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Norway Spruce For Christmas trees, overall color of Norway spruce is fair to excellent, but needle retention is considered poor unless the trees are cut fresh and kept properly watered. It is readily identified by its dark green needles and drooping branchlets. Trees have dark green crown with a triangular shape. Needles are 1/2-1 inch long, and sharp or somewhat blunt at the tip. White Pine For Christmas trees, sheared trees are preferred, although some people feel shearing results in trees too dense for larger ornaments. Needle retention is good to excellent. White Pine has very little aroma, but, conversely, is reported to result in fewer allergic reactions than do some of the more aromatic species. Fraser Fir The combination of form, needle retention, dark blue-green color, pleasant scent and excellent shipping characteristics has led to Fraser fir being a most popular Christmas tree species. Fraser fir is a uniformly pyramid-shaped tree. Needles are 1/2 to one inch long, have a broad circular base, and are usually dark green on the upper surface and lighter on the lower surface. Blue Spruce Blue spruce are pretty trees that can grow very large! The bark is thin and gray, with narrow furrows. The crown is cone shaped in young trees, becoming circular in older trees.The leaves are needle-like, long, stout, with the tree’s colors ranging from dull gray-green to bright grey-ish blue. The needles are unique, having several lines of pores and the tip is very sharp. These are very pretty, but not ideal for families with young children. White Fir As a Christmas tree, white fir has good foliage color, a pleasing natural shape and aroma, and good needle retention. Needles are usually 1/2 to 1 1/2 inch long, pointed or notched at the tip, bluish-green when young turning dull green with age.

113_12-2012.pdf  

http://activeezine.com/pdf/113_12-2012.pdf

113_12-2012.pdf  

http://activeezine.com/pdf/113_12-2012.pdf