Page 1

r publicatio tte nsle Be st

newsletter

2011

pu bl ic a o ti

ide y-w av n

n

Chinfo Merit Award

-B

1

est navy-wide ne

st t

er

n

ew

ws le t

USS blue ridge lcc 19

b pu

lic

n - Best n atio av y-w id e

MARCH 7, 2013

From Engineman to Machinist’s Mate U.S. 7th Fleet Band Nutrition, fitness and Sleep

BLR Sailors vs. HK Students Same-Sex Family Benefits Sailors’ College Path Detour

HONG KONG

and

E R O M E D I S IN


r publicatio tte nsle Be st

2011

pu bl ic a

Chinfo Merit Award

n

1

-B

est navy-wide ne

st

USS blue ridge lcc 19

b pu

lic

n - Best n atio av y-w id e

Page 05 | U.S. 7th Fleet Band’s Pacific Ambassadors

Blue Ridge Magazine is an authorized publication for Sailors aboard USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19). Contents herein are not the views of, or endorsed by the U.S. government, Department of Defense, Department of the Navy or the Commanding Officer of USS Blue Ridge.

Page 09 | Fitness, Nutrition and Sleep

All news, photos and information for publication in Blue Ridge Magazine must be submitted to the Public Affairs Officer.

Page 03 | From Engineman to Machinist’s Mate

Story by MC3(SW) James Norman

Story by MC1 Joshua Karstens

Story by MC3 Michael Hendricks

Produced by Media Services | Ext. 4154

Page 10 | Play Ball!

Commanding Officer Captain Will Pennington Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. Brian Ribota Command Master Chief CMDCM (SW/AW/IDW) Mark Tomlinson Public Affairs Officer Lt. Clinton Beaird Magazine Director MC2(SW) Timmy Wakefield Leading Petty Officer MC1(SW/AW) Heather Ewton MC1 Robert Northnagle Media Services Staff MC1(SW) Jay Chu MC2(SW) Aaron Pineda MC2(SW/AW) Jeff Troutman MC2(SW/AW) Rafael Figueroa MC2(SW) Mel Orr MC2(SW) Alexandra Arroyo MC3(SW) James Norman MC3 Michael Hendricks MC3 Cody Babin MC3 Sam Weldin MC3 Kelby Sanders MCSN Ben Larschied MCSN Jared Harral

Photo Story by MCSN Ben Larscheid

Page 13 | The Story of Us

Story by MC3 Everett Allen

Page 15 | Same-Sex Family Benefits

Stories by U.S Navy Public Affairs

Page 15 | Sailors’ College Plans Detour

Stories by U.S Navy Public Affairs

Click on the story you want to read. It will take you right to it! You can also click on web links in stories for more information.

On The Cover Friend us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/USSBlueRidge

HONG KONG (Mar. 2, 2013) -- Hong Kong lights up. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timmy Wakefield)

er

Features

t

n

ew

ws le t

Blue Ridge Magazine | Mar. 7, 2013

newsletter

o ti

CONTENTS

ide y-w av n


Commentary

By Lt. Clinton Beaird

Tomorrow Morning

T

his is about alcohol and what it has cost me during my career. It’s a cautionary tale and a source of information for anyone that wants to quit drinking for the improvement of their health, wealth and career. I have been in the Navy nearly 19 years now, and through the good and bad times I could always count on alcohol. I partied in more than 20 countries and drank to celebrate, drank to cheer up and drank to calm my nerves. I drank because I needed to. Fortunately (or unfortunately) I have been to Commanding Officer’s non-judicial punishment only once in my career. I have astonishingly made it this far in my career in spite of my best efforts to defeat myself through alcohol abuse and poor judgement. I have had pneumonia four times in the past two years and a constant drive of colds, coughs, and other ailments over the past decade. When I drank, I felt happy and carefree. I felt no pain, anxiety or anger. However, my problems were still with me the next morning with a hangover to top it off. Last year, I realized I was drinking entirely too much alcohol in one sitting. I self-referred to Blue Ridge’s Drug and Alcohol Program Advisor. I was subsequently screened by US Navy Hospital Yokosuka’s Substance Abuse Rehabilitation program (SARP) counselors. I was not prepared to hear their recommendation that I needed in-patient alcohol treatment, but five months later I left for treatment at Point Loma, San Diego. Last September I completed the Navy’s five week in-patient alcohol treatment, and I’m so glad I did. While in treatment, the key takeaways for me included: 1. In the past 18 years I have spent more than 250,000 on alcohol and drunken decisions like late-night meals, dumb purchases, buying rounds at the bar and a $300 taxi ride from Yokohama. 2. I resented my parents for always drinking when I was a kid, but I ended up doing the same thing to my children. I had the flawed thinking I was being a good dad,

because I spent my time at home with them while I was drinking. 3. A “normal” drinker will feel sick after four to five alcoholic beverages and an alcoholic is only warming up with five drinks. 4. Veterans Administration will not pay for alcohol treatment after separation or retirement unless you have attended alcohol treatment while in the service. The Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Control instruction (OPNAVINST 5350.4D) spells out termination of a Sailor’s career if he or she has an alcohol-related incident after receiving treatment (Self-referred or command directed). I was ignorant of those details when I was selfreferred, but quickly learned refusing to receive SARP’s recommendation is considered a treatment failure. At the time I couldn’t believe a Navy fiveweek program could cure me, but I agreed to save my career. I have been sober for seven months and am extremely motivated to stay that way. My bank account has grown substantially. I have not been sick since August, and I’m less anxious at work than I used to be. You can live a sober lifestyle by owning your alcohol problem and accepting SARP help. If you are worried that the Navy knowing your alcohol habit will end your career you can still get the help you need outside the Navy. Fleet and Family Service Center has civilian counselors who will help you identify issues that might be enabling your drinking. The counseling sessions are free, and the command is not involved. You can order Alcoholics Anonymous “The Big Book” or read it via PDF file online. If you read the book and find it could be your biography, you might be interested in attending AA meetings for support. AA membership is free and there are meetings worldwide. Becoming sober is hard work. There will be many temptations. You may have dreams about drinking or stray thoughts that a drink won’t hurt. You just have to take it one day at a time. If you have any questions please call or stop by. I’ll be glad to listen and offer advice.

Back to Table of Contents


Back to Table of Contents

from

M M

engine an to achinist’s ate Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James Norman

I’m nervous about

LEARNING a new job field.

ESPECIALLY,

EN since I’ve been an

Engineman 3rd Class Ivy Bonner conducts a clear and bright test of JP-5 fuel. The test checks for water and sediment in the fuel. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James Norman) (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timmy Wakefield)

for THREE years.

Engineman 3rd Class Ivy Bonner

Layout and design by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timmy Wakefield


HISTORY The Engineman rating was first established in 1917, and then disestablished 1931. In 1948, Engineman was re-established as a Navy rating when the rating of Motor Machinist’s Mate, Motor Machinist’s (Diesel Engine Mechanics), and Motor Machinist’s Mate (Gasoline Engine Mechanics) were consolidated.

-Naval History and Heritage Command

NAVADMIN 382/12 will merge 2,000 Sailors in the engineman rating to the machinist’s mate rating by the end of fiscal year 2013. Engineman 3rd Class Ivy Bonner is the only Blue Ridge Sailor directly affected by the new policy. Bonner said the merger will concentrate engineman (EN) efforts towards diesel propulsion, used aboard most amphibious ships. “I’m nervous and excited about learning a new job field. Especially,

when I’ve been an EN for three years,” said Bonner. “The merger will help get EN’s back on track to the core of our rate – diesel engines. I think the merger will help open up more billets for MM’s while allowing both rates to focus on their primary systems. The billets will mostly be sea, but the opportunities are endless.” MM’s will now primarily maintain shipboard auxiliary machinery work to include fresh water evaporators, air

MANNING 2013 EN: 4,716 MM: 4,179

2014 EN: 3,205 MM: 6,554

conditioning and refrigeration. EN’s can let their enlisted community manger (ECM) know what their intentions are through their command career counselor by March 1, 2013. Those with limited diesel experience may remain an EN based on their career progression considering paygrade, sea-shore rotation, manning or personal choice. ECM’s will make the final approval based on overall community manning. Reorganizing the rates will open

up billets for MM’s to serve aboard destroyers, cruisers, frigates and amphibious dock landing ships. Billets for these ships went away in the 1970’s because of the switch from steam to gas turbine and diesel propulsion. For more information on the entire instruction, visit the Navy Personnel Command website. NAVADMIN 382/12 covers much more instruction, procedures and policies of the latest merger.

Engineman 3rd Class Ivy Bonner visits the American Manila Cemetery and Memorial in the Republic of the Philippines. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timmy Wakefield/Released)

Back to Table of Contents


Back to Table of Contents


U.S. 7th Fleet Band’s pacific ambassadors Story by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Joshua Karsten Photos by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jared Harral

The U.S. 7th Fleet Band’s Pacific Ambassadors play for a large crowd at Hong Kong Disneyland, spreading positive community relations. This was the first show of the year for the band, who performed songs such as “Seven Bridges Road,” “Beat It” and “Gangnam Style.”

Back to Table of Contents


Back to Table of Contents

Musician 3rd Class Camellia Akhamie, percussionist for the U.S. 7th Fleet band, dances to “Gangnam Style� in front of an audience at Hong Kong Disneyland.


The U.S. 7th Fleet Band Pacific Ambassadors prepare to begin their performance for an audience at Hong Kong Disneyland.

T

he U.S. 7th Fleet Band’s Pacific Ambassadors performed for encore, the entire band performed the ever popular “The Stars and Stripes crowds of tourists at Hong Kong Disneyland on Mar. 1, 2013. Forever.” The performance kicked off the start of their 2013 touring “I’ve never experienced the U.S. Navy in such a unique way,” said Lesly schedule throughout Asia and the western Pacific. This was Centewo, a Hong Kong Disneyland performer. “Usually, everyone associates the third year in a row the Pacific Ambassadors have visited Hong Kong the military with the main characteristic of being stern. The 7th Fleet Band was Disneyland. a great way to experience a different “We’ve been practicing our new side of the U.S. Navy.” performances and arrangements since The band’s performance was November 2012,” said Musician 2nd energetic and geared to appeal to a Class Christopher Bourgeois. “It’s good wide variety of musical tastes. After to show the people of Hong Kong how the performance, the audience had much we care about our partnership a chance to meet with members of Musician 2nd Class Christopher Bourgeois with this country. We showed everyone; the band and pose for photos, further not only musically, but personally how building on the relationships between U.S. 7th Fleet Band Member much we appreciate them.” the Chinese and other nationalities Crowds enjoyed a little taste of that were in attendance. Americana during the performance “Our basic job is to make people along with genres such as jazz, rock and Dixie, and included movie and feel good,” said Chief Musician Mark Stout. “Our job as Navy Musicians when television theme music to complement the Disney spirit. During the set, the outside our country is to shed a positive image on the Navy and the United band performed such crowd favorites “Brazil,” “Beat It” and “Gangnam States. I feel we did that today.” Style.” In the middle of the set, 7th Fleet Band’s Vocal Quartet and two guitarists The Pacific Ambassadors are part of the U.S. 7th Fleet Band and are based performed “Seven Bridges Road” to an enthusiastic reception. For a final out of Yokosuka, Japan.

“It’s good to show the people of Hong Kong how much we care about our partnership with this country.”

Back to Table of Contents


Nutrition

Fitness & Sleep

The forgotten cornerstones of losing weight and building muscle. prevents it from healing sore muscles adequately. “While you sleep your body is producing hormones that help your body heal,” said Green. “At the same time it is also releasing hormones which affect your metabolism.” Irregular eating patterns appear when sleep deprivation is a factor. The hormones Leptin and Ghrelin influence the appetite and adversely affect eating habits when not enough sleep is an issue. According to the article “The Dream Diet: Losing Weight while You Sleep” by Colette Bouchez, Leptin and Ghrelin work as “checks and

Your shoes are tied, your iPod is charged, you grab your towel, gym bag and headphones and go to the gym. You sit down on the bench in preparation to start your lifts and you think, “Man! I’m too tired for this.” Story and photos by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Michael Hendricks

S

leep is a huge factor when it comes to health, nutrition and fitness. The consequences of sleep deprivation can be detrimental for individuals seeking to get in shape. Studies show eight hours of sleep is critical to muscle growth and hormone releases that help with daily activities and the motivation to stick to new health plans and exercise schedules. Sleep is an overlooked factor for new-comers trying to get fit and lose weight. It affects the more commonly known elements of physical fitness and a nutritious diet. “Working Out and Sleep” from Ask Men, correlates that lack of sleep inhibits muscle growth and prevents optimal workout sessions due to lack of energy and tired muscles. “Sleep is a very important aspect of fitness and health,” said Lieutenant Commander Justin Green, USS Blue Ridge medical officer. “At a basic level if you are sleep deprived your muscles will not respond as well and the work out will not be as effective compared to someone who

got the proper amount of sleep.” While you sleep your body routinely releases chemicals such as Erythropoietin, human growth hormones, and testosterone into the body. Shortening your sleep schedule affects the regularity that these chemicals get released. If sleep deprivation is an issue, the hormone Cortisol is more prevalent; it directly opposes muscle building and growth hormones which

Yeoman 1st Class Yonet Garciacabrerra tones his forearms and biceps through bicep curls in the ship’s gym.

Lack of sleep inhibits muscle growth and prevents optimal workout sessions due to lack of energy and tired muscles.

balances” controlling the feelings of hunger and fullness. Leptin signals the body to stop eating, and when you don’t get enough sleep these levels are decreased and you never feel full or satisfied after eating a normal meal. This can lead to overeating and weight gain. Do yourself a favor, add eight to nine hours of sleep to your current workout and nutrition plan and see the enhanced results faster! Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jared Harral works on his chest through pec flys in the ship’s gym.

Back to Table of Contents


Back to Table of Contents


EST 1 MAR. 2013

S

ailors assigned to U.S. 7th Fleet flagship, USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19) play a friendly game of baseball against the Hong Kong International School’s junior varsity and varsity baseball teams.

Back to Table of Contents


Members of the Hong Kong International School’s Junior Varsity and Varsity baseball teams come together for a pre-game pep talk.

Damage Controlman 3rd Class Allison Lance stands at home plate, poised to hit a pitch.

Both teams show good sportsmanship by congratulating each other after the game.

Lt. Donald Baker, Blue Ridge chaplain, (right) speaks with members of each team at the end of the game.

Back to Table of Contents


Story by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Everett Allen

l The

Story of Us l

Layout by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timmy Wakefield

Alyssa, Pickles and Eric Paul.

Michael, Ramon, Tawny and Jonathan Holley.

Back to Table of Contents


ALYSSA PAUL: “When he wakes up in the morning, I stay up because he’s making a noise in the kitchen and getting dressed. Then once he goes to work, I usually sleep for a little while longer. I usually set my alarm for 10 a.m. to feed Pickles, our dog.” Pickles is a miniature Dachshund Alyssa’s husband Eric gave her for Christmas. “After my morning routine I make breakfast and do whatever. Sometimes I go out and explore Japan. My average day also consists of appointments, reading, talking to Eric, and playing with the dog.”

An average Day MICHAEL HOLLEY: Michael Holley is a former U.S. Navy personnel specialist who served aboard USS Kitty Hawk. Michael and his wfe Tawny have two kids. Ramon, their 8-year-old son, is in the third grade, and their other son, Jonathan, is only 21 months old. “My wife goes to work, and I wake up at the same time. Once she’s gone, I clean throughout the day and also watch over Jonathan. Sometimes I’ll go for a walk with Jonathan.” TAWNY HOLLEY: “He usually gets up and takes care of our baby and makes sure the older one is getting ready for school. He tries to do the shopping before Ramon gets off school. On occasion, when I come home, he’s so caught up in what he’s doing that he doesn’t acknowledge me. It’s ok, because we’re the same in that sense. We just have that mutual understanding.”

ALYSSA PAUL: Alyssa and Eric Paul like going out and spending time with Eric’s friends, who have now become Alyssa’s friends. “They’ve made me happy since I’ve been here, and I haven’t felt left out. We have people over a lot for movies and eating, but we also go to our friends’ places.” Alyssa also socializes with a crowd much like her own. “I hang out with other Navy wives too.” ERIC PAUL: “I introduced my wife to a good group of people she can trust so when I’m gone, she can have a great social life.”

Socializing TAWNY HOLLEY: Sometimes, she and her husband watch movies and relax at home, but they always have to keep their kids in mind. “We usually wait for the kids to go to sleep before we even hang out. We’re also pretty introverted. I’ll hang out with a friend maybe once a week, but we pretty much only hang out with each other.” “After the Navy, Michael lost touch with most of his friends. We have a hard time making friends because people are hard to trust.”

ALYSSA PAUL: “My biggest struggle while he’s underway is that I get really bored.” “I explore and I do a lot of walking around Yokosuka. It usually helps make my time without him more bearable.” ERIC PAUL: “My biggest struggle is stress, which stresses her out. When I’m at sea, I can’t help her with certain problems. I feel like ‘What can I do when I’m an ocean away?’” ALYSSA PAUL: “Well, during the command sponsorship process, I struggled with getting my personal documents together to be with my husband. That was very stressful for the both of us.”

Struggles

ALYSSA PAUL: Alyssa Paul spends her time staying in touch with friends and family back home. “I’ve been keeping tabs with my friends and family. It seems like they’re forgetting about you, but once you talk to them, you pick up right where you left off.” ERIC PAUL: “She’s had to become more independent and she’s become very organized and she’s very reliable. She has coped with moving from an American culture to a Japanese culture. Learning their [Japanese] customs has been a dramatic change but it’s been a great way to broaden her worldly perspective.”

Coping With Change

MICHAEL HOLLEY: “When my wife goes underway, it’s just me and the children and it’s very secluded here.”

MICHAEL HOLLEY: “I pass the time by playing my guitar, watching movies, and playing video games.”

TAWNY HOLLEY: “Michael emails me and tells me he misses me and he wants me to be home.”

TAWNY HOLLEY: “He’s still adjusting. He used to be here in Japan as a single sailor and now that’s all changed. It’s a pretty slow adjustment. It’s not the being married with children part, it’s the being here in Japan part that Michael struggles with.”

MICHAEL HOLLEY: “When Tawny takes the kids for even a little while, it helps to relieve stress. It gives me time to do things by myself like playing guitar or video games.” TAWNY HOLLEY: “I’m thankful that I’m only away for this short amount of time. If it were more than 3 months, this would be really hard.”

ALYSSA PAUL: “Before sponsorship, it was a really stressful time. We were stressed out about bills, stressed out about Eric making his Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist, which he definitely made. I was really proud of him after he got it.” ERIC PAUL: “Sometimes I feel like it’s going to get better because it can’t get any worse. We are together, she’s sponsored. The only thing we have to get over now is the underway.”

Moving Forward MICHAEL HOLLEY: Michael Holley and his wife are glad that their kids are finally doing better with living in Japan. TAWNY HOLLEY: “The kids had been used to a different routine from San Diego and it took time to adjust to the Japan lifestyle. Ramon’s grades are improving as well.” MICHAEL HOLLEY: “This experience has really made me feel the empathy for single mothers. When she’s underway, I’m a single father. We’re still developing as a family. We’ll get into a routine, I’m sure of it.”

Back to Table of Contents


Back to Table of Contents

Secretary of the Navy, Ray Mabus discusses how the sequestration will affect the fleet. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timmy Wakefield)

SAME-SEX FAMILY BENEFITS AVAILABLE OCT. 1 From Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairs

WASHINGTON (NNC) – Department of Defense announced the extension of benefits to same-sex partners to ensure fairness and equal treatment to the extent allowable under law on Feb. 11. NAVADMIN 024/13 provides information on Navy’s implementation of the Department of Defense’s extension of family benefits to same-sex partners. “These benefits will be available no later than October 1,” said Rear Adm. Tony Kurta, director military plans and policy. “To qualify, Sailors and their same-sex domestic partner will be required to sign a Declaration of Domestic Partnership attesting to the existence of their committee relationship.” The declaration is similar to that in use by other federal agencies. Service members will file the declaration at their PSD, where a DD Form 1173 (“dependent” ID card) will then be issued allowing access to benefits. Children of same-sex domestic partners will also qualify for the ID card and benefits. Benefits the will be extended to same-sex domestic partners and families include: *Dependent ID cards (DD Form 1173) which will be renewed in accordance with existing policies *Commissary and Exchange *Access to Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) *Access to child and youth programs. This includes child care, youth programs and youth sponsorship. *Space-Available Travel on DoD Aircraft *Joint duty assignment for dual military partners *Access to Legal Assistance *Access to most Family Center Programs *Emergency leave and emergency leave of absence for the military member to attend to partner emergencies *Access to sexual assault counseling program. Emergency care provided; additional care determined by medical eligiblity *Exemption from hostile-fire areas for dual military if partner is killed in a combat zone *Transportation to and from certain places of employment and on military installations

*Transportation to and from Primary and Secondary school for minor dependents *Disability and death compensation: dependents of members held as captives *Payments to missing person *Authorization to participate in surveys of military families, including the quadrennial quality of life review *Ability to participate in the quadrennial quality of life review *Authority of Service Secretary to transport remains of a dependent These benefits are in additoin to the 20 educational, survivor, and travel and transportation benefits now available, without constraints, to same-sex domestic partners by designation of the service member. These member-designated benefits are available to all Service members and a beneficiary of their choosing. Much like the process for the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell law, Navy will review and modify all necessary instructions, notices, and MILPERSMAN articles, develop and deploy training for command triads, installation commanders, chaplains, care and benefit providers to include all Personnel Support Detachment (PSD) to ensure a clear understanding of the documentation requirements for, and the benefits associated with, these ID cards. Certain benefits currently provided to military families cannot be extended to same-sex domestic partners at this time, because they are restricted by law. Those benefits include Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) at the ‘with dependent rate, and medical care to include eligibility for TRICARE. Benefit information and updates to policy on benefits for same-sex partners and families will be posted as they become available on Navy’s Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Post Repeal website on Navy Personnel Command’s web page under Support and Services http://www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/support/dadt/ Pages/default.aspx

NAVADMIN 024/13 provides information on Navy’s implementation of the Department of Defense’s extension of family benefits to same-sex partners.

Sailors’ College Path May Face Possible Detour From Navy Public Affairs Support Element West

SAN DIEGO (NNS) – The Department of Defense voluntary education partnership memorandum of understanding (MOU), a document between higher education institutions and the U.S. government, went into effect March 1. Department of Defense Instruction (DoDI) 1322.25 Voluntary Education Programs, states all institutions providing high school completion and post-secondary education programs through the DoD Tuition Assistance (TA) Program must agree to the new D0D MOU and have a signed copy on-file with the DoD prior to Service members receiving TA approval to attend their institution. “The Navy will no longer issue TA vouchers for colleges that have not signed the DOD MOU,” said Dr. Jonathan Woods, (OPNAV 153 Education Branch). “DoD is not entertaining exceptions to this policy. Since most schools and colleges that serve Sailors have already signed the MOU, very few Sailors should be impacted by this policy. If there is any question, Sailors can check the status of their school at www. dodmou.com before submitting a TA request.” Sailors are also encouraged to talk to an education professional at the Navy College Office to explore all their options regarding best fit between degree programs and educational goals. Counselors can help maximize training and experiential credit opportunities and guide Sailors to meet degree requirements in the most economical way.

Blue Ridge Magazine: The First Interactive Digital Edition  

Contains a great video of the 7th Fleet Band. Same-Sex benefits. Hong Kong sports.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you