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USS Enterprise (CVN 65)

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“We are Legend”

June 5, 2012 Issue

The Battle of Midway

Enterprise Remembers: Part Two


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Tuesday, June 5, 2012

History of the Ba

Enterprise at Midway: Part 2 of 3

Story by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Brian G. Reynolds USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea – As the U.S. Navy continues to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Midway, Sailors aboard aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) are focusing on the vital contributions the first Big E (CV 6) made toward a U.S. victory in the battle widely regarded as the turning point of World War II. At its most basic, the Battle of Midway can be viewed as the victory of a U.S. Navy force, led by three aircraft carriers (USS Hornet (CV 8), USS Yorktown (CV 5) and USS Enterprise (CV 6), over four carriers of the Imperial Japanese Navy (Akagi, Kaga, Soryu, and Hiryu). However, this summary may blur the heroic roles of the vessels and their Sailors – specifically the legendary role played by Enterprise, her air wing and her crew. “Midway was truly a turning point,” said Capt. William Hamilton, current commanding officer of USS Enterprise (CVN 65). “It came horizon from this battle, Lt. Cmdr. Gene Lindsey’s Torpedo Squadron 6 (VT-6), embarked aboard Enterprise, found at a time when our backs were up against the wall. It was the Japanese carriers. Again, every plane launched their do or die, and the crew of the Enterprise (and her air wing) torpedoes despite heavy Japanese fire. As a result of the came through.” Japanese resistance, 10 out of 14 U.S. planes were lost – In an effort to strike first during the Battle of Midway, including Lindsey’s. No Japanese ships were sunk. Enterprise’s 6th Air Group sent up 10 F-4F Wildcat fighter As the Japanese planes were refueling aboard their planes to escort 14 TBD Devastator torpedo planes and 35 SBD Dauntless Bombers in search of the Imperial Japanese carriers, bombers from Enterprise and Hornet finally found their targets. Navy. Commanded by Lt. Cmdr. Wade McClusky, Enterprise Of the aircraft launched that June 4, 1942, morning, 31 Bomber Squadron 6 and Scouting Squadron 6 plummeted would never return to Enterprise. from an altitude of 20,000 feet to find their targets, the The Hornet’s Japanese aircraft carriers Akagi and Kaga. As many as eight Torpedo bombs smashed into Kaga. One bomb, launched by Lt. Squadron 8 Cmdr. Richard Best’s plane, hit Akagi, setting off munitions (VT-8), led in the hangar bay. by Lt. Cmdr. In five minutes, Enterprise bombers destroyed two Waldron, was the USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Japanese aircraft carriers. Meanwhile, bombers from first to find the The Shuttle is published and printed daily underway and bi-weekly in port by the USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Media Japanese carriers. Yorktown inflicted such heavy damage on Soryu that it Department, FPO AE 09543-2810. This newspaper is an sank later that evening. Waldron’s authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Please direct all story ideas, questions and “It was because of McClusky’s courage, perseverance squadron comments to MC1 (SW) Steve Smith at smithsw@cvn65. navy.mil. and some luck that his air wing made such a crucial launched their Commanding Officer Executive Officer contribution to the outcome at Midway,” said Capt. Jeffrey torpedoes as Capt. William C. Hamilton, Jr. Capt. G. C. Huffman L. Trent, the current commander of Carrier Air Wing every plane was Command Master Chief Public Affairs Officer CMDCM (AW/SW) Dwayne E. Huff Lt. Cmdr. Sarah T. Self-Kyler (CVW) 1, Enterprise’s embarked air wing. shot down by As Hiryu escaped, it launched a counterattack that Japanese fighters. Editors MC2 (SW) Kristin L. Grover inflicted heavy damage on Yorktown. Bombers from As smoke MCSN Brian G. Reynolds Yorktown’s Bombing Squadron 3 (VB-3) flew to rose on the

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attle of Midway Enterprise’s flight deck, as its crew worked feverishly to repair the damage. Enterprise combined forces with the remaining planes from Yorktown to defend it from a second Japanese attack, but could not stop it from sinking the carrier. A squadron, consisting of aircraft from both the Big E and Yorktown, launched from Enterprise’s flight deck June 4 at 5:03 p.m. The squadrons scored a mortal wound on Hiryu and left it a smoldering hunk of steel. Enterprise aircraft took credit for three of the four Japanese carriers destroyed that day. “It was a battle that clearly displayed the ability of carrier aviation to project power from the sea, foreshadowing the invaluable contributions our carrier Navy and its embarked air wings continue to bring to the

world’s oceans to this day,” said Trent. On June 5, Big E aircraft scored two more hits, sinking the Japanese cruiser Mikumi and damaging the cruiser Mogami. During the Battle of Midway, 307 Americans lost their lives, including crew members and pilots from Enterprise. Although the aviators of Midway were integral to the eventual American victory at Midway, the battle took a heavy toll on the air wing. “Carrier aviation’s ability to deliver credible combat power, an enduring value today, did not come without a cost,” said Trent. “Of the 77 aircraft that comprised the Enterprise air wing, 31 were lost during the Battle of Midway.” Their sacrifices helped achieve a later American victory against Japan during World War II that historian Walter Lord calls highly improbable. “By ordinary standards, they were hopelessly outclassed,” said Lord. “They had no right to win. Yet they did, and in doing so, changed the course of a war.” Enterprise changed command nine days after it arrived back in Pearl Harbor on June 13, 1942. Outgoing Commanding Officer Capt. George Murray had this to say to incoming CO Capt. Arthur Davis: “Our goal has been, is and will be the destruction of the enemy … the success we have achieved and those that lie ahead could not be realized without the teamwork and mutual good will which signify so essentially the Enterprise spirit … Captain Davis, I relinquish this command with regret. I am confident you will find the ship one of the great ships of our time – and the ship’s company the finest.” Enterprise would go on to win 20 battle stars during World War II, proudly achieving the title of the most decorated warship in U.S. Navy history. This inspired the building of a new Enterprise, which carries the namesake to this day. Enterprise and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 continue the legacy of the Enterprise namesake in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility as the carrier continues its 22nd and final deployment, adding to a legend begun more than 70 years ago. This is part two of a three-part series. Check tomorrow for more on USS Enterprise’s (CV 6) role in the Battle of Midway and its cooperation with Destroyer Squadron TWO, a relationship that continues today, 70 years later.


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Battle of Midway Wre

Photo by MC2(SW) Brooks B. Patton Jr.

Photo by MC2(SW) Brooks B. Patton Jr.

Photo by MCSN Gregory White

P

Photo by MCSN Gregory White

Photo by MCSN Gregory White


Tuesday, June 5, 2012

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eath Laying Ceremony

Photo by MCSN Gregory White

Photo by MCSN Randy J. Savarese

Photo by MC2(SW/AW) Nick Scott

Photo by MCSN Randy J. Savarese

Photo by MC2(SW) Brooks B. Patton Jr.

Photo by MCSN Gregory White


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Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Big E Happenings

Enterprise Commemorates the Battle of Midway Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (SW) Britney Epps USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea – Sailors and Marines aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) commemorated the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Midway with a ceremony conducted early in the morning June 4, a fitting tribute given the ship’s close ties to the battle. The previous USS Enterprise, CV-6, and her air wing played a vital role in the pivotal World War II battle that took place June 4-7, 1942. The Battle of Midway is widely regarded as the turning point of the war in the Pacific. “On this day in 1942, the entire complexion of the war in the Pacific changed,” said Capt. William C. Hamilton, Jr., Enterprise’s commanding officer, as he addressed the current Enterprise crew during the ceremony. “Thanks in no small part to the efforts of those serving aboard Enterprise.” Along with Enterprise, aircraft carriers USS Hornet (CV 8) and USS Yorktown (CV 5), along with U.S. Strike forces, defeated the Imperial Japanese navy carrier task force under the direction of Commander in Chief of the Japanese Combined Fleet, Admiral Yamamoto. Japanese losses during the battle were staggering. The Japanese Navy lost all four of the large carriers that had attacked Pearl Harbor, a heavy cruiser, 248 carrier-based aircraft and over 3,000 lives, including 100 trained pilots who could not be replaced. Enterprise and her air wing were credited with three of the four Japanese carriers sunk that day at Midway. “We were not without losses of our own, however,” said Rear Adm. Ted Carter, commander, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group. “Although Enterprise was not attacked during the MIDWAY continued on page 7

Photo by ISC Daniel Mayfield

Photo by ISC Daniel Mayfield


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Big E Happenings MIDWAY continued battle, her air wing suffered the heaviest losses of any air wing at sea up to that point.” At the opening of the ceremony, Carter described the heroic roles of the Sailors and Marines who fought and died during the historic battle. “This morning, we pause for a few moments to reflect on the battle itself, the role each member of the Enterprise Strike Group played, and the sacrifices Sailors and Marines just like you made on those early days of June 1942,” Carter told the crew. Hamilton, Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, Capt. Jeffrey L. Trent and Commodore, Destroyer Squadron Two, Capt. Joseph J. Leonard also spoke about the roles Enterprise, the air wing and the destroyer strike group played during the battle. “Knowing this is our legacy, it is an absolute honor and privilege to remember the heroes of the Battle of Midway aboard our nation’s most historic and legendary aircraft carrier, a great warship with a long-standing bond with Destroyer Squadron Two,” said Leonard. The partnership between Enterprise and Destroyer Squadron Two began at Midway 70 years ago and continues today.

As part of the commemoration, Enterprise’s First Class Petty Officer Association, detailed by Command Master Chief Dwayne E. Huff, performed a wreath-laying ceremony on the fantail aboard the ship. The fallen Sailors and Marines were also honored with a 21-gun salute and the sounding of Taps, played by Boatswain’s Mate 1st Class Timothy Lumpkin. “While we look back on the incredible achievements of Midway and reflect on what it took for those Sailors to win, we should also look forward with great confidence,” said Carter. “Midway taught us that this strength is not built upon technology and training, but rather brave, passionate Sailors and Marines just like you.” On June 3, aircraft assigned to Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 performed a missing-man flyover formation to commemorate the aviators who lost during the battle. Throughout the course of the day Enterprise went on to announce a historical timeline recounting the events of the Battle of Midway over the ship’s 1MC announcing system. “You preserve and celebrate the rich history and tradition of Enterprise,” said Carter. “It is our past that has brought us to today and our past that will continue to shape our future,” said Carter.

Marine Aviators Defend Midway Story by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Brian G. Reynolds USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea – It is no secret that the decisive victory at Midway in June, 1942 was a great example of two carrier air groups working cohesively. However, what is not as blatantly obvious is that Marine aviators also played a vital role in one of the most pivotal battles in world history. In early June, 1942, the Japanese Empire was at the height of its expansion. As the Japanese forces continued to expand throughout Asia and the Pacific, they set their sights on the tiny island of Midway. The Japanese sought to use the island to prevent U.S. forces from being able to regulate the Pacific sea routes, thus allowing the Japanese to expand further into Southeast Asia and beyond. As U.S. Naval forces prepared

for maritime and air combat engagements, Marine ground and aviation forces were also poised to defend the island at all costs. The Marine aviators of VMF-221 and VMSB-241 carried out the brunt of the early attacks on the Japanese aircraft and surface ships. VMF-221, led by Maj. Floyd B. Parks, was sent to engage the enemy aircraft and suffered heavy losses in the initial onslaught. Of the 12 Buffalo aircraft that flew into combat, only one survived. However, the Japanese forces were unsuccessful in achieving their goal because of the bravery of the Marine aviators of VMF-221. VMSB-241, led by Maj. Lofton R. Henderson, engaged the enemy carriers and destroyers. Aircraft from the squadron attacked a Japanese Kaga-class carrier and the battleship

Haruna. The Marine aviators attacked in vigorous intensity against overwhelming odds, but scored no direct hits. Both Marine squadrons suffered heavy casualties during the Battle of Midway. Over half of the pilots from VMSB-241 were killed, including Henderson. VMF-221 also lost the majority of the aircraft and pilots that participated in the battle. However, the aviators fought with an aggressiveness that is the embodiment of the Marine Corps. The Marine aviators that fought and died in the Battle of Midway, did so with a tenacity that would mark the initial momentum that led to victory. The Marines successfully contributed to defending the island and thus turning the tide in the Pacific.


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Big E Entertainment 12. Clan emblem 13. Colonic 19. Woman’s undergarment 21. Thorny flower 25. Require 26. Cocoyam 27. Assistant 28. Specter 29. Urgency 30. Amount of hair 31. Mistake 34. 8 in Roman numerals 35. As well 36. Adolescent 38. A parcel of land 39. Instruction 41. Ritual 42. Shocked reaction 44. Very small 45. Seasoning 46. Orderly grouping DOWN 47. Steed 1. Male deer 48. Wall climbers 2. Found in some lotions 51. Wacky 3. Low-fat 4. In an affectionate manner 52. Decorative case 5. Third sign of the zodiac 53. Accomplishes 54. Baking appliance 6. Egg-shaped 55. Absorb written material 7. Delay 56. Makes a mistake 8. Modify 58. Evil spirit 9. Netting 10. Uproar 11. 3-banded armadillo 38. Unsuccessful person 39. Scrabble piece 40. Female deer 41. Legions 42. False front 43. Testimony 45. Sir, in India 49. East southeast 50. Supply 53. Express strong disapproval 57. Aggravation 59. Affirm 60. Carryall 61. Exhaust 62. Equipment 63. Visual organs 64. Slightly intoxicated 65. Terminates

ACROSS 1. Stop 5. Automaton 10. Destiny 14. Away from the wind 15. Avoid 16. Atop 17. A soft sheepskin leather 18. Judge 20. Slender stem-like

structure 22. Thought 23. Many millennia 24. Literary genre 25. Myopic 32. Ancient Roman magistrate 33. Beset 34. Big wine holder 37. Countercurrent

The Battle of Midway Enterprise Remembers: Part Two  

USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea – As the U.S. Navy continues to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Midway, Sailors aboard aircraft carri...

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