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GRE or GMAT Top graduate programs in the US and Europe require prospective students to submit either a GRE score or a GMAT score. Though the GMAT is mainly used in the business school application process and the GRE is used for other graduate majors, a vast majority of programs allow applicants the option of submitting the results of either exam.

About 90% of US business schools will accept either GMAT or GRE scores. If a school provides you the opportunity to choose between the two exams, pick the one you can master more easily, that is, one in which you can score a higher percentile overall (particularly in the sections that matter more in the program you are applying to). This much is obvious. However, consider the following factors as well to make an informed decision: Just because schools accept scores from either exam doesn’t necessarily mean that they view the exams equally. Why? First, business schools feel that the questions on the GMAT, particularly the Quantitative and Integrated Reasoning sections, test skills and knowledge more directly related to what you’ll need to know to do well in business school, such as multi-source reasoning and data interpretation. It is a fact that multi-source reasoning and Data Interpretation have direct application in case-based pedagogies. Second, some schools believe that submitting GMAT scores shows that you’re certain (and confident in your decision) about attending business school and committed to that career path. The GRE is used for admissions to a much wider variety of grad school programs from a Master’s in English Literature to a PhD in Biotechnology, and many programs in between; submitting GRE scores could make it seem like you are unsure about which grad school program you are interested in and are trying to keep your options open. Thus, if you are a professional with 4-5 years of work experience, you would be better off taking the GMAT: this would convey your seriousness and maturity to business schools. Note also that if you foresee yourself pursuing a career in consulting and/or finance post-MBA, prospective employers/recruiters might factor in your GMAT score (the higher the better, obviously!) in deciding your eligibility.


GRE vs. GMAT: Other factors to consider before you decide. Just because business schools accept scores from either exam doesn’t necessarily mean that they view the exams equally. Why?

First, business schools feel that the questions on the GMAT, particularly the Quantitative and Integrated Reasoning sections, test skills and knowledge more directly related to what you’ll need to know to do well in business school, such as multi-source reasoning and data interpretation. It is a fact that multi-source reasoning and Data Interpretation have direct application in case-based pedagogies. Second, some schools believe that submitting GMAT scores shows that you’re certain (and confident in your decision) about attending business school and committed to that career path. The GRE is used for admissions to a much wider variety of grad school programs from a Master’s in English Literature to a PhD in Biotechnology, and many programs in between; submitting GRE scores could make it seem like you are unsure about which grad school program you are interested in and are trying to keep your options open. What other factors should I consider before deciding? Research School Exam Policies: Many schools will specifically state which exam(s) they accept on their website. Take a Practice Exam: Take a simulated exam under realistic conditions (without distractions!) and the scores you get will give you a better idea regarding the exam itself and your own strengths, weaknesses and preference. You can download free GMAT mock test after registering from: https://www.mba.com/india/the-gmat-exam/prepare-for-the-gmat-exam/test-prep-materials/freegmat-prep-software.aspx You can download free GRE mock test after registering from: https://www.ets.org/gre/revised_general/prepare/powerprep/ Scholarship: Some schools require applicants to submit scores from a specific exam in order to be eligible for certain scholarships. If you want to keep your education costs down, you may want to make sure which test the school you are targeting prefers. Cost: Taking the GMAT costs $250 (approximately Rs.16000 in India) compared to $205


(approximately Rs.13000) for the GRE. The GMAT fee includes five free score reports; the GRE includes four. If you think you might have to take the test multiple times, the GMAT’s higher fee might have to be factored in. To send additional score reports, it costs $28 for each GMAT report and $27 for each GRE report sent.

GRE vs. GMAT: format and structure of both the GMAT and the GRE Can you tell me about the format and structure of both the GMAT and the GRE so that I can take an informed decision? Since the two tests are both taken on a computer, you must examine the specific contents of each test in order to make the proper decision.To begin with, compare the sections on each test:

GMAT GMAT Test Section Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) Integrated Reasoning

# of Questions 1 topic

Question Types Timing 1. Analysis of Argument 30 Minutes

12 questions

1. Multi-Source Reasoning 2.Graphics Interpretation 3.Two-Part Analysis 4.Table Analysis 1.Problem Solving 2.Data Sufficiency 1.Reading Comprehension 2.Critical Reasoning 3.Sentence Correction

Quantitative

31 Questions

Verbal

36 Questions

Total Exam Time (not incl. breaks)

GRE GRE Test Section Analytical Writing Measure Quantitative (x2)

Verbal (x2)

30 Minutes

62 Minutes 65 Minutes

3 hours 07 minutes

# of Questions 2 Topics

Question Types 1.Analyze an Issue 2.Analyze an Argument 20 Questions in each of 1.Multiple-Choice: the two sections Select One (40 total) 2.Multiple-Choice: Select One or More 3.Numeric Entry 4.Quantitative Comparison 20 Questions in each of 1.Text Completion

Timing 30 Minutes 30 Minutes 35 Minutes per section (70 min. total)

30 Minutes


the two sections (40 total) Total Exam Time

2.Sentence Equivalence per section 3.Reading (60 min. total) Comprehension 3 hours 45 min.

Each test has Quantitative, Verbal and Writing sections, the types of questions within either Verbal or Quant section between the two tests are not similar. Quantitative Section One important difference between the GMAT and the GRE, especially helpful for those who hate doing (complex) math mentally is that the GRE provides an on-screen calculator for use during the Quantitative sections, while the GMAT does not. The body of knowledge tested in the Quantitative sections of each exam is quite similar: questions in both tests are based on high school level arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. The most common question type on each test is multiple-choice, which are problems in which you are presented with a question and several answer choice options. Note that the math in the GMAT is considered more challenging than that of the GRE by a fair margin.

GRE vs. GMAT: Verbal and Writing Section Verbal Section Reading Comprehension passages are common to Verbal sections in both exams. You can expect Reading Comprehension passages typically consisting of 200-600 words per passage with 3-4 questions for each passage.

The GMAT has two other Verbal question types: Critical Reasoning and Sentence Correction. Critical Reasoning questions present a short statement or argument and then test your ability to use logical analysis to evaluate the statement. These questions have multiple choice answers. Sentence Correction questions contain a sentence in which a part of the sentence or the entire sentence is underlined, and you will be asked to identify and correct errors in grammar and usage in the underlined portion. Expect to see 1-4 GMAT-style Critical Reasoning questions in the Verbal sections of the revised GRE. While there are no Sentence Correction questions on the GRE, it contains two additional Verbal question types: Text Completion and Sentence Equivalence. Text Completion questions will have a sentence or short passage with one, two, or three words or phrases missing. From the answer choices, you must pick the missing word(s) that best fit(s) the overall meaning and context of the sentence.


Sentence Equivalence question present a single sentence with one word missing. From among six answer choices, you must select the TWO answer choices that both logically complete the sentence AND produce sentences with equivalent meanings. These question types are a test of your ability to understand a) the logic and structure of English sentence formation; and b) vocabulary-in-context. Expect to see hard (not-so-commonly-used) English words in Text Completion and Sentence Equivalence questions. Writing The GRE and GMAT both have a 30-minute essay on the analysis of an argument, where you are asked to analyze an argument for its questionable assumptions and overall validity. The GRE, additionally, has a second 30-minute essay where you are prompted to take a position on an issue and present an argument for your position using specific and relevant examples. The specific tasks on the GRE (and the expected quality) of your draft are far more exacting than those on the GMAT.

How is GMAT Integrated Reasoning Scored? Integrated Reasoning The GMAT has a unique section called Integrated Reasoning which has four question types (total 12 questions).

They measure how well you integrate data to solve complex problems and test the following skills: Synthesizing information presented in graphics, text, and numbers  Evaluating relevant information from different sources  Organizing information to see relationships and to solve multiple, interrelated problems  Combining and manipulating information from multiple sources to solve complex problems Basically, you are given charts, graphs, tables, or other sets of data and asked to interpret them to provide meaningful answers to the questions asked. 

Scoring Both the GRE and the GMAT use an adaptive exam format, but in different ways. The computer adaptive format on the GMAT chooses each question based on your performance on the previous question(s) - you must answer each question in order, and you cannot skip questions or go back to prior questions. That is why the GMAT is called a CAT – a Computer Adaptive Test. The GRE, on the other hand, is section-adaptive: your second sections of Verbal and Math adapt (become harder or easier) depending on your overall performance in your first section of Verbal and Math, respectively. You can skip questions and move around within a section, much as you can on more traditional, paper-based exams. Mercifully!


The GRE gives three different scaled scores:  A Quantitative score reported on a 130-170 score scale, in 1-point increments  A Verbal score reported on a 130-170 score scale, in 1-point increments  An Analytical Writing score reported on a 0-6 score scale, in half-point increments The GMAT provides five separate scores:  A Quantitative Score on a scale of 0 to 60, in 1-point increment  A Verbal Score on a scale of 0 to 60, in 1-point increment  A Total Score on a scale of 200 to 800, in 10-point increments; only the scores on Verbal and Quantitative Ability sections count towards your TOTAL score. We are not privy to how a Quant/Verbal combo is converted to a TOTAL score.  An Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) score reported on a 0-6 score scale, in half-point increments  An Integrated Reasoning (IR) score reported on a 1-8 score scale, in 1-point increment

GRE vs GMAT : Final Considerations For the GMAT, the Quantitative and Verbal scores are section scores, and these two section scores are combined to create the Total Score. The Total Score is the one most familiar to GMAT testtakers, and it is given on the well-known 200 to 800 scale, with 200 being the lowest score and 800 the highest score.

Final Considerations: Now that you understand the most important differences between the GMAT and the GRE, do also consider the following before making a decision: If at least one program that you MUST apply to do not accept the GRE, you do not really have a choice. If you have very strong quant skills, but feel that your verbal skills (particularly vocabulary) are weaker, consider taking the GMAT. GMAT Verbal is heavily weighted towards reasoning and grammar whereas GRE Verbal ha an accent on vocabulary-in-context. Both the Verbal and Quantitative sections are more reasoning based on the GMAT; the Data Sufficiency questions on GMAT Quant involve higher-order quantitative reasoning skills. If you have very strong English skills (and if your vocabulary is stronger than your grammar knowledge), but feel less confident in math, consider taking the GRE. If you are applying to a program focusing specifically on your Quantitative or Verbal scores (such as Engineering or English), consider taking the GRE.


The AWA section is more demanding on the GRE. However, B-schools do not consider this data point as important as other numbers in your application mosaic. Finally, there is no IR section on the GRE though there is a DI set on GRE Math that has about 4 questions based on a DI set). GOOD LUCK! And whichever exam you decide to take, USERC has a tailor-made program for you. Get in touch with us today! Know More : www.useducentre.com Contact – Plot- 768, sector -39, Gurgaon, near Unitech Cyber Park. Phone - 9999009253

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