery is located in the central part of the North Sea, around 200 kilometres west of Stavanger. It is one of several future developments at Utsirahøgda, and lies close to Grieg and Sverdrup.

The Norwegian government has approved the development plan for the Edvard Grieg oil field. The field is the first of several planned developments in this part of the Utsira formation. The matter will now be referred to the Storting (the Norwegian parliament). The Edvard Grieg field was discovered in 2007, and lies in the middle of the North Sea, 180 kilometres west of Stavanger. The field is being developed using a bottom-mounted platform for processing oil and gas. The development costs total NOK 24 billion. “Through this development, a new company will begin operating an independent development on the Norwegian continental shelf. Greater diversity on the continental shelf is positive, and in line with Norway’s longterm petroleum policy,” says Minister of Petroleum and Energy Ola Borten Moe. Until now, the rights holders have referred to the find as Luno, but the Ministry has decided to rename it the Edvard Grieg field. Grieg’s compositions contributed to the creation of a body of recognisably Norwegian music that became a force in the development of a Norwegian identity, and thus also a force for Norway’s independence from Sweden. Edvard Grieg gave Norway a national and international musical voice, and helped to build the nation’s identity. “This is the start of a new chapter in Norway’s petroleum story. The expected recoverable resources in the Edvard Grieg, Draupne and Johan Sverdrup fields total 2.8 billion barrels of oil equivalents. Given the current oil price and exchange rates, this equates to around NOK 1,900 billion gross. These is an enormous sum, which will benefit all of Norwegian society,” says Minister of Petroleum and Energy Ola Borten Moe. The rights holders in the Edvard Grieg development are Lundin Norway AS (50%), Wintershall Norge ASA (30%) and RWE Dea Norge AS (20%).

Committee Renaming the Draupne field Ivar Aasen.

UT2 August 2012

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UT3 August 2012  

The August edition of UT3, the magazine of the SUT

UT3 August 2012  

The August edition of UT3, the magazine of the SUT