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National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Education at NASA Presented at The U. S. Women’s Chamber of Commerce Conference

Employ Educate Engage Inspire

www.nasa.gov

Carolyn Knowles Executive Officer to the Assistant Administrator for Education


The nation that

out-educates us today

will out-compete us

tomorrow. - President Barack Obama Speech to the National Academy of Science April 27, 2009


NASA Education

National STEM Priorities

President Barack Obama Administration Priorities (President Obama’s speech to National Academy of Science, April 27, 2009)

NASA’s Ability to Inspire a Nation Quantity and Quality of Math and Science Teachers Students Prepared for STEM Related Careers Educational Opportunities for Women and Minorities Fellowship and Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs Supporting Future Entrepreneurs Scientific Innovation 3


NASA Education

NASA Priorities

Administrator Charles F. Bolden, Jr.

• Build on our investment in the International Space Station, • Accelerate development of our next generation launch systems to enable expansion of human exploration, • Enhance NASA's capability to study Earth's environment, lead space science to new achievements, • Continue cutting-edge aeronautics research, • Support the innovation of American entrepreneurs, and • Inspire a rising generation of boys and girls to seek careers in science, technology, engineering and math. 4


NASA Education

More Women Need to Enroll in STEM Fields Proportion of Women in Selected College Majors 1999-2000 Bachelor’s Degree Recipients Education

79.3

Psychology

20.7

77.6

Health

22.4

72.9

Social Sciences

27.1

65.1

Humanities

34.9

60.7

39.3

Other

58.4

41.6

Biological Science

58.2

41.8

Social Science

53.2

Business/Management

46.9

45.3

History

54.7

41.1

Math/Physical Sciences

59

39.2

Engineering

60.8

17.7

0%

10%

82.3

20%

Female

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Male

NOTE: Excludes graduates older than 35 at completion of degree. SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2001 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:01).

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NASA Education

So That They Can Get STEM Jobs Women as a Proportion of Selected STEM Occupations, 2005 Mechanical Engineers

5.8%

Engineering Managers

9.5%

Civil Engineers

13.2%

Aerospace Engineers

13.3%

Chemical Engineers

14.3%

Industrial Engineers

14.9% 21.9%

Computer Software Engineers

26.0%

Computer Programmers

32.3%

Database Administrators Chemists & Materials Scientists

35.3%

Biological Scientists

48.7%

Psychologists

67.3% 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

Source: CPST,Professional Women and Minorities. Data derived from U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey 6


NASA Education

Women and NASA Women Employed at NASA 1964 <1% women 1970’s 17% 3% <1%

GS12 or higher

Today 31%

Total workforce S&T NASA workforce Senior Exec Service

Today 35% 22% 25%

NASA’s Higher Education Programs 2004 Nat. Avg. 20.5% 42% 29.1%

Engineering Physical Sciences Math and Computer Science

2008 41%

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NASA Education

Today, We Have THIS!

Now what do we do? How? 8

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NASA Education

NASA Has a Robust Education Plan Strategic Framework Cultivate Diversity of Workforce Disciplines and Practitioners

Higher Education

Outcome 1: Contribute to the development of the STEM workforce in disciplines needed to achieve NASAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strategic goals, through a portfolio of investments.

Employ

Employ Elementary/ Secondary Education

Educate

Educate

Outcome 2: Attract and retain students in STEM disciplines through a progression of educational opportunities for students, teachers and faculty.

Informal Education

Engage

Outcome 3: Build

Engage

strategic partnerships and linkages between STEM formal and informal education providers that promote STEM literacy and awareness of NASAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission.

Inspire Inspire

Principles/ Criteria

Relevance

NASA Content

Diversity

Evaluation

Continuity

Partnerships/ Sustainability

* Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)

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NASA Education

Engaging Women and Girls at all Stages Higher Ed STEM Opportunities: •RockOn! •Reduced Gravity flights •NASA and Partner telescopes and observatories (Arecibo, etc.) Higher Ed Opportunities •Student mission activities •Graduate Fellowships •Student Collaborations •NASA IYA Student Ambassadors •Student Suborbital Opportunities

STEM Student Opportunities (K-12) •Student Launch Initiative •FIRST Robotics •High School Internship Programs •Capstone Course for Space Science •GAVRT •Mars Student imaging •MicroObservatory Robotic Telescope Network

NASA Informal Education Opportunities •Kids Space activities •Remote presentations •Night Sky Network •Astronomy Clubs •NASA Kids Club •Astronomy Picture of the Day •Star Parties •Girl Scouts 10


NASA Education

What Is The Government Doing? White House Council for Women and Girls • Raises awareness • Cross-cutting women’s issues, including STEM education and careers • Seeks inter-agency collaborations, resolution for issues • Support new initiatives National Science and Technology Committee, Subcommittee on Education • Federal agencies must use their resources to promote STEM education o Research opportunities o Mentoring teachers and students

• Use evidence-based strategies to strengthen STEM teaching and learning • Collaborate to find synergies, means to reach more participants Federal Agencies • Eliminating efforts that don’t produce intended results • Collaborating with education experts • Deliberate engagement of all underserved /underrepresented audiences • Doing what works 11


NASA Education

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NASA Education

Our Unique People and Missions

CAN TOUCH THE WORLD 13

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Education at NASA  

Overview of the women's education initiative at NASA presented at the November 2009 meeting presented by the U.S. Women's Chamber of Commerc...

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