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Make a 1-inch cut at the leg joints to allow oil to drain after it's finished cooking. Next, measure the oil level needed for this bird. Mount the turkey on the poultry rack and insert into the fryer pot. Fill the pot with water until the turkey is fully submerged. Make a mark about a 3/4 inch below the waterline because oil will expand when heated. Pots made for turkey frying will usually have a maximum waterline, do not fill past this line. If there is not a maximum line, always leave at least 3 inches from the top of the pot. If the turkey is too large for the pot, the turkey will need to be trimmed down. It is very important to keep in mind that the water used to measure with will be contaminated. Thoroughly clean after draining the water. Completely dry the pot before adding oil. Peanut oil is the most commonly used to deep fry turkey. It has a high flash point and is cholesterol free. Any good host should be mindful of peanut allergies of their guests. Any vegetable oil can be used for a lighter taste due to allergies. Once the waterline is measured, you may season the turkey. Dry seasoning works best on the turkey's surfaces. Liquid marinade and or herbs may be injected into the the meaty parts. Mixing orange juice, beer, or wine with dry seasonings works wonders when injected. Placing the Fryer: One of the most important safety measure is properly placing the burner. The fryer needs at least 10 feet clearance on all sides from any buildings or flammable structures and should never be under any type of overhang or ceiling. Common dangerous mistakes include placing it on wooden decks, under the garage door, or loose uneven grass and dirt. Concrete or brick are the best surfaces to place the fryer. If using on the lawn, clear the area of grass and make sure the dirt is packed, firm, and even. Wind and weather can be dangerous factors.

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