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March 28, 2014 Volume: 2 Issue: 6

Celebrating Women’s Impact on Our Navy’s History By MCSA Aaron T. Kiser USS Bataan Sailors and Marines join the nation in celebrating Women’s History Month during March as a tribute to the successful impact women across all military branches have had throughout history. Women have served with great honor and valor in defense of our nation since the Revolutionary War. However, women did not become an official part of the service until 1908, when Congress established the Navy Nurse Corps. The first 20 nurses, called the “Sacred Twenty” broke the barriers that eventually paved the way for all women to officially enter naval service. All of the women

selected had a background in nursing and a desire to prove their worth. Despite having no formal rank, having to pay out of pocket for food and shelter, and receiving little respect at first, they persevered to become a reputable group of women working for the Navy. Since the “Sacred Twenty”, laws have been enacted that have changed the environment for women in the military. Currently more than 59,000 active duty women and more than 9,000 Reserve women serve in the Navy. Making up 18 percent of the total force, women make numerous contributions to our Navy’s Women’s History cont. page 2

Photo by MC3 Mark Hays

Bataan Sailors, Marines Participate in ‘Wear Green’ Run By MC3 Mark Hays Sailors and Marines attached to the amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) supported the Navy-Marine Corp Relief Society (NMCRS) by participating in a 5K ‘wear green’ run March 18 on the ship’s flight deck. The ‘wear green’ run was designed to

raise funds necessary to financially assist Navy and Marine Corps personnel and NMCRS programs. The NMCRS raises funds for programs and support services through repayment of interest-free loans, proceeds from thrift shops, the reserve fund, and contributions.

Photo by MC3 Mark Hays

All contributions are returned to the service member and their families in form of emergency relief and other services such as education assistance and child budgeting. “Raising money for the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society leads to us having an understanding that we are all family in this organization,” said Ens. Jonathan Panter from Palisades, N.Y. “This allows us to help those in need.” Bataan Sailors and Marines participated in the wear green run 5k by running 10 laps on the flight deck. Each participant was asked to donate five dollars to the NMCRS. “This was my first 5K run on a flight deck,” said Religious Program’s Specialist 3rd Class Stephen Mostella from Knoxville, Tenn. “It was a little windy and warm but overall a nice day on the flight deck to run for a great cause.” For most Sailors and Marines this was

Look Inside! Way Brothers, Page 2 | Women History Month, Pages 4 & 5 | Heat Stress, Page 8


Women’s History from Front page

mission and readiness. Additionally, more than 54,000 women serve in a wide range of specialties as Navy civilians. Women leading in the Navy include: 32 active and Reserve flag officers, 69 Senior Executive Service (SES) members, 48 command master chiefs, and three command senior chiefs. “Women’s history month means a lot to me. Women around the world fought for equality for their gender and race at the same time,” said Seaman Apprentice Michelle Taylor of Fountain Inn, S.C. “It takes a lot for a woman to go against a man’s wishes to gain their independence. I hope to see a female president within my lifetime.” Today, nearly every naval community

is open to women, and female Sailors continue to excel in almost all facets of naval duties both ashore and afloat. Today’s female Sailors continue forward in the proud heritage of the women who served before them and will not back down no matter what. “Leadership isn’t about what I’m doing right now. It’s all about the Sailors and Marines I have supporting me, that make me look good and make my job look like it’s easy,” said Maj. Jennifer Goddard. “If you can become a mentor for them and create a positive influence in their life, they will work harder for you. If you can do this and teach people simultaneously, you come out better in the long run.”

Photo by MC3 Mark Hays

Way Brothers Serve Together Aboard the Bataan

By MC3 Erik Foster Deployed ships may be a stressful place for any given crewmember out at sea. Being away from family can bring more challenges than long working hours and dangerous conditions. For Quartermaster 2nd Class David Way

and Cpl. Joseph Way, life is a little easier because, with a little luck, they both were assigned to the USS Bataan (LHD 5) for the ship’s 2014 deployment. “My brother’s and I had a pretty good relationship growing up,” said Joseph, a Marine Corps aviation electronics technician aboard Bataan. “We were best friends growing up and we all hung out with the same people. I’ve always looked up to him, and watching him go into the military made me want to follow in his footsteps.” “My brother and I grew up in Ida,

Mich.,” said David, who is assigned to the ship’s Navigation department. “We went out every summer on my dad’s fishing boat where he would make us drive and cast the nets.” “Ever since I was a little kid, I had an interest in sailing,” said David. “In fourth grade, my teacher’s husband would come into class and tell us cool stories. He was a Boatswain’s Mate. Ever since then I had an interest in joining and had it in the back of my mind that being a Sailor was what I wanted to do.” “One day I was sitting in class in college when a good buddy of mine and I decided to join up,” said David. “I always knew that one day I would just end up just doing it.” After David joined the Navy, Joseph decided to join the Marine Corps. “I joined the military to serve my Way Brothers cont. page 6

Photos courtesy of the Way brothers

The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, edited and provided by Bataan’s Public Affairs Office. This newspaper is an authorized publication for members of military services at sea. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the official views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. Editor MC1(AW/SW) RJ Stratchko

Commanding Officer

Command Master Chief

CMDCM(SW/AW) Kevin M. Goodrich

Layout and Design MC3 Chase Hawley

Executive Officer

Public Affairs Officer

MC1(SW/AW) John Belanger MC1(AW/SW) RJ Stratchko MC3 Erik Foster MC3 Mark Hays

Captain George J. Vassilakis

Captain John “J.C.” Carter

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MCC(SW/SCW) Dennis Herring

News Team 5

MC3 Chase Hawley MCSN Nicholas Frank Cottone MCSA Michael J. Lieberknecht MCSA Aaron Kiser


Way Brothers from page 2

Photo by MC1 RJ Stratchko

Electronic’s Technician 2nd Class John Williams from Austin, Texas and Electronic’s Technician 3rd Class Miguel Velazquez from Brooklyn. N.Y. install the forward radar motor while wearing a self contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) aboard USS Bataan (LHD 5). SCBAs are worn aloft because of the proximity of exhaust gases from the ships stacks.

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APRIL 1 SPADES / ZUMBA

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8 SAAM KICK-OFF

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SPADES / ZUMBA

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14 VISUAL INSPECTION OF ALL SPACES FOR SAPR VIOLATIONS

country,” said Joseph. “I joined the Marines because they offered more of a challenge along with more pride and brotherhood than the other branches.” Because David has experienced being out to sea for extended periods, Joseph will have his brothers experience to guide him through his first deployment. “Having several deployments under my belt, this deployment is different,” said David. “My family is the first thing that I have at the front of my mind when I’m out here. Now that part of my family is aboard, I have an actual link of support which makes things easier. If I ever need anyone to talk to, Joseph is right there, it’s a simple phone call away or I can walk to his shop. It has got its benefits and so far it’s been pretty cool.” “Actually having my brother on board is not how I thought it would be,” said Joseph. “I’ll only see him a couple times a week and on the mess decks. I was hoping there would be more down time, but unfortunately our schedules are conflicting.” “We signed up for the military to see the world,” said David. “It just makes it better when you can experience it with your best friend. This is his first deployment so I’m going to show him deployment isn’t just pulling into port. It’s about seeing the sights, seeing the world, and being there for him.”

15 SPADES / ZUMBA

JUMP ROPE COMPETITION

16 SCAVENGER HUNT

3 POKER TABLE TOP GAME NIGHT ZUMBA

4 CORN HOLE

5 BINGO

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POKER / ZUMBA

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SAAM TALENT CONTEST

18 FREE PLAY BASKETBALL-TBD

19 SAAM WEIGHTLIFTING CONTEST BINGO

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22 DOMINOS TOURNAMENT

23 SIT UP COMPETITION

28 SCAVENGER HUNT

29 SPADES / ZUMBA

POKER

25 MOVIE NIGHT-TBD

26 SAAM 5K RUN/WALK SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE

SPADES / ZUMBA 27

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30 ARTS AND CRAFTS NIGHT DUATHLON

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Assignment Flexibility Allows Detailers to Fill Vacancies From NPC and USS Bataan Public Affairs A change to personnel policy now allows detailers to write orders directing the transfer of Sailors up to six months prior to or after their Projected Rotation Date (PRD), according to NAVADMIN 058/14 released Mar. 13, 2014. Additionally, shore duty Sailors in pay grades E-4 to E-9 may be pulled for Early Return to Sea Duty, after having completed at least 24-months ashore. “This will affect all the commands out there that are having shortfalls in their manning for these particular people,” said Master Chief Navy Counselor Ellis Picheloupe aboard USS. Bataan. “It’s to help get those billets filled that they haven’t been able to get filled over the last 24 months” A change to MILPERSMAN 1306-104 gives Navy detailers increased flexibility in filling anticipated fleet vacancies on time with a fully trained and qualified relief. Although the use of the Voluntary Sea Duty Program, Sea Duty Incentive Pay, and the Chief Petty Officer Early Return to Sea programs have made progress in

improving fleet manning, there are times when the number of fleet vacancies and/ or the associated training requirements for those positions do not align with the number or availability dates of Sailors in their orders negotiation window. PRDs will not be adjusted and the current Career Management System/Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) application and detailing policies remain unchanged. Sailors will still enter their CMS/ID order negotiation window nine months prior to their PRD. However, when they are selected for their next assignment, their orders may direct transfer earlier than the previous three months prior to four months after their PRD allowed. The actual transfer date will be determined by the commencement of training for the prospective job and the date of the anticipated fleet vacancy they are being ordered to fill. Additionally, when the number of critical fleet vacancies exceeds the number of sea duty rollers, detailers may contact shore duty Sailors that are approaching or

beyond 24-months ashore, and consider them for an early return to sea move. When being considered for an early return to sea requirement, Sailors will be contacted by their detailer, and their current command will be contacted by their placement coordinator, and they will be afforded a 30-day window to submit an impact statement for consideration regarding their early transfer. NAVADMIN 058/14 states, these changes to our distribution policy are being driven by the need to ensure on-time arrival of the right Sailor, with the right training to Fleet commands. Decisions affecting the careers and lives of our Sailors and their families are not taken lightly. Our aim is to cause to cause the least amount of disruption to the careers and live of our Sailors and their families, while sustaining Fleet manning and ensuring our Navy remains mission ready across the broad spectrum of maritime operations. For more information, read the message at www.npc.navy.mil.

Meet Your Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Team

Back:

ABF3 Cralton Dobson, Victim Advocate; Staff Sgt. William McCord, Uniformed Victim Advocate; AC1 Adrianna Ayala Barcellos, Victim Advocate; ABFCS Glenn Apacible, Bataan SAPR Program Manager and liaison; Capt. Brian Felty, 22 MEU Sexual Assault Response Coordinator; AMC Jason Grisso, Bataan Assistant Point of Contact, Victim Advocate; Staff Sgt. Natalie Brewer, Uniformed Victim Advocate; ATC Jessica Struhs, Victim Advocate; Gunnery Sgt.

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Photo by MC3 Chase Hawley

Kimberly Gray, Uniformed Victim Advocate Front: Ensign Jonathan Panter, Victim Advocate; AM3 Jodie Owrey, Victim Advocate; Gunnery Sgt. Marcus Berry, Uniformed Victim Advocate; ABF1 Rodney Randall, Victim Advocate Not pictured: USMC Capt. Gregory Sanders, Uniformed Victim Advocate; Ensign Lainy Powell, Victim Advocate; AGC Sherita Jones, Victim Advocate; AG1 Otis Kendricks, Victim Advocate


Green Run from Front page

a great way to get out of their work spaces and enjoy some fresh air. With Bataan being deployed the chance to enjoy the sun are few and far between. “It’s a great morale booster getting people outside on the flight deck,” Panter said. “The sun on your skin and wind in your hair gives you the opportunity to realize there is more to life than work on the ship.” The NMCRS also offers other great ways to reach out to Navy and Marine Corps service members beyond emergency loans. Financial counseling, health education, post-combat support, disaster relief, and access to thrift shops are also available.

Photo by MC1 RJ Stratchko

Sirius, a military working dog, waits to board an aircraft aboard the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5).

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BY T HE

T E G T N O D

HEAT

T A E B

Heat Cramps

PREVENTION METHODS

Heat Exhaustion

H E AT I N D E X C H A R T

Heat STROKE T E M P E R A T U R E

R E L AT I V E H U M I D I T Y

Gator Growl Vol. 2 Issue 6  
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