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Volume 7 Issue 4

April 30, 2019

BATAAN

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FLEET & HOMETOWN NEWS


VOL.7 ISSUE 4

APRIL 30, 2019 Volume 7, Issue 2

BATAAN

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COVER: Approximately 76,000 filipino and American troops on Bataan were forced to make an arduous five day 65 mile march to Japanese prison camps. These Soldiers, Sailors and Marines made the trek in intense heat and were subjected to harsh treatment by Japanese guards. Approximately 21,000 people perished during the march in what became known as the Bataan Death March.

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Commanding Officer Capt. Greg Leland Executive Officer Capt. Bryan Carmichael Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/AW) Ryan Lamkin BATAAN PUBLIC AFFAIRS Public Affairs Officer

MCC(SW/AW) Stacee McCarroll

Editor, Layout & Design MC1(SW/AW) Jaq Renard MCSN Levi Decker

Table of Contents 3 News From Around The Fleet 4 Hometown News: An Italian Blend to U.S. Navy Life 6 Battle of Bataan, WWII Veterans 7 Mariner Skills Week 8 Bataan Remembers Vietnam Veterans 11 Battling Bastards Photos

News Team 5

MC1 Kegan Kay MC2 Zachary Anderson MC2 Kaitlin Rowell MC3 Leonard Weston MC3 Alan Robertson The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, edited and provided by Bataan’s Public Affairs Office. This newspaper is an authorized publication for members of military services at sea. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the official views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. USS BATAAN (LHD 5) USS BATAAN


Fleet News

VOL. 7 ISSUE 4

BATAAN TOUGH

APRIL 30, 2019

CHECKED OUT THE NAVY’S NEW

ADVANCEMENT DASHBOARD

NavyTimes Mark D. Faram

The Navy has launched a website designed to give Sailors individualized information on their advancement status, including study tips on how to boost their chances to move up. Called the Advancement Dashboard, it’s currently available online only to sailors eyeing advancement to pay grades E-4 through E-6. Officials promise that a version helping senior enlisted sailors make E-7 and above will arrive soon, but they haven’t listed a deadline for when it will become available. “The Advancement Dashboard provides a centralized location with the authoritative data so sailors know their personal information is correct and the reference materials used to study for the exams are up-to-date

A screen shot of the new Advancement Dashboard, designed to give sailors a detailed personal view of their eligibility status for advancement.

and reliable,” said Vice Adm. Bob Burke, the Navy’s top uniformed personnel officer, in a Friday press release and message announcing the

new online tool. In the release, officials the “dynamic, Continued on page 11

NAVY UNIFORM POLICY UPDATE ANNOUNCED

Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairs

The Navy announced updates to uniform policy, grooming standards, uniform item availability and mandatory possession dates for new uniform items in NAVADMIN 075/19, released March 25. Highlights include: A command/unit logo shoulder patch is now an option for wear on the left shoulder pocket of the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Type II and III

in place of the Don’t Tread On Me shoulder patch.

Black leather and non-leather gloves can be worn with the black NWU parka fleece liner. NWU Type III O-6 rank insignia will be available for purchase and optional wear in silver thread starting June 1, 2019 for easier visual recognition and distinction from the E-4 insignia. Effective June 1, 2019 all enlisted Sailors with 12 years of cumulative

service in active or drilling reserve time in the Navy or Marine Corps may wear gold rating badges and gold service stripes on dress uniforms in lieu of red rating badges and stripes. Women have the option to wear smooth or synthetic leather flat shoes (flats) in service and service dress uniforms. Nursing T-shirts may be worn with service uniforms, NWU Type I, II and Continued on page 11

No Mama, No Papa, No Uncle Sam | 3


Hometown news

AN ITALIAN BLEND TO U.S. NAVY LIFE Story & photo by MC1 Kegan Kay

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he fragrant smell of rich Italian coffee permeates the air inside the amphibious assault ship, USS Bataan’s (LHD 5), bridge. The scent is as faithful as the chimes of a clock indicating the time. It marks 2:30 p.m. and Italian Naval Officer, Sottoenente Di Vascello (Lieutenant Junior Grade) Gianluca Perino, 25, has just made some fresh espresso for Bataan’s Navigation Department. Lt. j. g. Perino is attached to Bataan as part of the Navy’s Personnel Exchange Program (PEP) which lets selected service members make a one-for-one exchange with personnel from another military or foreign service. Perino explained that the Navy sends out a message letting members know

what positions are available aboard U.S. naval vessels for allied forces to apply. As his case, assistant navigator aboard the Bataan . “I applied and I was lucky that they chose me,” Perino laughs. “For us, it is a good opportunity for our career and also for our spirits. We get to learn a language, get in touch with another culture and some say [the U.S. Navy] is the best navy in the world, I couldn’t miss that opportunity.” PEP’s objective is to integrate participants into the host organization as though they belonged to the service to which they become assigned and to share professional knowledge with members from other services and nations.

4 | We Are The Battling Bastards of Bataan

“We as a professional naval service have specific processes and methods of executing our mission as professional mariners,” remarks Bataan’s Navigation Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Jonathan Paiz, regarding Perino’s time aboard the ship so far. “He brings a fresh and different perspective on how his country conducts a lot of the same tasks at sea which allows us to improve upon our process and understand how some of our partner nations and allies operate at sea.” Perino while born in Genoa, Italy, was raised in La Spezia, a city with a population of around ninety-four thousand, located on the Ligurian Sea, midway between Genoa and Pisa. When describing his home town, he relates it to being similar to Norfolk as it also hosts a naval base and is broken


down by districts such as Cinque Terre, which he relates to being the Norfolk Ghent area of La Spezia. His career began in 2012, at the Italian Air Force Military School, Giulio Douhet, in Florence. He graduated with a high school scientific degree and then attended the Italian Naval Academy in Leghorn, Italy from 2012 to 2016. During his time at the Italian Naval Academy, Perino participated in the midshipmen summer exchange and spent a month and half aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer, USS Donald Cook (DDG 75), while she was stationed in Rota, Spain.

and my second favorite was when he dropped it within twenty yards of the plotted anchorage in front of ATG (Afloat Training Group). Their jaws literally hit the deck.” This is a remarkable feat for any mariner as the variables surrounding the ability to drop the ship’s anchor on the intended spot are numerous. Perino had to take into account, the ocean’s currents, wave size, wind direction and speed, the crew, timing, and most importantly himself.

“You would think the navy is the navy regardless of what country you’re in,” explains Senior Chief Quartermaster Charles Pugel, Bataan’s navigation departmental leading Perino laughingly tells how during that month and half, he chief petty officer. “Navigation is Navigation, but the gained twenty to twenty-five pounds, because of the great nuances of how differently we do things, its fun to sit ship food, and he worried when coming to Bataan that the down and have those conversations, not just showing Mr. same thing would happen. He was slightly disappointed Perino how we do things, but listening and learning from as he actually lost weight since being aboard the ship. his, gives a new perspective on the different ways you can complete the same tasks.” Most of Perino’s time aboard has been inport while the ship was undergoing a scheduled maintenance The dominate part of Perino’s personality is his jovial availability, he has still had the opportunity to see new nature and his focus on interpersonal relationships, events. especially with those around him, which is further Bataan recently completed a month underway for sea trials providing opportunities for Perino to experience life at sea aboard a U.S. ship. He chuckled stating that underways are all the same no matter which navy you are in and that he is used to life at sea. “I have a great opportunity to see a lot of stuff and this is really interesting to me,” clarifies Perino. “I’ve never seen a helicopter operation before, so when I first saw it, I was amazed. It was really outstanding.” While discussing his experiences aboard Bataan, he rates qualifying as a security reaction force member getting Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) sprayed as his most unique experience so far as that it is not something they do in the Italian Navy. “At first it wasn’t so pleasurable, but after a few minutes I started having fun,” Perino once again laughing. “And yeah it was worth it. I really liked enjoying it and having fun with other people.” While this is not a typical reaction most people have to being OC sprayed, unique moments with Perino are numerous and everyone has a story. Paiz was all too eager to share his favorite moments with Perino so far, boasting of Perino’s skills as a mariner in the process; “He dropped the anchor within six yards of the plotted anchorage during our first Basic Phase Underway and earned the moniker ‘The Italian Stallion,”

highlighted when asked about what he would tell people back home of his time aboard Bataan.

“I would not talk about the ship, I would talk about the people because I’ve really been accepted here,” grins Perino. “I really appreciate that. That’s my important thing, to be integrated and accepted into the group as one of them. It is really important, because it is not so easy to be far from home and to have people not like you and not want you here. I love helping people and interacting with people and the people here are always smiling and have hundred percent energy. They are always positive, so it is a really nice environment that I like to work in.” This love of his co-workers and department aboard the ship is easily seen in his day-to-day interactions with people aboard the ship and the special care he shows his department. “Relationships are important in Italy, so with the hectic schedule he decided he was going to get an espresso maker and every day around 2:30 p.m. he’ll brew up some espresso and share with the division,” stated Pugel. “Even if only for five minutes, you can tell the shop enjoys the break.” “Feel free to come up to the bridge whenever you want to have a cup of Italian coffee,” Perino laughingly invites. “I would really appreciate that.” No Mama, No Papa, No Uncle Sam | 5


Dan Crowley initially joined

the Army Air Corps in 1940 because he wanted to take a long trip with two of his friends to somewhere at the government’s expense. Little did he know how much the country would be indebted to him, for his sacrifice and true grit of fighting to keep America free and its citizens safe.

BATTLEof Story by MC2 Zachery Anderson & Photos by MCSA Levi Decker

BATAAN, WWII VETERANS 6 | We Are The Battling Bastards of Bataan


It’s often heard that the amphibious assault ship, USS Bataan (LHD 5), is the only U.S. warship named after an American defeat, and while it’s true the ship shares the same name as the Battle of Bataan, it is actually named for the fighting spirit of the American and Filipino Sailors and Marines who fought valiantly during the four-month battle during World War II. Seventy-six-thousand Filipino and American troops were forced to make an arduous five-day 65-mile march to Camp O’Donnell that has come to be known as the Bataan Death March. Of the 76,000 who participated in the march, only 50,000 made it to the camp. Over the next two and half years, the survivors of the Death March and the Battle of Bataan would continue to face hardships, from the journey on Japanese prison ships, known as hell ships, to the harsh conditions of prison camps. Only 15,000 service members made it back home at the end of the war. Battle of Bataan survivor, Dan Crawley joined the crew on April 26 to share his story, along with fellow World War II veterans, Mickey Casady and Anthony Gravino, as they answered questions during the ship’s 77th Anniversary of Battle of Bataan commemoration held onboard. The ceremony included words from Commandig Officer Capt. Gregory Leland, a question and answer session with the honored guests, and the

Bataan Heritage Committee reading the timeline of events from the Battle of Bataan to the troops coming home at the end of the war. “When you’re drinking clean water, remember how some Soldiers went mad trying to get just a drop while walking 65 miles in the scorching hot sun for five days,” said Bataan Heritage Committee member, Aviation Boatswain’s Mate [Fuel] First Class Christopher Hunter. “When you’re eating a hot meal, remember how they were lucky if they got a cup of rice to eat for the day after an intense day of manual labor in a brutal concentration camp. When you’re lying in your bed tonight, remember that only 15,000 service members returned home at the end of the war.” Leland closed the ceremony with a request to the crew of Bataan, to reflect on the experiences the ship’s special guests shared and take those experiences with them into their personal lives. “Today, I ask you all to pass on the unconquerable faith, that glorious something in your heart and soul, to the next generation,” said Leland. “To remind us and others of what they fought for and what we fight for today. To never be forgotten.” After the ceremony ended, the floor was opened for Sailors to come up to Crowley, Gravino and Casady to ask questions, listen to war stories, and shake hands.

Sailors and veterans assembled in the hangar bay in remembrance of Bataan Death March.

Command Master Chief Ryan Lamkin gives Anthony Gravino his challenge coin.

Dan Crowley, a Battle of Bataan survivor, is escorted onboard. No Mama, No Papa, No Uncle Sam | 7


MARINER SKILLS WEEK Story and photos by Zachary Anderson

Turning left, when you’re driving a car, it’s a simple task. If you’re driving a semi-truck, it’s slightly more difficult. But what if you’re driving an 800-foot-long warship? For the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) navigation team it’s all in a day’s work, and during sea trials their skills were put to the test. March 14th, marked the beginning of mariner skills week, a comprehensive week of training combined with an assessment of the crews’ ability to navigate the ship. The week includes everything from basic communications and watch standing practices to advanced evolutions such as loss of steering drills, precision anchoring, and restricted waters transits. For Lt. Cmdr. Jonathan Piaz, the ships navigator, and his team of watch standers, this week is a vital check to ensure the ships safety. “Just like any other ship coming out of a shipyard, your skills atrophy, you have experience that departs and new people that come in who haven’t been underway,” said Paiz. “For a lot of our junior watch standers this is their first time underway, it’s their first time seeing and doing the things they have been trained to do. So we need that outside look to come in and say ‘yes, you are in fact ready to do this.’” Due to the size and weight of USS Bataan that navigational safety doesn’t come easy. “I’ve driven destroyers and I’ve driven this big deck amphib[ious ship],” said Piaz. “destroyers have a lot more 8 | We Are The Battling Bastards of Bataan

power and a lot less weight than a ship like this. Driving an amphib takes a lot of anticipation. a lot of patience and really requires you to think through problems before you come to a solution.” The training and assessments the navigation team are receiving all support one goal, to become mission ready. “We’re a war ship, our mission is to put marines on the beach,” said Paiz. “You can’t do any of that, you can’t execute the basic mission of the ship, if you’re not able to safely and properly drive the ship and that’s what this week is really all about.” While challenging evolutions and practice are good for the ship, they can also help watch standers on a personal level as well. “My hope for my team is that during every evolution, everyone involved learns something new, no matter how junior or senior they are,” said Paiz. “Whether that’s about themselves personally or how to execute their duties and responsibilities as a watch stander.” For Piaz, the goal is to come out of this week ready to move forward, having proved to leadership that the Bataan is ready for tasking and ready to focus on what lies on the horizon. “I’m looking forward to the future,” said Paiz. “This underway, we’ve done a lot of growing and caught up on a lot of proficiency we had lost from before, I’m really proud of the watch standers and watch teams, the progress they’ve made and the work they’ve put in.


BATAAN REMEMBERS VIETNAM VETERANS

Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Fuel Airman Michael Bernal and Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Fuel 3rd Class Giancarlo Davilalopez fold the Ensign during a Vietnam Veteran Recognition Ceremony on the mess decks aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5). Story by MCSN Levi Decker, photos by MC3 Lenny Weston

Bataan’s Heritage Committee hosted a flag folding vigil in honor of the men and women who fought valiantly during the Vietnam War, March 29. Sailors aboard the amphibious assault ship, USS Bataan (LHD-5), gathered on the mess Friday to recognize the service of Vietnam veterans as part of the Vietnam War Veterans Recognition Act of 2017 signed by president Donald Trump. During the ceremony, 13 bells were rung in conjunction with 13 flag folds to honor the sacrifice of the men and women who served, who fought and fell along with those who were captured that became prisoners of war, and the ones yet to come home. Bataan Sailors read the timeline of Vietnam War events between each bell and flag fold. Between 1956 to 1975, 2.5 million Americans served during the Vietnam War, more than 58,000 Americans

sacrificed their lives in service to our nation. The average age of service members during the war was 21 years-old compared to World War II which was 26 years-old. The average infantryman saw at least 240 days of combat within a year compared to World War II that saw an average of 40 days of combat in four years. An Estimated 4 million Vietnamese service members and civilians both North and South were killed during the conflict. The American service members who returned home from war, were treated with disdain and shunned for their service unbefitting a hero’s welcome. “Our veterans answered our country’s call and served with honor, and on March 29, 1973, the last of our troops left Vietnam,” said Command Master Chief Ryan Lamkin. “Yet, in one of the war’s most profound tragedies, many of these men and women came home to be shunned or neglected, to face treatment unbefitting their courage and a welcome unworthy

of their example. We must never let this happen again. Today, we reaffirm one of our most fundamental obligations. To show all who have worn the uniform of the United States the respect and dignity they deserve, and to honor their sacrifice by serving them as well as they served us. Half a century after those helicopters swept off the ground and into the archives of history, we pay tribute to the fallen, the missing, the wounded, the millions who served and the millions more who awaited their return. Our nation stands stronger for their service, and on National Vietnam Veterans Recognition Day, we honor their proud legacy with our deepest gratitude.” Following the recognition ceremony Bataan’s triad and ceremony participants gathered to cut the ceremonial cake marking the end of the event.

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BATAAN’S BATTLING BASTARDS PHOTOS

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(1) ATCS Michael McCann, CMDCM Ryan Lamkin and OSC Danielle Gonzales ceremoniously cut the 126th CPO birthday cake. (2) Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Affairs Gregory Slavonic and Capt. Greg Leland look at miniture ship replica’s of Bataan. (3) Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Affairs Gregory Slavonic listens as Capt. Greg Leland explains the components that make up the flight deck. (4) ENS Collins Amihere is pinned by his family duing his commissioning ceremony. (5) Capt. Carmichael gives remarks during the CPO birthday celebration. (6) Commander, Second Fleet, Vice Adm. Andrew Lewis conducts media interviews. (7) CMDCM Ryan Lamkin, Capt. Greg Leland, BM3 Savanna Fossler, LT Joshua Lawrence,Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Affairs Gregory Slavonic, AD2 Angelica Manuel, ET3 Neyva Mendes, ABHAN Samantha Beaver and MM2 Fernando Sanchez pose for a group photo.

6 | MC1 Kay

7 | MC1 Renard

10 | We Are The Battling Bastards of Bataan


NEW ADVANCEMENT DASHBOARD

Continued from page 3

user-friendly, web-based dashboard” that’s located on the MyNavy Portal promises to provide personnel a “detailed personal view of their eligibility status for advancement” while also housing a reference library to help Sailors understand and study for their next exam. For now, however, to visit the new site Sailors still need a computer set up to take a common access card. The online version available now features a calculator that helps to eliminate errors in computing a Final Multiple Score that determines whether a Sailor moves up or not. It includes performance marks, points for longevity and credit for passing previous tests, military awards and educational attainment.

Worksheet that Sailors must fill out, verify and sign before taking their tests. If the online version is correct, Sailors can print it out and hand it in. If there are errors, Sailors will see what they are and use a notification system to alert officials that help is needed to fix them. Officials also predict that by the fall Sailors will be able to take and pass the new Professional Military Knowledge Eligibility Exam, which will become a new requirement for advancement.

The dashboard also should provide Sailors with the Navy’s rules for advancement and tell personnel if they meet all the requirements. There also will be a list of study plans and the latest reference materials available to each Sailor, based on rating and pay grade. The new system arrives too late to have much influence over the March exam cycle but officials expect to beef up the online version by the fall, adding features to the dashboard to automate the Enlisted Advancement

NAVY UNIFORM POLICY

Continued from page 3

III and flight suits.

The message provides clarification on the definition and manner of wear for ponytail hairstyles. Effective immediately, Sailors who are assigned to Joint/Unified Commands are authorized to wear the command’s identification badge only during the period of assignment. Navy Exchange (NEXCOM) uniform stores will provide a free replacement collar if needed to improve the fit of the officer and chief petty officer (CPO) service dress white coat (choker) effective March 1, 2019. The NAVADMIN announces the completion of the testing and evaluation of the improved female officer and CPO slacks and skirts. It also provides the schedule for when the NEXCOM Customer Contact Center and Uniform Centers will have slacks and skirts, the Improved Safety Boot (I-Boot 4) and the optional physical training uniform available for purchase. The dates for when Sailors must possess new uniforms and uniform components are listed in the NAVADMIN.

DON’T DRINK & DRIVE Drivers with a blood alcohol content of .08 or above are considered too drunk to drive in every state. Even one drink could affect your ability to drive safely and react in time especially if you haven’t eaten in a few hours. Know your limit before you get there. Have a plan and stick with it.

Bataan Bustle

Safety Stand down will be held Thursday May 16 at BLDG C-9 from 1300 - 1700 No Mama, No Papa, No Uncle Sam | 11


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Gator Growl - April 2019  

In this edition of the Gator Growl we remember the 77th anniversary of the Bataan Death March, take a look at the life of an Italian Naval O...

Gator Growl - April 2019  

In this edition of the Gator Growl we remember the 77th anniversary of the Bataan Death March, take a look at the life of an Italian Naval O...

Profile for ussbataan
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