Page 1

TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE..................................................................................................................................... 3 PART I - GENERAL INFORMATION .................................................................................... 4 PROGRAM PURPOSE ............................................................................................................. 5 PROGRAM OVERVIEW.......................................................................................................... 5 PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT ................................................................ 5 SDSU FACULTY ...................................................................................................................... 8 USD FACULTY 12 PART II – PROGRAM COMPONENTS................................................................................ 15 PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS .............................................................................................. 16 COURSE REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................................. 17 Core and Research Courses (21 units) ................................................................................ 17 Concentrations..................................................................................................................... 18 Teaching and Learning / Literacy Concentration Courses (15 units)................................. 18 Educational Technology Concentration Courses (12 units)................................................ 19 Dissertation Component (12 Units) ..................................................................................... 20 QUALIFYING EXAM #1 ....................................................................................................... 21 Purpose ................................................................................................................................ 21 Exam Format ....................................................................................................................... 21 Evaluation of QE1................................................................................................................ 21 QUALIFYING EXAM #2 ....................................................................................................... 22 Purpose ................................................................................................................................ 22 Procedures for Development ............................................................................................... 22 Procedures for Administration ............................................................................................ 22 Submission Guidelines ......................................................................................................... 23 Criteria for Evaluation ........................................................................................................ 23 ADVANCEMENT TO CANDIDACY.................................................................................... 24 STEPS TO COMPLETING THE DISSERTATION ............................................................... 25 DISSERTATION COMMITTEE ............................................................................................ 26 DISSERTATION PROPOSAL................................................................................................ 27 IRB PROCEDURES ................................................................................................................ 29 WRITING THE DISSERTATION .......................................................................................... 31 DISSERTATION DEFENSE .................................................................................................. 31 DISSERTATION DEFENSE ANNOUNCEMENT ................................................................ 32 Dissertation Defense............................................................................................................ 32 PART III – POLICIES AND PROCEDURES........................................................................ 34 ACADEMIC CALENDAR...................................................................................................... 35 REGISTRATION .................................................................................................................... 35 Elective and Independent Study Options ............................................................................. 35 TUITION AND FEES.............................................................................................................. 38 ACADEMIC RECORD (AR) .................................................................................................. 38 CHANGE OF NAME/ADDRESS ........................................................................................... 38 August 2004

1


FINANCIAL AID .................................................................................................................... 39 CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT............................................................................................ 39 INCOMPLETE GRADES ....................................................................................................... 39 GRADE GRIEVANCE............................................................................................................ 40 ACADEMIIC STANDING...................................................................................................... 40 STUDENT DISMISSAL ......................................................................................................... 41 STUDENT REINSTATEMENT ............................................................................................. 42 WITHDRAWAL/LEAVE OF ABSENCE .............................................................................. 42 TIME LIMITS 43 PETITION TO GRADUATE................................................................................................... 44 SUMMARY 44 PART IV –APPENDIX.............................................................................................................. 45 APPENDIX A: APPENDIX B: APPENDIX C: APPENDIX D: APPENDIX E: APPENDIX G: APPENDIX H: APPENDIX I: APPENDIX J: APPENDIX K:

August 2004

DISSERTATION COMMITTEE FORM..................................................... 46 OUTSIDE MEMBER DISSERTATION COMMITTEE FORM................. 47 PROPOSAL HEARING FORM................................................................... 48 DISSERTATION PROPOSAL APPROVAL FORM .................................. 49 PETITION FOR DEFENSE OF DISSERTATION FORM.......................... 50 PROGRAM ELECTIVE FORM .................................................................. 52 INDEPENDENT STUDY FORM ................................................................ 53 LEAVE OF ABSENCE FORM.................................................................... 54 USD PETITION FOR GRADUATION FORM ........................................... 55 SDSU PETITION FOR GRADUATION FORM......................................... 56

2


PREFACE Forecasters looking for trends that may help define the shape of the future almost uniformly describe a world that will become more knowledge intensive. In this world it’s projected that one will likely engage in a lifetime of ongoing learning and act and think creatively in a connected global arena. Universities can and must play important roles in preparing leaders in education to engage in the scenario that is painted for the future. The impact of the educational systems on tomorrow’s world will depend on the vision of leaders who anticipate the future. Educators will need to be able to develop learning opportunities in an information age; they will need to understand the processes under which innovation occurs and they will require a sense of who we are as human beings in an increasingly diverse society. Clearly, collaboration and interagency problem solving will be necessary to plan beyond the newest technological and societal trends. Universities will need to join in partnerships to plan and prepare educators for the future that is ahead. It is within this context of a future that requires enlightened leaders that we welcome you to the SDSU-USD Doctoral Program in Education. To begin the experience, however, it is necessary to have a view of the end and the path that has been constructed to guide your journey. This Handbook is a compilation of the purposes, program, policies and procedures that have been developed by faculty at San Diego State University and the University of San Diego to direct you on the path to a Doctorate in Education. Although the Handbook provides an overview of the policies and procedures governing the SDSU-USD joint program, you are also responsible for being familiar with the contents of the Graduate Bulletins at both universities. All who are involved in the program look forward to working with you in what is viewed as an exciting and challenging educational experience. And now together we begin‌.

August 2004

3


Part I - General Information

August 2004

4


PROGRAM PURPOSE The doctorate in education (Ed.D.) that is collaboratively offered by San Diego State University and the University of San Diego is designed to prepare professionals who can create effective learning environments and responsible social policy in a rapidly changing world. The doctoral program builds upon the strengths, resources and collective capabilities of two major institutions of higher education in the San Diego region. The close proximity of the two campuses provides opportunities for shared support and maximum interaction as well as a rich exchange among students and faculty. The primary goal of the partnership is to create a collaborative program of specialized study anchored by a common core of courses. An additional purpose is providing students with an opportunity to study research and evaluation models that will enable them to conduct inquiries and to write dissertations on topics appropriate to their concentrations and interests.

PROGRAM OVERVIEW The doctoral program has been designed to move students through a logical progression of coursework and educational experiences that will culminate with the writing of a dissertation. It is expected that students will take six units of study each fall and spring semester, with occasional courses in the summer or intersession. Courses will be taken at each university in alternating semesters. In addition, students are expected to complete all coursework and dissertation requirements within the seven-year time limit.

PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT Concentration Advisors

Each doctoral cohort of students has a concentration advisor at SDSU and at USD. The concentration advisor counsels students and consults with administration, faculty and support staff regarding general requirements for the program. The advisor meets with the concentration cohort on a monthly basis while the cohort is taking coursework at each respective university. Each student's proposed course of study (particularly electives and independent studies) must be approved by the concentration advisor at the institution where the course resides. August 2004

5


Other duties of the concentration advisor include: working with administration and faculty to monitor student progress and to ensure compliance with program requirements; work with students to craft their concentrations and electives; work with doctoral office support personnel to maintain and update a database of students’ progress and serve as a liaison between institutions and between program concentrations. Educational Technology Advisors (Cohort I):

SDSU: Dr. Brock Allen Professor of Educational Technology 619-594-5439 brock.allen@sdsu.edu

USD: Dr. Jerry Ammer Associate Professor of Education 619-260-4292 ammer1@cox.net

Educational Technology Advisors (Cohort II):

SDSU:

USD:

Dr. Donn Ritchie Professor of Educational Technology 619-594-5076 dritchie@mail.sdsu.edu

Dr. Jerry Ammer Associate Professor of Education 619-260-4292 ammer1@cox.net

Educational Technology Advisors (Cohort III)

SDSU: Dr. Marcie Bober Professor of Educational Technology 619-594-0587 bober@mail.sdsu.edu

USD: Dr. Jerry Ammer Associate Professor of Education 619-260-4292 ammer1@cox.net

Literacy Advisors (Cohort I):

SDSU:

USD:

Dr. Nancy Farnan Professor of Teacher Education 619-594-1366 nfarnan@mail.sdsu.edu

Dr. Kathleen Collins Associate Professor of Education 619-260-7452 kcollins@sandiego.edu

Literacy Advisors (Cohort II):

SDSU:

USD:

Dr. Nancy Farnan Professor of Teacher Education 619-594-1366 nfarnan@mail.sdsu.edu

Dr. Kendra Sisserson Assistant Professor of Literacy Education 619-260-7670 kendra@sandiego.edu

August 2004

6


Literacy Advisors: (Cohort III)

SDSU:

USD:

Dr. Barb Moss Assistant Professor of Teacher Education (619) 594-3788 bmoss@mail.sdsu.edu

Dr. Maria Luiza “Malu� Dantas Assistant Professor of Literacy Education 619-260-7671 mdantas@sandiego.edu

Program Directors

Program Directors coordinate the administrative needs of the Joint Doctoral Program, and help program faculty develop and articulate program policies and procedures. SDSU:

USD:

Dr. Cheryl Mason

Dr. Cheryl Getz

619-594-0909

619-260-4289

cmason@mail.sdsu.edu

cgetz@sandiego.edu

Administrative Assistants

The role of the SDSU Program Coordinator and the USD Program Manager is to support the work of the Program Directors. Both administrators work closely together to coordinate events, communicate with faculty and students, maintain student records and reflect on Joint Doctoral Program procedures. SDSU:

USD:

Caroline Balzer

Beth Yemma

619-594-0909

619-260-4637

cbalzer@mail.sdsu.edu

byemma@sandiego.edu

August 2004

7


SDSU FACULTY Brock S. Allen

Professor

bsallen@mail.sdsu.edu

Educational technology; instructional strategies and applications of interactive multimedia and hypermedia.

Bobbie J. Atkins

Professor

batkins@mail.sdsu.edu

Administration, rehabilitation and postsecondary education; rehabilitation counseling; alcohol and drug prevention education; diversity, AIDS education. mb@mail.sdsu.edu Administration, rehabilitation and postsecondary education; cohort learning; group process; behavioral integrity; trust and change.

Margaret R. Basom

Associate Professor

Nadine S. Bezuk

Professor

nbezuk@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; mathematics education: rational numbers, professional development, closing the achievement gap, using children’s thinking to inform instruction.

Marcie J. Bober

Assistant Professor

bober@mail.sdsu.edu

Educational/instructional technology; instructional systems; technology integration; evaluation in instructional settings; assessment and measurement; instructional and program accountability.

Karen Cadiero Kaplan

Assistant Professor

kcadiero@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; literacy and bilingual education; social justice and equity in literacy, the arts and technology; teacher development for English Language Learners.

Patricia T. Cegelka

Professor

pcegelka@mail.sdsu.edu

Special education; organizational program management models for systems change.

Bernard J. Dodge

Professor

bdodge@mail.sdsu.edu

Educational technology; design of constructivist learning environments; motivation; social software applications; use of GPS technology for teaching; online learning styles.

Ruben W. Espinosa

Professor

espinos2@mail.sdsu.edu

Policy studies in language and cross-cultural studies in education; public policy; action research; school finance; organizational program management; social policy action research; equity issues.

Ronald W. Evans

Professor

revans@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; educational history; curriculum history; social studies education; citizenship education.

Nancy Farnan

Professor

nfarnan@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; literacy teacher education; writing instruction; reading instruction (upper grades and secondary).

Leif Fearn

Professor

lfearn@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; literacy with concentration in writing; vocabulary development and spelling skills and attitudes focused on writing; social studies especially with respect to students’ knowledge and attitudes regarding the U.S. Constitution.

August 2004

8


Douglas Fisher

Assistant Professor

dfisher@mail.sdsu.edu

Adolescent literacy; English Language Learners; qualitative methodologies.

James Flood

Professor

jflood@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; reading and literacy; processes of reading; literacy for the future; teaching and learning literature; communicative and visual arts; multicultural book clubs.

Margaret A. Gallego

Associate Professor

mgallego@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; literacy; multiple literacies; out of school learning contexts; classroom cultures and cultures in the classroom; research methodologies.

Rich Gibson

Associate Professor

rgibson@pipeline.com

Professor

graves2@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education.

Anne W. Graves

Special education; reading and writing instruction for diverse learners; longitudinal research on first grade English Learners and their teachers through the 4th grade; reading and comprehension.

Dana Grisham

Associate Professor

grisham@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; literacy education; reading comprehension; writing; literacy and technology integration; classroom curriculum enactments; adolescent literacy; school/university partnerships.

Laura Hall

Professor

ljhall@mail.sdsu.edu

Special education; autism; communication skills; social interaction skills; peer interaction that include individuals with disabilities.

Ron Jacobs

Professor

rjacobs@mail.sdsu.edu

Administration rehabilitation and postsecondary education; individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing; rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities; access to post-secondary education for individuals with disabilities; research methodology; program evaluation methodology; quantitative methods.

Victoria Jacobs

Associate Professor

vjacobs@mail.sdsu.edu

Math education; children’s math thinking; teacher development; professional development; educational psychology.

Robert P. Hoffman

Associate Professor

bob.hoffman@sdsu.edu

Educational technology; learning with virtual reality; informal learning (museums); eLearning; web-based training.

Colette L. Ingraham

Associate Professor

ingraham@mail.sdsu.edu

Counseling and school psychology; multicultural and cross-cultural consultation; systems change; multicultural and ecological perspectives in prevention and intervention in schools.

Evangelina B. Jones,

Professor

ejones@mail.sdsu.edu

Policy studies in language and cross-cultural education; bilingual education; bicultural and teacher instructional design; culturally relevant and culturally responsive instruction; adolescent literacy development (English Language Learners); curriculum development for multicultural populations.

John R. Johnson

Assistant Professor

johnson7@mail.sdsu.edu

Special education; transition from school to adult life; self determination of people with disabilities; employment of people with disabilities; leadership; disability and deaf culture.

Patricia R. Kelly

Professor

prkelly@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; reading/language arts education; early intervention; struggling readers; beginning reading and writing; classroom instructional practices in literacy; reader response.

Margie K. Kitano

Professor

kitano@mail.sdsu.edu

Special education; gifted education; multicultural course transformation; ethnically diverse gifted women.

August 2004

9


Diane K. Lapp

Professor

lapp@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; reading comprehension and cognitive development; language acquisition; reading/writing development and instruction; discourse analysis; literacy and language of children and families situated in urban settings; emergent literacy.

Rena B. Lewis

Professor

rlewis@mail.sdsu.edu

Special education; faculty development and research at the university level; learning disabilities; assistive technology and technological tools for literacy; classroom assessment; instructional adaptations in general education for students with disabilities; enhancement of writing performance via technological tools for students with learning disabilities; roles of hypermediabased literature; equity in the information age.

Eleanor W. Lynch

Professor

elynch@mail.sdsu.edu

Special education; infants and preschoolers with disabilities and their families; interagency collaboration; cross-cultural competence in-service delivery; family perspectives on services; evaluation of collaborative efforts; inclusive schooling and communities for individuals with disabilities; maintaining diversity within the context of unity.

Cheryl L. Mason

Professor

cmason@mail.sdsu.edu

Science education; biology; equity issues; classroom environments; student development of scientific knowledge; visual/spatial thinking skills.

Diane “Kate” Masarik

Assistant Professor

kmasarik@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; mathematics education; algebra K-12 (students’ algebraic thinking); writing in mathematics; curriculum development 6-12.

Carla S. Mathison

Professor

cmathison@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; the marriage of education and neuroscience and its implication for learning and instruction; learning styles and teaching strategies; organizational change strategies.

Fred R. McFarlane

Professor

fmcfarla@mail.sdsu.edu

Administration, rehabilitation and postsecondary education; leadership; organizational change; diversity; topics related to disability and community; inclusion; distance education.

Philip E. Molebash

Assistant Professor

molebash@mail.sdsu.edu

Educational technology; pre-service teacher education; inquiry; conceptual change; social studies education; math education.

Barbara Moss

Professor

bmoss@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; content area literacy (k-12); children’s literature; children’s information texts; qualitative research methodology.

Alberto M. Ochoa

Professor

aochoa@mail.sdsu.edu

Policy studies in language and cross-cultural education; language policy; desegregation issues; public equity; critical pedagogy; biliteracy; community and parental engagement; access to higher education; effectiveness of programs for language minority students; bicultural immigrant experience in schools; achievement gap between low and middles class students; community capacity building; forecasting the educational needs of school districts through demographic trends, socio-political conditions and educational reform trends.

Valerie Ooka Pang

Professor

pang@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; multicultural education; Asian Pacific Islander Americans; equity education; caring-centered multicultural education; issues-centered education.

Cynthia Darché Park

Associate Professor

cpark@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; effective instruction for students at risk; equity and social justice issues in American education; effective methods of reducing prejudice.

Randolph A. Philipp

Professor

rphilipp@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; mathematics education; teachers’ beliefs, children’s mathematical thinking.

William E. Piland

Professor

piland1@mail.sdsu.edu

Administration, rehabilitation and postsecondary education; community college accountability; academically gifted students in higher education; vocational education; economic impact of community colleges.

Ian Pumpian

Professor

ipumpian@mail.sdsu.edu

Educational leadership; school improvement.

August 2004

10


Donn C. Ritchie

Professor

dritchie@mail.sdsu.edu

Educational technology; technology in schools; distance education; problem-based learning; goal-setting.

Carol Robinson-Zanartu

Professor

crobinson@mail.sdsu.edu

Counseling and school psychology; issues of social justice in education, especially Native American issues; systemic models of program development to enhance diversity; dynamic intervention-based assessment.

Alberto Rodriguez

Assistant Professor

arodriguez@mail.sdsu.edu

Policy studies and cross-cultural education; multicultural science education; multicultural teacher education; equity issues; sociotransformative constructivism

James L. Rodriguez

Assistant Professor

jlrodrig@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; child/adolescent development; educational psychology; ethnic psychology; bilingual and multicultural education; immigrant children and families; parental involvement; sociocultural theory; culturally responsive pedagogy.

Pamela J. Ross

Professor

pross@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; assessment and instruction of struggling readers; teaching reading comprehension; tutoring programs utilizing university undergraduates (America Reads); clinical work in reading; teacher preparation for teaching reading.

Allison Rossett

Professor

arossett@mail.sdsu.edu

Educational technology; planning systems; performance analysis; workforce learning and development; role of technology in reform in learning systems; instructional design; relationship between teaching and technology; teacher migration to instructional systems; theory and models of needs assessment; performance support tools.

Farhad Saba

Professor

fsaba@mail.sdsu.edu

Educational technology; distance education and integrated telecommunication systems; multimedia production and design; communications development through educational communications in the post Cold War era.

Rafaela M. Santacruz

Associate Professor

rsantacruz@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education; research design; statistics; role of mathematics, technology, and mentoring in student empowerment; measurement of attitudes and knowledge about diversity; ethnic and gender comparisons; effectiveness of intervention programs.

Caren L. Sax

Assistant Professor

csax@mail.sdsu.edu

Administration, rehabilitation and postsecondary education; disability and rehabilitation; assistive technology; transition from school to adult life for students with disabilities; organizational change; interdisciplinary collaboration; qualitative research.

Minjuan Wang

Assistant Professor

mwang@mail.sdsu.edu

Educational technology; design, development and delivery of mobile learning; sociocultural aspects of online learning; technological interventions in language and literacy education.

Randy K. Yerrick

Associate Professor

ryerrick@mail.sdsu.edu

Professor

ruyoung@mail.sdsu.edu

Teacher education.

Russell L. Young

Policy studies in language and cross-cultural education; multicultural education; quantitative methods; race and ethnicity; Asian-American studies,

August 2004

11


USD FACULTY Viviana Alexandrowicz

Assistant Professor

vivianna@sandiego.edu

Bilingual and second language learning; service learning; specially designed academic instruction in English

Jerome (Jerry) Ammer

Professor

ammer1@cox.net

Special education - learning handicapped; educational technology; instrument construction; shared community in cyber space

Associate Professor

Donna Barnes

donnabme@yahoo.com

Language and literacy acquisition; children and adolescent literature; on-line learning; education in Central and South America

Katie Bishop-Smith

Associate Professor

kbishop@sandiego.edu

Special education - severely handicapped; comprehensive behavior support planning

Sandy Buczynski

Assistant Professor

sandyb@sandiego.edu

Science education; curriculum design; environmental science and biology, indigenous cultures; ethnobotany; educational technology; early teacher career intervention

Kathleen M. Collins

Associate Professor

kcollins@sandiego.edu

Guided inquiry supporting multiple literacies; strategic writing; literacy

Paula A. Cordeiro

Professor

cordeiro@sandiego.edu

Educational administration; multicultural education; cross-cultural educational leadership; internationalizing the curriculum

Maria Luiza (Malu) Dantas

Assistant Professor

mdantas@sandiego.edu

Early literacy learning and teaching; family literacy practices; literacy assessment; sociocultural and political perspectives on schooling; ethnography in education

Edward DeRoche

Professor (Director)

deroche@sandiego.edu

Educational administration; social studies education; character education

Robert Donmoyer

Professor

donmoyer@sandiego.edu

Educational leadership; qualitative research methods; research utilization in policy/practice; curriculum theory & policy

Anne Donnellan

Professor

donnellan@sandiego.edu

Special education; autism

Todd Edwards

Associate Professor (Director)

tedwards@sandiego.edu

Integration of the biopsychosocial model and systems theory; chronic illness in the family; collaboration between family therapists and health care practitioners; medical family therapy supervision

Ana Estrada

Associate Professor

estradaa@sandiego.edu

Process and outcome of child, couples and family therapy; family diversity and social justice; training of child and family practitioners

Fred Galloway

Associate Professor

galloway@sandiego.edu

Higher educational policy, the economics of education; quantitative research methodology and design.

August 2004

12


Professor

Steven Gelb

sgelb@sandiego.edu

Disability Studies, University/School district Partnerships and the Tavistock Group Relations training model

Assistant Professor

Cheryl Getz

cgetz@sandiego.edu

Diversity in higher education administration; multicultural education; study of leadership and group relations; college student development/social identity

Kenneth Gonzalez

Associate Professor

kennethg@sandiego.edu

Retention and persistence of students of color, campus culture, college access, doctoral student socialization, Latinas/os in higher education.

chansen@sandiego.edu

C. Bobbi Hansen

Math and science education; curriculum development; service learning

Associate Professor

Lea Hubbard

lhubbard@sandiego.edu

Educational policy; underrepresented students and achievement; gender and education; leadership and qualitative research methods

Robert Infantino

Professor

infntino@sandiego.edu

Writing across the curriculum; literacy; assessment; ethics and education; induction of new teachers

Noriyuki Inoue

Assistant Professor

inoue@sandiego.edu

Human cognition and learning; socio-cultural foundation of learning; development of mathematical thinking; motivational development; qualitative methodology

Misook Ji

Assistant Professor

mji@sandiego.edu

Authentic learning environment; web-based/project-based learning and teaching; professional development; electronic portfolio; technology and assessment; design issues

Ronn Johnson

Associate Professor

ronnjohn@cts.com

Psychological assessment; ethical and legal issues associated with professional practice; psychopathology; psychotherapy

Lori Low

Judy Mantle

Assistant Professor Grief, loss and crisis intervention; suicide; self care and burnout; school counseling and supervision; adolescent issues such as eating disorders and body image Visiting Professor (5 yrs) jmantle@sandiego.edu Leadership and management of Special Education programs, parent and family involvement, early intervention, mediation.

Dan Miller

Assistant Professor

danmiller@aol.com

Educational administration; organizational behavior; public policy; collaboration and participation in school communities

Terri Monroe

Associate Professor

tmonroe@sandiego.edu

Leadership theory; canon law; organizational diagnosis and strategies for a diverse society; practice of authority in high commitment organizations

August 2004

13


JoEllen Patterson

Professor

joellenpatterson@aol.com

Family functioning and physical health; health care reform and mental family therapy training

Athena Perrakis

Assistant Professor

Higher education policy and analysis, with an emphasis in community college administration, community college presidency, student leadership, and retention of minority student populations at both the two and four-year level.

Reyes L. Quezada

Associate Professor

rquezada@sandiego.edu

Models of cultural proficiency in professional education programs; bilingual instructional strategies; home-school, community partnerships; adventure based counseling; recruitment, retention of faculty of color

Assistant Professor

Jaime Romo

jromo@sandiego.edu

Multicultural education; foundations; cultural and linguistic training; border pedagogy; study of leadership and group relations

Associate Professor

Lonnie Rowell

lrowell@sandiego.edu

Program development and evaluation in school counseling; men’s issues in counseling and therapy; International collaboration and cooperation in educational reform

Professor

Mary Scherr

scherr@sandiego.edu

Leadership and spirituality; leadership theory; qualitative research methods

Kendra Sisserson

Assistant Professor

kendra@sandiego.edu

Literacy; rhetoric and composition; professional development; critical literacy; literature for children and adolescents

Associate Professor

Lee William

williams@sandiego.edu

Premarital counseling; interchurch couples; family therapy training

Sue Zgliczynski

Associate Professor (Director)

zglnski@sandiego.edu

Statistics and quantitative design; lifespan development; cross-cultural competence

August 2004

14


Part II – Program Components

August 2004

15


PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Core Courses EDUC 651 EDUC 652 SDSU 670 (ED 826) SDSU 671 (ED 810) SDSU 674 (ED 814)

Communication and Cognition Equity and Ethics in a Diverse Society Examining Major Issues in Education Seminar in Curriculum and Technology Seminar in Change Theory

3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units

Research Courses EDUC 654 SDSU 675 (ED 851)

Quantitative Research Design Qualitative Research

3 Units 3 Units

Concentration Courses Educational Technology

Literacy

EDUC 655 Technology & Learning Communities SDSU 673 (ED 831) Ed Tech R&D SDSU 676 (ED 833) Cognitive & Interactive Learning SDSU 677 (ED 834) Design & Development of Tech Based Learning

EDUC 653 Emerging Issues EDUC 656 Policy Development SDSU 672 (ED 825) Seminar Lit SDSU 678 (ED 890) Processes in Literacy SDSU 679 (ED 895) Research in Writing

Electives Educational Technology students are required to take 12 units of Electives at USD and 3 units at SDSU. Literacy students are required to take 9 units of Electives at USD and 3 units at SDSU.

Qualifying Examinations Qualifying Examination #1 Qualifying Examination #2

Advancement to Candidacy Dissertation Proposal Dissertation and Defense

August 2004

16


COURSE REQUIREMENTS Core and Research Courses (21 units) The program is organized around a sequence of five core and two research courses designed to provide foundational knowledge for students as they move into their selected area of concentration. The courses are listed first by the number that will be used to register students at the USD campus. The number in parenthesis indicates the course number used on the SDSU campus. ™

EDUC 651 Communication and Cognition (3)

This seminar revolves around the concepts of knowledge and how it is gained, and communication as a structure through which learners comprehend and compose knowledge. These perspectives will enable students to explore issues from social, political and historical viewpoints. ™

EDUC 652 Equity and Ethics in a Diverse Society (3)

This seminar explores equity issues from epistemological and ethical perspectives to increase understanding of past and current public policies, and to create solutions for the future. ™

SDSU 670 (ED 826) Examining Major Issues in Education (3)

This course centers on leadership in educational and community settings. The seminar sets a foundation for the concentrations and research components by having students explore current problems that require innovative solutions. ™

SDSU 671 (ED 810) Seminar in Curriculum and Technology (3)

Central to this seminar is an examination of technologies for teaching, learning, collaboration and assessment. It includes critical appraisal of learning products and systems and studies of technologies with potential for enhancing human performance and knowledge representation. ™

SDSU 674 (ED 814) Seminar in Change Theory (3)

The course examines theories of change and organizational development and their application to educational settings. Central to this seminar is the application of theory to generate constructive change in diverse arenas.

August 2004

17


™

EDUC 654 Quantitative Research Design (3)*

This course explores a variety of quantitative research designs and the methods of statistical analysis appropriate for each design. ™

SDSU 675 (ED 851) Qualitative Research Design (3)

An investigation of the major qualitative research methodologies. The philosophy behind using such qualitative methods forms the center of this seminar.

Concentrations The Joint Doctoral Program centers on the development of student expertise in an area of concentration. Within the selected concentration, candidates take specific required courses and selected elective experiences. The two major domains of concentration for doctoral students are: (1) Teaching and Learning with an emphasis on literacy (2) Educational Technology Teaching and Learning / Literacy Concentration Courses (15 units) This concentration focuses on developing a deep understanding of pedagogical content knowledge in literacy and language development. Required courses for this area are as follows: ™

EDUC 653 Emerging Issues (3)

Major issues as they relate to education, curriculum and instruction will be identified and examined in light of theory and research and will serve as a foundation for delving into literacy. ™

EDUC 656 Literacy Policy Development (3)

This course examines the socio-political policy environment in which students live and work to gain a better understanding of policy analysis, development and change. ™

SDSU 672 (ED 825) Seminar in Literacy Research (3)

This seminar introduces doctoral students to a variety of faculty and to various aspects of the field of literacy research. ™

SDSU 678 (ED 890) Processes in Literacy

The underlying purpose of this course is an exploration of cognitive, linguistic and social processes of literacy. * This course is subject to change to 1-4 unit modules. August 2004

18


™

SDSU 679 (ED 895) Research in Writing

A focused exploration of issues related to writing and writing instruction forms the center of this seminar. Electives (12 Units: 9 Units at USD and 3 Units at SDSU)

Students are required to take a specific number of elective units at each university. (USD 9 Units; SDSU – 3 Units). This should always be indicated on the elective form. 12 units of elective courses are available to Literacy Concentration students to provide opportunities for examination of areas of individual interest as well as independent study with faculty. These selections are made in consultation with the concentration advisor at the university where the study will occur. (See page 35 for details regarding electives and independent study)

Educational Technology Concentration Courses (12 units) The intent of this concentration is to provide opportunities for candidates to explore areas such as instructional and information design theory and strategies, emergent technologies and individualized, and distributed strategies and technologies. The courses that are required include: ™

EDUC 655 Technology and Learning Communities (3)

Use of distributed communications and computing networks such as the internet and intranets to support learning communities and access by diverse learners form the core of this seminar. ™

SDSU 673 (ED 831) Ed. Tech. Research and Development (3)

The purpose of this seminar is to analyze existing literature in educational technology research and its application to the field. ™

SDSU 676 (833) Cognition and Interactive Learning (3)

In this course, areas of exploration include the role of contemporary interactive media in facilitating human thought and action; and interactions of mind and media as they enhance learning, knowledge and action. ™

SDSU 677 (ED 834) Design & Development of Tech.-Based Learning (3)

August 2004

19


This seminar focuses on theories, frameworks, and strategies for designing educational products and systems. Electives (15 Units: 12 Units at USD and 3 Units at SDSU)

Students are required to take a specific number of elective units at each university. (USD 12 Units; SDSU – 3 Units). This should always be indicated on the elective form. 15 units of elective courses are available to Educational Technology students to provide mentoring and teaching opportunities as well as internships and individual research projects. These avenues will be chosen in consultation with the concentration candidate’s advisor. (See page 35 for details regarding electives and independent study)

Dissertation Component (12 Units) All students are required to take 3 units of dissertation seminar. One unit is taken early in the program, while the second two units are generally taken after students have completed all core courses. The purpose of both courses is to provide students with a framework for exploring areas of professional interest that might lead to a dissertation topic. Students will be given guidance and support in identifying ways to obtain the knowledge and skills needed to complete a dissertation project. ™

EDUC 650 Dissertation Seminar (1)

™

EDUC 657 Dissertation Seminar (2)

Once students have completed all coursework and begin working on the dissertation, it is required that they maintain continuous enrollment in EDUC 695/SDSU 695 Dissertation. While students are enrolled in 695, they will be getting support from their dissertation chair and possibly from members of the dissertation committee. Students are required to register for a total of 9 dissertation units (EDUC 695/SDSU 695). 6 units must be taken at SDSU in the semester following advancement to candidacy, then 3 units must be taken at USD in the subsequent semester. Please see the continuous enrollment policy on page 39 for additional information regarding registration for dissertation units.

Note: All course descriptions and titles are subject to change.

August 2004

20


QUALIFYING EXAM #1 Purpose To assess student’s competency in applying qualitative and quantitative research methodologies to specific contexts. By successfully completing the exam, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the critical issues in their respective professional fields and to show evidence that they have the ability to conduct scholarly research.

Exam Format Qualifying Exam #1 (QE1) will be taken during the summer after students have completed all research courses and four of the five core courses. QE1 is a take-home exam. A sample case study and rubric will be available approximately one month beforehand. The actual exam will be sent electronically by the JDP Office. Students will need to return, within the designated period of time, two hard copies and an electronic copy of the exam to the JDP Office.

Evaluation of QE1 The exam will be read by two readers and will receive one of four possible score responses: ♦

Pass

Pass with revisions (30 days to rewrite and resubmit)

Fail: Technical writing deficiency, requires student to take technical writing course and retake QE1 the following semester

Fail: Conceptual deficiency: requires work with advisor in content area, then retake of QE1 the following semester.

Readings will be "blind," with exams identified by students' ID numbers only. A third reader will read if there is discrepancy in the intial scoring. Results will be sent to students via a letter in four to six weeks after they take the exam.

August 2004

21


Candidates who do not successfully complete QE1 after 1 revision, will be disqualified from the Joint Doctoral Program. *( we reserve the right to make adjustments to these procedures as deemed necessary)

QUALIFYING EXAM #2 Purpose The purpose of qualifying Exam #2 (QE2) is to assess the student's ability to: ♌

Express him/herself in a scholarly paper demonstrating readiness for preparing a doctoral dissertation.

♌

Communicate original evidence and/or data with analysis and interpretation.

♌

Interpret, reflect on, and discuss the significance of the work products in relation to her/his professional goals and prospective community of practice.

Procedures for Development Students will typically prepare QE2 under the general supervision of faculty members. The starting point might be a course project or independent study elaborating a course project. The role of supervising faculty members will be formative with summative evaluation left to a QE2 Review Committee. Procedures for Administration The QE2 Review Committee consists of two faculty members, one from each institution each semester. The members will approve the submission for acceptance; reject the work; or accept the work conditionally, upon completion of specific revisions within a specified time period. In the event that the two faculty members cannot agree on disposition of the student's submissions, the matter will be referred to one of four concentration advisors with expertise in the area, for a final decision. Students will be notified in writing, within 4-6 weeks of submission, concerning the results of the exam. Depending on these results and if the Review Committee agrees that all competencies are not fully met, a student may be required to submit a second or third time. If after the third

August 2004

22


submission, the committee finds the exam unacceptable, students’ can not advance to candidacy and therefore will be dismissed from the Joint Doctoral Program. Submission Guidelines The student must submit QE2 as a manuscript compliant with the most recent edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, unless the publication to which it will be submitted specifically calls for another style. The manuscript must be suitable for submission to a specifically targeted refereed publication identified by the student. The manuscript can not exceed 5,000 words, excluding figures and references, unless an exception is approved in writing by the student's concentration adviser. A shorter work, in the range of 2,500-3,500 words is preferable. The student must be sole author, or lead author with one coauthor. It is highly recommended that students confer with a USD or SDSU faculty member prior to submission. A photocopied sample of the targeted journal and a copy of that journal’s editorial guidelines must accompany the manuscript for prospective authors. If the manuscript has been already published or is in press, the student's submission to the Review Committee shall include, in addition to the guidelines and manuscript proper, a copy of the published article or galleys and all correspondence with the publisher. The student must also submit with QE2 an essay of approximately 1,500 words explaining how work leading to the manuscript reflects, enables, or influence(ed) development of the student's professional goals, links to the students prospective community of practice, and must explain the role and level of support provided by any collaborators or co-authors. Students must submit two hard copies of the QE2 exam and an electronic copy to the JDP Office. Criteria for Evaluation The manuscript must be suitable for submission to a refereed publication in the student's professional or scholarly community. A list of acceptable publications will be provided. The manuscript must clearly demonstrate a capacity for evidence-based scholarship at a level consistent with preparation and defense of a doctoral dissertation. The essay must provide a

August 2004

23


coherent self-assessment of the student's professional goals and explain the relationship of the manuscript to these goals. In applying these criteria to the manuscript, the Committee will consider factors such as: ♦

Currency and relevance

Rigor of methods

Quality of evidence, analysis, presentation, and scholarly synthesis

Clarity of written communication and argumentation

Contributions to the literature or knowledge base associated with the candidate's concentration(s)

Contributions to the student’s prospective community of practice

Appropriateness of content and style for the targeted publication

In assessing the essay, the Committee shall consider the degree to which it evidences the students ability to: ♦

Articulate his or her professional goals

Link these goals to the needs of prospective communities of practice in which the student plans to participate

Reflect on the relevance of specific aspects of his/her experience and particularly his/her doctoral studies as they reflect, enable, and/or influence(ed) these goals

After two revisions, candidates who do not successfully complete QE2, will be disqualified from the Joint Doctoral Program.

ADVANCEMENT TO CANDIDACY Students will be notified of advancement to candidacy when they have successfully completed QE1, QE2, core, research, concentration and elective courses (with certain elective course exceptions). At this point, the student becomes a “doctoral candidate,” and can begin the dissertation process.

August 2004

24


STEPS TO COMPLETING THE DISSERTATION Pass QE 1 and 2 Advance to candidacy Select a Committee Chair Formulate a Research Topic Submit Dissertation Committee Form (Appendix A)

With the Chair, Select a Committee Draft a Proposal; Gain Committee Approval via Proposal Hearing

Submit Proposal Hearing Form (Appendix C)

Receive approval from the Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects

Submit Dissertation Proposal Approval Form (Appendix D)

Begin Research Draft Parts/Chapters; Consult with Chair and Committee Submit Petition for Defense of Dissertation Form (Appendix E)

Prepare Complete Final Draft Public Oral Defense of the Dissertation; Final Acceptance

August 2004

25


DISSERTATION COMMITTEE It is the responsibility of the dissertation committee to guide the work of the candidate during the process of shaping an acceptable proposal and writing a dissertation. The committee is also responsible for the approval of the dissertation with the successful defense of the product by the candidate. Students generally begin this process after they have completed most of the core courses and had an opportunity to work closely with a number of faculty from both institutions, and completed QE 1 and 2. To begin the procedure, candidates select a chair for their dissertation. The chair must have a doctorate from an accredited university and must have had prior experience with doctoral dissertations, except under unusual circumstances. This person may be a faculty member at either institution. Eligibility for doctoral committee work differs at each university. All USD full time faculty and administrators are eligible to serve on committees. However, to Chair a committee a faculty member must have served as a member on 2 committees prior to being permitted to chair a dissertation. At SDSU appointment of a faculty member to doctoral committees shall be subject to the approval of the Dean of the College of Education and the Dean of the Graduate Division. Upon successful completion of service as a member of a dissertation committee, a faculty member will be authorized to serve as chairperson of a dissertation committee. In special circumstances, the doctoral program director may waive the requirement for previous committee service in the appointment of committee chairs. The chair and the candidate will then collaborate on a committee structure and choose two members who are deemed appropriate from either of the two institutions. It is required that there is at least one member (of the three person committee) from each institution. To confirm agreement on the structure of the committee, the candidate is required to complete the Dissertation Committee form (Appendix A), circulate the form to committee members, get signatures, and turn it into the Joint Doctoral Program (JDP) office at SDSU or USD (wherever the chair resides) before moving forward with the dissertation proposal.

August 2004

26


In the rare circumstance that a committee member is chosen who is not a doctoral faculty member/ administrator from SDSU or USD, an Outside Member Dissertation Committee form (Appendix B) must be completed and approved by the candidate’s dissertation chair and JDP Program Director of that institution.

DISSERTATION PROPOSAL Once a student has successfully passed QE1 and QE2, he/she can formally begin the dissertation process. First, doctoral candidates are required to complete the proposal review process. A good dissertation proposal includes a strong rationale, a review of the literature and a coherent and systematic procedure to be followed. Guided by this, the candidate will have a methodical plan and will be more efficient and purposeful when undertaking the research. Additionally, writing a proposal demonstrates scholastic competence in the projected area of study. In doing so, the doctoral student, with guidance from the chair, is expected to persuade the committee that the project is a good idea based on the strength of the research design in the purpose, and a procedure has been determined to carry it out to fruition. An approved dissertation proposal serves as an agreement between the doctoral candidate and the members of the dissertation committee. The steps for the Dissertation Proposal Hearing include: ♌

Preparation of the dissertation proposal: The document should be about 20-30 pages and include appendices. A one page abstract (approved by the dissertation chair) should accompany the dissertation proposal. After careful review by your dissertation committee chair, the proposal is then submitted to the committee for examination.

♌

Once the committee agrees that the written portion of the proposal is acceptable, the candidate arranges a formal meeting with his/her committee to present the proposal. The approval meeting is open to all faculty and graduate students. Candidates must complete the Proposal Hearing form (Appendix C), indicating the date, and time of the proposal hearing. In addition, the committee chair must approve the abstract attached to the proposal hearing form. The form must be completed, signed by the committee members, and turned into the JDP office at SDSU or USD (wherever the chair resides) two weeks in advance of the hearing date. This is to ensure that all

August 2004

27


committee members are aware of the date and agree on moving forward with the dissertation proposal hearing. At this time, the JDP office will schedule a room for the defense. The student must also communicate all AV needs to the JDP office at this time. ♦

The student will also prepare a one page announcement and email this along with an electronic version of the abstract to the JDP office at the university where the defense will take place, at least one week prior to the hearing date. This announcement will then be distributed electronically to faculty and graduate students at both universities.

At the Dissertation Proposal Hearing, candidates have the opportunity to orally present their proposal to their committee.

Once the proposal hearing has been completed, committee members will either pass the student, pass with revisions or no pass. In the case of a ‘no pass,’ the committee chair will work with the student until the product is acceptable to the committee. If after several revisions (up to 3), the committee finds the proposal unacceptable, the candidate will not be permitted to continue in the doctoral program.

The dissertation proposal should also be submitted to the Institutional Review Board (IRB) for approval per the instructions below. Neither institution will not accept dissertations that include material obtained or produced without an approved IRB Protocol.

Upon acceptance by the committee, a Dissertation Proposal Approval form (Appendix D) will be signed by all committee members and sent to the JDP office at SDSU or USD (wherever the chair resides). They will in turn send the form to the Graduate Division. In addition, the original will be placed in the candidates file in the JDP office at SDSU.

Once the candidate receives formal approval from the dissertation committee and the Institutional Review Board (IRB), she/he can begin work on the dissertation.

August 2004

28


IRB PROCEDURES •

All Joint Doctoral Program (JDP) students will follow the policy as written, irrespective of where the dissertation chair resides.

Students will complete the SDSU IRB process, which can be found on this website: http://gra.sdsu.edu/irb/

On the SDSU website, prior to submitting the proposal, students must: (1) Complete tutorial (2) Follow the instructions of the IRB website for protocol development and submission (3) Ensure that their dissertation chair has reviewed their proposal prior to submission Additional steps for students to follow: (1)

Retrieve, complete and obtain the chair’s signature on the Proposal Cover Sheet from the USD IRB website: http://www/provost/ and submit it, along with a printed copy of the protocol, to the Doctoral Programs office in the School of Education at USD. Then, the remaining signatures will be obtained and the completed cover sheet will be submitted to the USD IRB Office.

(2)

Submit the required hard copy of the IRB application to the SDSU IRB Office. Upon receipt of electronic correspondence from the IRB that verifies receipt of your protocol and provides protocol identification information, send one electronic copy of the proposal including abstract and attachments (not forms) to irb@mail.sdsu.edu. With the electronic submission, include the IRB protocol number and reference USD/SDSU in the subject line. Upon submission of a protocol, an email message will be sent to investigators.

(3)

Add the following statement to the Research Review Form and within the protocol document when the student is discussing their experience within the “Investigator Experience” section. USD/SDSU JDP RESEARCH This step serves as a reminder that upon approval, the graduate office at SDSU will forward the proposal to USD for review/approval.

(4)

Turn in all other forms (from the SDSU IRB website) to the IRB office in the Division of Research Administration and Technology at SDSU (located in room

August 2004

29


222 in the administration building). The IRB application can also be mailed to the following address: SDSU Institutional Review Board 5500 Campanile Drive, (AD-222) MC 1643 San Diego, CA 92182-1643 •

SDSU will review each IRB protocol application. Upon receipt, the SDSU IRB will forward an electronic copy of the student protocol and related application documents to USD (bmaldonado@sandiego.edu). During the review process, the SDSU IRB will copy or forward all communications between the IRB and student to USD. The USD IRB will maintain an ongoing file of the protocol during the review process and may interact with the SDSU IRB as needed with questions, comments or concerns. Upon completion of the review process and prior to final approval the SDSU IRB will request final comments from USD. Review Outcomes: 1. Approval: USD has accepted SDSU’s IRB review and requires no modifications or clarification prior to finalizing approval. This will be communicated to SDSU via email. SDSU will then finalize the review and notify the USD IRB, the student and the chair of the approval status via email and regular mail. 2. Conditional Approval: If USD requires modification prior to finalizing approval, this will be communicated to the SDSU IRB via email. SDSU IRB will communicate requirements posed by USD to the student. The SDSU IRB will forward student responses to USD who will determine whether stipulations posed by USD have been adequately addressed or whether any further information is needed prior to final approval. Students will receive final written notification of approval generally within 3-4 weeks of submission. Upon completion of the process, students must pick up the approved, signed and dated Project Action Summary form, from the Doctoral Programs Office at USD. This form becomes part of the “front matter” of the bound dissertation.

August 2004

30


NOTE: This process is subject to change.

WRITING THE DISSERTATION Candidates are advised to work closely with their dissertation chair during the research process and the writing of the dissertation. Depending on the type of research conducted, completing a dissertation can take anywhere from one to two years. As the time of completion gets closer, candidates often refer to the doctoral handbook to ensure timeliness in executing the proper paperwork and accuracy in following established procedures. At this point, it is also important that candidates closely follow the deadlines for submitting USD Petition for Graduation and SDSU Application for Graduation (Appendices J and K). (Please refer to the SDSU and USD Graduate Bulletin for posted deadlines each semester). Specific guidelines for writing and preparation of the dissertation can be obtained from the Thesis Review Office at SDSU.

DISSERTATION DEFENSE After the data collection and analysis phase of the research, a complete dissertation including all required chapters is submitted for committee review. When the dissertation chair and committee members determine that the dissertation is ready to be defended, the candidate should obtain a Petition for Defense of the Dissertation form (Appendix E). This form should be completed and on file at least 2 weeks in advance of the requested date. Candidates whose dissertation chair resides at SDSU will turn in the form to the JDP office at SDSU. Candidates whose dissertation chair resides at USD must turn in their form to the JDP office at USD. An abstract (no more than 350 words) of the dissertation that has been approved by the dissertation chair should accompany this form. The abstract must be reviewed by the committee chair and becomes a part of the dissertation document. Abstracts that do not conform to standards will be returned. It is the candidate’s responsibility to work with the administrative support personnel at each institution to confirm the date and secure a room for the defense. A room will NOT be reserved if the form is incomplete or missing signatures, or the approved abstract is not included. Original copies of the form will be placed in the candidates file in the JDP office at SDSU.

August 2004

31


DISSERTATION DEFENSE ANNOUNCEMENT The student will prepare a one page announcement and email this along with an electronic version of the abstract to the JDP office at the university where the defense will take place, at least one week prior to the hearing date. Students must use the announcement template that can be found on the program website. This announcement will then be distributed electronically to the USD President, Vice Presidents and Deans, as well as faculty, and graduate students at both universities. Students are also required to provide the JDP office with one copy of the dissertation at this time.

Dissertation Defense It is recommended that the candidate visit the room assigned to them in advance to ensure that the room meets their needs and can be set up appropriately. In addition, candidates should make arrangements for any electronic needs they have at the time they submit the Petition for Defense. Arriving early on the day of the defense is always a good idea as well to make sure there are no unforeseen schedule conflicts or problems with the room. Although it primarily involves the committee, the defense is generally open to all interested faculty and students at both universities. At the defense, the candidate has an opportunity to present an overview of his/her work. In addition, the process involves a briefing of the committee on the findings followed by questions germane to the topic. Possible discussion may ensue related to future activity of the candidate in the area being investigated. The dissertation chair facilitates the meeting in which the dissertation is defended. Following the discourse the candidate and guests leave the room, and the committee deliberates and reaches a decision to pass or fail the candidate. If the committee approves the dissertation or approves with revisions, committee members must sign nine original copies (for a 3 member committee) of the Dissertation Defense Approval form (Appendix F) (the candidate should take the copies of the form with them to the defense and give them to the dissertation chair prior to the start of the defense). A copy of this form is kept in the candidates file (and should be given to the appropriate program office where the defense is held). The originals are placed in the bound copies of the dissertation to be distributed. If the committee does not approve, the chair keeps the forms until the dissertation is approved. August 2004

32


If the dissertation is not approved, the committee must decide about the changes necessary to receive full approval, or if the candidate should be terminated from the program. The candidate is responsible for working with the chair to make any significant written changes to receive final approval. After any final changes are made the candidate submits the complete original dissertation to the chair for final approval. Additionally, the student should be following the appropriate procedures/timelines for formatting dissertations which can be obtained from the SDSU Thesis Review office. Upon receipt of format approval, the candidate is responsible for submitting two unbound originals (one to each university) and arranging to make no less than six additional copies for binding and distribution. Details on binding and submission procedures are available on the program website: http://www.sandiego.edu/soe/acadprog/doctoral/jointdocprog It is the candidate’s responsibility to make sure that the completed forms are filed properly. If the JDP office does not have the final approval form, a candidate’s graduation from the Joint Doctoral Program could be delayed. Candidates who are unable to successfully complete the dissertation will not graduate from the Joint Doctoral Program.

August 2004

33


Part III – Policies and Procedures

August 2004

34


ACADEMIC CALENDAR Due to the nature of this program, with two institutions operating under a single pay method, the appropriate academic calendar to follow is that of the University of San Diego with respect to registration and payment deadlines. However, when enrolled in courses at SDSU, the student will follow course dates and holidays per that campus calendar. The USD calendar can be accessed via the website, http://www.sandiego.edu/bulletin/calendar.html. The SDSU calendar can be accessed via the website: http://coursecat.sdsu.edu/bulletin/AC.pdf.

REGISTRATION To make the entire registration process as easy as possible for students, USD has been designated as the campus where all registration activities will occur. This means that no matter where classes are physically located (SDSU or USD), all registration will be handled at USD. To register for classes, simply follow these two steps: 1. Since all students are required to take the appropriate concentration courses and the program’s core courses, the USD program manager will automatically enroll you in these mandatory classes each semester. If for any reason, a student cannot enroll in the designated courses during a specific semester, it is the student’s responsibility to notify the USD program manager. 2. After students are enrolled in courses they will automatically be billed by USD’s Student Accounts Office. Please note that the USD program manager will not be able to register you if you have an outstanding balance from a previous semester’s bill. It is the students’ responsibility to communicated directly with the student accounts office at USD (619-260-4561) to make arrangements to remove a registration block. Elective and Independent Study Options Elective courses and independent study opportunities are designed to provide doctoral students with specific and in-depth examination of topics that will enhance their course of study. A specified number are available through each university for both concentrations.

August 2004

35


Independent Studies

The purpose of the independent study is to explore in-depth a topic of interest and importance to a student. Independent study should be used wisely and on a limited basis. Independent study activities include, but are not limited to, conducting library research, implementing a pilot study or an individual action research study, conducting a program evaluation or policy analysis, preparing and/or implementing a staff development project. Any full-time faculty member may advise independent study students each semester, including summer session. The student may register for 1 to 6 units of independent study per semester, but may only apply a maximum of nine units of independent study to his/her doctoral program. In addition to the registration procedures below, the students must include the following detailed information attached to the form or in the body of the email, if electronic (do not use attachments). 1. Description of proposed study 2. Description of materials, resources and methods employed 3. Process of evaluation The following outline has been developed to give student’s step-by-step directions on how to proceed with either an elective or an independent study. Registration for Electives and Independent Studies

To register for elective classes students have 2 options. It is the student’s responsibility to obtain all approvals (1) Download the Program Elective Form or Independent Study form (Appendix G) which can be found on the program website. and hand deliver to get appropriate signatures. The student must obtain signatures from a. Instructor of the course b. The advisor from the university where the course takes place c. The program director from the university where the course takes place Upon receipt of the completed form, the USD Program Manager will register the student.

August 2004

36


OR (2) Utilize the following Electronic Approval Process, a. Email the instructor of the class. This email is a request for the instructor to admit you to the class. (Ideally, you have already conversed with the instructor regarding this situation.) Include the following in the body of your email: Dear Dr. ____________: My name is (your name). I am a student in the Joint Doctoral program. I would like to take your course: (course # and title) in the (Semester/Year). If you approve this request, please forward this email to my advisor: Dr. (your advisor’s name) at (your advisor’s email address). Please include the comment, “I approve (YOUR NAME) to take my course per the request below.” Please copy me on your email to my advisor so I can keep track of the progress of my request. Thank you very much for your cooperation in expediting this process. Signed, Your Name b. Follow up with your concentration advisor to ensure he/she received the request and forwarded it to the appropriate Program Director who will then forward it to the USD program office. c. Finally, you will receive an email confirmation from the USD Program Manager once your request is received. NOTE: It is the student’s responsibility to ensure the progress of the request. If an instructor is unable or unwilling to use this electronic process, the student is responsible to route the paper form for signatures. A request will not be considered approved unless the advisor receives an email directly from the instructor and the program director receives the email directly from the advisor. No forwarded emails from a student will be considered approved. Copies of the form or email will be placed in the student’s file in both JDP offices. The USD Program Manager must receive either the signed form or the final email from the program director by the stated deadline each semester. Summary

Student’s who do not follow these steps to officially enroll for class will not be permitted to remain in the class. Any student who does not officially register for a class will not appear on August 2004

37


the official class roster and will not receive a grade for the course. In this instance, students will be required to take a substitute course to fulfill the elective requirement.

TUITION AND FEES As described above, after registering for classes you will automatically be billed by USD’s Office of Student Accounts. For the 2004-05 academic year, tuition and fees is $655 per unit. This dollar figure is subject to change based on future increases or decreases in tuition and fees at either of the universities. However, at the current per unit rate ($655) the total for the 60-unit program works out to approximately $39,300.

ACADEMIC RECORD (AR) The USD Academic Record (AR) is a list of requirements for each student's program and the courses that have been taken to meet the requirements. The AR is not an official record, but it is designed to keep students updated on their academic progress. The USD Graduate Records Office sends the AR to registered graduate students and their advisors each fall and spring semester. If there are errors on the AR, students should work with their advisor to make adjustments.

CHANGE OF NAME/ADDRESS If the student should have any name or address change, they should notify university personnel at both USD and SDSU so we can stay in communication with students throughout the program. Failure to compete this form may result in the student missing important information sent to all students. At USD: Students should complete a “Change of Name” or “Change of Address” form and submit it to the USD JDP office. At SDSU: students need to access their SDSU Web Portal account from the SDSU website and click on the change of address link. In addition, when accepted to the program, all students are added to an email listserv. It is the students’ responsibility to notify both JDP offices of any change in email address.

August 2004

38


FINANCIAL AID Although there are many ways to finance doctoral study, all students are first encouraged to apply for federal financial assistance by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Assistance (FAFSA), available in the Financial Aid Office at USD. After completing the FAFSA and then submitting it to the Office of Financial Aid at USD, students will be notified of their eligibility for federal financial aid, which includes loans, grants, and work-study. In addition to these funding opportunities, students are also encouraged to apply for various types of external support, for which information can be found in either one of the financial aid offices, or on the web. Finally, a limited number of graduate fellowships and assistantships are available at each institution. Information regarding assistantships/fellowships can be obtained by contacting the program directors at each institution.

CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT Students are required to maintain continuous enrollment throughout their doctoral studies. Continuous enrollment is defined as a minimum of 1 unit *of coursework during the fall and spring semesters. Although students are not required to enroll during intersession or the summer, some required courses may only be taught during these periods and, as such, students will be expected to enroll in these particular courses. It is the student’s responsibility to inform the USD program manager of registration plans. Students will be automatically registered in accordance with the Joint Doctoral predetermined schedule, unless written notification is received three weeks prior to the beginning of the semester. *If students do not graduate at the end of the spring semester of their 5th year in the program and instead plan to graduate during the following summer, they must enroll in one dissertation unit at USD and complete a petition for graduation (Appendices J and K) at both universities. Any students not graduating before the beginning of the fall semester of their sixth year in the program must enroll for 3 dissertation units each fall and spring semester at USD up until and including the semester of planned graduation.

INCOMPLETE GRADES The grade of Incomplete ("I") may be recorded to indicate that the requirements of a course have been substantially completed, but, for a legitimate reason, a small fraction of the work August 2004

39


remains to be completed; and that the record of the student in the course justifies the expectation that he or she will complete the work and obtain a passing grade by the deadline. It is the student's responsibility to explain to the instructor the reasons for non-completion of the work and to request an incomplete grade prior to the posting of final grades. The instructor should discuss with the student the conditions and deadline for completion, whenever possible. The Incomplete grade is not counted in the computation of the grade point average, nor is credit earned for the semester/session for which the grade was authorized. Students receiving financial aid should be aware that taking an incomplete grade might affect their eligibility for financial aid by their failure to earn the appropriate amount of credit within a year. When the work is completed, the instructor will follow procedure to remove the Incomplete from the student’s record at both universities if applicable. Students who receive a grade of “Incomplete” for a USD course must complete the required work and receive a grade before the end of the tenth week of the next fall or spring semester. Students who receive a grade of “Incomplete” for a SDSU course must complete the required work and receive a grade within one year of the end of the course. Failure to complete the required work by these deadlines will result in an automatic “F” being recorded in place of the incomplete, and usually results in the student being placed on academic probation. Please remember that making up an incomplete is ultimately the student’s responsibility, and failure to do so is not an acceptable excuse for later petitioning to have the “F” removed from your record.

GRADE GRIEVANCE Refer to guidelines provided at the university where the course was taken.

ACADEMIIC STANDING To remain in good academic standing and to be eligible to graduate, students are required to earn at least a 3.0 Grade Point Average (GPA) each semester that they are enrolled as well as maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale). If for any reason either of these two conditions is not met, students will be placed on academic probation. In addition, students must August 2004

40


receive a grade of B- or better in all required courses. If a student receives a grade lower than a B-, she/he will need to retake the course at the next available opportunity (students should be aware that JDP courses are not offered every academic year). In the event of academic probation the student’s advisor evaluates the student’s progress and recommends a course of action to the two program directors. Students may not continue in the program on academic probation for more than two consecutive semesters, and will be recommended for disqualification from the program, if this occurs. Students receiving a notice of disqualification may appeal to the Dean of the School of Education at USD and the Graduate Dean at SDSU within ten calendar days of receiving such notice.

STUDENT DISMISSAL Students may be dismissed from the Joint Doctoral Program for the following reasons: 1. Violations of academic integrity. 2. Failure to maintain established grade point average of 3.0 for all coursework. 3. Failure to make satisfactory academic progress toward their degree. 4. Violations of Ethics Code as established by applicable field of study and program area. 5. Failure to complete time limits for degree. 6. Violations of policies and the USD Student Code of Rights and Responsibilities, as listed in the USD Graduate Student Handbook, and the SDSU Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities. This includes policies on academic dishonesty and plagiarism, 7. Failure to make satisfactory progress in the development of academic and practitioner skills. 8. Failure to resolve personal and interpersonal issues, which interfere with cooperative learning experiences among students and faculty or interfere with the delivery of satisfactory services to clients during fieldwork, including, but not limited to: internships, student teaching, practicum or service learning. When any of the above concerns are raised, the student will be asked to meet with his/her advisor or the Program Director to discuss the concern. A consultation will follow and a written plan will be developed to ensure the student understands the concerns and the proposed plan for remediation. A written review placed in the student’s file outlining the concern and the August 2004

41


recommendations for addressing it will follow such contact. It is the student’s responsibility to make sure that the concerns are addressed and she/he fully understands the issues and the plan outlined for successful completion of their degree. The Program faculty (on an ongoing basis) will evaluate the student’s progress relative to the concern and written evaluation of progress will be sent to the student and placed in the student’s file. If the student fails to make satisfactory progress toward the resolution of the concern, the Program faculty will discuss this and determine the specific action to be taken. In the event that satisfactory progress is not made within the time limits set by the faculty, a written notification of dismissal will be sent to the student. Students who are terminated for any reason may appeal for reinstatement in writing to the Dean of the School of Education at USD and the Graduate Dean at SDSU within ten calendar days of receiving notice of termination. Reinstatement will occur only when there is a compelling reason to do so.

STUDENT REINSTATEMENT Students who fail to make satisfactory progress toward the required deadlines, who have dropped out of the program for any reason or those who do not maintain continuous enrollment will be dismissed from the program. Students may appeal this decision by applying for readmission. The procedure for readmission may require a new personal statement of interest in the program, three new letters of recommendation and a complete set of current transcripts. Students who reapply may be considered at the same time as those seeking admittance for the first time. In considering the readmission request, faculty will evaluate previous coursework, and other activities both in and out of the program. If the student is admitted, the faculty may recommend redoing any or all of the student’s coursework depending on the length of the time away from the program and the original reason for leaving the program. There is, however, no guarantee of readmission.

WITHDRAWAL/LEAVE OF ABSENCE Due to the cohort model, it is highly recommended that students do not take a leave of absence, as they will fall behind the cohort and may not be able to take courses that are only offered once August 2004

42


in several years. However, in extreme cases, students may withdraw from current courses taken at either university. A petition for leave of absence must be filed in conjunction with a withdrawal if a student plans to remain in the Joint Doctoral Program. However, students withdrawing from their current classes will lose their eligibility for federal financial aid, and depending on the time of their withdrawal, will be required to return either all, or part, of the federal aid they received for the semester. Students who are unable to maintain continuous enrollment need to complete a Leave of Absence (LOA) form (Appendix I) from USD. (These forms are available the School of Education at USD). The student’s advisor, Program Director, and the Associate Dean of the School of Education at USD, must approve the form. Failure to maintain continuous enrollment will result in suspension from the program. Students must apply for readmission unless the LOA form is on file and current. Leaves may be granted for up to one year. A leave of absence does not stop the seven-year time clock from ticking. Students who are absent from the program (ie: not enrolled) for longer than one year must reapply during the next admission cycle. Students in the dissertation stage are not eligible to take a leave of absence.

TIME LIMITS As with all doctoral programs, this program must be completed within seven years from the date the student first enrolls in the program. Additionally, the dissertation must be completed within three years of advancement to candidacy (please refer to page 24 for policies pertaining to advancement to candidacy). Clearly, for a student to complete the program within seven years they need to be making substantial progress each semester. Failure to complete the program within seven years will result in revocation of candidacy and being dropped from the Joint Doctoral Program. Only in highly unusual circumstances can a student request an extension of the time limit. This must be done in writing and approved by the student’s advisors at both universities and both Directors of the Joint Doctoral Program.

August 2004

43


PETITION TO GRADUATE In order to be cleared for degree completion, students, in consultation with their advisor must file a Petition for Graduation form (Appendix J) with the Graduate Records Office at USD and an Application for Graduation form (Appendix K) with the SDSU Graduate Division by the deadlines posted in the respective graduate bulletins. There are three graduation dates at the end of January, May, and August. Deadlines for defense and submission of dissertations must be observed. Students who fail to meet the deadlines, will not be permitted to graduate, even if all other graduation requirements have been met. In order to receive permission to attend Commencement, eligible students must register and pay in full for their remaining units at USD no later than May 1. Each university holds only ONE graduation ceremony each year. All graduates during the relevant academic year are welcome to participate in these May graduation ceremonies. If a candidate does not graduate at the expected time: 1.) The USD registrar will automatically roll the petition for graduation over to the next graduation period if it is in the same calendar year. If the graduation period extends beyond the calendar year for which the petition was filed, a new petition must be completed. 2.) At SDSU, the student must reapply for the next semester one expects to graduate. Petitions are never rolled at SDSU. Additionally, JDP students must meet SDSU Thesis Review deadlines in order to be eligible to graduate in a given semester.

SUMMARY The SDSU-USD Student Doctoral Handbook has been developed as a general set of guidelines for this particular joint program. Its contents have been designed by the joint faculty to provide direction for students, but specific policies and procedures in each institution’s Graduate Bulletin should also be consulted when indicated.

August 2004

44


Part IV –Appendix

August 2004

45


APPENDIX A:

DISSERTATION COMMITTEE FORM

SDSU-USD JOINT DOCTORAL PROGRAM

STUDENT’S NAME: PROPOSED TOPIC OF DISSERTATION:

The following Joint Doctoral faculty member has agreed to chair my dissertation committee: Chair

Signature

Date

The following faculty members will serve on my dissertation committee: Member:

Title:

Signature:

Date:

Member:

Title:

Signature:

Date:

Member:

Title:

Signature:

Date:

Please attach a one-page description of the dissertation topic, and return signed copies to the SDSU or USD Joint Doctoral Program Office (wherever the chair resides). The Outside Member Dissertation Committee form must be attached for any members outside of the University of San Diego or San Diego State University. Date Received in JDP Office: August 2004

46


APPENDIX B:

OUTSIDE MEMBER DISSERTATION COMMITTEE FORM SDSU-USD JOINT DOCTORAL PROGRAM

STUDENT’S NAME: TOPIC OF DISSERTATION:

STUDENT’S SIGNATURE: COMMITTEE CHAIR SIGNATURE: (INDICATING APPROVAL)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------PROSPECTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBER INFORMATION: NAME: TITLE: PHONE: MAILING ADDRESS: SIGNATURE:

DATE:

* Please attach vita of prospective member and return all completed forms to the JDP Program Office at SDSU or USD (wherever the chair resides). -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------To be completed by program manager/coordinator at appropriate institution MEMBER ACCEPTED: MEMBER DENIED:

ACCEPTANCE LETTER SENT OUT TO MEMBER:

August 2004

RATIONALE:

DATE:

47


APPENDIX C:

PROPOSAL HEARING FORM

SDSU-USD JOINT DOCTORAL PROGRAM

STUDENT’S NAME: TOPIC OF DISSERTATION PROPOSAL:

DATE OF HEARING:

TIME OF HEARING:

The following faculty member serving as my chair recognizes that my dissertation defense is on the above date and time:

Chair

Signature

Date

The following faculty members, serving on my dissertation committee, recognize that my dissertation defense is on the above date and time: Member:

Title:

Signature:

Date:

Member:

Title:

Signature:

Date:

Member:

Title:

Signature:

Date:

Location:

USD

SDSU

Room assigned for Hearing:

Date Received in JDP Office: August 2004

48


APPENDIX D:

DISSERTATION PROPOSAL APPROVAL FORM SDSU-USD JOINT DOCTORAL PROGRAM

STUDENT: ADDRESS: AREA OF CONCENTRATION: TITLE OF PROPOSAL:

DATE OF PROPOSAL HEARING:____________________________________ DATE BY WHICH STUDENT EXPECTS TO COMPLETE DISSERTATION: STUDENT’S SIGNATURE:______________________________

DATE:

The following signatures are testimony that the student’s proposal has been accepted and that the student may proceed with the dissertation.

DISSERTATION COMMITTEE SIGNATURES _________________________________________________________ Chair _________________________________________________________ Member _________________________________________________________ Member _________________________________________________________ Member Human Subjects Committee Approval Date: (attach copy of approval) Date Received in JDP Office: August 2004

49


APPENDIX E:

PETITION FOR DEFENSE OF DISSERTATION FORM SDSU-USD JOINT DOCTORAL PROGRAM

CANDIDATE’S NAME: TITLE OF DISSERTATION:

I hereby petition for the defense of my dissertation and request that the defense will take place on DATE:

TIME:

SIGNATURE:

DATE OF REQUEST:

Location:

USD

SDSU

Date Approved by Dissertation Committee: ______________________________________, Chair ______________________________________, Member ______________________________________, Member ______________________________________, Member -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------To be completed by program manager/coordinator at appropriate institution

Date Received in appropriate JDP Office: Room assigned for Hearing: Copies sent to:

August 2004

Chair:

50


APPENDIX F:

DISSERTATION DEFENSE APPROVAL FORM SDSU-USD JOINT DOCTORAL PROGRAM

This is a copy ONLY. Student creates original forms which must be used for inserts prior to binding of the dissertation. Templates available on the program website.

SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY – UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO The Undersigned Faculty Committee Approves the Dissertation of Your Name

Title of Dissertation Second Line if Needed

__________________________________________ Faculty Name, Chair Name of Appropriate Department or College __________________________________________ Faculty Name Department Name __________________________________________ Faculty Name Department Name

______________________________ Approval Date August 2004

51


APPENDIX G:

PROGRAM ELECTIVE FORM

SDSU-USD JOINT DOCTORAL PROGRAM Section 1

STUDENT’S NAME: CONCENTRATION:

ED. TECH.

LITERACY

ELECTIVE AT:

SDSU

USD

Semester/Yr:

/

Course Code & Number:

Course Title: Units: Previous Electives taken (Please list course code & number) USD SDSU

Course Description:

Section 2

APPROVALS: Faculty Supervisor:

Date:

Concentration Advisor:

Date:

Program Director:

Date:

Date Received by USD Program Manager:

August 2004

52


APPENDIX H:

INDEPENDENT STUDY FORM

SDSU-USD JOINT DOCTORAL PROGRAM Section 1

STUDENT’S NAME: CONCENTRATION:

ED. TECH.

LITERACY

INDEPENDENT STUDY AT: SDSU Semester/Yr:

/

USD

Units:

Previous Electives taken (Please list course number) USD SDSU

Please use a separate page to fully address the following: 1. Description of proposed study 2. Description of materials, resources and methods employed 3. Process of evaluation

Section 2

APPROVALS: Faculty Supervisor:

Date:

Concentration Advisor:

Date:

Program Director:

Date:

Date Received by USD Program Manager: August 2004

53


APPENDIX I:

LEAVE OF ABSENCE FORM

SDSU-USD JOINT DOCTORAL PROGRAM

August 2004

54


APPENDIX J:

USD PETITION FOR GRADUATION FORM

SDSU-USD JOINT DOCTORAL PROGRAM

August 2004

55


APPENDIX K:

SDSU PETITION FOR GRADUATION FORM SDSU-USD JOINT DOCTORAL PROGRAM

Download a current copy of this form from http://gra.sdsu.edu/ G35 $35

SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY Graduate and Research Affairs Graduate Division $35 Application Fee for Graduation with an Advanced Degree

FALL 2004 Filing Deadline SEPTEMBER 20, 2004 The name on your University record will appear on your Diploma. Last

First

MI

Red ID # Only if you have a "unique" spelling of your name (it includes the use of tildes, hyphens, accent marks, for example), please print it below: (please print)

"You" are responsible for checking and changing spelling corrections in your name, Mailing or Diploma address. To do this go to www.sdsu.edu/e-services Diplomas are not forwarded by the Post Office.

Candidate for the degree of (circle one) MA MS MBA MCP MFA MM MPA MPH MSW

AuD EdD PhD

I understand that, if I do not graduate the semester for which I am applying, I must reapply for the next semester in which I expect to graduate. I also understand if I have any outstanding Incompletes they will be charged and counted as an “F” for grade point purposes at the time of graduation. Student Signature __________________________________________

August 2004

56

http://www.sandiego.edu/soles/documents/joint_doctoral/jdp_handbook_revised_2005  

http://www.sandiego.edu/soles/documents/joint_doctoral/jdp_handbook_revised_2005.pdf

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you