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US CLIMATE ACTION NETWORK

ANNUAL REPORT 2017


Front Cover: Peoples Climate March for Climate, Jobs, & Justice in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: Anthony Torres.

US CLIMATE ACTION NETWORK ANNUAL REPORT 2017 50 F STREET NW, EIGHTH FLOOR WASHINGTON, DC 20001 202.495.3046 | operations@usclimatenetwork.org www.usclimatenetwork.org All rights reserved © US Climate Action Network. 2018


Support for Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) workers outside the EPA headquarters in Washington, DC. Photo credit: Anthony Torres.

MISSION

US CLIMATE ACTION NETWORK The US Climate Action Network (USCAN) was founded in 1989 to coordinate US non-governmental organization (NGO) voices in international climate negotiations. In the 1990s, USCAN expanded its work to coordinate with state and local groups to help with national and international engagement. USCAN is an increasingly diverse, vital, and growing network of 165+ member organizations dedicated to building trust and alignments among members to fight climate change in a just and equitable way. USCAN’s key strength is the ability to create the space where a broad and deep network of civil society organizations can establish the relationships and processes needed to achieve transformational change in climate policy. For the past 29 years, USCAN’s purpose and its biggest successes have been maximizing stakeholder involvement and moving groups from shared vision to collective action. USCAN ensures that the climate community is stronger together than any US organization could be alone. USCAN is committed to building a culture of equitable relationships.

USCAN’s mission is to build trust and alignments among its members to fight climate change in a just and equitable way.

VISION USCAN envisions a powerful, inclusive, and trusting network of US organizations that work together to meet the global goals in the Paris Climate Agreement and exceed the US targets outlined in that agreement.

USCAN is the US node of Climate Action Network (CAN) International. CAN—International is a worldwide network of over 1100 NGOs in more than 120 countries. uscan annual report 2017 | 1


USCAN Board Chair David Turnbull delivers a joint letter demanding no new fossil fuel infrastructure at COP 22 in Marrakech. Photo Credit: David Tong.

MESSAGE FROM THE BOARD CHAIR The first year of the Trump Administration has been a challenging year for progressive activism of all sorts, not least of which climate justice work. This year we’ve seen climate deniers and fossil fuel billionaires installed into the seats of power in Washington, and attacks on science and climate justice action at every turn. USCAN’s efforts to be a more member-driven, aligned network could not be better timed in this new political atmosphere. What’s become clear in 2017 is that the opposition is organized. Attacks on critical climate policies and initiatives are trying to upend hard fought gains in recent years. The fossil fuel industry is not only influencing from the outside, but now from within as well. However this year we’ve also seen US Climate Action Network (USCAN) members fighting back in a more coordinated, more aligned, and ultimately more effective fashion thanks to the able facilitation of the USCAN team implementing the vision of our new strategic plan. With every assault on science, USCAN members are united in pushing back. With every attempt to dismantle critical policies, USCAN members pull together and defend our gains.

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USCAN’s work in recent years to build out a strategy that prioritizes community building amongst our network membership is paying important dividends in a challenging time. Our efforts to build alignment within our community are critical at a time when our enemies seek to divide us and tear us down. And our efforts to ensure we are led by a truly diverse set of leaders is ensuring we live the values that we espouse. In doing so, we benefit from the knowledge and perspectives that are critical to ensuring our pursuits are centered in justice and equity, particularly in the face of the increased racism, sexism, xenophobia, and hate being fomented by some in our political system. We have an ever-dwindling window to solve the climate crisis and we can not afford delay. While a hostile administration could have sent our network into a tailspin, instead it has brought us together. USCAN is as united as ever, and we’re ready for whatever comes next.

David Turnbull USCAN Board Chair


USCAN Executive Director Keya Chatterjee. Photo Credit: Erica Flock.

MESSAGE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Oh, 2017. I have never been as grateful for the work of our members and our network as I have been in 2017. We turned out in huge numbers for the Peoples Climate Movement mobilization and succeeded in inserting ourselves into the news stories covering the first 100 days of the administration. We disrupted the Trump Administration’s efforts to peddle coal at the UN climate meetings. We directed members to grassroots organizations doing longterm hurricane response, and we raised funds for them to do their work. This annual report shows that, by and large, our network pulled together in 2017. We had to. This was a year of:

Our membership responded by working in a new way together, leaning into democracy and building relationships with each other, and the results are starting to show, at a time when we need results more than ever. Our members voted on what to work on together for the first time, began to come together monthly around those topics, and worked together across difference. We are starting to become more diverse, less wonkish, more welcoming to newcomers, and more oriented towards achieving our vision together. A huge thanks to our members for all that you have done to make all of this possible, and to our supporters who make our work possible every day. We have a long way to go. We need to scale up our organizing, enhance and embrace our diversity, bolster our grassroots, and escalate our tactics. 2017 was a good start. Thank goodness for this network. We will never give up, and together we will win.

++ Hurricanes Irma, Maria, and Harvey, and multiple large

fires in California; ++ Multiple efforts to unravel climate policy—from

threatening to withdraw from the Paris Agreement to threatening to repeal the Clean Power Plan—both policies that need strengthening; ++ A laying bare of the fact that fossil fuel oligarchs have

more than access; they have control of the agencies of the federal government; and

Onward, Keya Chatterjee USCAN Executive Director

++ The members of the US Climate Action Network being

more aligned and ready to fight back than ever.

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USCAN Board of Directors at the Annual Meeting. Photo Credit: Ron Suzuki.

USCAN BOARD OF DIRECTORS USCAN board members are amazing with 100% commitment! Not only are they generous with their time and knowledge, but also each year every board member makes a financial contribution. USCAN’s board reflects the network’s ongoing commitment to racial equity, diversity, and inclusion.

TERM ENDING JULY 2018 Adrianna Quintero Director of Partner Engagement Natural Resources Defense Council Alden Meyer Director of Strategy & Policy Union of Concerned Scientists Claudia Malloy National Outreach Director National Wildlife Federation Colette Pichon Battle Director Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy Daniel Sosland (Treasurer) President Acadia Center

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David Turnbull (Chair) Campaigns Director Oil Change International J. Drake Hamilton Science Policy Director Fresh Energy Jose Aguto Associate Director Catholic Climate Covenant Kyle Ash (Board Functions Committee Chair) Director of Government Affairs Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine Rachel Potter (Secretary) Director of Operations Climate Nexus William (Bill) Snape (Legal Advisor) Senior Counsel Center for Biological Diversity


It is inspiring to be a part of this community of Americans who are working diligently to protect our global environment for each other, for our children, for people we’ll never know. There is no network of climate citizens more diverse, more engaged, or more collaborative. Although the climate problem is intimidating, we can be optimistic because of the growing movement that is USCAN. — Kyle Ash

TERM ENDING JULY 2019 Heather Coleman (Vice-Chair) Policy Manager, Climate Change Oxfam America Jacqueline Patterson Director, Environmental and Climate Justice Program National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Dr. Jalonne White-Newsome (Justice, Equity, Diversity, & Inclusion Committee Chair) Senior Program Officer The Kresge Foundation

Mike Tidwell Founder and Director Chesapeake Climate Action Network Vien Truong Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Green for All Joe Uehlein (Future Vision Committee Chair) President and Executive Director Labor Network for Sustainability

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USCAN is the wool that knits the climate community together. The forums they’ve established and support they provide have made climate activism in the United States more cohesive and more reflective of the society we’re fighting to protect. As a communicator, the access USCAN gives me to stories and storytellers is invaluable, and the relationships I’ve developed by participating in the network have made my job both easier and more enjoyable! — Rachel Potter

Few groups working to fight climate change are as truly inclusive as USCAN is. This diversity of backgrounds brings perspectives that make us stronger and, in the end, will help to make us all better able to tackle the threat of climate change. As a parent, I know this is an urgent and critical fight that we must win! — Adrianna Quintero

Anyone who is anyone in the climate advocacy world works with USCAN, which only gets better with each passing day as diverse and strong groups from every corner of our country strive jointly for concrete action to combat global warming. Our partners are literally at every level of government, from local and state governments to the federal government, and then to national governments all over the world. When we are all together—as we were in Paris in 2015—our power is undeniable and unstoppable. USCAN is the place where participation and passion join with people power to deliver a healthy world for future generations. — Bill Snape


Members sign group photos at the Annual Meeting. Photo Credit: Ron Suzuki.

THE NETWORK: 165+ ORGANIZATIONS STRONG 2017 continued to see new members joining USCAN, even as USCAN underwent organizational changes with the implementation of a new strategic plan. This speaks to a membership invested in USCAN’s mission of alignment. Over the course of the year, USCAN was excited to welcome 24 new organizations:

14. Pennsylvania Interfaith Power and Light State College (State College, PA) 15. Philadelphia Physicians for Social Responsibility (Philadelphia, PA) 16. Protect Our Winters (Boulder, CO)

1. Alliance for Climate Education (Boulder, CO)

17. Rhode Island Interfaith Power and Light (Warwick, RI)

2. Care About Climate (Flagstaff, AZ)

18. Showing Up for Racial Justice (New Market, TN)

3. Catholic Climate Covenant (Washington, DC)

19. Solar Head of State (Oakland, CA)

4. Clean Energy Works (Washington, DC)

20. South Carolina Interfaith Power and Light (Greenville, SC )

5. Climate Hawks Vote Civic Action (Washington, DC)

21. The Mountain Pact (Truckee, CA)

6. Climate Mobilization Project (Brooklyn, NY)

22. United Methodist Women (New York, NY)

7. Climate Wise Women (Berkeley, CA)

23. US Climate and Health Alliance (Oakland, CA)

8. Elected Officials to Protect New York (Fly Creek, NY)

24. Virginia Student Environmental Coalition (Mechanicsville, VA)

9. Hip Hop Caucus (Washington, DC) 10. Livelihoods Knowledge Exchange Network (LiKEN) (Lexington, KY) 11. Michigan Interfaith Power and Light (Southfield, MI)

Many of these new member organizations are active across a variety of states and regions. The new members also represent a range of foci, including education, empowering youth leadership, environmental and social justice, cultural change, faith groups, and health and wellbeing.

12. Ohio Interfaith Power and Light (Columbus, OH) 13. Partnership for Policy Integrity (PFPI) (Amherst, MA)

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At the Annual Meeting, members worked together in an exercise expressing what drives them to do this work. The answers were diverse, but came together to form a beautiful picture. Photo Credit: Ron Suzuki.


IMPLEMENTING THE NEW STRATEGIC PLAN 2017–2022 USCAN didn’t just have a new mission and vision in 2017, but also a new way of working together! Network members voted for the first time on topics to work on together, meeting in person and building relationships; members worked together to write proposals and obtain funding for collaborative and grassroots work; and all with a focus on effectiveness and achieving USCAN’s mission and vision.


OUR FOUR GOALS

Incremental Change Makers

1

Policy Theory of Changes

Grassroots Theory of Changes

Aggressive Change Makers

Facilitate Democratic Participation

2

Build Trust

Foster Alignments

3

1

Create sustaining value in the network by transitioning to a democratically member driven network model.

2

3

Build critical mass for climate action and policy by enabling alignments between clusters of members.

4

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4

Build the foundational relationships essential for collective action by facilitating peer learning activities that foster trust and candor between members. Enhance network eectiveness.


GOAL 1: DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION

WHAT DOES DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION LOOK LIKE? Voting Participants (VoP): Each organization appointed up to two Voting Participants, who are the individuals within member organizations most engaged in trust-building and alignment with other USCAN members. USCAN Voting Participants came together at the Annual Meeting in June 2017 to vote on user group topics and deepen personal relationships. Each organization received four votes, which Voting Participants used to vote on the eight user group topics USCAN members would align on for the twelve month period following the Annual Meeting, from July 2017 to June 2018. User Group Participants: Up to ten people from each organization can be appointed as user group participants by the Voting Participants . User group participants have similar access to USCAN resources as Voting Participants but do not attend the Annual Meeting or vote on network priorities.

In 2017, USCAN transitioned to a democratic, memberdriven network model. In member-driven networks, participation is the essence; it’s what makes them work. When members experience that the time they put into the network delivers outcomes that are meaningful to them, it builds ownership and value in the network. Members took leadership roles in many aspects of the network, including planning the Annual Meeting, chairing the collectively-defined work of user groups, and helping to coordinate massive mobilizations for climate, jobs, and justice. Participation is what breathes life into this diverse network and places attainment of the mission firmly within reach.

(EEECHO); Kelly Stone, ActionAid USA; Lydia Avila, Power Shift Network; Mia MacDonald, Brighter Green; Molly Rauch, Moms Clean Air Force; and Ruth Ivory-Moore, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Annual Meeting Steering Committee members worked together to define goals for the meeting, develop the meeting agenda, identify speakers and panelists, and provide on-site leadership. Thank you to our 2017 Steering Committee: Alden Meyer, Union of Concerned Scientists; Alexander Easdale, Southeast Climate and Energy Network; Aurash Khawarzad, Race Forward; Brandon Wu, ActionAid USA; Denise Abdul-Rahman, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP); Dyanna Jaye, Virginia Student Environmental Coalition; Heather Coleman, Oxfam; Heather Warman, Kentucky Environmental Foundation; Rachel Potter, Climate Nexus; Susannah Tuttle, North Carolina Interfaith Power and Light; Timothy Judson, Nuclear Information and Research Service; and Varshini Prakash, Sunrise Movement.

NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE AND ANNUAL MEETING STEERING COMMITTEE The Nominations Committee led the process of consolidating and finalizing the user group voting list with member input, vetted the on-site voting process, and supported on-site voting at the 2017 Annual Meeting. Voting Participants then voted on the eight user groups at the Annual Meeting. All network activities and resources (staff, user groups, grants) supported members working together in these eight areas. Thank you to the 2017 Nominations Committee: Basav Sen, Institute for Policy Studies; Claudia Malloy, National Wildlife Federation; Daphne Wysham, Center for Sustainable Economy; Huda Alkaff, Wisconsin Green Muslims; Ian Hamilton, US Baha’i Office of Public Affairs; Katherine Egland, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and Education, Economics, Environmental, Climate and Health Organization

Jaimie (Philip) Worker, Center for Community Change, votes on a user group at the Annual Meeting. Photo Credit: Ron Suzuki.

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WHAT CAN NETWORKS DO: CONNECT-ALIGN-PRODUCE

Higher Commitment, Trust Foster collective action

PRODUCE

Develop and spread a shared point of view

ALIGN

CONNECT

Allow easy flow of information and relationships

Lower Commitment, Trust

The ‘connect-align-produce’ sequence is a foundational network The user groups are part of a broader strategy to inspire members to concept that explains the path groups need to follow to build connect with align topics and work bodiestogether. of work that are the one trustanother, required foron effectively

important, and work together in productive ways. This “connect-alignproduce” sequence is a foundational network concept that reflects an understanding that as connections are made, the potential for members to align emerges, and after that members start to undertake collective projects. It supports USCAN’s theory of change, which is that if members work together, they will successfully impact climate change.

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2017–2018 USER GROUPS: For the first time, Voting Participants from 157 organizations at the Annual Meeting in June democratically selected the eight user group topics for 2017–2018. Members joined user groups at the meeting and jumped into user group calls in July. As part of the member-driven process, each user group consists of two co-chairs who are Voting Participants. Also, user group participants democratically decide what they want to work on together, and they commit to actively participate. The end of 2017 marks the mid-way point of this first year of user groups. Here is a summary of the progress made so far. 100% Renewable Energy (Climate Action Network—International priority) Co-chairs: Huda Alkaff, Wisconsin Green Muslims Michael Hansen, Gasp This user group started by working on two short-term projects that explored and mapped 1) resources in (and beyond) the network on 100% renewable energy (RE), and 2) what definitions, opportunities, and issues exist around 100% RE. Two themes emerged in these discussions: supporting local work around 100% RE and the 100% Transition Roadmap. Members are currently working on projects within these themes. Building Power from the Grassroots Up Co-chairs: Brian Borncamp, Clean Air Coalition Reverend Lawrence J. Jennings, GreenFaith This group started by identifying these unifying themes: 1. Groups looking at building power from the grassroots but unsure on how to proceed and need training/resources. 2. Groups already building power from the grassroots but constrained by a need for financial and other resources, and the inequity between big environmental organizations and smaller grassroots organizations (or smaller national/ regional organizations). 3. A desire for a better picture of the overall climate and environmental justice landscaping. This group has been brainstorming tangible solutions based on the shared self-interest. Federal Oversight and Resistance Opportunities Co-chairs: Bill Snape, Center for Biological Diversity Emily Wirzba, Friends Committee for National Legislation Members of this user group work together to build coordinated defense and offense, with both natural and unlikely allies, to pass legislation that protects the environment and slows climate change. One accomplishment this year was sending a letter, signed by 43 environmental, conservation, and religious organizations, to the bipartisan Climate Solutions Caucus, challenging its members to take stronger positions around climate.

Above the fold coverage in the New York Times of a walk out of a White House backed fossil fuel and nuclear panel led by SustainUS at COP23. Photo Credit: USCAN.

Global Climate Advocacy (Climate Action Network—International priority) Co-chairs: Katherine Egland, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and Education, Economics, Environmental, Climate and Health Organization (EEECHO) Ruth Ivory-Moore, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America The Global Climate Advocacy user group had five priorities going into the 23rd Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Bonn, Germany: 1) A youth-led day of action on the last day of the COP; 2) A US People’s Delegation; 3) Rejecting any US efforts to promote climate denial; 4) Preventing US blocking of the implementation of the Paris Agreement; and 5) The “We are Still In”/America’s Climate Leadership work to lift up the many cities and companies taking action. One of the highlights of the user group’s work together was supporting a youth-led disruption of the Trump Administration event at COP, which was covered on the front page of the New York Times and in hundreds of other outlets across the world. Moving forward, members are continuing to work in three subgroups they identified to focus in on specific pockets of work: climate finance, domestic mobilization, and international damage control, which is aimed at preventing U.S. political leadership from undermining the UNFCCC process and the full implementation of the Paris Agreement. uscan annual report 2017 | 13


North Carolina Interfaith Power & Light (NCIPL) at the West Virginia EPA hearing, speaking against the repeal of the Clean Power Plan. Photo Credit: NCIPL.

Just Social and Economic Transition Co-chairs: Denise Abdul-Rahman, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)—Indiana Jon Barton, Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Just Social and Economic Transition members agreed to work together to create a common definition of just social and economic transition that will shape how they think about and approach it in their work. The first phase, September to December, involved listening to folks in labor, environmental justice, and other communities/organizations and learning how they are defining and implementing just transitions, including the challenges, successes, and lessons. Land, Agriculture, and Climate Change Co-chairs: Steve Chui, Budhust Tzu Chi Foundation Kelly Stone, ActionAid USA The Land, Agriculture, and Climate Change group identified three broad issues that members of the group will work together on: food security, land management, and land policy. Subgroups were formed based on these themes, with monthly check-ins for the whole user group. Members of the user group recently developed plans for webinars and are moving forward through the workstreams. Public Campaigns Against Fossil Fuels Co-chairs: Aaron Mintzes, Earthworks Varshini Prakash, Sunrise Movement

Members demonstrate over the repeal of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Photo Credit: Twitter @ GreenLatinos.

This group formed broadly around US-based campaigns that challenge/oppose political and financial support for fossil fuel infrastructure and industries. This group meets on an ad hoc basis to share updates, connect with each other, and work together on issues that arise around fossil fuels. Social and Economically Just Adaptation and Mitigation (SEJAM) Co-chairs: Thilmeeza Hussain, Climate Wise Women Harrison Wallace, Chesapeake Climate Action Network In response to Hurricanes Maria, Irma, and Harvey, the SEJAM group compiled a list of grassroots/frontlines-led organizations and shared it widely through USCAN and beyond, with the purpose of getting resources to folks on the ground who are often working with few, if any, resources. Members also adopted a set of goals toward which to work: 1. Develop a proposal for improving the National Flood Insurance Program by incorporating principles of justice and equity. 2. As climate disasters occur, highlight and amplify stories from the ground with the aim of generating support and resources. 3. Integrate, when/where applicable, the need for mitigation and disaster risk reduction as an element of long-term and short-term response work. 4. Agree to adopt and incorporate principles for a strong and just hurricane recovery in the actions taken.


MEMBER PARTICIPATION NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE Makes a list of possible alignment areas (user groups) for the following year

STEERING COMMITTEE Makes an agenda and decides the goals for the Annual Meeting

MEMBER SURVEY

ANNUAL MEETING

Voting Participants give input on user groups and the Annual Meeting

Voting Participants vote on user groups

2017–2018 USER GROUPS Co-chaired by members

Federal Oversight and Resistance Opportunities

100% Renewable Energy Building Power from the Grassroots Up

Public Campaigns Against Fossil Fuels

Just Social and Economic Transition

Global Climate Advocacy

Land, Agriculture, and Climate Change

Social and Economically Just Adaptation and Mitigation

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Fellows with the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE) marched with young people from around the country at the Peoples Climate March for Climate, Jobs, & Justice in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: Alliance for Climate Education.


GOAL 2: TRUST Build the foundational relationships essential for collective action by facilitating peer learning activities that foster trust and candor between members. Trust is earned, not given. It takes time, and it takes great care. A network is remarkably more impactful when members sincerely trust each other. Networks can accelerate member trust by connecting them in low-threat activities around topics of shared interest. For example, USCAN may coordinate a work group whose first step is for members to create a plan for three informational calls. This step will not directly solve climate change or negotiate policy positions; however, it is a low-threat activity for the members to connect with each other, work together, and to create easy alignment. Each low-threat connectivity activity that USCAN fosters creates additional layers of trust between members. These activities establish a belief of working together. USCAN will continue to focus on building connections between members to solidify a foundation to USCAN’s member alignment success.

The USCAN Annual Meeting in June, 2017. Photo Credit: Ron Suzuki.

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Revealing what the user groups will be for the upcoming year based on member votes. Photo Credit: Marie Risalvato.

HOW USCAN BUILDS TRUST The Annual Meeting From June 5–7, 2017 in Richmond, Virginia, climate leaders from around the US came together for the USCAN Annual Meeting. Following the announcement of the US’s intent to pull out from the Paris Agreement, the meeting was an important moment for leaders to connect and plan for the scale of collective action and power that is needed to respond in the coming year. The meeting hosted over 150 members from 106 organizations in 27 states. Voting Participants were from national groups such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Sierra Club, and Greenpeace, as well as from grassroots organizations such as the New Jersey Organizing Project, Georgia Women’s Action for New Directions (WAND), and West Michigan Environmental Action Council. The meeting had six goals: ++ Ensuring equity: This is a core value and practice that drives all aspects of the Annual Meeting. USCAN builds member leadership and capacity into all aspects of the Annual Meeting. About two-thirds of participants took leadership roles in running the meeting, including 53 people who self-identified as people of color or indigenous. ++ Building relationships and deepening connections: A good deal of time was dedicated to facilitating members getting to know one another through networking opportunities, receptions, and interactive activities peppered throughout the agenda. In addition, sixteen breakout sessions focused on building relationships and were co-led by Voting Participants around the topic areas selected by members.

++ Alignment areas: Through a democratic voting process, members selected topics they wanted to work with others on in the coming year. When the top eight alignment areas were announced, participants started chanting, “I believe that we will win,” which even won over the non-USCAN patrons of the brewery where participants were gathered! ++ Align around shared pockets of work: Members worked together across organizations to plan the meeting and coordinate breakout sessions. Breakout sessions also built in opportunities for members to connect and made space for them to talk with others throughout the meeting on issues they wanted to work together on in the coming year. ++ Invigorate and inspire: By allowing space for personal interaction, members were inspired through songs, tears, and laughter. Each panel discussion also elicited head nods, applause, and cheers. Members left the Annual Meeting with strategies and examples so they could continue to create linkages with one another and move beyond conversations toward collaborative work. ++ Empower members to take externally meaningful action: Each plenary and breakout session shared and identified opportunities and pathways for working together. Many members were excited to share rapid response opportunities to take action together in the coming weeks, months, and year.

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The USCAN Annual Meeting held in Richmond, VA in June 2017. Photo Credit: Ron Suzuki.


Members heard from Rev. Leo Woodberry of Kingdom Living Temple and Susannah Tuttle of North Carolina Interfaith Power and Light (NCIPL), who have been working collaboratively together with USCAN board member Jacqueline Patterson of NAACP, and as a result created an Inclusive Climate Adaptation and Resilience workshop, which trained 98 people to be climate advocates.

Just Transition Leaders. Photo Credit: NCIPL.


Every year, USCAN’s Annual Meeting results in connections that build power for the network. Below is an excerpt from a message from Joy Bergey, describing one of the many critical connections that came from the 2017 USCAN Annual Meeting. Claudia Malloy, Colette Pichon Battle, and Joy Bergey at the Annual Meeting. Photo Credit: Joy Bergey.

I attended the Annual Meeting representing the Environmental Justice Center at Chestnut Hill United Church—a USCAN member and my home congregation. When I heard Colette Pichon Battle speak on a panel at the June conference, she knocked my socks off with the power and authenticity of her message. I was deeply moved, and wanted nothing more than for her to come deliver the same message about the environmental and social injustices caused by extractive industries to my church folk in Philadelphia. I approached Colette after the session—serendipitously, it was happy hour—and introduced myself. She was chatting with my longtime friend Claudia (see photo of the three of us at that moment). I asked Colette if she would come preach to those of us in Philadelphia who so needed to hear her important words. And she said yes! Hallelujah! Colette came and preached at Chestnut Hill United Church on Sunday, October 22. She was fabulous beyond words. While in Philly that weekend, she also spoke at an interfaith conference on climate justice that my congregation was part of, and she got some amazing press, including 40 minutes on live radio during Monday morning drive-time on WURD (a Pennsylvania, African-American owned and operated talk radio station). Her other press hits included an online radio interview with G-Town Radio, and an op-ed in a well-read northwest Philly weekly. Colette educated and inspired many, many people in Philly within 24 hours. I am deeply grateful for Colette and her work. AND I am deeply grateful for USCAN’s role in bringing Colette and me together.

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GOAL 3: ALIGNMENT In 2017 USCAN built critical mass for climate action by enabling alignments between clusters of members. A collective value proposition that network members find compelling provides the glue for members’ sustained connectivity and shared action. USCAN is in a unique position to pursue this goal because of the success it has had in building a bigger, broader network. By creating space for members to reach shared understanding with people they trust, members can then create alignment by agreeing on shared goals and strategies. While this effort can be challenging due to the size and diversity of the membership, members see it as necessary to push successful outcomes through working together across the climate movement continuum.

MEMBERS WORKING TOGETHER Supporting the Peoples Climate March What does it look like to have the climate movement “connect-align-and-produce” together? It looks like 300,000 strong in the streets of DC (and across the country) taking action for climate, jobs, and justice. More than half the Peoples Climate Movement Steering Committee of 50+ organizations was made up of USCAN organizations! Dozens more were partners, organizers, and supporters whose passion and work created and continue to drive this beautiful movement. As in previous years, USCAN staff helped support the mobilization through participation on the mobilization support team, member outreach, and fundraising. Funding Grassroots and Collaboration No single organization can tackle the climate crisis alone. To limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius and prepare for impacts that communities are beginning to experience today, stronger collaborations are needed, and more grassroots leadership must be supported. USCAN is supporting collaborations and grassroots leadership through its Member Alignment Grants. The purpose of the Member Alignment Grants is to:

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++ Direct more funding to the grassroots climate movement— especially but not exclusively to frontline communities and those in the movement who are traditionally underfunded; ++ Support efforts to build long-term grassroots power from the ground up, and more unity and solidarity, within USCAN and within the climate movement as a whole; and ++ Foster collaborative approaches to overcoming shared barriers. In August, USCAN received eighteen proposals requesting a total of $773,658, and eleven grants were awarded (five Collaborative Grants and six Grassroots/Frontlines Grants), totaling $400,227. It is clear that the need for support for grassroots leadership and collaboration is as high as ever, and USCAN will continue to discuss and look for opportunities for members in the coming years.


Peoples Climate March, April 29, 2017 in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: USCAN.

Grants were awarded to: Alliance of Nurses for Healthy Environments (Collaborative Grant with Physicians for Social Responsibility, US Climate & Health Alliance, and Moms Clean Air Force) to organize an alignment convening, bringing together community organizations and health professionals as a first step in a longer-term collaborative effort to mobilize more health sector support for the work of grassroots climate justice activists in Miami, Florida. Clean Air Coalition (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) to support efforts to advance climate and environmental justice in working class communities and communities of color, to continue organizing for the just transition of the NRG Huntley Coal plant in Tonawanda, NY, and to create and grow accessible, generational green jobs in the western New York region. Creation Justice Ministries (Collaborative Grant with Pennsylvania Interfaith Power and Light, Franciscan Action Network, North Carolina Interfaith Power and Light) to build on momentum from the State of Appalachia Conference in 2017 for another conference in 2018, which includes local organizing leading up to the conference, follow-up from the previous one through a listening campaign, and the creation of a State of Appalachia Report to be created after the 2018 conference.

Georgia Women’s Action for New Directions (WAND) (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) to expand work that focuses on building power from the grassroots up by hosting a convening of local leaders, community members, influencers, and allies in the region and across the state. GreenLatinos (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) to identify one or two environmental justice hot spot campaigns that represent pressing and urgent local on-the-ground efforts where GreenLatinos can add value through logistical support, media coordination and messaging amplification, harnessing existing networks and organizational relationships, or other mechanisms that will help those campaigns achieve victory. Iowa Interfaith Power and Light (Collaborative Grant with National Association for the Advancement of Colored People [NAACP] and Young Evangelicals for Climate Action) to convene listening sessions with faith leaders for the purpose of increasing awareness and advocacy about energy equity and environmental justice at the grassroots and grasstops levels. This is envisioned as a pilot project that can be scaled up for other USCAN members.

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Kingdom Living Temple (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) to support work such as implementing renewable energy, energy democracy, and just transitions through an environmental justice and equity lens. New Jersey Organizing Project (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) to anchor frontline community leadership within USCAN by spending the next year building connections and bridges within USCAN to incrementally shift this dynamic and to build the grassroots power to anchor this work. North Carolina Interfaith Power and Light (Collaborative Grant with Sustaining Way, Kingdom Living Temple, Creation Justice Ministries, Nuclear Information and Resource Services, Environmental Defense Fund, and Southern Alliance for Clean Energy) to build a network between faith groups and environmental policy groups, enabling engagement and activation of the faith community on issues regarding climate change, the environment, and social justice in the Carolinas.

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Sunrise Movement (Collaborative Grant with the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice, Power Shift Network, and SustainUs) to fight back against President Trump pulling out of the Paris Agreement by pushing forward in cities and states around the country to demand that local governments uphold the Paris Agreement’s intentions domestically; and to lead three regional tours, host community events, embark on a 30-day public journey of sacrifice and storytelling, and lead youth delegations to COP23. Sustaining Way (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) to support two efforts: 1) a multi-tiered workforce development program which employs and trains community members in sustainable practices, advocacy, leadership, and community development and 2) strategic planning for proliferation of this model in South Carolina.


1- Feminists held space at the Women’s March, the Peoples Climate March, and demonstrations in Bonn, Germany demanding a gender-just transition in the U.S. and globally. Photo Credit: Women’s Environment and Development Organization (WEDO). 2- Youth at this year’s North Carolina Climate Justice Summit led a Climate Legacy Time Capsule dedication ceremony for the intergenerational crowd. Photo Credit: North Carolina Climate Justice Summit. 3- Kingdom Living Temple’s solar training class for renewable energy and just transitions. Photo Credit: Eco-Tech, Inc. 4- North Carolina Interfaith Power and Light (NCIPL) marching in 2017 Peoples Climate March. Photo Credit: NCIPL. 5- Jason Miller of Franciscan Action Network serving as a pallbearer at an action to protect healthcare coverage at the US Capitol building. Photo Credit: Keya Chatterjee. 6- Feminists held space at the Women’s March, the Peoples Climate March, and demonstrations in Bonn, Germany demanding a gender-just transition in the U.S. and globally. Photo Credit: Women’s Environment and Development Organization (WEDO).

4

5

5 3

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GOAL 4: ENHANCE NETWORK EFFECTIVENESS

The 2017–2022 Strategic Plan looks to enhance the long-term sustainability and effectiveness of USCAN by aligning staff, resources, and performance management to position USCAN to create alignment among members. In 2017, USCAN reconfigured the staff to serve the new strategy, added “board reserved” funds to match the levels recommended for healthy non-profits, and surveyed members to understand where USCAN can further increase effectiveness.

WHAT DO USCAN MEMBERS THINK? This year, 153 Voting Participants representing 134 member organizations took part in USCAN’s Fall Survey. The purpose of this survey was to collect information to support members having realistic assessments of each other, and to understand member satisfaction in the network and the connections that are fostered through USCAN. This information will also be used by USCAN to assess the implementation of the new strategic plan, helping USCAN to determine which areas need strengthening and which areas are successful. Member priorities were shared with USCAN members, including data on current alignment on technologies and policies. Members provided reasons why they value USCAN and why they participate as a member. Some interesting findings:

NETWORK SATISFACTION members agree that:

The highest-valued network activities USCAN provides are:

Members are learning valuable information and skills from each other.

In-person meetings.

Members should feel proud of what is being accomplished together.

Off-line connections to peers.

Members are adding value to each other’s work. Members feel a part of something big and important. Members are working jointly to advance network goals.

Grants.

List serves.

Value Propositions:

Have access to trusted information about climate action strategies, policies, intelligence, models, solutions, etc. Move together with the voices of leaders of color within the climate movement.

Get to know diverse colleagues whom I can learn from and share with. Leverage resources for shared goals.

Participate in processes to implement shared strategies across organizations.

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SOUTHEAST CLIMATE & ENERGY NETWORK (SCEN) Now completing its ninth year in existence, the Southeast Climate & Energy Network’s mission is to create strategic coordination among organizations in the Southeast, securing fair, just, and science-based climate and energy policies. SCEN’s main objective in 2017 was to begin the process of redesigning SCEN’s structure, to serve as a catalyst for greater impact of the SCEN network and overall initiatives in the Southeast. In this regard, key steps taken over the past year included beginning a network-wide dialogue aimed at transitioning SCEN away from being a USCAN program by December 2018. Inspired by the USCAN model, throughout 2017 a member-driven coordination strategy was instituted with SCEN members to identify what SCEN should transition to and prioritize. A key to this strategy has been creating a revamped Steering Committee, which resulted from discussions and a call to action during SCEN’s June Annual Convening. SCEN has prioritized working with those members that have been the most active and engaged, while also supporting other networks. Two working groups were launched in March 2017: the Environmental Justice Working Group and FRESH Energy Committee. Each working group had monthly calls, with an average participation of 17 individuals per call. In December 2017, a survey of the entire network allowed members to elect working groups for 2018 as well as discuss other programmatic possibilities.

TOP: SCEN Convening in Richmond. Photo Credit: USCAN. BOTTOM: #StillIn Event organized by Sierra Club in Fort Lauderdale, Florida (SCEN attended and spoke) Speakers and attendees posing for a photo after the press event. Photo Credit: Jon Ullman.

The SCEN network had its first in-person meeting in more than two years in June 2017 in Richmond, Virginia. Chiefly, the meeting served as an excellent convening opportunity for key national and regional stakeholders and leaders to discuss the main environmental challenges facing the Southeast, while giving the SCEN network added momentum. With a revamped Steering Committee, active working groups and a more engaged network, SCEN will continue to work toward becoming its own organization to increase impact in the Southeast.

uscan annual report 2017 | 29


Youth place objects in the Climate Legacy Time Capsule in Boston, where they demanded that Governor Charlie Baker put forward policies to uphold the Paris agreement and protect their futures. Photo Credit: Sunrise Boston.

2017 UNITED NATIONS CLIMATE CHANGE CONFERENCE (COP23) As part of USCAN’s new member-led, democratic way of working, user group co-chairs led USCAN’s work at the United Nations (UN), alongside an elected USCAN liaison for 2017, Dyanna Jaye from the Sunrise Movement. Thank you to the user group co-chairs Ruth Ivory-Moore, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and Katherine Egland, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and Education, Economics, Environmental, Climate and Health Organization (EEECHO), for their summary of COP23. “Civil society made a few significant advances at COP23, in spite of the fact that the United States earlier this year announced its intention to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, including the adoption of the Indigenous People’s Platform, the Gender Action Plan, a decision that the Adaptation Fund will serve the Paris Agreement, and a decision to address vulnerabilities of agriculture to climate change and approaches to achieving food security. Additionally promising is Fiji’s call for an open, transparent, and participatory dialogue called the Talanoa Dialogue to share stories, build empathy, and make wise decisions that will benefit the good of all. The People’s Delegation waged a successful demonstration during the Trump Administration’s panel, calling attention to the lack of action on climate and the impact on people and the planet. Their voices were picked up by the New York Times and other national and international media outlets. The presence of elected officials at the U.S. Climate Action Center made a powerful statement, sending a message to the world that #WeAreStillIn. Signatures of over 1.1 million Americans who personally pledged to uphold the Paris Agreement in a #IamStillIn petition was added into a time capsule at COP. These signatures were also added to capsules around the US along with collected objects symbolizing what people are fighting to protect in this moment. Disappointing was the lack of significant progress on the finance accounting and loss and damage negotiations by countries that have contributed the most and for the longest to the climate crisis. Proper finance accounting procedures are essential to assure transparency and trust-building, but the developed and developing countries remain far apart. Similarly, loss and damage issues are/were very polarizing in the negotiations. While the decision was made to go forward with an expert committee process to begin to work toward loss and damage solutions, this process is likely not robust enough. Civil society must remain diligent in all aspects of implementation of the Paris Agreement going forward.”

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LOOKING AHEAD In addition to the eight user groups, USCAN launched two cross-cutting committees in 2017 with board and member participation: The Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (JEDI) committee kicked off in 2017 with a review of USCAN metrics on member diversity, input from a network scan conducted by the Raben Group, and a draft statement for membership that will gather input in 2018. Huge thanks to Denise Abdul-Rahman, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)— Indiana; Evelyn Lynn, Showing Up for Racial Justice; Huda Alkaff, Wisconsin Green Muslims; Lindsay Harper, Georgia Women’s Action for New Directions (WAND) Education Fund, Inc; Mark Magana, GreenLatinos; Mikhiela Sherrod, Agricultural Missions, Inc.; Sara Ward, Ohio Interfaith Power and Light; Sophie Zaken, Alliance for Affordable Energy; Tamar LawrenceSamuel, Corporate Accountability International; and David Turnbull, Oil Change International, for joining the committee and to Jalonne White-Newsome, USCAN board member and Kresge Foundation, and Harrison Wallace, Chesapeake Climate Action Network, for chairing this important committee. The Future Vision committee kicked off with a webinar that outlined the science, technology, and ethics behind how USCAN can together meet the vision of “meeting the global goals of the Paris Agreement and exceeding the US targets.” Huge thanks to Anusha Narayanan, Union of Concerned Scientists; Shantha Ready Alonso, Creation Justice Ministries; and Brandon Wu, ActionAID USA, for participating in this committee and especially to Joe Uehlein, Labor Network for Sustainability, for serving as the board representative for this committee.


US People’s Delegation Town Hall with Elected Officials at COP23. Photo Credit: Survival Media Agency and 350.org.

Banner at the US People’s Delegation Speak Out at COP23. Photo Credit: Survival Media Agency and 350.org.


CAN—International node coordinators at the the sixth annual Secretariat and Node Coordinators Annual Meeting in April 2017. Photo Credit: USCAN.

WORKING WITH CLIMATE ACTION NETWORK—INTERNATIONAL USCAN is a node of Climate Action Network—International (CAN) and as a result is linked directly to a global community. To meet the emerging needs of the global community, CAN hosted the sixth annual Secretariat and Node Coordinators Annual Meeting in April 2017. The five-day meeting had representatives from Canada, the Arab world, South Asia, New Zealand, Japan, South Africa, China, Tanzania, Pacific Islands, Southeast Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe, Europe, South Asia, Nepal, and the United States. This year’s meeting objectives were: ++ Information-sharing and cross learning; ++ Sharing plans for 2017; ++ How to best work together; and ++ Strengthening the relationships and links between nodes. One of the highlights of the meeting was when each CAN node presented solutions and possible ways of engaging members according to different broad topics including: ++ Increasing responsiveness and initiative; ++ Reinforcing the network; ++ Making CAN more vibrant; and ++ Increasing trust and knowledge-sharing. USCAN was a member of the planning committee and participated on a panel at the Clean Energy Nepal workshop. USCAN also conducted a session on how to facilitate and enrich connections in networks with a focus on outcomes of the USCAN strategic plan and how USCAN builds relationships with members.

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THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS SUPPORTED USCAN IN 2017. It’s been a long and difficult year, but the number of wins member organizations have achieved together is staggering. In 2018, you will continue to see USCAN members RESIST, PERSIST, and INSIST!


USCAN staff at the Annual Meeting. From left to right: Ife Kilimanjaro, Senior Network Engagement Director; Sydney Mosier, Network Systems Coordinator; Alexander Easdale, Southeast Climate and Energy Network (SCEN) Coordinator; Maggie Ullman, Consultant, Ullman Consulting; Makalia Chimia Mosby, Intern; Keya Chatterjee, Executive Director; Jess Gray, Coordinator; Marie Risalvato, Network Engagement Director; Carrie Clayton, Senior Network Systems Director. Photo Credit: Ron Suzuki.

USCAN STAFF MEMBERS Keya Chatterjee Executive Director Ishmael Buckner Network Engagement Coordinator

GET INVOLVED Become a member: Contact membership@usclimatenetwork.org and learn how your organization can become a USCAN member. Follow us online:

Carrie Clayton Senior Network Systems Director

usclimatenetwork.org

Alexander Easdale Southeast Climate and Energy Network (SCEN) Coordinator

facebook.com/USClimateActionNetwork

Ife Kilimanjaro Senior Network Engagement Director

instagram.com/climateactionnetwork @USCAN

Sydney Mosier Network Systems Coordinator Marie Risalvato Network Engagement Director

MAKE A DONATION

Anne Scholle Network Systems Director

uscan annual report 2017 | 33


FINANCIAL REPORT 2017 USCAN’s fiscal year begins July 1. This report is for the calendar year ending December 31, 2017.

CALENDAR YEAR JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31 2017

TOTAL

Revenue

Grants & Individual Contributions

1,584,826

Reimbursements, Contractual Services, & Speaker Fees

Annual Membership Fees

Interest Income - Loss on Eqpt Asset

1,212 128,185 4,310

Total Revenue

$1,718,533

Expenditures Salaries

475,227

Employer Payroll Taxes

39,692

Benefits - Health, Dental, Life, Retirement

74,077

Consultants for Advocacy/Education/SCEN

60,688

Infrastucture/Website/Computers

16,326

Accounting Audit, Bookkeeping Fees

17,294

Strategic Planning

32,477

Insurance

10,897

Annual Meeting

110,321

Internships

12,915

Member In-Person Meetings

19,108

Office Equipment & Supplies

4,799

Rent & Utilites

Postage & Deliviers

72,781 285

Publications/Printing

6,888

Member Grants

428,998

Telecommunications

11,825

Travel

21,526

24,041

Working Group Coordinators & Participants

Total Expenditures

$1,440,165 Net Revenue

34 | www.usclimatenetwork.org

278,368


2017 EXPENDITURES SOUTHEAST ENERGY (SCEN) INTERNATIONAL 1% DOMESTIC POLICY FUNDRAISING

7% 9%

3% 35%

OPERATIONS/ LOGISTICS, TECHNOLOGY, RENT & UTILITIES

15%

2% STRATEGIC PLANNING

8%

COMMUNICATION

MEMBER GRANTS, MEMBER MEETING ASSISTANCE, & TRAVEL STIPENDS

20%

MEMBER MEETINGS & OUTREACH

SOURCES OF SUPPORT GREATER THAN $10,000 USCAN Member Organizations Anonymous Donors Chris and Lisa Kaneb Fund Elmo Foundation Franciscan Sisters of Mary Kendeda Fund MacArthur Foundation Mertz Gilmore Foundation Pisces Foundation

To ensure the network’s effectiveness, credibility, cohesion, and advancement toward common goals, USCAN members use the Jemez Principles for Democratic Organizing as a guide for conduct. These principles are: 1) be inclusive; 2) emphasis on bottom-up organizing; 3) let people speak for themselves; 4) work together in solidarity and mutuality; 5) build just relationships; and 6) commitment to self-transformation.

Surdna Foundation V. Kann Rasmussen Foundation

uscan annual report 2017 | 35


USCAN MEMBERS 350.org

Brooklyn

NY

Conservation International

Arlington

VA

Acadia Center

Rockport

ME

Conservation Law Foundation

Boston

MA

ActionAid USA

Washington

DC

Corporate Accountability International

Boston

MA

Agricultural Missions, Inc. (AMI)

New York

NY

Creation Justice Ministries

Washington

DC

Alliance for Affordable Energy

New Orleans

LA

New Orleans

LA

Alliance for Climate Education

Boulder

CO

Deep South Center for Environmental Justice

Alliance of Nurses for Healthy Environments

Mount Rainier

MD

Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice

Detroit

MI

Alliance to Save Energy

Washington

DC

Earthjustice

San Francisco

CA

American Jewish World Service

New York

NY

Earthworks

Atlanta

GA

Appalachian Voices

Boone

NC

ecoAmerica

Washington

DC

Arise for Social Justice

Springfield

MA

Ecoequity

Albany

CA

Avaaz

New York

NY

Gulfport

MS

BlueGreen Alliance Foundation

Minneapolis

MN

Education, Economics, Environmental, Climate and Health Organization (EEECHO)

Brighter Green

New York City

NY

Elders Climate Action

Trukee

CA

Buddhist Tzu Chi Foundation

San Dimas

CA

Elected Officials to Protect NY

Fly Creek

NY

Care About Climate

Flagstaff

AZ

Environment America

Boston

MA

CARE USA

Atlanta

GA

Washington

DC

Carmelite NGO

New Orleans

LA

Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI)

Catholic Climate Covenant

Washington

DC

Environmental Defense Fund

New York

NY

Center for American Progress

Washington

DC

Environmental Investigation Agency

Washington

DC

Center for Biological Diversity

Tucson

AZ

Episcopal Church Office of Government Relations

Washington

DC

Center for Clean Air Policy

Washington

DC

Franciscan Action Network

Washington

DC

Center for Climate Protection

Santa Rosa

CA

Fresh Energy

St Paul

MN

Center for Community Change

Washington

DC

DC

Washington

DC

Friends Committee on National Legislation

Washington

Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL)

Friends of the Earth (FoE)

Washington

DC

Center for Popular Democracy

Brooklyn

NY

Gasp

Birmingham

AL

Center for Sustainable Economy

Lake Oswego

OR

Georgetown Climate Center

Washington

DC

CERES

Boston

MA

GA

Takoma Park

MD

Georgia Women's Action for New Directions (WAND)

Atlanta

Chesapeake Climate Action Network (CCAN)

Green For All

Berkeley

CA

Citizens Climate Lobby

Coronado

CA

Greenfaith

Highland Park

NJ

Clean Air Coalition

Buffalo

NY

GreenLatinos

Washington

DC

Clean Air Council

Philadelphia

PA

Greenpeace

Washington

DC

Clean Energy Action

Boulder

CO

Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy

Slidell

LA

Clean Energy Works

Washington

DC

Health Care Without Harm

Reston

VA

Climate Access

San Francisco

CA

Hip Hop Caucus

Washington

DC

Climate Generation: A Will Steger Legacy

Minneapolis

MN

Honor the Earth

Callaway

MN

Climate Hawks Vote Civic Action

Washington

DC

Humane Society International (HSI)

Washington

DC

Climate Interactive

Washington

DC

Illinois Environmental Council

Springfield

IL

Climate Mobilization Project

Brooklyn

NY

iMatter, Kids vs Global Warming

Ventura

CA

Climate Nexus

New York

NY

InterAction

Washington

DC

Climate Parents

Oakland

CA

Interfaith Power and Light

San Francisco

CA

Climate Solutions

Olympia

WA

Interfaith Power and Light (DC.MD.NoVA)

Washington

DC

Climate Wise Women

Berkeley

CA

OR

Paonia

CO

International Environmental Law Project (IELP) at Lewis and Clark Law School

Portland

Colorado Farm & Food Alliance (for Resource Balance) Colorado People's Alliance (COPA)

Aurora

CO

Iowa Interfaith Power and Light

Des Moines

IA

Columban Center for Advocacy and Outreach (CCAO)

Washington

DC

IPS/Sustainable Energy & Economy Network (SEEN)

Washington

DC

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Kentucky Conservation Committee

Frankfort

KY

Showing Up for Racial Justice

New Market

TN

Kentucky Environmental Foundation

Berea

KY

Sierra Club

San Francisco

CA

Kingdom Living Temple

Florence

SC

Solar Head of State

Oakland

CA

Kyoto USA

Berkeley

CA

SC

Takoma Park

MD

South Carolina Interfaith Power and Light

Greenville

Labor Network for Sustainability League of Conservation Voters

Washington

DC

Southern Alliance for Clean Energy

Knoxville

TN

Livelihoods Knowledge Exchange Network (LiKEN)

Lexington

KY

Southern Oregon Climate Action Now (SOCAN)

Jacksonville

OR

Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns

Washington

DC

Sunrise Movement

Washington

DC

Michigan Interfaith Power and Light

Southfield

MI

Sustaining Way

Greenville

SC

Moms Clean Air Force

Washington

DC

SustainUS

Quincy

MA

Montana Environmental Information Center

Helena

MT

The Climate and Development Lab, Brown University

Providence

RI

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)

Baltimore

MD

The Climate Reality Project

Washington

DC

The College of the Atlantic, Program in Global Environmental Diplomacy

Bar Harbor

ME

National Wildlife Federation (NWF)

Reston

VA

PA

New York

NY

The Environmental Justice Center at Chestnut Hill United Church

Philadelphia

Natural Resources Defense Council New Jersey Organizing Project

West Creek

NJ

The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

Chicago

IL

New Mexico Interfaith Power and Light

Albuqureque

NM

The Mountain Pact

Trukee

CA

North Carolina Conservation Network

Raleigh

NC

The Nature Conservancy (TNC)

Arlington

VA

North Carolina Interfaith Power and Light

Raleigh

NC

The Resource Innovation Group (TRIG)

Eugene

OR

Nuclear Information and Resource Service

Takoma Park

MD

The Solutions Project

Washington

DC

Washington

DC

Ohio Interfaith Power and Light

Columbus

OH

The United Methodist Church – General Board of Church and Society*

Oil Change International

Washington

DC

The Wilderness Society

Washington

DC

Olympic Climate Action

Port Angeles

WA

Tribal Environmental Policy Center (TEPC)

Rio Rancho

NM

OneAmerica

Seattle

WA

U.S. Baha'i Office of Public Affairs

Washington

DC

Oregon Environmental Council

Portland

OR

U.S. Climate Health Alliance

Oakland

CA

Oxfam America

Boston

MA

Union of Concerned Scientists

Cambridge

MA

Pacific Environment

San Francisco

CA

United Methodist Women

New York

NY

Partnership for Policy Integrity (PFPI)

Amherst

MA

Utah Moms for Clean Air

Salt Lake City

UT

Partnership for Southern Equity

Atlanta

GA

VA

State College

PA

Virginia Student Environmental Coalition

Mechanicsville

Pennsylvania Interfaith Power and Light

Voices for Progress

Washington

DC

Philadelphia Physicians for Social Responsibility

Philadelphia

PA

WE ACT for Environmental Justice

New York

NY

Physicians for Social Responsibility

Washington

DC

We Own It

Madison

WI

Polar Bears International

Bozeman

MT

WEDO

New York

NY

Power Shift Network

San Francisco

CA

West Michigan Environmental Action Council

Grand Rapids

MI

Presbyterian Church USA

Louisville

KY

Wisconsin Green Muslims

Milwaukee

WI

Protect Our Winters

Boulder

CO

Mill Valley

CA

Public Citizen

Washington

DC

Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN)

Quaker Earthcare Witness

Albany

CA

Woods Hole Research Center

Falmouth

MA

Race Forward

New York

NY

World Resources Institute (WRI)

Washington

DC

Rachel Carson Council

Bethesda

MD

World Wildlife Fund

Washington

DC

RE-AMP

Madison

WI

Young Evangelicals for Climate Action

Indianapolis

IN

Refugees International

Washington

DC

Rhode Island Interfaith Power and Light

Riverside

RI

Service Employees International Union (SEIU)

Washington

DC

uscan annual report 2017 | 37


usclimatenetwork.org

Over 60 people joined the Sierra Club, Sound Rivers, and 350 Triangle for a trip down the Tar River, paddling past the survey marks for the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline to highlight just how bad the project could be for North Carolina’s waterways and wetlands. Photo Credit: The Sierra Club.

Profile for US Climate Action Network

2017 Annual Report - US Climate Action Network (USCAN)  

USCAN is a vital network of 160+ organizations active on climate change. Our mission is to build trust and alignments among members to fight...

2017 Annual Report - US Climate Action Network (USCAN)  

USCAN is a vital network of 160+ organizations active on climate change. Our mission is to build trust and alignments among members to fight...

Profile for uscan
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