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US CLIMATE ACTION NETWORK ANNUAL REPORT 2018


Front Cover: The USCAN Annual Meeting 2018. Photo Credit: Grace June Photography.

US CLIMATE ACTION NETWORK ANNUAL REPORT 2018 50 F STREET, WASHINGTON, DC, 20001 202-255-2322 | operations@usclimatenetwork.org www.usclimatenetwork.org All rights reserved © US Climate Action Network. 2019


US Climate Action Network’s mission is to build trust and alignments among its members to fight climate change in a just and equitable way.

Green Latinos Summit. Photo credit: Green Latinos.

US CLIMATE ACTION NETWORK

US CLIMATE ACTION NETWORK’S MISSION IS TO BUILD TRUST AND ALIGNMENTS AMONG ITS MEMBERS TO FIGHT CLIMATE CHANGE IN A JUST AND EQUITABLE WAY.

The US Climate Action Network (USCAN) was founded in 1989 to coordinate US non-governmental organization (NGO) voices in international climate negotiations. In the 90’s, USCAN expanded its work to coordinate with state and local groups to help with national and international engagement. USCAN is an increasingly diverse, vital, and growing network of 165+ member organizations dedicated to building trust and alignments among members to fight climate change in a just and equitable way. We envision a powerful, inclusive, and trusting network of US organizations who work together to meet the global goals in the Paris Climate Agreement and exceed the US targets outlined in that agreement. USCAN is the US node of CAN International. CAN International is a worldwide network of over 950 non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in more than 110 countries.

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Left: Board Member Rachel Potter (Climate Nexus) leading a session at the 2018 Annual Meeting. Photo Credit: Grace June Photography. Right: USCAN Executive Director Keya Chatterjee. Photo Credit: Erica Flock.

MESSAGE FROM THE BOARD CHAIR Friends, Allies and Fellow Advocates, 2018 was a tough year for the climate movement. With Trump’s Administration in full chaos mode, we faced an ever deeper enemy bench of cronies and lobbyists from across the extractive industries—each of whom has been teed up not only to oppose progress on our issue, but to do active damage to our people and our planet. It has not all been smooth sailing within our own community either, but I am proud to be able to point to the work of US Climate Network (USCAN) as a light that shines through the darkness. USCAN now stands at 165 member organizations, having grown more than 10 percent in the past year alone. We believe that it is through understanding the authentic experiences of people and groups operating at the grassroots and on the frontlines that we can win, and year after year we work harder to bring more of those voices into the climate fight. For me our newest members, which include 350 Spokane, Dogwood Alliance, Jail and Prison Rehabilitation Information Community Outreach Program (JAPRI), Sol Nation and Texas Impact, are reflective of that commitment and of our overall commitment to justice, equity, diversity and inclusion, without which we would be lost in the face of such resourced opposition. Through our Member Empowerment Grants program, USCAN is able to commit real, tangible resources toward strengthening the climate movement in a way that is truly inclusive and equitable. I am delighted to say that we provided $600,000

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in support of 18 of 23 proposed projects and collaborations in 2018, and we are excited to develop the program further in 2019 and beyond. How do we know this work signifies progress? Because our members tell us so! Our 2018 Fall Survey saw an incredible 82 percent of member organizations submitting responses. Such an amazing rate of participation shows us that our members are truly engaged in what we do. The results themselves speak to that same truth, the highest valued network offerings being our in-person Annual Meetings, the offline connections we facilitate between groups, and our Member Empowerment Grants Program. Looking to 2019, I feel apprehension around the state of our political reality and what that might mean for our issue, but I also feel hugely optimistic about the potential of USCAN to drive real change in the halls of power. USCAN’s leadership, driven by the indomitable Keya Chatterjee, has such smarts and passion that I know without question they will continue to fight for a just, equitable solution to the climate crisis, no matter what. And with yet another year of 100 percent giving from the Board of Directors, it is clear that the entire network architecture is behind them in doing it.

Rachel Potter Climate Nexus


MESSAGE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Dear Friends, 2018 held somber news for the US Climate Action Network. We received an Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report telling us that the speed and scale at which we must do our work is unprecedented in human history. We received the 4th National Climate Assessment estimating costs of $500 billion per year from climate change-related crises ranging from Lyme disease to larger fires, and heavier downpours. We received a UN Environment report, indicating that the gap remains significant between what we have promised to do and what is needed. We received news that greenhouse gas emissions are continuing to climb. All the while our members were living in and around Hurricanes Florence and Mitchell, devastating fires in the West, and more.

USCAN members organized grassroots pressure from hundreds of thousands of volunteers to achieve the first bipartisan House and Senate bills, brought about by training, nurturing and supporting leaders around the country to step into their leadership potential and take on meetings with representatives, letters to the editor and more, thanks to leadership from Citizen’s Climate Lobby, Friends Committee for National Legislation, and other members.

And, yet, we stayed the course and got wins from implementing our 2017–2021 strategy for the US Climate Action Network. Facing an administration staffed by white nationalists and oil, gas, and coal billionaires, and a weakening democracy, we continue to lean heavily into democracy and relationships as a way of working for our members across the climate network.

USCAN members supported the organizing efforts of Tesla workers in a Buffalo, NY community where jobs from coalfired power plants are now gone, in an effort to bring about a truly just transition for that community, thanks to leadership from Clean Air Action for Western NY.

Today we can see that this investment in our own relationships and alignment is paying off. USCAN members are building our power and working together to do so. Just take a look at a snapshot of a few things that happened around our network with our amazing members leading the way:

Of course some of this would have happened even if we were not all working together as a network, but none of this could have happened at the same scale if we had not been there to support each other. We are building trust and alignment on the way to changing everything. And change everything we must. Together, I know we can do it.

USCAN members worked together to pass the most ambitious climate legislation in the US in our nation’s capital, Washington, DC (Chesapeake Climate Action Network, Sierra Club, SEIU, Moms Clean Air Force, Interfaith Power and Light, Center for Biological Diversity, Friends of the Earth, Institute for Policy Studies, Hip Hop Caucus). USCAN members have forced the Green New Deal onto the agenda, the first discussion of climate action that encompasses the scale and scope of USCAN’s vision to exceed the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement, thanks to leadership from Sunrise Movement, Sierra Club, and other organizations.

In solidarity, Keya Chatterjee USCAN Executive Director

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USCAN Board Members at the 2018 Annual Meeting. Top row (from right) reverend Leo Woodberry, Claudia Malloy, Rachel Potter, Alden Meyer, Jose Aguto. Bottom row (from left): Dyanna Jaye, Heather Coleman, Keya Chatterjee, David Turnbull, William Snape, and Colette Pichon-Battle. Photo Credit: Grace June Photography.

Board Member Bill Snape. Photo Credit: Grace June Photography.


USCAN BOARD OF DIRECTORS USCAN board members are amazing with 100 percent commitment! Not only are they generous with their time and knowledge, but also each year every board member makes a financial contribution. USCAN’s board reflects the network’s ongoing commitment to racial equity, diversity, and inclusion.

TERM ENDING JULY 2020 Alden Meyer Director of Strategy & Policy Union of Concerned Scientists Claudia Malloy (Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Committee Chair) National Outreach Director National Wildlife Federation Colette Pichon Battle (Development Committee Chair) Director US Human Rights Network and Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy Daniel Sosland President Acadia Center David Turnbull (Secretary) Campaigns Director Oil Change International

TERM ENDING JULY 2019 Dyanna Jaye Organizing Director Sunrise Movement Heather Warman Executive Director Kentucky Environmental Foundation

J. Drake Hamilton Science Policy Director Fresh Energy Dr. Jalonne White-Newsome (Treasurer) Senior Program Officer The Kresge Foundation Kyle Ash (Board Functions Committee Chair) Director of Government Affairs Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine Rachel Potter (Chair) Projects Director Climate Nexus William (Bill) Snape (General Counsel) Senior Counsel Center for Biological Diversity

Rev. Leo Woodberry Pastor, Consultant Kingdom Living Temple Joe Uehlein (Vice-Chair and Future Vision Committee Chair) President and Executive Director Labor Network for Sustainability

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USCAN Member Empowerment Grantees GreenLations. Photo Credit: Green Latinos.

OUR NETWORK: 165+ ORGANIZATIONS STRONG 2018 continued to see many new members joining USCAN, even as USCAN continued to implement organizational changes in the second year of our strategic plan. This growth speaks to a membership invested in USCAN’s mission of alignment. Over the course of the year, USCAN was excited to welcome 17 new organizations: 350 Spokane

Spokane

WA

Mobile Home Education Fund/MHAction

Nation Wide

Anthropocene Alliance

Chicago

IL

Our Children’s Trust

Portland

OR

Berkeley Carbon Trading Program

Berkeley

CA

Pivot Point

Shelton

WA

Dogwood Alliance

Asheville

NC

People’s Action/ People’s Action Institute

Chicago

IL

Environmental Finance Center West (EFCWest)

Oakland

CA

Sol Nation

Charlotte

NC

The Institute for Carbon Removal Law & Policy

Washington

DC

Texas Impact

Austin

TX

The Imani Group

Aiken

SC

Jail and Prison Rehabilitation Information Community Outreach Program (JAPRI)

Greenville

NC

The People’s Justice Council

Atlanta

GA

The Whitney M. Slater Foundation

Florence

SC

Michigan Climate Action Network

Lansing

MI Many of these new member organizations are active across a variety of states and regions. The new members also represent a range of foci, including education, empowering youth leadership, environmental and social justice, cultural change, faith groups, and health and well-being.


As a start-up nonprofit organization, I have found USCAN to be a foundation to carrying our mission. It is through the expert guidance of the staff of USCAN that I have been able to navigate the network. Through the USCAN network I have gained relationships and partnerships that will last throughout the life of The People's Justice Council. USCAN is both vital and viable in the fight for climate justice! Happy 30th USCAN, and looking forward to many more to come!

USCAN has been instrumental in our work. It has served to provide national and Midwest engagement opportunities, that allow us to connect and learn from connections across the country and that we converse with on Just Social and Economic Transition Action Team or others we might reach out to in order to achieve our goals.

This is my first year as a USCAN member participant. The most valuable benefit to me has been access to additional avenues to grow relationships in the Climate Justice Movement.

The 2018 Annual Meeting has had the biggest impact on my work. Not only was I able to form and strengthen relationships with a variety of organizations (including those with different approaches/theories of change), I was also able to build trust and understanding in a way that I hadn't been able to before because of indepth conversations and the respectful tone that the conference took from the very beginning.


COP 24 in Poland. Photo Credit: Collin Reese (Oil Change International).


OUR STRATEGIC PLAN 2017–2022 USCAN moved into the second year of its strategic plan in 2018. Through various evaluative processes, we learned many lessons and made changes as necessary to better implement the plan, while addressing issues, challenges and opportunities that arose. We learned, for example that members were concerned about working together with greater urgency, at scale yet at the pace of trust. As a result, several conversations, webinars, strategies and bodies of work were identified and carried out, including a movement alignment activity at the Annual Meeting that extended into an in-person strategy meeting later in the year. In addition, we created opportunities for members to develop language to inform just and equitable federal climate policy, consider and debate the elements of the Green New Deal.


OUR FOUR GOALS

Incremental Change Makers

1

Policy Theory of Changes

Grassroots Theory of Changes

Aggressive Change Makers

Facilitate Democratic Participation

2

Build Trust

Foster Alignments

3

1

Create sustaining value in the network by transitioning to a democratically member driven network model.

2

3

Build critical mass for climate action and policy by enabling alignments between clusters of members.

4

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4

Build the foundational relationships essential for collective action by facilitating peer learning activities that foster trust and candor between members. Enhance network eectiveness.


GOAL 1: DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION

In 2018, USCAN continued operating as a democratic, member-driven network model. In member-driven networks, participation is the essence; it is what makes them work. When members experience that the time they put into the network delivers outcomes that are meaningful to them, it builds ownership and value in the network. Members took leadership roles in many aspects of the network, including planning the annual meeting, chairing the collectively-defined work of User Groups, and helping to coordinate massive mobilizations for climate, jobs, and justice. Participation is what breathes life into this diverse network and places attainment of the mission firmly within reach.

WHAT DID DEMOCRATIC PARTICIPATION LOOK LIKE IN 2018? Voting Participants (VoP): Every year VoPs democratically vote at the Annual Meeting on the issues USCAN will prioritize in the coming year. All member organizations attending the Annual Meeting receive a total of four votes, which the VoPs use to select the topics they would like USCAN to focus on. At the June convening, 147 VoPs from 102 member organizations selected the following four priorities: Equitable and Ambitious Climate Vision, Building Power from the Grassroots, Just Social and Economic Transition, and Social and Economically Just Adaptation and Mitigation. Our top three topics all tied for first place at 70 votes each, displaying an amazing feat of alignment across our diverse membership. Additionally, three of the four top alignment areas were voted into User Groups at the 2017 Annual Meeting. These existing groups, now called Action Teams, created meaningful connections and impactful climate work, thus creating momentum to be voted on again and collaborated on further. Our new Action Team, Equitable and Ambitious Climate Vision, grew out of our Future Vision Committee and has been an exciting new addition to our work. Our fifth and final Action Team is Global Climate Advocacy(GCA), which we include every year because of our commitment to continue working and supporting our members working in the international space and to include CAN-International priorities.

USCAN Member Nana Firman (GreenFaith) voting at the 2018 USCAN Annual Meeting. Photo Credit: Grace June Photography.

Spring Survey: The annual spring survey is when members provide input into the topics that should be covered at the Annual Meeting and included in the voting ballot, which in turn determines our work plan for the subsequent 12 months. In 2018, the survey also sought member input into: 1. A more detailed vision for reaching Paris goals that can be used as a climate platform for organizing and for candidates; 2. Mapping of USCAN member’s organizing work. State of play/what are we doing right now? Are we working at scale? What is missing? Map level of organizing effort, topics for organizing and whether they match what is needed for achieving Paris goals and our vision; 3. Developing principles for federal climate policy platform-for 2021 (topic from 2/1 vision meeting and complementing a Climate Action Campaign CAC objective).

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MEMBER ENGAGEMENT CYCLE CALL TO PARTICIPATE

Strategy 1.2

GENERATE POSITIVE EMOTION

REWARD PARTICIPATION

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ENGAGE THE WILLING

RECRUIT DIVERSITY


NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE AND ANNUAL MEETING STEERING COMMITTEE The infrastructure for member collaboration and connectivity expanded in the lead up the 2018 Annual Meeting through the formation of two member-led committees—the Steering Committee and Nominations Committee. The Nominations Committee led the process to create and consolidate the 2018 voting ballot of network alignment areas, with input from members. USCAN members then voted at the Annual Meeting. All network activities and resources (staff, Action Teams, grants) supported members working together in these five alignment areas. Thank you to our 2018 Nominations Committee: Ruth Ivory-Moore (The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America), Molly Rauch (Moms Clean Air Force), Kyle Gracey (SustainUs), Sophie Zaken (Alliance for Affordable Energy), Adrianna Quintero (NRDC), Lindsay Harper (Georgia WAND), Mia MacDonald (Brighter Green), and Marie Risalvato (USCAN). Annual Meeting Steering Committee members worked together to define goals for the meeting, develop the meeting agenda, identify speakers and panelists, and provide on-site leadership. Members of the 2018 Annual Meeting Steering Committee included Alex Easdale (SCEN), Denise Abdul Rahman (NAACPIN), Rachel Potter (Climate Nexus), Varshini Prakash (Sunrise), Anne Hedges (MEIC), Mikheila Sherrod (Agricultural Missions Inc.), Aurash Khawarzad (Race Forward), Alden Meyer (Union of Concerned Scientists), Timothy Judson (NIRS), Alan Journet (Southern Oregon Climate Action Network). Transition to Action Teams—why the change? In 2018, we heard feedback from our members questioning whether “User Groups” was the right name for the groups we convene in to work on our network alignment areas. We took this feedback to a network-wide vote, and they decided that changing our groups to Action Teams was more fitting to our work and ambition. Members joined Action Teams at the meeting and began participating in Action Team calls in July. Sign-ups for Action Teams remain open throughout the year, and members are always encouraged to sign up and participate in them in order to increase connection and trust within our membership. As a member-driven network, each Action Team is co-chaired by two USCAN members, and the participants of the Action Teams decide democratically what they would like to achieve together. Members are working through the “Connect, Align, Produce” sequence to form lasting relationships and work together.

Harrison Wallace (Chesapeake Climate Action Network) participating in a Bill Moyers Four Roles exercise . Photo Credit: Grace June Photography.

2018–2019 ACTION TEAMS: CO-CHAIRS AND PRIORITIES The end of 2018 marked the mid-way point of work for the Action Teams. Here is a summary of the work plans and priorities for each group. Building Power from the Grassroots Up Co-chairs: Natalie Lucas (Care about Climate) Michael Malcom (The People’s Justice Council) Lawrence Jennings (GreenFaith) Groups are collaborated through a just and equitable process to build grassroots power in the climate movement, under the leadership of grassroots and frontline USCAN members. Together, we are created space for a stronger, more coordinated climate network across the diverse member organizations and exploring opportunities and advancing strategies to increase funding to the grassroots. This year, that work together included organizing a series of “Power Talks”—a new training initiative that features twenty minute expert presentations on various subjects that assist organizations in building power from the grassroots. The themes we are discussing this year are Money Matters, Empowering People to Lead, and Organizing for Success. The group took on the project of improving network asset mapping: the team worked closely with USCAN staff to improve a network map to help organizations share resources more effectively and easily. The Asset Mapping Subcommittee so far analyzed what assets USCAN currently has and mapped themselves to make suggestions for what assets would be beneficial to have, especially for grassroots organizations. Additionally, four organizations—Care About Climate, Alabama Interfaith Power and Light, South Carolina Interfaith Power and Light, and Georgia WAND took it a step further and will use the map to share resources as well as develop a guide to help other organizations understand how to use the asset map themselves. These four organizations received a grant from USCAN to do this extra work on the asset map.

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Members of the Just Social and Economic Transition Action Team meet to discuss priorities and goals of the group. Led by co-chairs Jessica Eckdish (BlueGreen Alliance) and Basav Sen (Institute for Policy Studies). Photo Credit: Institute for Policy Studies.

Equitable and Ambitious Climate Vision (EACV)— Our new Action Team Co-chairs: Lindsay Harper (Georgia WAND) David Arkush (Public Citizen)

Global Climate Advocacy (GCA)—CAN International Priority Co-chairs: Ruth Ivory-Moore (The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America) Michael Hansen (Gasp)

This Action Team is developing a vision, principles, and details for a climate platform grounded in equity and justice that exceeds the Paris Goals, inspires the public, and can be promoted by leaders. The team has used the USCAN Fall Survey to understand where there is policy alignment, has crafted a “problem statement” that defines the climate crisis, has assessed existing vision and goal statements on climate and created parameters and principles for our USCAN process of working on a vision. The team is now formulating high-level policy asks by sector. The next steps for this group are to draft a vision statement that as many groups as possible sign onto and draft principles. Following that we will begin to detail and get sign- on to more specific policies, sometimes by issue, e.g. forests or renewables; some currently exist and some will be new. We will do this to the extent we can without losing lots of members, with the goal of ending with a full set of climate policy recommendations for our use..

USCAN is a node of CAN-International and was founded to bring a U.S. presence into international spaces, such as United Nations Climate Change Conference of Parties of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Through the Global Climate Advocacy team, USCAN continues working on and supporting these cornerstone issues—including CAN-I priorities that fit within this action team—and holding space in international fora for our members to engage. Currently the team prioritizes work in three areas: 1. Congressional Engagement. The GCA priority is to target the offices of pro-climate members of Congress for the purpose of educating staffers; giving insight and information to appropriators; developing leadership on climate-related issues; and providing oversight of the federal government. 2. Climate Finance. The GCA priority is to develop a resource that consolidates climate finance knowledge, mechanisms, and instruments; bolsters accountability and transparency in climate finance; and addresses gender and indigenous peoples’ concerns with regard to adaptation, mitigation, resiliency, and transition. 3. UN Talks. UN Framework Convention on Climate Change/ Conferences of the Parties 24 was focused on engaging the U.S. delegation and other delegations as well as NGOs on positive outcomes in three areas: the Talanoa Dialogue; Nationally Determined Commitment (NDC) enhancements; and the Paris Rulebook. A report back from this year’s COP is found on page 31.

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USCAN Member Empowerment Grantee New Jersey Organizing Project. Photo Credit: New Jersey Organizing Project.

Just Social and Economic Transition (JSET) Co-chairs: Basav Sen (Institute for Policy Studies) Denise Abdul-Rahman (NAACP) Jessica Eckdish (BlueGreen Alliance)

Social and Economically Just Adaptation and Mitigation (SEJAM) Co-chairs: Huda Alkaff (Wisconsin Green Muslims) Harrison Wallace (Chesapeake Climate Action Network)

This Action Team has outlined three priorities to help reach our collective mission of “ensuring a just and equitable energy transition in the United States that will impact others around the globe, and builds equitable social and economic power and is accountable to workers and communities.” These priorities include:

This Action Team agreed upon and is working on four priorities:

1. Identifying models of successful policy, projects, and legislation for a just transition. The Action Team has outlined criteria for these models or approaches that achieve environmental and social outcomes that we want to see (i.e. just transition outcomes); brought a coalition together (or at least was supported by) environmental, labor, and EJ groups; or that failed/weren not “successes” and look at why. The proposed areas of interest for these models are equitable energy efficiency, equitable clean energy, local/community ownership, or transition to decentralized energy. 2. Ongoing just transition work. This includes creating pathways and systems for people to ask ask the Action Team for help with ongoing Just Transition work. This goal also includes creating ways for updates on ongoing work and projects that the group and the broader network should know about.

1. Advocate for consideration of communities vulnerable to inland and coastal area flooding and sea level rise in the reauthorization of National Flood Insurance Program (mitigation, affordability and mapping) and in the implementation and defense of U.S. federal agency programs (i.e., Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Federal Emergency Manag ement Agency (FEMA), NOAA, etc.). 2. Create just and equitable principles and guidelines for underserved communities that are vulnerable to climate disasters to help them prepare for and/or rebuild in a way that strengthens mitigation and community resilience policies and practices. 3. Continue the conversations on how to reduce risks that climate displaced people and those at the risk of being displaced (including those related to migration upticks due to global climate-impacts. 4. Coordinate a gathering/exchange between community/ local groups to inform and build upon the work in priorities 2 and 3.

3. Sharing knowledge and resources. This goal includes creating a list of those who have made presentations to the USCAN Just Transition Action Team, which presentations we have sent members to, the best contact at these organizations, and, as needed, helping to make connections to weave members together. uscan annual report 2018 | 15


GOAL 2: TRUST USCAN members Laura Haight (Partnership for Policy Integrity), Huda Alkaff (Wisconsin Green Muslims), and James Woodly (Jail and Prison Rehabilitation Information Community Outreach Program) at the Annual Meeting. Photo Credit: Grace June Photography.

In 2018 we continued to build the foundational relationships essential for collective action by facilitating peer learning activities that foster trust and candor among members. Trust is earned, not given. It takes time, and it takes great care. A network is remarkably more impactful when members sincerely trust each other. Networks can accelerate member trust by connecting them in low-threat activities around topics of shared interest. For example, USCAN may coordinate a work group whose first step is for members to create a plan for three informational calls. This step will not directly solve climate change or negotiate policy positions; however, it is a low-threat activity for the members to connect with each other, work together, and to create easy alignment. Each low-threat connectivity activity that USCAN fosters creates additional layers of trust among members. These activities establish a belief that we can work together. USCAN will continue to focus on building connections among members to solidify a foundation for success in USCAN’s member alignment.

HOW USCAN BUILT TRUST IN 2018 The Annual Meeting USCAN members ranked our in-person Annual Meeting as the most important network activity that we offer. This data is the same as last year, and we are not surprised. In person convenings are vital for building trust within our membership. When we can congregate to build relationships, trust is built and becomes the foundation for organizations working together. When trust is at the center of our network, we can begin to build power together. It was so inspirational to be together with so many climate leaders at the 2018 USCAN Annual Meeting in Spokane, WA! This meeting was our second under the current strategic plan and the 29th as a network. We came together to connect with our friends and colleagues during a difficult time, build appreciation for the roles of different activist tactics, summarize our work over the last year, align on strategy for the coming year, and set the stage for action at the scale of our vision in the next 12 months. One hundred and forty-seven members came together from 102 organizations, including 66 leaders who self-identified as leaders of color or from low income communities. Fifty-six members participated in the Steering Committee, Nominations Committee, and/or as plenary or breakout speakers.


I have been to a lot of meetings this year and this one was the best. It was very well executed and focused. I receive a lot of information from USCAN electronically so I wasn’t sure what to expect from my first meeting. However, I was very pleased with all aspects. I left with great connections, new and revived, and I look forward to becoming more involved with the network.


GOAL 3: ALIGNMENT

In 2018 USCAN worked to build critical mass for climate action by enabling alignments among clusters of members. A collective value proposition that network members find compelling provides the glue for members’ sustained connectivity and shared action. While this effort can be challenging due to the size and diversity of the network, members see it as necessary to push successful outcomes through working together across the climate movement continuum. How does connectivity evolve into alignment? Alignment is a process by which members reach shared understanding with people they trust. By reaching a shared understanding, members can then begin to agree on shared goals and strategies.

IN-PERSON MEMBER ALIGNMENT MEETINGS Future Vision In-person meeting: At USCAN we firmly believe that we are stronger together than apart. By leaning into the places where we align, coordinating where we can, ramping up action at all levels and doing more of this, we can help to make some real change in our lifetimes. USCAN—staff and members alike—began this process because we needed to know what we face and what would be required to hit a target that has since changed. We knew that we must do more. And we must do more together. On February 1, over sixty USCAN members met to reach USCAN’s vision and see the big picture together. The outcomes of the meeting for the USCAN Voting Participants were to: 1. Define the problem together of how we achieve the vision of USCAN, taking into account the latest knowledge; 2. Get more comfortable with uncomfortable realities 3. Get ready for decisions/votes coming up to define the USCAN ballot and vote in June 4. Have materials they can share with their organizations and sectors to build the common understanding of the problem we face; and 5. Gain an understanding of how/if your sector is thinking about the challenge ahead Proactive Federal Policy Meeting: In December, USCAN hosted a meeting to coordinate proactive/offensive work at the federal level on climate change among USCAN members, including a great panel discussion with Varshini Prakash (Sunrise Movement), Stephanie Doyle (Citizens' Climate Lobby), and Liz Perera (Sierra Club). More than 50 USCAN members gathered to map out the various federal policies being put forward to drive the national conversation about what we need to do to act at scale to address the climate crisis. We mapped out the timelines of the Green New Deal, the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act, the “HR-2-10” bills members want on the Paris Climate Agreement, the infrastructure bill, a 100% clean energy marker bill, flood insurance reform, and more.

USCAN Member Varshini Prakash (Sunrise Movement) at the December 18th Federal Policy Meeting. Photo Credit: USCAN.

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Finally, we discussed common language that brings us all together, and took a decision to revamp the federal lobbying table at USCAN known as CLEAN-Strat. A small group of USCAN members are revising the rules and deciding on next steps to regularly bring together members focused on setting the federal agenda.


OUR VISION


SUPPORTING THE PEOPLES CLIMATE MOVEMENT Throughout the year USCAN supported the Peoples Climate Movement by serving on the Mobilization Support Team, assisting with outreach, fundraising and engaging in moments of large scale mobilization. Timed to put pressure on elected officials a week before the Global Climate Action Summit, people took to the streets in a true example of building collective action as part of the Rise for Climate and Peoples Climate Movement actions. More than 40 USCAN member organizations joined dozens of other organizations to call for greater action on climate. This is what "Connect-AlignProduce" looked like: ++ 250,000 people in 95 countries on seven continents came together to #RiseforClimate because there is no time to lose. In the US people all across the country took action to build a larger climate movement rooted in economic and racial justice. ++ 30,000 people in San Francisco and 300 events in communities across all 50 states and Puerto Rico ++ Throughout the week, the climate justice community, which included some USCAN members, kept the pressure on leaders though Solidarity to Solutions #Sol2Sol. Afterwards, the Peoples Climate Movement (PCM) didn’t miss a beat. It continued moving from march to movement, supporting non-partisan civic engagement work through the November mid-term elections and is planning for ahead to 2020/21!

SUMAPP MAPPING PROJECT In 2018, we decided to map our membership to see how interconnected we are as a network. What we found was that we have increased our alignments and number of strong relationship ties to one another over the years. From our baseline data in 2016, with members having an average of six strong ties to other members, we are now at nine strong ties! This interactive mapping platform which is accessible to the USCAN Voting Participants gives them access to see what other USCAN members are working on, bringing awareness to alignments/connections in their work.

No single organization can tackle the climate crisis alone. To limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial temperatures and prepare for impacts that communities are beginning to experience today, stronger collaborations are needed, and more grassroots leadership must be supported. USCAN is supporting collaborations and grassroots leadership through its Member Empowerment Grants. This grants process is completely member driven, with the Request for Proposals (RFP) available to the network for review and edits, and the Grant Review Team composed of five members representing various perspectives. The Grant Review Team gives valuable time and input to this process: thank you to Rachel Potter (Climate Nexus), Elizabeth Chun Hye Lee (United Methodist Women), Rev. Michael Malcom (The People’s Justice Council), Mia MacDonald (Brighter Green), Bill Wood (West Michigan Environmental Action Council), and Alex Easdale (Southeast Climate and Energy Network). The purpose of the Grassroots and Collaboration Grants is to: ++ Direct more funding to the grassroots climate movement—especially but not exclusively to frontline communities and those in the movement who are traditionally under-funded; ++ Support efforts to build long-term grassroots power from the ground up, and more unity and solidarity, within USCAN and within the climate movement as a whole; and ++ Foster collaborative approaches to overcoming shared barriers. In August, we received 23 proposals requesting a total of $1,035,130, and we awarded 18 grants, totalling $600,000! We also began awarding two year grassroots/frontline grants. It is clear that the need for support for grassroots leadership and collaboration is as high as ever, and USCAN will continue to discuss and to look for opportunities for members in the coming years.

MEMBERS WORKING TOGETHER Funding Grassroots and Collaboration

USCAN’s Voting Participants mapped on their connectivity. Our members have an average of 9 strong ties to one another. Via SumApp Mapping.

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Member Empowerment Grantees during a gathering funded by a Collaborative Grant. Photo Credit: Iowa IPL.

Grants were awarded to: Care About Climate (Collaborative Grant) Care About Climate will partner with The People’s Justice Council, Georgia WAND Education Fund, and South Carolina Interfaith Power & Light to pilot an asset map project within the Building Grassroots Power Action Team that will improve communication among all USCAN action teams and among more than 175 grassroots and grasstop groups. Clean Air Coalition (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) The grant funds will be used to support the organization’s efforts to advance climate and environmental justice in working-class communities and communities of color, continue organizing for the just transition of the NRG Huntley coal plant in Tonawanda, NY and create and grow accessible, generational green jobs in the Western New York Region. Environmental Finance Center West (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) This funding will be used to support New Mexico Tribal efforts to: 1. Better understand potential impacts of and vulnerabilities to climate change; 2. Develop climate adaptation plans; and 3. Empower Tribal members to tell and share their own climate stories through digital storytelling training and production. While the initial focus of this proposal is New Mexico’s 220,000 Tribal members and 22 Tribes, the final product will be made available to Tribes throughout the United States.

Gasp (Collaborative Implementation Grant) Gasp will work in partnership with Power Shift Network, Sierra Club, and The People’s Justice Council to host the inaugural Renew Alabama Environmental Justice Tour, a series of convenings throughout the state of Alabama to introduce and engage moral leaders and young organizers in the movement for environmental justice. Georgia WAND (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) Funding will be used to create participatory education, public health, and policy campaigns in Burke County, Georgia. Georgia WAND is planning a public education campaign about the issues facing the Burke County community, focusing on how residents can be their own advocates around public health and climate awareness. Kentucky Conservation Committee (Collaborative Implementation Grant) KCC is partnering with three other USCAN member groups (Center for Biological Diversity, Dogwood Alliance, and the Livelihoods Knowledge Exchange Network) and other key advocacy organizations working in this region to build strategies for addressing the impacts of climate change on biodiversity and water quality in the Upper Cumberland Watershed. Kingdom Living Temple (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) Funds will be used to engage grassroots communities, i.e.., students in renewal education and citizen science around the issues of populations and climate change. We will be working in the cities of Florence and Orangeburg, SC. New Jersey Organizing Project (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) This collaborative proposal continues and expands the work of a subgroup of USCAN’s Socially and Economically Just Adaptation and Mitigation Action Team. The group is working together for just policies, programs, and practices for climate preparedness, adaptation, resiliency, and mitigation.


USCAN has helped me grow relationships with individuals and organizations in a way that allowed me to have challenging and constructive conversations about my strategy and its impacts. I specifically found the 2018 Annual Meeting invaluable for strengthening relationships and building trust across the diversity of change strategies.

The peer grants have been instrumental for us in building stronger peer working relationships across organizations. This is breaking down silos, building trust, increasing opportunities to learn from each other in a hands-on way, and showing the communities we serve that the climate movement is organized and united.

We are a small, multi-issue organization so being a member of USCAN puts us in the room with organizations with more capacity, which enhances our own work.

Because of the grassroots grant we received this year, we will be able to amplify indigenous voices and support climate adaptation efforts within indigenous communities in the US.


Sunrise Movement Education Fund (Alignment Convening Grant) Funds will support an in-person convening and coalitionbuilding to align environmental, labor, racial justice, and economic justice organizations around a popular platform to fight climate change, restore our environment, and guarantee good jobs for all. Sustaining Way (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) Funding will support two efforts: 1. Sustaining Way’s multi-tiered workforce development program that builds grassroots power through employing and training community members in sustainable practices, leadership, advocacy and personal skills all while developing the surrounding low-income community; and 2. Strategic planning for proliferation of our replicable model throughout South Carolina and the Southeast enabling Sustaining Way to establish a network of grassroots communities. Sunrise Movement Time Capsule Project. Photo Credit: Sunrise Movement.

North Carolina Interfaith Power and Light (Collaborative Implementation Grant) The Southeast Climate Action Faith Leaders Network is a collaborative effort building long-term grassroots power lifting up the principles and values of a just transition as we convene faith leaders throughout the Southeast region. Ohio Interfaith Power and Light (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) Grant funds will be used to support Ohio Interfaith Power & Light in transformings its organizational mission, vision, and programming to strengthen its work towards intersectional justice, inclusivity, anti-racism, and grassroots movement building. Physicians for Social Responsibility (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) Physicians for Social Responsibility Philadelphia (PSR), in collaboration with Earth Quaker Action Team (EQAT), will amplify the message of health in context of solar energy jobs in underinvested Philadelphia neighborhoods. Sol Nation (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) Funds will be used to support the annual Sol Summit, an event that equips marginalized communities with education, training and resources to address injustice specifically in the areas of climate, environmental, and economic impacts.

The People’s Justice Council (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) Funding will support startup expenses for Alabama IPL, a hopeful moral response to climate change, including the purchase of equipment for training and speaking events, the creation of initial marketing materials, and staffing costs for first year programming. The Whitney M. Slater Foundation (Collaborative Implementation Grant) Funds will be used to take follow-up measures after the completion of the Justice First Tour. These follow-up measures will include: convening two organizers from each of the 12 states that the Justice First Tour visited and participating in the 2018 Creating a Climate for Change Conference. Wisconsin Green Muslims (Grassroots/Frontlines Grant) Funds will be used for centering equity in the 100 percent clean and renewable energy economy on the local level in Wisconsin. Through grassroots and community-led efforts in building a large and diverse coalition, our collective work on climate, justice and jobs, grounded in energy democracy, will enhance capacity to successfully launch Wisconsin’s Just Solar guiding principles and programs. Young Evangelicals for Climate Action (Collaborative Implementation Grant) This member alignment grant will go directly toward offsetting the staff costs of participating in the work of the Equitable and Ambitious Climate Vision Action Team. This grant will allow a more diverse, inclusive, and grassroots representation on the Action Team and will enhance the outcome of the Action Team’s work as a result.

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GOAL 4: ENHANCE NETWORK EFFECTIVENESS

Denise Abdul-Rahman (NAACP Indiana); David Turnbull (Oil Change International); Huda Alkaff (Wisconsin Green Muslims); Mark Magaña (GreenLatinos); Jalonne White-Newsome (The Kresge Foundation); and Tamar Lawrence-Samuel (Corporate Accountability International).

GREEN GROUP CHAIR

In 2018 efforts were successfully made to enhance the long-term sustainability and effectiveness of USCAN by aligning staff, resources, and performance management, and to create alignment among members. USCAN members also let us know that the following are their top three value propositions, which are the values a member experiences and receives participating in the network: moving together collectively and centering leaders of color within the climate movement; having access to trusted information about climate action strategies, policies, intelligence, models, solutions, etc.; and getting to know diverse colleagues whom they can learn from and share with. Additionally, the highest valued USCAN network activities are: our in-person Annual Meetings, Member Empowerment Grants, and offline connection to peers. Listening Session: Moving together and centering leaders of color within the climate movement is USCAN members’ number one value proposition: however, many of our members let us know on the fall survey that we were delivering well but could improve. In response to this feedback, we coordinated a conversation with members of color to dive more deeply into what they think we are doing well and what they think could be improved. Members noted that they loved how intentional USCAN is in recruiting for diversity and ensuring leaders of color are compensated for the time they dedicate to network and network-related activities. They also offered valuable suggestions for improvement that we began incorporating into our operational plans, such as creating a leaders of color space to discuss issues of concern just before the 2019 Annual Meeting. JEDI Statement and Checklist: Members of the JEDI committee developed a statement that members affirmed at the annual meeting. They went on to draft a checklist for use in Action Team and committee calls to ensure that our commitments to justice, equity, diversity and inclusion were being implemented. Thank you so much to our JEDI Committee: Sophie Zaken (Alliance for Affordable Energy); Sara Ward (Ohio Interfaith Power and Light); Harrison Wallace (Chesapeake Climate Action Network); Mikhiela Sherrod (Agricultural Missions); Lindsay Harper (Georgia WAND);

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Keya Chatterjee, USCAN Executive Director, served as the chair of the “Green Group” of 35 organizations in 2018, following a vote by USCAN members indicating this as a priority. During 2018, the Green Group focused on civic engagement, diversity, equity & inclusion, and developing a new network of leaders that will be more inclusive. In the civic engagement arena, many Green Group members asked their membership to vote in the general election for the first time in 2018, and the Green Group worked together with the Climate Action Campaign to understand and enhance the civic participation of their membership. The work of chairing the Green Group fits the USCAN strategy by maintaining staff roles in other climate groups to advocate for more inclusive and equitable dialogue in the movement (Goal 4.4).

JEDI Statement signed by USCAN members. Photo Credit: USCAN.


USCAN, while advocating for a more sustainable just and equitable future for all, continues to embody the very values needed to create this sort of radical change, from the ground up. In walking the talk and intentionally building the network to be inclusive, and diverse in opinion, with an emphasis on fostering mutual understanding and member alignment, USCAN not only strengthens the climate action movement with its work, but also creates a thriving environment that empowers activists and citizens alike to connect, learn and build a better future together. — Steve Chiu (Buddhist Tzu Chi Foundation)

WHAT DO OUR MEMBERS THINK? Fall Survey: This year, 166 Voting Participants (65 percent of VoPs) representing 137 member organizations (82 percent of member organizations) took part in USCAN’s Fall Survey. We are excited that a higher percentage of voting participants and member organizations took this survey than ever before! So, what do our members think? Member alignment is highest on equity policies that support communities adversely affected by climate change, fossil fuels and/or transition off fuels (81 percent alignment, up from 64 percent alignment in 2017); 100 percent renewable energy for all (66 percent alignment, up from 55 percent in 2017); and adaptation policies that prepare for climate impacts (70 percent alignment, up from 51 percent).

SOUTHEAST CLIMATE & ENERGY NETWORK (SCEN) Now completing its tenth year, the Southeast Climate & Energy Network’s mission is to create strategic coordination among organizations in the Southeast, securing fair, just and science-based climate and energy policies. We strive to be the premier environmental network in the Southeast by advocating for, educating, responding to and empowering our members, frontline and low-income communities and communities of color. SCEN’s main objective in 2018 was to begin implementing the transition toward becoming an independent organization, after incubating as a project with USCAN for the past decade. SCEN seeks to serve as a catalyst for greater impact of the SCEN network and overall initiatives in the Southeast. Inspired by the USCAN model, throughout 2018 a member-driven coordination strategy was instituted with SCEN members to identify what SCEN should transition to and prioritize.

SCEN has also prioritized working with those members that have been the most active and engaged, while also supporting other networks. Two working groups were again selected and launched in March 2018: the Environmental Justice Working Group and FRESH Energy Committee. Each working group had nine monthly calls, with an average participation of 15 individuals per call. In December 2017, for the second year in a row, a survey of the entire network allowed members to elect working groups for 2018 as well as discuss other programmatic possibilities. SCEN members elected to have two in-person convenings in 2018 and opted for a formal membership structure to be implemented in 2019. Eight SCEN Steering Committee members have volunteered to become SCEN’s initial eightperson board of directors, a board that is truly diverse in terms of geography, racial and ethnic make-up, balanced female and male representation, as well as representation from the LGBTQI community. Most importantly, every incoming SCEN board member is an expert in the field, a leader in the climate change movement and truly invested in SCEN’s success. The SCEN network held two convenings in 2018. The first was held at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, Georgia in May while the second was held at the University of New Orleans, in New Orleans, Louisiana in November. Chiefly, these meetings served as an excellent convening opportunity for key national and regional stakeholders and leaders to discuss the main environmental challenges facing the Southeast, while giving the SCEN network added momentum. Active working groups and regular yearly convenings that emphasize clean energy, energy democracy and environmental justice are now part and parcel of SCEN’s work. Starting next year, SCEN will be a member of USCAN rather than a program of USCAN!

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Members of SCEN at the New Orleans convening. Photo Credit: USCAN.

Guests at the Atlanta SCEN Convening. Photo Credit: USCAN.

Guests at the New Orleans SCEN Convening. Photo Credit: USCAN.


USCAN Annual Meeting Breakout Session. Photo Credit: Grace June Photography.

We wish to take this opportunity to once again thank our host in New Orleans, Ms. Colette Pichon-Battle representing the Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy, the University of New Orleans for providing an excellent venue, Ms. Camille Pollan of the City of New Orleans Office of Resilience and Sustainability for welcoming us to her city, to SCEN’s incoming board of directors for their support, participation and leadership, to participants from the Advancing Equity and Opportunity Collaborative, and to our awesome SCEN members for their enthusiastic participation. In 2019, the network will continue designing programming that seeks to empower communities in the Southeast by supporting civic engagement initiatives, leadership development, and capacity building/organizational development support (including funding) to frontline and grassroots organizations led by people of color. In 2018, SCEN was able to leverage close to $20,000 in stipends to support to leaders within the SCEN network for their participation in the convenings, as well as to support several steering committee members to participate and contribute to SCEN’s strategic planning process, which concluded in the fFall of 2018. All told, SCEN has contributed close to $150,000 in support to grassroots organizations and leaders from communities of color and low-income communities. . SCEN’s incoming Board of Directors had its first formal meeting via teleconference on the week of December 17 as SCEN prepares to begin operating independently in 2019.

2018 UNITED NATIONS CLIMATE CHANGE CONFERENCE (COP24) As part of USCAN’s new member-led, democratic way of working, members led our work at the UN, alongside our elected USCAN liaison for 2018, Emma Collin from the Gulf Coast Center for Law and Policy. Thank you to Emma Collin and Katherine Egland for this summary of COP24: Amid mounting tensions, COP 24 was successful in adopting a rulebook which will guide the implementation of the Paris Agreement when it enters into force in 2020. The Rulebook provisions for mitigation, transparency, adaptation, finance, periodic stocktakes, and other provisions of the Paris Climate Agreement—set the stage for a new international climate regime under which all countries will have to report their emissions—and progress in cutting them—every two years from 2024. In addition to the rulebook, COP 24 advanced the concepts of the Talanoa Dialogue, which will allow progress reporting and inform parties as they prepare for a new round of nationally determined contributions (NDCs) in 2020. However, there were also disappointments at COP 24, such as shunning of warnings of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special report of the need for greater ambition to stay below 1.5C. Many NGOs felt that more aggressive language was needed in requiring more ambitious climate pledges. Parties also failed to agree on rules for Article 6, which addresses voluntary market mechanisms. This process was deferred to COP 25.

uscan annual report 2018 | 27


Annual Secretariat and Node Coordinators Annual Meeting in Bangkok. Photo Credit: USCAN.

New research released at COP 24 revealed that global emissions were going up, not down. With the proliferation extreme climate incidents in 2018, such as drought, fires, storms, world temperature records, etc., and an unprecedented concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere, we cannot claim victory yet. More clearly defined and assertive strategies are required to meet the mounting challenges of climate aggression.

WORKING WITH CLIMATE ACTION NETWORK—INTERNATIONAL In February 2018, Carrie Clayton, USCAN’s Senior Director, attended the 6th Annual Secretariat and Node Coordinators Annual Meeting. CAN “nodes” worldwide met and exchanged ideas about how nodes function individually and together. Many positive outcomes and proposals were developed during this important time together, including a CAN values statement detailing how we will work and communicate effectively with each other, a One CAN Committee that is led by Node Coordinators to support the efforts of building capacity in the Nodes that have requested and identified what they need, a proposal to move the CAN General Assembly timing to during CAN Strategy Meetings and during the Secretariat and Node Coordinators Annual Meeting, and to do a node-to-node connectivity mapping.

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Throughout the year, USCAN was engaged in advancing governance reforms for CAN-International, and continues to prioritize support our international network so that wehave the critical infrastructure we need to take a humble approach to learning from CAN members around the world.

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO SUPPORTED USCAN IN 2018. It’s been a long and difficult year, but also a joyous year, because the number of wins member organizations have achieved together is staggering. In 2019 you will continue to see USCAN members RESIST, PERSIST, and INSIST!


Uscan staff from left to right: Jess Gray, Ishmael Buckner, Ife Kilimanjaro, Carrie Clayton, Keya Chatterjee, Marie Risalvato, Alex Easdale, Sydney Mosier, Jamiere Folmar. Photocredit: Grace June Photography.

USCAN STAFF MEMBERS Keya Chatterjee Executive Director Carrie Clayton Senior Network Systems Director Alexander Easdale Southeast Climate and Energy Network (SCEN) Coordinator Ife Kilimanjaro Senior Network Engagement Director Marie Risalvato Network Engagement Director

GET INVOLVED Become a member: Contact membership@usclimatenetwork.org and learn how your organization can become a USCAN member. Follow us online: usclimatenetwork.org facebook.com/USClimateActionNetwork instagram.com/climateactionnetwork @USCAN

Sydney Mosier Network Systems Director Jamiere Folmar Network Systems Coordinator

MAKE A DONATION

Ishmael Buckner Network Engagement Coordinator

uscan annual report 2018 | 29


FINANCIAL REPORT 2018 USCAN’s fiscal year begins July 1. This report is for the calendar year ending December 31, 2018.

CALENDAR YEAR JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31 2018

TOTAL

Revenue

Grants & Individual Contributions

1,918,705

Reimbursements & Contractual Services - Speaker Fees

Annual Membership Fees

Interest Income

2,122 118,315 6,557

Total Revenue

$2,045,699

Expenditures Salaries

547,791

Employer Payroll Taxes

45,222

Benefits - Health, Dental, Life, Retirement

92,950

Consultants for Advocacy/Education/SCEN

65,683

Infrastructure/Website/Computers

29,561

Accounting Audit, Bookkeeping Fees

4,987

Strategic Planning

5,000

Insurance

14,737

Annual Meeting

202,955

Internships

2,875

Member In-Person Meetings

45,747

Office Equipment & Supplies

6,197

Rent & Utilities

Postage & Delivery

60,915 18

Publications/Printing

100

Member Grants

632,107

Telecommunications

8,106

Travel

22,503

Working Group Coordinators & Participants

102,593

Total Expenditures

$1,890,047 Net Revenue

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$155,652


2018 EXPENDITURES SOUTHEAST ENERGY (SCEN) INTERNATIONAL 3% FUNDRAISING

OPERATIONS/LOGISTICS, TECHNOLOGY, RENT & UTILITIES 2% STRATEGIC PLANNING

COMMUNICATION

4%

7%

14%

37% MEMBER GRANTS, MEMBER MEETING ASSISTANCE & TRAVEL STIPENDS

6% 27%

MEMBER MEETINGS & OUTREACH

THANK YOU FOR YOUR GENEROUS SUPPORT: USCAN Member Organizations Franciscan Sisters of Mary Kendeda Fund Kresge Foundation MacArthur Foundation Mertz Gilmore Foundation Nathan Cummings Foundation Surdna Foundation And all of our individual donors

To ensure the network’s effectiveness, credibility, cohesion, and advancement toward common goals, USCAN members use the Jemez Principles for Democratic Organizing as a guide for conduct. These principles are: 1. be inclusive; 2. emphasis on bottom-up organizing; 3. let people speak for themselves; 4. work together in solidarity and mutuality; 5. build just relationships; and 6. commitment to self-transformation.

uscan annual report 2018 | 31


USCAN MEMBERS Columban Center for Advocacy and Outreach (CCAO)

Washington

DC

Conservation International

Arlington

VA

Corporate Accountability International

Boston

MA

Creation Justice Ministries

Washington

DC

Deep South Center for Environmental Justice

New Orleans

LA

Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice

Detroit

MI

Dogwood Alliance

Asheville

NV

Earthjustice

San Francisco

CA

Earthworks

Atlanta

GA

ecoAmerica

Washington

DC

Ecoequity

Albany

CA

Education, Economics, Environmental, Climate and Health Organization (EEECHO)

Gulfport

MS

Elders Climate Action

Truckee

CA

Elected Officials to Protect New York

Fly Creek

NY

Environment America

Boston

MA

DC

Environmental & Energy Study Institute (EESI)

Washington

DC

New Orleans

LA

Environmental Defense Fund

New York

NY

Center for American Progress

Washington

DC

Washington

DC

Center for Biological Diversity

Tucson

AZ

Episcopal Church Office of Government Relations

Center for Climate Protection

Santa Rosa

CA

Environmental Finance Center West

Oakland

CA

Center for Community Change

Washington

DC

Franciscan Action Network

Washington

DC

Washington

DC

350.org

Brooklyn

NY

350 Spokane

Spokane

WA

Acadia Center

Rockport

ME

ActionAid USA

Washington

DC

Agricultural Missions, Inc. (AMI)

New York

NY

Alliance for Affordable Energy

New Orleans

LA

Alliance for Climate Education

Boulder

CO

Alliance of Nurses for Healthy Environments

Mount Rainier

MD

Alliance to Save Energy

Washington

DC

American Jewish World Service

New York

NY

Appalachian Voices

Boone

NC

Anthropocene Alliance

Chicago

IL

Avaaz

New York

NY

Berkeley Carbon Trading Project

Berkeley

CA

BlueGreen Alliance Foundation

Minneapolis

MN

Brighter Green

New York City

NY

Buddhist Tzu Chi Foundation

San Dimas

CA

Care About Climate

Flagstaff

AZ

CARE USA

Washington

Carmelite NGO

Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL)

Washington

DC

Center for Popular Democracy

Brooklyn

NY

Forum for Climate Engineering Assessment, American University/ The Institute for Carbon Removal Law & Policy

Center for Sustainable Economy

Lake Oswego

OR

Fresh Energy

St Paul

MN

CERES

Boston

MA

Washington

DC

Chesapeake Climate Action Network (CCAN)

Takoma Park

MD

Friends Committee on National Legislation Friends of the Earth (FoE)

Washington

DC

Citizens Climate Lobby

Coronado

CA

Gasp

Birmingham

AL

Clean Air Coalition

Buffalo

NY

Georgetown Climate Center

Washington

DC

Clean Energy Action

Boulder

CO

Atlanta

GA

Clean Energy Works

Washington

DC

Georgia Women's Action for New Directions (WAND)

Climate Access

San Francisco

CA

Green For All

Berkeley

CA

Greenfaith

Highland Park

NJ

GreenLatinos

Washington

DC

Greenpeace USA

Washington

DC

Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy

Slidell

LA

Health Care Without Harm

Reston

VA

Hip Hop Caucus

Washington

DC

Honor the Earth

Callaway

MN

Humane Society International (HSI)

Washington

DC

Illinois Environmental Council

Springfield

IL

iMatter, Kids vs Global Warming

Ventura

CA

InterAction

Washington

DC

Institute for Policy Studies

Washington

DC

Interfaith Power & Light

San Francisco

CA

Interfaith Power and Light (DC.MD.NoVA)

Washington

DC

Climate Generation: A Will Steger Legacy

Minneapolis

MN

Climate and Development Lab, Brown University

Providence

RI

Climate Hawks Vote Civic Action

Washington

DC

Climate Interactive

Washington

DC

Climate Mobilization Project

Brooklyn

NY

Climate Nexus

New York

NY

Climate Parents

Oakland

CA

Climate Solutions

Olympia

WA

Climate Wise Women

Berkeley

CA

Collage of the Atlantic

Bar Harbor

ME

Colorado Farm & Food Alliance (for Resource Balance)

Paonia

CO

Colorado People's Alliance (COPA)

Aurora

CO

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International Environmental Law Project (IELP) at Lewis and Clark Law School

Portland

Iowa Interfaith Power & Light

Des Moines

OR

IA

RE-AMP

Madison

WI

Refugees International

Washington

DC

Rhode Island Interfaith Power & Light

Riverside

RI

Service Employees International Union (SEIU)

Washington

DC

Sierra Club

San Francisco

CA

Sol Nation

Charlotte

NC

Solar Head of State

Oakland

CA

Greenville

SC

IPS/Sustainable Energy & Economy Network (SEEN)

Washington

DC

Jail and Prison Rehabilitation Information Community Outreach

Greenville

NC

Kentucky Conservation Committee

Frankfort

KY

Kingdom Living Temple

Florence

SC

Kyoto USA

Berkeley

CA

South Carolina Interfaith Power and Light

Labor Network for Sustainability

Takoma Park

MD

Southern Alliance for Clean Energy

Knoxville

TN

League of Conservation Voters

Washington

DC

Jacksonville

OR

Livelihoods Knowledge Exchange Network (LiKEN)

Lexington

KY

Southern Oregon Climate Action Now (SOCAN) Sunrise Movement

Washington

DC

Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns

Washington

DC

Sustaining Way

Greenville

SC

Michigan Interfaith Power & Light

Southfield

MI

SustainUS

Quincy

MA

Michigan Climate Action Network

Lansing

MI

Texas Impact

Austin

TX

Moms Clean Air Force

Washington

DC

The Climate Reality Project

Washington

DC

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)

Baltimore

MD

The Environmental Justice Center at Chestnut Hill United Church

Philadelphia

PA

National Wildlife Federation (NWF)

Reston

VA

The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

Chicago

IL

Natural Resources Defense Council

New York

NY

The Imani Group

Aiken

SC

New Jersey Organizing Project

West Creek

NJ

The Mountain Pact

Truckee

CA

New Mexico Interfaith Power and Light

Albuquerque

NM

The Nature Conservancy (TNC)

Arlington

VA

North Carolina Conservation Network

Raleigh

NC

The Solutions Project

Washington

DC

North Carolina Interfaith Power and Light

Raleigh

NC

The Whitney M. Slater Foundation

Florence

SC

Nuclear Information and Resource Service

Takoma Park

MD

The United Methodist Church — General Board of Church and Society

Washington

DC

Ohio Interfaith Power & Light

Columbus

OH

The Wilderness Society

Washington

DC

Oil Change International

Washington

DC

Tribal Environmental Policy Center (TEPC)

Rio Rancho

NM

Olympic Climate Action

Port Angeles

WA

U.S. Baha'i Office of Public Affairs

Washington

DC

OneAmerica

Seattle

WA

U.S. Climate Health Alliance

Oakland

CA

Our Children’s Trust

Portland

OR

Union of Concerned Scientists

Cambridge

MA

Oxfam America

Boston

MA

United Methodist Women

New York

NY

Pacific Environment

San Francisco

CA

Utah Moms for Clean Air

Salt Lake City

UT

Partnership for Policy Integrity (PFPI)

Amherst

MA

Voices for Progress

Washington

DC

Partnership for Southern Equity

Atlanta

GA

WE ACT for Environmental Justice

New York

NY

Pennsylvania Interfaith Power and Light

State College

PA

We Own It

Madison

WI

People’s Action Institute

Chicago

IL

WEDO

New York

NY

People’s Justice Council

Atlanta

GA

Grand Rapids

MI

Philadelphia Physicians for Social Responsibility

Philadelphia

PA

West Michigan Environmental Action Council Wisconsin Green Muslims

Milwaukee

WI

Physicians for Social Responsibility

Washington

DC

Mill Valley

CA

Pivot Point

Shelton

WA

Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN)

Polar Bears International

Bozeman

MT

New York

NY

Power Shift Network

San Francisco

CA

Women’s Environment and Development Organization (WEDO)

Presbyterian Church USA

Louisville

KY

World Resources Institute (WRI

Washington

DC

Protect Our Winters

Boulder

CO

World Wildlife Fund

Washington

DC

Public Citizen

Washington

DC

Young Evangelicals for Climate Action

Indianapolis

IN

Quaker Earthcare Witness

Albany

CA

Rachel Carson Council

Bethesda

MD

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Profile for US Climate Action Network

2018 Annual Report - US Climate Action Network (USCAN)  

USCAN is a vital network of 180+ organizations active on climate change. Our mission is to build trust and alignments among members to fight...

2018 Annual Report - US Climate Action Network (USCAN)  

USCAN is a vital network of 180+ organizations active on climate change. Our mission is to build trust and alignments among members to fight...

Profile for uscan
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