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2013

ARCH. PORTFOLIO VOL.03

DAN BROWN M. ARCH CANDIDATE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS: SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN & PLANNING PORTFOLIO 2013


“A GREAT BUILDING MUST BEGIN WITH THE UNMEASURABLE, MUST GO THROUGH MEASURABLE MEANS WHEN IT IS BEING DESIGNED AND IN THE END MUST BE UNMEASURABLE.” - LOUIS KAHN


CONTENTS RESUME.......................................................................................03 LAWRENCE ENTERPRISE CENTER....................................................05 LAWRENCE ARTIST COMMUNITY................................................... 15 MARVIN HALL ADDITION..............................................................27 RIVER CITY | MASTER PLAN..........................................................39 RIVER CITY | ATHENEAUM............................................................45 PHOTOG |..................................................................................59


Daniel P. Brown

Architecture & Design Intern

2028 E. Cherokee Place Olathe, KS 66062 913.593.1888 daniel87brown@gmail.com

PROFILE

Team oriented masters of architecture student with professional experience in leadership, marketing and sales. a self starter and quick learner with a passion for architecture and design.

EDUCATION The University of Kansas

Masters of Architecture, Masters of Arch. Management

spring 2015 (anticipated) fall 2015 (anticipated)

The University of San Diego,

Bachelor of Arts Communication Studies Sociology

spring 2009 spring 2009

EMPLOYMENT Sales Specialist, Apple Inc; San Diego, CA — 2011- 2012 Provide the complete solutions for electronic needs while developing working relationships. Deliver peer feedback

Develop team relationships.

Manage scheduling

Lead customer personal training sessions

Store Manager, Target Corp; San Diego, CA — 2009-2011

Drive profitable sales along with process shortage and inventory discrepancies through best practices. Deliver corrective action

Manage expense centers /payroll / scheduling

Maintain brand standards

Recruiting Coordinator, University of San Diego; San Diego, CA — 2006-2009 Host / present academic criteria and expectations to perspective student athletes

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COMMUNITY SERVICE Community Captain, Target Corp; San Diego, CA — 2009-2011

Responsibilities included organizing community programs for the betterment of the community while developing relationships. The purpose of the program is to create volunteering opportunities for team members to give back to the community.

PROGRAM KNOWLEDGE Autodesk AutoCAD Revit 3ds Max

Adobe CS6 Photoshop Illustrator InDesign

Sketch-Up Rhino Grasshopper

References Dr. Paola Sanguinetti Department Chair | School of Architecture The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

785.864.3862 paolas@ku.edu

Kapila Silva Associate Professor | School of Architecture The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

785.864.2700 kapilas@ku.edu

Shaney Fink Associate Athletic Director The University of San Diego, San Diego, CA

619.921.6850 sfink@sandieg.edu

Timothy Marsh Store Manager| Apple Inc. North County Apple Sotre, Escondido, CA

858.602.8004 tmarsh@apple.com

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[ LEC | Business Incubation Center ] spring 2013

LAWRENCE ENTERPRISE CENTER Instructor | Kapila Silva

Project Synopsis Architecture and design have a tremendous responsibility within the built environment, to appropriately represent the cultural values of the community in which the design is proposed to exist. For these reasons, the design of the Lawrence Enterprise Center should be targeted toward the enhancement of the pedestrian -friendly active urban life in the downtown Lawrence, and thus the building form, elevations and street level functions should be catalysts for lively city life. It is this concept that should be rooted within the design philosophy. The downtown Lawrence urban definition has a fairly continuous urban edge/wall. Any recess kept in the site would disrupt the continuous urban edge. Therefore, this issue must be carefully addressed within the design approach. The design should have a unique contemporary

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spirit, such a visual presence is vital for promoting new businesses. However, this notion must be critically analyzed as the downtown Lawrence has a historic ambiance with historic styles. The tectonic expression of these styles is represented in varying building heights and predominately brick masonry urban wall. Although it is not of an extra-ordinary piece of historic urban fabric, it poses a design challenge when one designs an infill building with it. As a business center, the overall design of a place should project a vibrant ambiance full of energy, yet in a controlled manner that suits the workplace function. The use of light, materiality, and tectonic feel of the spaces require careful attention For an effective contemporary character, natural spaces could be integrated at different levels of the building.


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Design Inspiration

Material

Abstract

Through the exploration of materials, abstract representations and conceptual ideas, the Lawrence Enterprise Center was envisioned as a container for an entrepreneurial community. It was imagined as a place where the very idea of business has the ability to adapt to the demands of its users. As an incubation center, the

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L.E.C. Creates a fostering environment that cultivates future business through its spacial relationships as well as interstitial meeting spaces. Just as the space is intended to nurture aspiring businesses, the L.E.C. is programatically organized with the principal arrangement of the natural world; more specifically, a tree. Using this concept, the


Precedent Study

Clive Wilkinson | Marquis Group Form is a representation of its program arrangement. The use of precedent analysis play a major role in the L.E.C. specifically, the Marquis Group building by Clive Wilkinson Architects embody the ideological similarities. This notion of creating a permanent collaboration space for the businesses of tomorrow is a direct challenge into the way

in which business will be conducted by the next generations. With an aim to associate to the existing urban context and the ambition to imagine what the future may hold, the L.E.C. is a place acting as a community container. It is acting as a beacon and a link to tomorrows possibilities

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Process Analysis

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Professional collaboration bridge (Top Left) is a space that allows professionals to work collectively in small break out groups. The floating library (Bottom Left) is a space imagined as a linkage point between business innovation and the collaborative conference rooms. Research and analysis play a major role in the process

of innovation. The idea is that one must first acquire the knowledge base before cultivating and assisting in the growth of others. Lastly, the gallery space (right) is a space that allows for public engagement within an exhibition space. Circulating the public through the space as a way of generating activity.

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[ LAC | Lawrence Artist Community & Gallery ] spring 2013

LAWRENCE ARTIST COMMUNITY Instructor | Kapila Silva


Project Synopsis The value that is attributed toward the creation, collection and exhibition of art is varying dependent upon several factors. The city of Lawrence maintains a consistent level of interest within the art community and therefore is interested in the possibility of creating a center for artists in residency. With need for a live/work cultivating space for aspiring artists, the Lawrence Artist Community (LAC) is will require an environment that is conducive to both community and art. The City of Lawrence plans to develop a ‘business incubator’ that is focused solely on in residency artists. It conceived as a Co-housing type Live/Work community, accommodating 8 to 10 artists within a living and work environment. Shared community spaces are seen as significant means for

providing individual artist access to patrons and community support beyond their individual effort. This development is to be managed by the existing Lawrence Arts Center and it is expected that this project could supplement the centers requirement for more exhibition spaces and workshops, accommodate their Artists-in-Residence program, and provide a source of income. The project should reflect a collective urban living for the city of Lawrence and should be focused on innovative & economic possibilities for extending the role of community arts centers. All projects shall be designed to engage the environment in a way that dramatically reduces or eliminates the need for fossil fuels. While providing a space for the community of live and grow.

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Design Inspiration

Material

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In creating a living working environment within the context of the urban boundary of the city of Lawrence, the process of design began the exploration of materials. The idea and recognition of this boundary generated a response to codify the varying typologies. Abstractly, bringing these opposing environments together through

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the representations of conceptual ideas. The LAC was envisioned as a cultivating space where community and creativity engage in a dialog. This dialog requires a certain level of transparency allowing the viewer to gain access without disruption the artists.


Precedent Study

Steven Holl | Sliced Porosity Block With a need for public spaces, Again, the use of precedent analysis initiated the schematic design for the L.A.C. In investigating the Sliced Porosity Block by Steven Holl architects, one gains access to the complexity of the notion of creating a space allowing for freedom and creative expression while also fulfilling the nature of a

“home�. In this project, the response to the complexity comes through the use of public interstitial spaces. This meaningful space creates interactions that can then develop into conversation with the freedom of flow beyond boundaries of physical space.

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Process Analysis

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Conceptual Diagram LAC Context

Sub Urban Fabric

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Urban Fabric

Context Intersections

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Floor Plans

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Living spaces (Top Left) for the artists and their families is essential to the nature of this live/work environment. The public viewing gallery (Bottom Left) acts as a defensible mechanism between the vehicular street and the residential yard space. This gallery also allows for the public to have Interaction with the work created

by the artists in residence. The gallery space (right)further allows for the exhibited work to be adorned and viewed by the public and potential clients therefore it is imagined as a space to generate revenue and sales for the artists and the Lawrence Art Center.

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[ ADP |Architecture, Design & Planning ] summer 2013

MARVIN HALL ADDITION Instructor | Steve Padget


Project Synopsis With a steep tradition for the development of future thinkers and leaders, the University of Kansas the school of architecture design and planning was missing an essential celebratory space. Marvin Hall, located on the main Lawrence campus, lacked a space acting as a formal lecture hall. Though the historical building had experienced several renovations, a lecture hall had never been successfully proposed nor designed. The challenges one faces in creating a formal lecture hall within the site boundaries of Marvin hall are plentiful. Careful consideration must be taken in terms of the contextual value of existing institutional buildings, while also pursuing innovative ideas. Design parameters referencing the historical relevance of Marvin Hall require the design to abide

by a five foot boundary in relation to the existing foundation. This design opportunity allows one to consider how this required barrier can be used for the benefit of the project. Lastly, the proposed design must respond to environmental conditions in relation to the site. The use of passive systems, both lighting and ventilation, must play a significant role within the tectonic expression of the architecture. The resulting scheme should act as both, a new lecture hall as well as a new and innovative institutional architectural form.

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Design Inspiration

Material

Abstract

In the design of new architecture within the context of a historical institutional building, one must be initiate a conversation in regards to material expression. While Marvin Hall is constructed through heavy masonry construction, the Addition is proposed to be constructed using new construction methods, embodying the values

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held within the traditional form. The interior of the space requires special attention, as it is to become a ceremonial space for the school. This space in particular, should evoke a sense of wonder and mystery, while celebrating the history of Marvin Hal itself.


Precedent Study

Renzo Piano | Beyeler Foundation The beyeler foundation by Renzo Piano architects, was used as a point of departure for understanding passive lighting design. This system allows for maximum lighting in response to the site orientation. Further, this system begins to play a major role in the tectonic expression of the architectural form. With performance factors acting as the

a. Circulation Diagram

main forces driving the design process, the tectonic expression simply nests itself within the existing expressed boundaries of the side. In coalition with the computer lab between Marvin hall and the building for Art and Design, the new addition also employs the use of a solar chimney system, employing both performance and representation.

b. Exploded Axon

c. Passive Systems | Air, Acoustics, Daylighting

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Floor Plans

Upper Level 1 : 12’ 0”

Ground Level : 0’ 0”

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1. Flashing 2. Blocking 3. EPDM Roofing 4. Rigid Insulation Tapered 5. Cant Strip 6. Concrete Filled Metal Decking 7. Coping 8. Steel Split - Tail Anchor in Vertical Joint 9. Window Mullion (Shim as Required) 10. Structural Supports 11. Operable Panels 12. Secondary Pivoting-arm 13. Non Operable Panels 14. Steel Beam 15. Structural Open Web Joist 16. Eave Anchor 17. 3/4” Gypsum Wall Board 18. Sound Insulation 19. Concrete Floor Slab 20. Gravel Fill 21. Rigid Insulation 22. Bearing Seat 23. Drainage Pipe 24. Sealant Cant 25. 1” Glazing


New Hall entry(Top Left) is a space that allows for students to enter both Marvin hall and the lecture hall from the south. The student lounge (Bottom Left) acts as gathering space in which students can congregate in small groups following lectures as well as a space allowing discussions to take place. The purpose of this

space is to generate conversations in regards to the lecture subject matter. Lastly, the connection bridge(right) allows students to bypass the lounge and gain entry into the lecture space from the west. The interdisciplinary nature of the hall requires democratic design decisions.

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[River City: Master Plan] fall 2013

RIVER CITY : KANSAS CITY, MO Instructor | Chad Kruas

Project Synopsis Architecture is place making. It is proposed that a bold new city official, inspired by extensive travels to the urban centers of Florence, New York, Portland and Copenhagen, has teamed up with several united developers (UD’s) in Kansas city to pioneer a new approach to healing the decaying urban city. In addition to being a strong proponent of the light rail system, this government official is determined to present a series of urban proposals to garner the support of the city voters. Due to the diversity of stakeholders involved, the UD would like to strike a balance between practical, realizable solutions and utopian visions that capture the publics imagination. In teams of three (or four), you will carefully select and research an area of Kansas city, Missouri, along the proposed light rail transit system, that has experienced

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the devastating effects of de-urbanization. Geographical, infrastructural, or cultural features should inform the extents of the chosen area. The neighborhoods will serve as case studies in the transformation of Kansas city. Existing urban, architectural, and natural features will be preserved or modified based on their value and conformance with the proposed framework. A series of urban interventions must be proposed. Schemes will draw upon various models of city planning, with an emphasis on the key principals of walk-ability, sustainability, and social engagement. Each scheme should possess : a landscaping strategy; integrated transportation strategies (consolidated vehicle parking, bicycle rental stations, light rail, bus, automobile sharing.


NEW URBAN GROWTH TRANSIT LINE PEDETRIAN PATHWAY PROJECT SITE

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As part of the master planning process, the creation of an urban block typology allowed for the creation and manipulation of urban densities. This concept allows for a sophisticated understanding of density capacity on a block by block basis. The overall growth projection must be able to sustain mass transit systems within the

Urban Block Typology

community. By properly scheduling and identifying the different typologies, the density is distrusted intelligently and accurately. Further, the street taxonomy begins to define the urban condition in response to the typology assignment. The street taxonomy is an approach toward codifying the relationships within the built environment.

Street Taxonomy

Land Allocation

T-5 Urban Core | dense development Vertical Growth Allocation 30 % Residential & 70 % Commercial

a. 50 % Commercial B. 25 % Outdoor Space C. 25 % Residential

a. 25% Commercial b. 25 % Outdoor Space c. 50 % Residential

a. 37.5 % Commercial b. 37.5 % Residential c. 25 % Outdoor Space

a. 50 % Commercial B. 25 % Outdoor Space C. 25 % Residential

a. 25% Commercial b. 25 % Outdoor Space c. 50 % Residential

a. 37.5 % Commercial b. 37.5 % Residential c. 25 % Outdoor Space

T-4 Urban Periphery | Urban development Vertical Growth Allocation 50 % Residential & 50 % Commercial

T-3 River Front | Sub Urban development Vertical Growth Allocation 50 % Residential & 50 % Commercial

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a. 50 % Commercial B. 25 % Outdoor Space C. 25 % Residential

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The pedestrian walkway serves as a public corridor for foot traffic within the community. It acts and an urban oasis providing refuge from vehicular traffic and noise. By maintaining access to important elements of the city, the pedestrian walkway can serve as the main means of movement throughout the city. Further, this mode of

transportation is a promotion of healthy public life and interaction. Both walking and cycling begin to create a more engaging and dynamic community experiences sort of environment would begin to cultivate the sense of community with the neighborhoods, thus, promoting further encounters.

Pedestrian Walkway

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The neighborhood street taxonomy begins to allow regulated vehicular traffic access to important elements of the city. While maintaining a social hierarchy, the neighborhood street maintains its emphasis on the pedestrian first approach. This approach places more significance on the pedestrian versus the vehicular traffic.

With the master plan deploying concentrated parking, this taxonomy does not allow for street level parking, thus reducing the dimensional space required to serve vehicular function. With an abundance of landscaping and topographic deployments, the space created is geared towards a much more enjoyable experience.

Neighborhood Street

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Main street is the first example of street cross sectional value that deploys the use of mass public transit systems. While this street taxonomy has varying modes of transportation, the major emphasis is still placed upon the rights of the individual in comparison to vehicular traffic. With a large stress placed on the use of the light rail public

transit system, this cross sectional value is an example of one where interests align with the reduction of carbon emissions by the promotion of clean means of transportation. Further, by placing more significance on public transit, the system empowers both the individual and the community.

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[River City: Atheneaum] fall 2013

The Atheneaum: KANSAS CITY, MO Instructor | Chad Kruas


Project Synopsis Architecture is experience. Following the production of the master plan, individual development of a schematic design for one of the tree projects types collectively referred to as the forum. The project will serve the selected neighborhood as well as the greater Kansas city community. The aim of this exercise is to strengthen the overall design of the forum through a careful consideration of tectonics, materiality, and building systems. In addition to developing all the materials from previous exercises, students must produce an axonometric drawing that will illustrate the proper address of structural and life safety systems. Students must explore issues of materiality and tectonics, building systems and assemblies, and , very importantly, the ongoing conceptual framework

underpinning your overall design. The creation of a sacred space (the Atheneaum) is one of significant importance. It brings into question, what role does this form of media play in the future? Further, how is that one can engaged the public with this type of space in an informative and experiential way? In the creation of this project, individual student work will exhibit the thought process behind critical design decisions. Further, students will be provided the opportunity to explore their own interpretation of architectural design and form. Lastly, students will stitch together a narrative of the anticipated program usage as well as the experience of the perceived users of the space.

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Design Inspiration

Material

Abstract

In the design of a temple for the housing of rare books, the Atheneaum design was focused on the inherent metaphysical benefits of using wood as both structural and expressive fenestrations. The notion of the destination as the abstract, the atheneaum was placed in a specific location giving access to the Missouri river front. This

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architectural concept of destination is heightened the an emphasis placed upon the journey through space instead of the destination only. Conceptually, this is reinforced by through the generation of perspectival experience as one enters the space, acknowledging the value of the space while passing through it.


Precedent Study

Jensen & Skodvin Architects | Tautra Mariakloster While using heavy timber and cross laminated timer (CLT) as a structural material the metaphysical qualities of a wood building were heavily sought after in the creation of this design. The work of Jensen & Skodvin Architects and their Tautra Mariakloster project acted as the main case study of tectonic expression and detailing. Through the

ceiling and floor construction method, the design is able to communicate its assembly the viewer within the space. Further, the structure both exposes and expresses itself through the apertures and window walls. It is through the use of this material that the inherent atmospheric quality is successfully achieved.

Section AA

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Process Analysis

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2. Accentuate

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Systems Conditions

SELECT CASES OF EGRESS

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12 X 18 SOUTHERN PINE HEAVY TIMBER COLUMN tributary area : 56.25 Sq. Ft

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Site Plan

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1. 5 Ply CLT (cross laminated timber) Wall 2. EPDM Roofing Membrane 3. Cant Strip 4. Expanded polystyrene (EPS) Rigid Insulation 5. Extruded Polystyrene (XPS) Rigid Foam Insulation 6. 2x4 Furring Strips 7. 1x6 Cypress Rain Screen Cladding 8. Rain Screen Clip 9. Moisture Barrier 10. 5x15 Glulam Southern Pine Beam 11. 2 x 12 Southern Pine Joist 12. 12x16 Timber Column 13. Wood Floor System 14. Steel Fastening Plate 15. 2x10 Window Blocking 16. Aluminum Window Head Frame 17. 2- ¾” Glazing 18. Aluminum Window sill Frame 19. Aluminum Flashing 20. Expanded polystyrene (EPS) Rigid Insulation 4” 21. Sidewalk 22. Compact Sand 23. Crushed Rock 24. Earth 25. Drainage Pipe 26. Bearing Seat 27. Secondary Foundation 28. Primary Foundation 29. Expansion Joint 30. Concrete Slab 31. Moisture Barrier


The entry portal (left) displays the perspectival experience of the user once one enters into the athenaeum space. The user is immediately introduced to the destination at the end of the passage way. However, the are also introduced to different experiential options on the path towards the

destination. The viewer is also introduced to the suspended rare books collection as a reinforcing agent. The concept of knowledge acquisition become prevalent to the user. The reading room (right) is a ceremonial gathering space that provides users with access to book collections as well as a discussion.

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[Catalog of Events] 2010- 2013

Personal Photography


Architecture is a vehicle for transformation that goes beyond the physical, to a timeless and boundless space, elevating and alleviating the mind from the trivial aspects of human existence. Design changes the way one sees the world, allowing one to absorb the beauty of their surroundings and thus transforming and enhancing the human experience. It is this challenge and opportunity that drives my passion for creating and capturing meaningful architecture. The process of translation from architectural concepts to architectural realities requires a comprehensive team of professionals holding a collective rational towards attaining their collective goals. It is this process of transformation that has been of significant personal interest sense my

introduction to architecture. Throughout personal travel and experiences, both domestic and abroad, i have been able to experience remarkable architecture and design creations. The catalog that follows only represents a small portion of personal encounters with masterful spaces. Though the photography may act as a method of cataloging the experience, the method is insufficient in terms of fully capturing the experience. With a personal passion for architecture and design, i only hope to continue in my interests of encountering these spaces and continuously cataloging them through my perspective.

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As one of the first environments that truly evoked an emotional response through a personal encounter, the Salk institute by Louis Kahn has been and will remain one of the most significant experiences of my professional life. The ancient geometric forms produced by Kahn serve as a timeless representation of

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architectural form. It is within the ordering systems of the facility, the i found Myself aware of the void. The gesture of carving space through a solid, to create a sense of porosity and passage. Further, a sense of material expression, and more importantly, the expression of the act of making, played a significant


role in my fascination of this space. The garden as conceived by kahn has a direct connection with this site specificity. The orientation to the west and the gesture towards the grand nature of the pacific. Kahn elevated this research institution into a conversation that only a select few architectural spaces can reach.

The performance in coalition with the ambiance of the space are truly remarkable. This is a culturally significant example of great architecture and a sense of place. A place that is transcendent by nature.

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Continuing the discussion of culturally significant spaces. The Kauffman Center for the performing arts plays a tremendous role in the growth of the arts in the Kansas city metropolitan area. Its iconic form, revolutionary expression and innovative design approach create an iconic architecture nested within

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the landscape of the city. The design by Moshe Safdie, is one of a grand performance hall. However, i find the beauty of this space to be located particularly within the details. The use of tension cable Systems with different connection Types, again, indicates the way in which this space is assembled.


In this regard, the user of the space is able to identify the human touch that has gone into the act of creation. The ability to see the way in which something comes together and the way to see how something works, is a remarkable design tool. A tremendous amount of time went into the unique nature of the

design details within this project. I believe this time and effort is visible as one experiences the space. It is this type of design integrity that will progress our design culture forward in years to come.

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The Holocaust Memorial by Peter Eisenman was a significant experience of my time abroad. While in Germany, this memorial was visited following a visit to Sachsenhausen concentration camp. The travesty and devastation of that place cannot be appropriately described through language and to follow that

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experience with an encounter of this brutal tactile field only heightened the emotional sensitivity to the subject matter. The nature of this memorial is that its users are able to drive their own interpretations of its representations. The reality is that there is nothing special in regards to the form nor the material used


Within this memorial. There is nothing special about its orientation or approach. There is nothing special about the way in which one interacts with the space. It simply exists, just as the Holocaust simply happened. Nothing anyone can do in time nor space will change that fact. Just as no person has the ability to change that, a

memorial has no ability to convey or communicate the sorrows and despairs associated with that tragedy. It exists in time and in space as a memorial to our human capability within our reality.

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The team of Sir Norman Foster played a significant role in the reconstruction / renovation of the Reichstag Parliament Building in Berlin Germany. Following the war, this imperial architectural structure was severely damaged by way of fire. Vandalism had proliferated throughout the interior of the space and the building

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had fallen into disrepair. The unified Germany aspired to a higher level of transparency within the governmental sector and the design directly responds to this demand. The use of a glass dome structure, often referred to as “Fosters Dome,� caps the renovated Parliament building. Resting just above


the primary chamber. With this notion of transparency, the Dome allows users to experience the city of Berlin in a completely unique way. Further, the reflective surface of the natural light reflector allows for light passage into the chamber space. Further, this reflective service allows the users inhabiting the dome space to

maintain vigilance over the elected officials while they work. In concept this allows the society to have a higher level of comfort with their elected officials, especially considering the dark past of German history.

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Thank You

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dan brown architecture & design intern daniel87brown@gmail.com 913.593.1888

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Dan Brown | Architecture & Design Portfolio | 2013  

A compilation of graduate work at the University of Kansas: School of Architecture, Design & Planning

Dan Brown | Architecture & Design Portfolio | 2013  

A compilation of graduate work at the University of Kansas: School of Architecture, Design & Planning

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