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Winter Cup Challenge John Orozco Wins the All-Around

Preschool FUNdamentals

Tips from USA Gymnastics National Instructors

MARCH 2012 – VOL. 32 – #3


EVENTS 2012

AUGUST

MARCH

8–11

TOPs Invitational Camp (W)

Huntsville, TX

10–12

Region 6 Congress

Providence, RI

10–12

Region 8 Congress

Nashville, TN

12 – 15

TOPs Invitational Camp (W)

Huntsville, TX

17–19

Region 7 Congress

Baltimore, MD

22-25

Women’s Level 300 JO Team Coaches Course (W300)

Huntsville, TX

24–26

Region 2 Congress

26 – 29

Women’s Level 400 National Coaches Course (W400),

16–18

Kellogg’s Pacific Rim Championships (M/W/R/T)

30–31

USA Gymnastics Collegiate Championships (M)

30–Apr 1

Elite Challenge (TT)

Everett, WA Colorado Springs, CO Tulsa, OK

APRIL Bridgeport, CT

Everett, WA Huntsville, TX

12 – 14

USA Gymnastics Women’s Collegiate National Championships

13–15

Women’s Level 9/10 Regionals

Various Sites

13–15

Men’s JO Regional Championships

Various Sites

16–22

Acro Gym. World Champs. & World Age Group Competition Lake Buena Vista, FL

14–16

Region 5 Congress

Indianapolis, IN

20–21

NCAA Men’s Gymnastics Championships

22

National Gymnastics Day

various locations

20–22

NCAA Women’s Gymnastics Championships

28 – 30

National TOPs Testing (W)

Huntsville, TX

Norman, OK Duluth, GA

SEPTEMBER

NOVEMBER

MAY 3–6

Level 9 East/West Championships (W)

Landover, MD/Boise, ID

7

USA Gymnastics Special Olympics Championships (M/W/R/GG)

7–13

JO National Championships (M)

10–12

JO National Championships (W)

11–13

Stars & Stripes Cup (TT)

13

JO National Invitational Tournament (W)

26

Secret U.S. Classic (W)

31–June 3 USA Gymnastics Open Championships (W)

Marietta, GA

7–10

Level 9/10 Training Camp (W)

Huntsville, TX

10–14

JO National Team Training Camp (W)

Huntsville, TX

Cincinnati, OH Hampton, VA Cleveland, OH Hampton, VA Chicago, IL Lake Buena Vista, FL

2013 APRIL 12–14

Women’s Level 9/10 Regionals

Various sites

MAY

JUNE

2–5

Level 9 East/West Championships (W)

St. Louis, MO

9–11

JO National Championships (W)

Minneapolis, MN

Region 4 Congress

St. Louis, MO

12

JO–NIT (W)

Minneapolis, MN

26–28

USA Gymnastics Rhythmic & Trampoline Championships

San Jose, CA

31–June 2 2013–20 JO Compulsory Master Workshop – East (W)

28–July1

U.S. Olympic Team Trials–Gymnastics (M/W)

San Jose, CA

28

Certifications for USA Gymnastics National Congress

San Jose, CA

JUNE

29–July1

USA Gymnastics National Congress and Trade Show

San Jose, CA

6–12

JO National Championships/Invitational (R)

7–10

Visa Championships (M/W)

8–10

Lake Buena Vista, FL

JULY 5–11

T&T Junior Olympic Nationals

19–22

USA Gymnastics For All Nationals

23–26

JO Optional Skills Camp (W)

27–Aug. 12 Olympic Games (M,W,R,T)

Long Beach, CA Lake Buena Vista, FL

7 – 9

2013–20 JO Compulsory Master Workshop – West (W)

NOTE: Dates and events subject to change or cancellation. 2

TECHNIQUE • MARCH 2012

Orlando, FL

Reno, NV

SEPTEMBER 13–15

Region 5 Congress

Huntsville, TX London, GBR

W = Women, R = Rhythmic, TR = Trampoline, M = Men, GG = Group Gymnastics, TU = Tumbling, AG = Acrobatic Gymnastics, B = Business, TT = Trampoline/Tumbling

(TBD)

Columbus, OH


TECHNIQUE

an official publication of USA Gymnastics University

M A R C H 2 0 1 2 • V O L U M E 3 2 • #3

F E AT U R E S PUBLISHER

Steve Penny EDITOR

6 USA Gymnastics – Preschool Fundamentals

Luan Peszek

14

Clear Hip Handstand: Shape, Drop, Open

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

18

Working Together to Make a Difference

24

Foam Rolling for Optimal Performance

28

USA Gymnastics Business Advisors’ Tips

Jeannie Shaw

USA GYMNASTICS BOARD OF DIRECTORS Chair: Peter Vidmar Vice-Chair: Paul Parilla Secretary: Gary Anderson Treasurer: Jim Morris National Membership – Women: Tom Koll National Membership – Women: Steve Rybacki National Membership – Men: Yoichi Tomita National Membership – Men: Russ Fystrom National Membership – Rhythmic: Brooke Bushnell-Toohey National Membership – Trampoline & Tumbling: George Drew National Membership – Acrobatic Gymnastics: Dr. Jay Binder Advisory Council: Mike Burns Advisory Council: Ron Ferris Advisory Council: Carole Ide Athlete Director – Women: Terin Humphrey Athlete Director – Men: John Roethlisberger Athlete Director – Rhythmic: Jessica Howard Athlete Director – Trampoline & Tumbling: Karl Heger Athlete Director – Acrobatic Gymanstics: Michael Rodrigues Public Sector: Frank Marshall Public Sector: Bitsy Kelley Public Sector: Jim Morris Public Sector: Mary Lou Retton

CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES: In order to ensure uninterrupted delivery of TECHNIQUE magazine, notice of change of address should be made eight weeks in advance. For fastest service, please enclose your present mailing label. Direct all subscription mail to TECHNIQUE Subscriptions, USA Gymnastics, 132 E. Washington St., Suite 700, Indianapolis, IN 46204 .

D E PA R T M E N T S 2 Event Schedule 4 Inside USA Gymnastics Message 22

Athlete Focus: John Orozco

30

Member Service Update

32

National Congress

36

National Congress List of Presenters

40

Women’s Elite Committee Minutes

46

Classified Ads

14

24

HEALTH

TECHNIQUE is published monthly except bimonthly in Sept/ Oct and Nov/Dec by USA Gymnastics, 132 E. Washington St., Suite 700, Indianapolis, IN 46204 (phone: 317-237-5050) or visit online @ www.usagym.org Subscription prices: U.S.– $25 per year; Canada/Mexico–$48 per year; all other foreign countries–$60 per year. If available, back issue single copies $4 plus postage/handling. All reasonable care will be taken, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited material; enclose return postage. Copyright 2011 by USA Gymnastics and TECHNIQUE. A­ll rights reserved. Printed by Sport Graphics, Indianapolis, IN. Member Services 1-800-345-4719 Unless expressly identified to the contrary, all articles, statements and views printed herein are attributed solely to the author and USA Gymnastics expresses no opinion and assumes no responsibility thereof.

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KNOWLEDGE

www.usagym.org COVER PHOTO: John Orozco by John Cheng M MA RACRHC H2 021021 1• •T ET CE CHHNNI IQQUU EE

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INSIDE INSIDE INSIDE A

Get Ready! The 2012 Kellogg’s® Tour of Gymnastics Champions, a 40-city national tour featuring Team USA’s top performing gymnasts following the 2012 Olympic Games in London, is coming to a city near you between September and November.

2008 Olympic all-around champion Nastia Liukin will lead an impressive cast that includes members of the men’s and women’s 2011 World Championships and 2012 Olympic teams, in men’s, women’s, rhythmic, acrobatic gymnastics and trampoline and tumbling. Local area gymnasts will also have the chance to participate in each Tour stop’s performance.

A Gym Club Ticket Sales Program has been created to make sure that the sport’s most loyal fans get the first opportunity to secure seats to this event. Joining the Club Ticket Sales Program is easy and you can register to participate through your local arena or USA Gymnastics. Clubs are encouraged to visit www.kelloggstour.com and register their clubs for the Club Ticket Sales Program. Clubs will get discounts on tickets when purchasing as a group and qualify for great incentives, including a chance to have their gymnasts participate in their local show. Check the website regularly because it will be updated when Tour stops are confirmed and clubs are added to the ticket sales program. Our goal is to get this information out as quickly as possible to let our members and fans have an early opportunity (before tickets go on sale to the public) to buy tickets to this gymnastics celebration following the Olympic Games in London. We are grateful to our partners from Kellogg’s, P&G, and Hilton for their support of this tour. This show promises to be a fantastic display of our sport and showcase USA Gymnastics like never before. Get on-board early for the Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions. It will be one show you won’t want to miss! See you in the gym,

Steve Penny President and CEO

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USA Gymnastics University

www.usagymnasticsuniversity.org

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Preschool FUNdamentals: USA Gymnastics University provides two great learning opportunities for recreational coaches and more specifically preschool instructors. R101 Preschool Fundamentals Theory and R102 Preschool Fundamentals: Hands-on Training (HOTPS) are great opportunities to earn credits in USA Gymnastics University: School of Recreational Gymnastics and to gain additional teaching knowledge. The more you know the better you are prepared to coach and teach.

R101 Preschool FUNdamentals THEORY is an online course that addresses the theoretical aspects of a preschool age child and how to best work with that aged child. The course is interactive and loaded with great information that will make your job as an instructor easier. In order to maximize opportunities for gymnastics clubs and coaches to obtain this information, USA Gymnastics University has recently LOWERED the online price to $39. Learn at your own pace with this online course by logging on to usagymnasticsuniversity. org and registering for R101.

TECHNIQUE • MARCH 2012

R102 Preschool FUNdamentals: Hands-on Training (HOTPS) is a live 4-hour interactive experience. Participants apply theoretical aspects learned in R101 as well as learn new games, activities and tips to work with the preschool age child. To embrace these fantastic, educational opportunities, USA Gymnastics University is NOW offering Member Club pricing for R102. This allows Member Clubs to send ALL of their staff at discounted pricing. The best investment a club owner can make is in the education and training of their staff.

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R102 is offered at all regional and national congresses as well as offered at various locations throughout the U.S. Log on to view the most up to date live course schedule at www.usagymnasticsuniversity.org. Let’s get to know some of National Instructors who teach the R102 Preschool Fundamentals courses as they share additional gymnastics tips. USA Gymnastics likes this!


Preschool FUNdamentals Jeff Lulla Jeff Lulla

Beth Gardner

National Instructor for R102 Preschool Fundamentals: Hands-on Training (HOTPS) and R103 School Age: Hands-on Training (HOTSA) U101 Safety & Risk Management

National Instructor for R102 Preschool Fundamentals: Hands-on Training (HOTPS) and R103 School Age: Hands-on Training (HOTSA)

www.usagymnasticsuniversity.org

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Never limit your imagination. Allow children to express their own imagination as well. Make sure to keep lesson plans fresh and new, adding new props, themes or games. Look outside of the gym, and think outside of the box. Challenge yourself to find new things to add to class. Our most recent purchase, for example, was a group of small stuffed animals shaped like Angry Birds characters. We let the kids build mat structures, put the pigs into the structures and toss the birds at them to knock the pigs out of the structures. It’s a spatial awareness drill the kids love because it’s different and it includes pop culture to which they can relate. It accomplishes the same spatial awareness as other tossing games and challenges them to use their spatial awareness in constructing various structures. USA Gymnastics likes this!

____________________________________ USA Gymnastics So creative! Great tips, Beth. ____________________________________

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After years of teaching I have learned one thing – that you cannot CONTROL children (or anyone for that matter). The only person any of us has control over is ourselves. However, you can LEAD, ENCOURAGE and ENTICE a child to make desirable choices. Let me give you an example; a class of six 5 year olds is asked to stand on a line while the teacher adjusts the bar. A moment later the teacher notices four of the kids standing on the line and two kids playing in the chalk bucket. The most common “reaction” to this situation – the teacher addresses the two kids in the chalk about their inappropriate behavior. Of course, when this happens, those kids who chose the wrong behavior get the ATTENTION that is often what they are seeking. This frequently leads them to misbehave again since any attention is better than none. A more effective response would have been for the teacher to “act” (instead of react) by NOTICING AND ACKNOWLEDGING THE FOUR KIDS WHO LINED UP! For instance, “Lisa, Mark, Sue and Jim – I love how you lined up. Thank you for being good listeners. Give me a ‘High Five’! I have a good listener stamp for you.” Now what do you think those two kids in the chalk will do when they see the attention good listeners get? In most cases Continued on pg. 8

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www.usagymnasticsuniversity.org

Preschool FUNdamentals

they will leave the chalk bucket and line up too. And when they do, how should the teacher respond? “Thank you for listening Bill and Bob. I love it when you chose to listen. Give me five!”

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When bad behavior gets ignored it often disappears. Of course you can’t ignore dangerous behavior. Instructors should be trained not only to teach skills, but more importantly, how to help children choose behaviors that they can be proud of so they can see themselves as successful, capable and worthy of praise. That’s how we help build their self-esteem. USA Gymnastics likes this!

____________________________________ USA Gymnastics This works! ____________________________________

Sandi McGee

National Instructor for R102 Preschool Fundamentals: Hands-on Training (HOTPS) and R103 School Age: Hands-on Training (HOTSA) Wall

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Always be prepared to offset a child’s lack of confidence by being on guard with our dialog, so as to discourage failure in their minds before they have the opportunity 8

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to think it. Commonly around the ages of 4 to 5 some children will begin to see “Fun in the Gym” as “Challenges in the Gym,” challenges that under the growth of “preschool reasoning,” seem unattainable more or less because of the lack of selfconfidence. We should never give them the opportunity to make a choice to fail, we should always and only give them the opportunity to try. Make sure your curriculum is mapped out in “true progression” and that it promotes a “positive self concept.” Each progression should be mastered, which naturally dictates progression to the next level. Children need to be successful most of the time, not only in order to feel and be confident, but to just plain want to continue. In the Movement Education & Lesson Plan Development Workbook developed by USA Gymnastics, it talks of the “80% Rule.” Young children need to be successful 80% of the time to maintain a sense of competence and challenge (Graham, 1992). If they are successful less then 80% of the time, they get frustrated or anxious, If they are successful more than 80% of the time, they get board. Examples: Instead of asking a child to do something and predetermining what his/her success should be such as “Jump and touch the hoop,” we should instead say “Show me how high you can jump!” If they didn’t reach the hoop it’s okay because, we just simply ask them to jump!
Another example would be working with progressions. Setting up a variety of cartwheel stations and allowing the student to work at his or her own pace, only to advance to a more challenging station once they feel confident and ready. Our dialog should be nurturing, positive, and always focused on elaborating, keeping the student informed of what is going on with empowering dialog. USA Gymnastics likes this!

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National Instructor for R102 Preschool Fundamentals: Hands-on Training (HOTPS)

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–Having the kids repeat what you say

Cindy Furman

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–Voice inflection from the instructor to encourage fast or slow rhythm +

Every instructor should reach out and take advantage of the many new educational programs offered through USA Gymnastics and stay current on what are the most effective ways to teach kids of all ages to be their personal best. My challenge for instructors is to become informed and sensitive coaches that form a collective effort to set the direction for our youth. Keeping in mind that all kids are unique, we must learn what learning style is most productive in building long lasting self-esteem.

Visual learners benefit from seeing information or an illustration and may grow impatient listening for long periods of time. Strategies for visual learners include: –Use of color to show where a hand or a foot needs to be placed in a skill –Using a mat or a prop to demonstrate skills or how the body should move in

relationship to the fixed objects (cartwheel over a mat, etc.) –Showing the kids a video or photo of the skill they are attempting

–Having the kids watch the instructor demonstrate Like • Comment • Share

There are many different learning styles. Some children use different styles, but there is normally one style of learning that is dominant. Examples of learning styles and different teaching tips for them are: Auditory learners are typically good at absorbing the information from spoken words or sounds. Strategies that work well include: –Talking to the kids about what they are doing –Set information to a tune or a rhythm to help the kids remember (singing can demonstrate when/where a foot or hand is placed during a skill)

TECHNIQUE • MARCH 2012

USA Gymnastics likes this!

Annette Thomas

National Instructor for R102 Preschool Fundamentals: Hands-on Training (HOTPS) and R103 School Age:Hands on Training (HOTSA) Wall

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Try out some old warm-up music favorites on the balance beam to help your preschoolers with their balance. Try doing … Head and Shoulders, Knees and Toes, ...

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Preschool FUNdamentals Hokey Pokey, or Simon Says.

Later into the session and aware of gym safety, the children take turns being the bus driver.

It makes beam time totally different! USA Gymnastics likes this!

Children have fun and always stay in line.

____________________________________ USA Gymnastics Always looking for beam ideas! ____________________________________

USA Gymnastics likes this!

Brant Lutska

National Instructor for R102 Preschool Fundamentals: Hands-on Training (HOTPS)

Cindy Morano

National Instructor for R102 Preschool Fundamentals: Hands-on Training (HOTPS)

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It’s always a safety concern moving students from one event to another while other classes are in progress in the gym. Here is what I do: I have the preschoolers take a bus ride to each new event. During this ride, I incorporate daily life lessons such as: “counting,” “right side,” “left side,” “stop sign,” “fast,” “slow,” “buckle your seat belt,” “stoplight: red means stop, yellow means caution, green means go.” In the beginning of the session, the teacher is the bus driver and the children ride the bus. The children must pay their fare (high five’s) to ride the bus. They count as they give their fare (high five’s) to the bus driver. Once everyone is on the bus (in line), they buckle up their pretend seat belts. Prior to leaving to the next event, everyone looks and points to the “right” then “left” to see if it is safe to proceed. They look and become aware of gymnasts in other classes. When moving, the teacher utilizes a “stop sign” and/or “red light” when they need to cross an area that gymnasts from the other class are using. “Green light” means it is safe to cross and proceed.

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What does your body language say as a teacher? Many of us teach classes behind a glass wall where parents are watching. Make sure your body language is showing positive movement. Parents cannot always hear what we are saying, so your body is telling what is happening on the floor. It is said that when talking to a person the information that we receive can be broken down as: 10% from what the person actually says 40% from the person’s tone and speed of voice 50% from the person’s body language. It’s a great idea to video tape your teaching and view how you are perceived. USA Gymnastics likes this!

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Preschool FUNdamentals

Linda Thorberg

National Instructor for R102 Preschool Fundamentals: Hands-on Training (HOTPS)

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“Life Skills” of jumping, landing on two feet, rolling, and safety falling are one of the most important actions we can teach in gymnastics class. We need to incorporate landing skills and safety falls in every class.

To learn more about the Preschool Child, as well as gain additional teaching tips and ideas, register for R101 Preschool FUNdamentals Theory Online or a live course: R102 Preschool FUNdamentals: Hands-on Training (HOTPS).

www.usagymnasticsuniversity.org

Make Safety Rolling/Falling an automatic reaction by repeating this many times. We know that the natural reaction when falling backwards is to reach behind with the arms. This can result in injury to an arm, shoulder, or head. Children need to practice “Safety Rolling” by holding arms overhead or in front of their bodies when falling. Good instructors will find ways to make this a game to practice every class. Safety falls can be practiced forwards, sideways and backwards to reinforce rolling when falling. These will keep children safe at the playground, at home riding their bikes as well as at gymnastics! USA Gymnastics likes this!

LIVE COURSE SCHEDULE U101 – SAFETY CERTIFICATION (LIVE) March 4 El Paso, TX June 7 St. Louis, MO June 28 San Jose, CA July 13 Centerville, OH Aug. 9 Nashville, TN Aug. 9 Providence, RI Aug. 16 Baltimore, MD

SCHEDULE

NEW – W200 – DEVELOPMENT COACHES COURSE: HANDS ON TRAINING (HOTD) March 17 Everett, WA Purchase a Pac Rim Ticket and you can attend this course for free!

April 22

Longwood, FL

Purchase a World Acro Championships Ticket and you can attend this course for free!

June 3 June 28

Camarillo, CA San Jose, CA

T200/T201 – TRAMPOLINE & TUMBLING DEVELOPMENT COACHES COURSE: LEVEL 1 AND HANDS ON TRAINING March 16 Everett, WA Purchase a Pac Rim Ticket and you can attend this course for free!

April 27 June 28

Fort Worth, TX San Jose, CA

R102 – PRESCHOOL FUNDAMENTALS: HANDS ON TRAINING (HOTPS) March 16 Tampa, FL March 24 San Jose, CA April 15 Manteca, CA

June 10 June 28 Aug. 9 Aug. 12 Aug. 19 Aug. 26 Sept. 16

St. Louis, MO San Jose, CA Nashville, TN Providence, RI Baltimore, MD Everett, WA Indianapolis, IN

NEW – R103 – SCHOOL AGE/RECREATIONAL: HANDS ON TRAINING (HOTSA) March 17 Tampa, FL W300 – JUNIOR OLYMPIC TEAM COACHES COURSE Aug. 22-25 Huntsville, TX

To register for a course, visit the USA Gymnastics website at www.usagymnasticsuniversity.org. | Register online or download the registration form. | **Save $5 by registering online!**

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By Karen Goeller, CSCS

T

he Clear Hip Handstand on uneven bars is not an easy skill for many gymnasts. It requires technique, timing, speed, and strength. To perform the clear hip to handstand correctly the gymnast must do the following: 1. Form the correct shape in the cast. 2. Keep that shape on the drop and throughout the entire of the skill. 3. Open her shoulders at the correct time, with speed and precision. 4. See the bar, but keep her head neutral. There are so many drills for the clear hip handstand, but I will discuss my favorite ones. First, how do you train your gymnast to hold the shape? Instruct your gymnast to get in a front support position on the bar. Instruct her to push down on the bar and slide her thighs to the bar just enough to round out her upper back while keeping her buttocks muscles tight. It is imperative that you tell your gymnast to squeeze her buttocks throughout the clear hip to handstand. Once comfortable in the correct shape, rounded upper back and squeezed buttocks, teach the shape to your gymnast upside down. Be sure to remind her that she MUST hold the bar securely so that she

does not fall to the floor. Once in the correct shape on top of the bar instruct your gymnast to drop back until her feet face the ceiling. Her thighs should still be in contact with the bar on the drop. Please spot your gymnast for this 14

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simple DROP BACK drill. Make sure she holds the correct shape. The drill is really 1/2 of a back hip circle. Your gymnast will be upside down. Once upside down instruct your gymnast to hold that shape and position for 10–20 seconds. Spot her for this drill to be sure she does not release the bar and fall. As soon as your gymnast loses the correct shape, rounded back with squeezed buttocks, allow her to slowly bring her feet down to the floor and then release the bar. Remind your gymnast to look at the bar the entire time but to keep her head neutral. The two most important safety factors in the clear hip to handstand are to hold onto the bar and to keep the head neutral. Explain to your gymnast that if she drops her head back it will change the shape of her spine. Dropping the head back on this skill may cause your gymnast to lose her grip and fall. Although you want your gymnast to hold the bar securely, you also want her to be able to shift her hands as she circles. You can ask your gymnast to perform a cast and two consecutive back hip circles as a wrist flick and shape drill. Now let’s discuss the drop. The better the drop, the easier it will be to reach the handstand. A simple drill for the drop is the Cast-Drop-Fall to a resi or soft mat stack. Instruct your gymnast to start in a front support. Ask her to perform a cast. As soon as her hips are off the bar she must release the bar, reach up and back, and land on the mat on her back. Some gymnasts will need a spot the first time. You can hold your gymnast’s legs as she casts and guide her down to the mat to land on her back with her arms up. This drill should help your gymnast become comfortable with dropping her shoulders back quickly and remaining in the correct shape. The next drill also teaches the gymnast to open her shoulders as she drops back rather than waiting until she is completely upside down. While teaching the clear hip handstand, tell your gymnast that it is important to open her shoulders as soon as she drops her shoulders back. For the Cast-UnderswingDrop instruct your gymnast to perform an underswing and to hold the bar until her toes are facing the ceiling and she


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feels the upward motion. Once your gymnast feels the upward motion she must release the bar and fall to her back on a resi or soft mat stack. When she releases, she must also perform a throwing motion. This drill will help with the drop, shape, and shoulder action for the clear hip handstand. Your gymnast will quickly realize that she must remain tight and drop back quickly in order to travel towards the ceiling for a handstand. You should spot your gymnast until she is comfortable performing this drill on her own. Here are two strength, visualization, and speed exercises for the clear hip handstand. Your gymnast will need a toning bar and dumbbells. In the beginning, she must perform the exercises slowly. Eventually, she can increase the speed a bit to more closely simulate the clear hip handstand on uneven bars. Start with light weight, 3-pound dumbbells or a 6-pound toning bar, for both exercises. The Standing Cast / Front Raise Drill is very effective with strength, speed, visualization, and technique. It is a useful station between turns on the uneven bars. Tell your gymnast to hold one dumbbell (weight) in each hand. Instruct her to squeeze her buttocks and start with the dumbbells touching her thighs. Your gymnast’s palms must face her thighs. Instruct her to raise her arms forward and upward simulating a cast to handstand on uneven bars. Once her hands are facing the ceiling and her shoulders are elevated at the top, she may slowly lower the dumbbells to her thighs. With both exercises make sure your gymnast keeps her hands shoulder-width apart throughout the exercise. Some gymnasts tend to go too wide with their hands. Instruct your gymnast to keep her arms straight, but if she feels any tension in her elbows, she must perform the drill with slightly bent arms. The Supine Kip-Cast Drill is very effective with strength, speed, visualization, and technique. It is a useful station between turns on the uneven bars. Tell your gymnast to lie on her back on the floor and hold one dumbbell (weight) each hand. Instruct her to start with the dumbbells touching her thighs. Your gymnast’s palms must face her thighs. Instruct your gymnast to raise her arms towards the ceiling to simulate 16

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a cast to handstand on bars. She must go through the full range of motion until her hands touch the floor above their head. Once her hands touch the floor, she must elevate her shoulders. That portion of the exercise will help with the cast handstand and clear hip handstand. Next, instruct your gymnast to lift her hands off the floor and bring her arms towards the ceiling, then down to her thighs. Once the dumbbells touch her thighs, instruct your gymnast to lift her head and shoulders off the floor to form a hollow shape. Her feet must remain on the floor. That part of the exercise will help with the glide kip. When your gymnast performs several repetitions consecutively, she will be performing a similar movement as a glide kip to cast handstand on uneven bars. You can teach the exercises with dumbbells or with a toning bar, but I prefer dumbbells. With dumbbells, each side of the body will become strong and efficient with the movement. When a toning bar is used, some gymnasts compensate and do more work with their stronger side. That does not allow the weaker side to improve very much. I hope these drills will help your gymnast become comfortable with the clear hip handstand on uneven bars. You will see that your gymnast’s cast handstand will

improve as a result of the two dumbbell exercises. Best of luck with this skill and always keep safety in mind while training.

Karen Goeller, CSCS Gymnastics and Fitness Author NSCA-Certified Strength and Conditioning Coach www.KarenGoeller.com www.GymnasticsDrills.com


http://usagym.sportgraphics.biz/ JeniGym 10 is an interactive CD for judges, coaches and anyone interested in the details of Level 10 women’s gymnastics. The CD was originally created as a study aide for the Level 10 test; however, has been very useful to coaches and others in understanding the details, including value parts, start values, deductions, composition and bonus. The CD was created for PC users and includes sort functions in Excel. MAC users can use the CD; however, the sort function will not work on this platform. A free version of Open Office (which includes Excel) is included as part of the CD. Cost $35.00 Item # 2115 JeniGym 9 is an interactive CD for judges, coaches and anyone interested in the details of Level 9 women’s gymnastics. The CD was originally created as a study aide for the Level 9 test; however, has been very useful to coaches and others in understanding the details, including value parts, start values, deductions, composition and bonus. The CD was created for PC users and includes sort functions in Excel. MAC users can use the CD; however, the sort function will not work on this platform. A free version of Open Office (which includes Excel) is included as part of the CD. Cost $30.00  Item # 2116 JeniGym 7/8 is an interactive CD for judges, coaches and anyone interested in the details of Levels 7 & 8 women’s gymnastics. The CD was originally created as a study aide for the Level 7/8 test; however, has been very useful to coaches and others in understanding the details, including the rules, value parts, start values and deductions. The CD was created for PC users and includes sort functions in Excel. MAC users can use the CD; however, the sort function will not work on this platform. A free version of Open Office (which includes Excel) is included as part of the CD. Cost $25.00 Item # 2117

To order go to http://usagym.sportgraphics. biz/

or call 800-345-4719 and select option 1.

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Industry members who support your industry. The United States Gymnastics Supplier Association proudly supports Industry Education.

WORKING TOGETHER

To Make a Difference By Carrie Lennox, Jefferson County Parks & Rec. and Diana Hughes, PhD.

ow can private gym clubs work together with local schools, rec programs, YMCA’s, and other groups in order to coordinate efforts to provide fun and safe physical activity to kids of all ages and abilities – basically to support the activity of gymnastics which hopefully leads children into the sport of gymnastics?

H

Outreach programs, like the one described in this article, can go a long way to increase enrollment for gymnastics clubs that make the effort, so it can Set up in the be a win-win situation for all involved.In communities large and small, there are often several options for families to provide physical enrichment to their youth. These programs are commonly offered by private or public entities, including Parks and Recreation programs, YMCAs, school districts, churches, private gym programs, and others. These programs share the

common goal of getting and keeping kids active, but many differ in how they do it. A recent cooperative effort among several organizations resulted in a two-day event at Blue Heron Middle School in Port Townsend, Wash. Activities were planned by one main coordinator and were gymnasium geared toward providing students, of all different skill levels, an opportunity to succeed. Recreation and YMCA staff, along with physical education teachers, were assigned stations with simple activities and a list of a various challenges. There were several run-and-jump stations using a combination of bouncy equipment and mats. Jr. Bars were set up with rings attached, to create several Continued on pg. 18

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Ron & Joan Ganim

MARCH 2012 • TECHNIQUE

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Industry members who support your industry. The United States Gymnastics Supplier Association proudly supports Industry Education.

WORKING TOGETHER

To Make a Difference pull-up stations and beams and slacklines were set up for several balance stations. Even the instructors with little or no experience, working with groups on this type of equipment, commented on the ease of helping kids to learn and grow. The physical education teachers were ecstatic as they noticed students, who are typically inactive in class, participate with excitement.

ions

Stat p U l

Pul

Feedback from students in the following days included: • “That was the best PE class we’ve ever had!” • “I did pull ups for the first time ever!” • “When can we do that again??” These comments came from fourth through eighth grade students who are in a crucial time of developing identity and positive self-esteem. Run-and-Jump Stations The two-day event was considered a great success for all – students, teachers and program coordinators. It provided a terrific model for developing more events like it in the future. So, think about reaching out to your local Recreation Center, Community Center, YMCA or school to see if you can organize an event like this one in your community. The kids will benefit, and your enrollment can benefit, too. After having experienced an event like this, many children will look to their local gymnastics club for similar activities and just may sign up for a birthday party or even a class or two.

Since it was s was a two tored -day e overni ght in vent, equip me a corn er in t nt he gym .

Industry members who support your industry. The United States Gymnastics Supplier Association proudly supports Industry Education. 20

TECHNIQUE • MARCH 2012


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“I’ve had the worst luck at this meet in the last few years,’’ Orozco said. “I’ve either been hurt or sick during this competition. So, this year, I just tried to get over all that and change my luck. I’m glad I got to start off the new year like this.” A native of the Bronx, N.Y., Orozco trains at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs with his coach Vitaly Marinitch. He led after the first day of competition and never looked back. In addition to the all-around title, he won the title on parallel bars, tied for first on the horizontal bar, finished second on pommel horse and fourth on floor. Orozco finished fifth in the all-around at the 2011 World Championships and helped his team to a bronze medal finish. He also qualified to high bar finals where he finished eighth. Orozco was third in the all-

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His goal this year is to make the Olympic Team and help the USA win a team medal. Orozco’s parents are William and Damaris. He said, “My parents are my backbone. They are there for me through the good times and the bad times, helping me follow my dream.”

Photo by John Cheng

Nineteen-year-old John Orozco changed his luck this year at the 2012 Winter Cup Challenge in Las Vegas, winning the allaround title with a score of 180.700.

around at the 2011 Visa Championships and won the junior title in 2009.


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HEALTH KNOWLEDGE

FOR OPTIMAL PERFORMANCE By Jeffrey Richter, CSCS, USAW

T

he rigors of gymnastics places neuromuscular stress on the body that must be accounted for through proper recovery techniques. Gymnasts are well aware of the benefits of a thorough flexibility and stretching program. While this form of neuromuscular recovery focuses on the length of our muscle tissue, it cannot account for tissue quality. To address tissue quality, one simple yet profound strategy for the gymnast is to start incorporating a foam rolling sequence into the warm-up and cool down. The truth is, repetitive sportspecific movements done in gymnastics causes eccentric and concentric muscle stress. These hyper-

contracted muscle fibers result in trigger points that must be alleviated. To compound the problem, our society reinforces poor posture positions in the rhythms and flow of life that, if left uncorrected, can leave our muscle tissue “locked long” with eccentric stress and “locked short” with concentric stress. Take for example sitting in a desk at school writing a paper. While in this position, our hip flexors are particularly vulnerable because they are in a constant state of “shortening.” This chronic shortening of the muscle tissue may cause an anterior pelvic tilt which then places extra tension

IT band

Latissimus Dors

i

pine

S Thoracic

on the hamstrings. In addition, our muscles surrounding the scapula are in a constant state of “lengthening” due to leaning forward and having a rounded shoulder position. This causes the tissue to be “locked long,” in desperate need of tension relief. Therapeutic massage is one modality that can be used to release these trigger continued on pg. 26

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...continued

points. However, setting up appointments for this form of treatment is often anything but quick and easy. In addition, prices for this treatment are expensive and thus are often times non-ecumenical. A more practical solution to the problem is foam rolling. Foam rolling, also known as self-myofascial release, is particularly effective at releasing trigger points due to the principle known as autogenic inhibition. As we roll our myofascia across the foam roller, we place tension across the muscle that our Golgi Tendon Organ responds to and sends a proceeding relaxation signal. Functional movement patterns are essential to sports performance, and often times we are prone to movement restrictions when we don’t address these trigger points in the muscle. If we release this muscle tissue that is preventing us from moving properly, we are more apt to be able to place ourselves in the positions needed for success. In gymnastics, the demand for mobility is paramount for success so we need to make sure we are doing

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Hip Flexo

rs

Quadraceps

Calves


ngs

Hamstri everything we can to ensure that our movement patterns are optimal. I would encourage you to check out the video that we put together and sent to USA Gymnastics about a lower-body foam rolling sequence that targets the IT Bands, hamstrings, quadriceps and glutes. This “howto” guide will steer you in the right direction so you can begin implementing this in your routine immediately! In addition, the pictures we have provided will help you get in the right position to target a certain group of fascia.

Piriformis

Gluteus Maximus

St. Vincent Hospital and St. Vincent Sports Performance in Indianapolis, Ind., are official service providers to USA Gymnastics Call 317-415-5747 or visit sportsperformance.stvincent.org

Check out the Foam Rolling video at http://usagym.org/pages/home/fitness/healthknowledge.html or use your smart phone to scan the code on the right.

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USA Gymnastics recently received the following question. We asked the USA Gymnastics Business Advisors to comment on how to handle this question and we selected a few of their responses to publish in Technique – all of their responses will be posted online on the Member Club website, under forums. Response from David Holcomb of Buckeye Gymnastics

In basic terms, I do not think USA Gymnastics can do much of anything. We own businesses that are governed by the laws of the states, counties and cities in which we operate. As a general operating principles, we enter into contractual agreements with our customers that are governed by these laws. USA Gymnastics does not have any authority to intervene in that contractual relationship in any way unless it impacts or interferes with our contractual agreement with USA Gymnastics. This can happen when we become a Member Club (agree to have liability insurance, not hire those on the banned list, etc.) or when we host or enter gymnasts in USA Gymnastics sanctioned events (all coaches and gymnasts must be currently registered with USA Gymnastics). We live and operate in the USA and our gym families are free to contract with us for gymnastics services and are also free to leave us and contract with someone else to provide those services. USA Gymnastics plays no part in this relationship in a legal sense. Nor can USA Gymnastics be the arbiter of contractual disputes between our gyms and those who contract with us. USA Gymnastics cannot be put into the position of being the “finder of fact” (that role is left to judges and juries) and they certainly cannot determine winners and losers. (What a nightmare!)

gymnastics businesses. We do this knowing that we take a calculated risk in doing so. As it happens, Buckeye Gymnastics is on good terms with most of the gyms in our area and in the rare event that a student or athlete leaves us as a family “not in good standing” and joins another club, we get on the phone with one another and get things sorted out. This arrangement works both ways. But, we are not on good terms with every gym.

Response from Jeff Metzger of Kids First Short answer...no way, José. USA Gymnastics should do nothing more than to educate why it is not their business to police private enterprise.

Response from Patti Komara of Tumblebear Gym Program

I strongly urge USA Gymnastics to stay out of these disputes. The affected gym owners have recourse through the legal system within their respective states.

I agree–nothing should be official from USA Gymnastics. However, aren’t most gyms going to the policy where you pay up-front with your auto-pay credit card system? Therefore, there should be no outstanding bills. Now, we all know we get bad credit card numbers, expired cards, etc. But when there is an unpaid bill, that child is not allowed into class as soon as we get the notice. Our bad debts add up to almost zero at the end of the year. Make them pay up front like a university–no upfront payment, no class.

The best course of action might be to take no action at all. We all extend credit to those in difficult situations within our

Do you have a question you’d like to ask our Business Advisors? If so, email your question to clubservices@usagym.org.

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MEMBER SERVICES UPDATE

MEMBER SERVICES UPDATES AND REMINDERS: • Effective April 2012 domestic sanctioning prices change to one fee of $90 regardless of the amount of participants. • Any meet director that wishes to sanction a meet must be affiliated with either a Registered Business or a Member Club. • All Instructor members are now required to complete a criminal background check upon becoming a member or renewing. • USA Gymnastics University certifications will not be provided to anyone who has not successfully completed the USA Gymnastics background check screening.

• The price of Instructor membership has decreased to $30. • Professional, Introductory Coach or Jr. Professional members in a pending status due to missing background check or safety/risk management requirements are NOT ELIGIBLE to be on the floor of USA Gymnastics sanctioned events. Allowing pending members on the floor of sanction events is a sanctioned violation. Sanction violation can results in fines, and/or loss of sanction privileges. • Current members have the ability to print their membership cards and certificates from the USA Gymnastics website. Simply log on to the website and click on Member Services, and the My Membership link to access these features.


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E H T ST R O BE ER! F V USST &S E IN E ES O J IGG GR B ON C

See Schedule on pages 36–39

REGISTER NOW FOR THE 2012

NATIONAL CONGRESS & TRADE SHOW! 48TH ANNUAL USA GYMNASTICS NATIONAL CONGRESS & TRADE SHOW Held in conjunction with 2012 U.S. Olympic Trials–Gymnastics June 29 – July 1, 2012 San Jose Convention Center–San Jose, California

EXPECT

on addy Certificati it rs e iv n U s mnastic y, June 28 • USA Gy on Thursda ld e h e b l il w REGISTER Friday, on courses NOW AND l take place il w s re tu c SAVE! ss le 1 • ly Ju R e y, g • Congre a ister online Sund h g u ro a th t: 9 f June 2 usagymnast ll tracks o icsnationalc ature 15 fu ot n fe l l il il w w y d n a a d ongress.org s • Membe ipline c • Each is d 6 ll a n o r m ti C o ti fr lu e p b n o m ti ti o ered pricing educa Trials c is available SAVE BIG! the Olympic h it s w . t re ic tu fl c n Le co g in tt o p S s-On d n a • H 2 1 d N 0 te 2 a a tional Cong June 29, • Design ress attende held Friday, m o es receive th p ru ti o on to purch F ss n e -o n d si d u a e B n a a se 2012 U.S • n as o o n G 2 e y 1 th . Olympic Tr m – y n m a b st d ic re s ti so from 8a c n kets at a dis ials– w hall spo counted rate • Visit Na ssociation l Trade Sho A a n ! rs o e ti li a ti p N o p n u a S • l Travel Syst s ems at s Gymnastic ntssportstra United State v e e n l.com for tra li n o le b a il a vel accomm rs’ list av odations • Presente For comple te details on the 2012 N Trade Show ational Con visit usagym gress & nasticsnatio nalcongress .org.

WHAT TO

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Preliminary List of Topics and Presenters June 29 – July 1, 2012

List as of February 14, 2012 – All information subject to change – Dates and Times Coming Soon! Women’s Program Judging/Technical

So She Has A Double Back Flyaway….What’s Next?

Topic(s)–each provided in 1-hour session Bloopers Mistake Management for Judges

Catherine Batsche

Taxes and the Judge/Meet Director

Marian Dykes

Compulsory Vault Optional Vault–Do You See What I See?

Tom Forster

Elite Developmental Tumbling: TOPS to Pre-Elite

Ivan Ivanov

Jr. Elite Level Tumbling

Ivan Ivanov

Linda Thorberg & Marian Dykes

Developing Yurchenko Vaults

Connie Maloney & Neil Resnick

Overview of the Elite Competitive Track – How to Structure

Neil Resnick

Floor: 7/8 Practice Judging

Linda Mulvihill & Char Christensen

Raising the Intensity from Conditioning to Training

Floor: 9/10 Practice Judging

Linda Mulvihill & Char Christensen

Bonus Combinations on Bars

Tricky Tricks on Bars

Catherine Batsche

Tom Forster

The Tkachev: The Most Important Move On Bars?

Steve Rybacki Mary Lee Tracy Marvin Sharp

Front Tumbling

Al Fong

Bars: 7/8 Practice Judging

Connie Maloney & Cheryl Hamilton

Basic Development for Elite Training on Beam

Bars: 9/10 Practice Judging

Tammy Biggs

Connie Maloney & Cheryl Hamilton

Twisting Yurchenko Vaults

Neil Resnick

Beam: 7/8 Practice Judging

Carole Bunge & Myra Elfenbein

Tumbling Basics on Beam

Tammy Biggs

Beam: 9/10 Practice Judging

Carole Bunge & Myra Elfenbein

Beam Dance

Men’s Program

Neela Nelson

NAWGJ General Meeting

Topic(s) – each provided in 1-hour session

Evenlyn Chandler

NCAA Update New Judges Tools and Information

Kathy Feldmann

Developing a Winning Mindset

Kathy Feldmann

Identifying, Developing and Training Judges

Robert Andrews Mark Sherman

Performance Assessment

See active lecture schedule for additional lecture offerings

Ron Brant

2013–2016 FIG Code of Points

Women’s Program Junior Olympics – Levels 1– 8 and Xcel Topic(s) –each provided in 1-hour session Transition Releases: Straddle Back, Bails, Chinese Sit Ups, Paks

John Geddert

Moving your Gymnast Through the Levels

Mark Folger

Tumbling Progressions for Twisting

Brad Harris

Gym Layout and Team Scheduling: How to Maximize your Gym Space

Bryon Hough

Preparing for the 2013 Compulsory Floor Elements Junior Olympic Update

Linda Johnson Connie Maloney & Tom Koll

Acro & Dance Connections –Why Didn’t the Judges Give It and How to Fix

Laurie Reid

Bar Releases from High Bar to Low Bar

Dan Witenstein

How To Be a Better Meet Director

Diane Callison

Basics for Beam

Kathyrn Geddert

Yurchenkos – When and How to Start! Teach Salto Vaults Using the Pit

John Geddert Mark Folger

Compulsory Vault Level 4–6

Brad Harris

Conditioning and Flexibility–How Much Time to Spend at the Developmental Levels Technique – Why Does My Gymnast Keep Wobbling on Turns? The Switch Leg Leap: It's Application to "C" Level Leaps Teach Front and Back Giants from the Ground Up Basics for Floor

Bryon Hough Linda Johnson Tom Koll Dan Witenstein Kathryn Geddert

Preparing for 2013 Balance Beam

Cheryl Jarrett

Steve Butcher

Pommel Horse: Progressions for Multiple Turning Skills

Dave Juszczyk

Peach Basket Development with Emphasis on the Drop

Vitaly Marinitch

Technical Sequence Update

Kevin Mazeika

Vault Front Handspring: Converting Power to Vertical Direction & Rotation Horizontal Bar: The Jam and Takamoto

Tom Meadows Hideo Mizoguchi

Basic Sports Medicine Concepts for Coaches

Don Rackey

Path to Successful Boy’s Gymnastics Team Program

Dusty Ritter

Pommel Horse Basic Curriculum for Boys

Jeff Robinson

Floor Exercise: Mastery of Forward and Backward Tumbling for Elite Success

Yoichi Tomita

Floor Exercise: Twisting Development

Joy Umenhofer

Sports Psychology: Returning from Injury Building Teams Through Sound Leadership

Robert Andrews Dennis McIntyre, Kevin Mazeika & Ron Brant

Team Workout Management – Keep Workouts Interesting

speaker TBD

Parallel Bars: Giant Swing Variations

speaker TBD

Strength Development for Juniors

speaker TBD

Taps and Trampoline Drills for Tkatchev & Kovacs The "Rings Turnover Swing" for Giants, Honma, Yamawaki Jr. Olympic Program Update Still Rings Basic Curriculum for Boys Pommel Horse: Breaking Down the Technical Sequence for 10.0 Performance

Geoff Corrigan Hideo Mizoguchi Dusty Ritter Jeff Robinson Dave Juszczyk

Strength/Conditioning from Dance to Gymnastics

Linda Fenton

Seasonal Planning for Beam

Beth Rybacki

Parallel Bars Basic Curriculum for Boys

Jeff Robinson

Warm Ups & Conditioning for the Optional Athlete

Beth Rybacki

Creating a Motivating Boy’s Team

Jeff Robinson

Pommel Horse: Learning the Swing to Handstand and Scissors to Handstand

Women’s Program Elite, Level 9/10 and TOPs/Hopes Topic(s) –each provided in 1-hour session TOPS New State & National Compulsory Testing Elements/Routines How Basic Bar Shapes Turn Into Bigger Skills

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Dave Juszczyk

Horizontal Bar – Mastering the "Hang and the Handstand" for Kevin Mazeika Perfect Giants & Dismounts Tammy Biggs Tom Forster

See active lecture schedule for additional lecture offerings


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Designing Successful Parent/Tot Classes

...Continued

Dr. Pamela Evans

Parent & Child Class – Set It Up

Linda Thorberg

Preschool Vault

Brant Lutska See active lecture schedule for additional lecture offerings

Trampoline and Tumbling Program

School Age

Topic(s) –each provided in 1-hour session What it Takes to Grow a Great Athlete

Judy Cline

Progressions for Trampoline to Build Skills

Susan Jacobson

How to Add a Trampoline & Tumbling Program to your Gym

Susan Jacobson

100 Things to do Before Going Upside Down

George Hery

Trampoline for Competitive Gymnasts

Judy Cline

Changes to the JO Guide for Trampoline & Tumbling

Susan Jacobson

How to Start a Trampoline & Tumbling Team

Susan Jacobson

Understanding the Mystery of Twisting

George Hery

Tumbling Basics/Spotting/Drills

Joy Umenhofer

Motivating Athletes in Daily Training

Joy Umenhofer

Trampoline 1 Coaching Basics/Spotting/Drills

Joy Umenhofer

Trampoline 2 Coaching Multiple Somersaults and Multiple Somersaults with Twist

Joy Umenhofer

Topic(s) – each provided in 1-hour session Skill Deconstruction – Critical Components

April Sawyer

Handstand/Cartwheel

Sandi McGee

Brain and Body Working Together

Beth Gardner

Are You Using Your Tumble Track and Trampolines to Their Fullest Potential

Annette Thomas

Lesson Planning

Quin Shannon

Smart Spotting

Steve Greeley

Expect the Unexpected…Behavior Management

Randy Parrish

Skills & Drills Using Shapes/Skill-Builders

Rhonda Zaluckyj & Patti Komara

Awards, Rewards, & High 5’s

Steve Greeley

Professionalism: Beyond the Staff Shirt

Sandi McGee

Recreational Bars

Robin Pearson

13 Unbreakable Laws of Teaching

Steve Greeley

Business

Beam Stations, Drills and Games

Sandi McGee

Topic(s) –each provided in 1-hour session

Fun and Creative Tumbling Basics

Randy Parrish

Leadership Development and Style: Why Most Don’t Work and What to Do About It

Jeff Metzger

Go for the Green and Decrease Operation Costs

Lynn Ledford

Image Management – Creating and Exceeding your Clients’ Expectations

Jeff Lulla

Women of Mass Discussion

Patti Komara

Protecting your Business

Tom Forster

Sports Science Topic(s) –each provided in 1hr session Lower Back Injury Prevention in the Gym

Brandi Smith Young

Sports Nutrition for Compulsories: Building a Foundation for Competitive Gymnastics

Bindee Eberlee

The Competitive Mindset: How to Hit When it’s Time

Dr. Alison Arnold (presented by Janae Whitaker)

Steve Greeley

She Won’t Go Backwards!: Coaching Through Fear in Gymnastics

Dr. Alison Arnold (presented by Janae Whitaker)

Simplify your Hiring and Training Process with a Step-by-Step System

Diane Barron

Business System and Strategies

Frank Sahlein

Sports Nutrition for Optional Gymnastics: Advanced Strategies to Optimize Training, Recovery and Competition

Wellness for the Club Owner and Coaching Staff

Julia Thompson

Fun and Variety in Staff Training

"Sometimes I Wish….." Tips on Dealing with Difficult Parents

Anne Josephson

Running Multiple Facilities

Jim Jarrett

Summer Camps – A New Competitive Environment

Beau Biron

Capitalizing on the USA Gymnastics National Advertising Campaign

Scott Willy & Loree Galimore

Procedures that Nurture Relationships – The Key to Great Customer Service Additional Programs to Build Revenue…It’s Showtime!

Jeff Lulla Beau Biron

Facebook Bootcamp

Michelle Weaver

Birthday Parties that Boost Enrollment

Mimi McKellar

State Licensing. Will it Affect Your Business?

Diane Callison

Topic(s) –each provided in 1-hour session

Jeff Lulla

Core Stabilization

Nancy Cummings

Perfect 10 Posture

Paula Lord

Solving the Mystery of Motivation

Michael Taylor

Keep Boredom Out of Beam

Annette Thomas

Preschool Gymnastics Stations Rolling Into Reading: How Gymnastics Readies Preschoolers for Academic Learning Preschool Tumbling Curriculum Progressions Understanding the Preschool Child How Safe Are Your Youngest Athletes? Things All Preschool Teachers Should Know

3 Silver Bullet Coaching Strategies that Work

David Benzel

Shoulder Instability

Dr. James Bicos

Strength Training from Childhood to Adulthood

Dr. Bill Sands

What do Stretching, Warm-Up and Injury Prevention Have in Common? When the Foot Hits the Mat Everything Changes

Dr. Bill Sands Dr. Larry Nassar

Dr. Larry Nassar

Pelvic Instability and Its Implication for Training

Dr. Bill Sands

Back from the Brink: Journey to Overtraining the Back

Dr. Bill Sands

Cindy Furman Debra Em Wilson Jeff Lulla Beth Gardner Cindy Morano & Annette Thomas

Rhythmic, Gymnastics for All, Special Needs, Special Olympics, Risk Management, Cheerleading, Collegiate Topic(s) – each provided in 1-hour session GFA: Mini-Trampoline for Team Gym GFA: Performance Choreography GFA: Team Gym at My Gym GFA: Rules for Team Gym GFA: Gym Shows and Gym Fest

Birthday Parties and Field Trips

Mike Spiller

Collegiate: NCAA Rules and Collegiate Recruiting

Crawlers, Walkers, and Runners – Children Under 2

Brant Lutska

Cheer: Introducing Cheerleading to Grow your Gym Business

TECHNIQUE • MARCH 2012

David Benzel

Brant Lutska & Linda Thorberg

FUNdamental Preschool Bars

38

Dr. Alison Arnold (presented by Janae Whitaker)

Incorporation of Kinesthetic Awareness and Proprioception in the Core Linda Thorberg & Brant Lutska

Class Management Specific to Preschool Fun Movement to Music for Preschool Classes

Coaching Gymnastics/Coaching Life

Rehab Monkeys: The Physical and Mental Aspects of Injury Recovery Brandi Smith Young (featuring Dr. Alison Arnold)

Preschool Latest and Greatest Equipment

Bindee Eberlee

George Hery Cheryl Cupples Barbara Jo Taylor Steve Whitlock Steve Whitlock & Cindy Bickman Kurt Hettinger Kevin Brubaker


Cheer: Building a Successful Cheer Program

Kevin Brubaker

Active Recreational: Back Handsprings

Risk Management: Supervision and Sharing the Safety Message

Michael Taylor

USA Gymnastics National Instructors

Active Recreational: Wild Wacky Camp Phun Games

Mike Spiller

Risk Management: Avoid Sexual Misconduct

Scott Himsel

Active Recreational: Retaining Recreational Kids with Play

Mike Spiller

Risk Management: USA Gymnastics Safety/Risk Management Handbook

Scott Himsel

Active Recreational: Best of the Best Birthday Parties & Activities

Mike Spiller

Active Recreational: The Playful Team

Mike Spiller

Risk Management: State Licensing – Will it Affect Your Business?

Diane Callison

Risk Management: USA Gymnastics Sanction Insurance Coverage

Pat O’Connor

Women: Feel the Music…You Can Teach Dance

Risk Management: Insurance FAQ

Pat O’Connor

Women Technical: Floor Dance

Risk Management: Have a Plan Before the Crisis

Michael Swain

Acro: Acrobatic Gymnastics=Athlete Retention

Special Needs: Growing Your Special Needs Program

Kim Pladson Nate Hendrickson

Special Needs: Special People In Our Gym: Opening our Doors to Special Needs Special Needs: Autism Spectrum and other Disorders

Beth Gardner Robin Pearson

Active Lectures & Hands-On Spotting Topic(s) –each provided in 1-hour session

Women: When Will My Susie Start Kipping?

Women JO: Compulsory Floor…One More Year

Tom Koll

Nancy Davis & Selena Peco

Special Needs: How to Start a Special Needs Program in Your Gym & Sustain It

Men: Basic Parallel Bars Spotting

Antonia Markova Audrey Schweyer & Tammy Biggs

Jeff Robinson Quin Shannon

USA Gymnastics University Certification Opportunities Each certification takes place on Thursday, June 28th at the San Jose Convention Center. *Additional registration and fee are required to attend. *U101: USA Gymnastics Safety/Risk Management Course

June 28

3:00 – 8:00 p.m.

*R102: Preschool Fundamentals Hands-on Training Course

June 28

12:00 – 4:00 p.m.

*W200: Development Coaches Hands-on Training Course

June 28

12:00 – 7:00 p.m.

*T200/T201: Trampoline & Tumbling Development Course/ Hands-on Training

June 28

12:00 – 5:00 p.m.

*Y200: Rhythmic Development Coaches Course

June 28

10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

*Women’s Judging Exam

June 28

5:00 – 8:30 p.m.

Women: Level 5/6 Spotting

USA Gymnastics National Instructors

Special Olympics – Artistic

June 28

12:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Women: Beginning Optional Spotting

USA Gymnastics National Instructors

Special Olympics – Rhythmic

June 28

4:30 – 8:30 p.m.

Acro: Let’s Get Spotting Recreational: Level 1–4 Spotting Active Recreational: Let’s Get Up Up Up with a Warm Up Up Up

Selena Peco & Nancy Davis

USA Gymnastics National Instructors Randy Parrish

MARCH 2012 • TECHNIQUE

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MINUTES MINUTES E L I T E

INTERNATIONAL ELITE COMMITTEE January 18, 2012

Chairman ................................... Steve Rybacki Coach Representatives ................. Valeri Liukin ................ Mihai Brestyan ................ Mary Lee Tracy Alternate .................................... Liang Qaio

Motion Liukin Second Brestyan PASSED The committee assigned Tammy Biggs to the Video Review Panel for classics, championships and trials. The committee gave their recommendation for Olympic judge selection. The committee tabled the nominations for the FIG Intercontinental Judges Course until the next meeting.

National Team Coordinator .......... Martha Karolyi Athlete Representative .................. Absent Vice President Program ................ Kathy Kelly Managing Director Athlete & Coaching Program ................... Kim Riley Meeting convened at 12:40 a.m.

I. JUDGES SELECTION COMMITTEE IEC discussed the appointment of a judge to serve on the Judges’ Selection Committee and our plan and recommendations/nominations for the judges to represent us at the FIG Intercontinental Judges Course. Recommendation to appoint Cheryl Hamilton as the judge to serve on the Judges’ Selection Committee, beginning on Sept. 1, 2012.

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II. ZONE ADMINISTRATORS/CLINICS The committee discussed the current system of the zone clinics and made the decision to change the emphasis to TOPS athletes and elite developmental education. New zone administrators will be assigned and will work closely with Kim Riley and Gary Warren. National Team coaches may conduct compulsory sessions for qualifying at their Invitationals with approval of the IEC.

III. OLYMPIC EQUIPMENT

Recommendation that GYM Nova bars and vaulting boards be used for seniors at CoverGirl Classic, Visa Championships and U.S. OlympicTrials. Motion Tracy Second Liukin PASSED Continued on pg. 44


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MINUTES MINUTES

...CONTINUED

E L I T E Recommendation that a GYM Nova balance beam be purchased for the Training Center. Motion Liukin Second Tracy PASSED

IV. QUALIFICATION SCORES The committee discussed the current qualification scores and made no changes from last year’s qualification scores to classics/championships. Recommendation that those event specialists from the 2011 season who hit the qualifying score for two or three events at the 2011 Visa Championships are qualified to the 2012 classics on the same events. If the athlete elects to compete in the All-Around in 2012, then she must attain the All-Around

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qualification score in 2012. Motion Liukin Second Brestyan PASSED

V. ATHLETE FUNDING Committee discussed the 8 slots that need to be reviewed by the Selection Committee and decided that all the athletes will receive a letter outlining the expectations. It was decided to delay the review until the March camp so the athletes will have time to prepare.

VI. TOPs SKILL TESTING Committee discussed the TOPs skill testing. Skill testing will be initiated at the TOPs state testing. A complete list of skills will be posted on the website after agreement with the Athlete Development Committee. Meeting adjourned at 3:00 p.m.


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CLASSIFIEDS

for sale • position available • seeking employment • education • consignment

POSITION AVAILABLE

COACHING POSITIONS AVAILABLE IN VIRGINIA! New facility in Northern Virginia (14,000 square feet) looking for professional, organized and motivated staff. We are looking for experienced personnel:  Trampoline and Tumbling Coach, Rhythmic Gymnastics Coach, Acrobatic Coach and a Cheer Director. Part time/full time positions available. Salary to commensurate with experience. Please email your credentials to XKSports@gmail.com. INSTRUCTOR/COACHES. Paragon Gymnastics of Norwood NJ (Bergen County), is looking for instructors and coaches, P/T–F/T. Requirements: Positive attitudes, responsible, reliable, and love of children. Position available for competitive team coach level 4 and up with flexible hours. Also preschool through intermediate instruction/cheerleading. Company sponsored certifications (safety, CPR, First Aid). Benefits available, paid vacations & sick days. Salary commensurate with experience. NEW facility, state-of-the-art approx. 11,000sq ft. Located in the NY/ NJ Metropolitan area, easily accessible from all major highways. Contact Dot: email: paragongymnastics@verizon.net, 201767-6921 or fax to 201-767-6693 or at 49 Walnut Street, Suite 4, Norwood, NJ 07648. www.paragongym.com FOR SALE

GK RISK-FREE PROGRAM: Get with the program! It’s better than ever, with a terrific assortment of NEW styles and fabrics and incomparable sales potential. Plus, it’s easier 46

TECHNIQUE • MARCH 2012

than ever to order, sell and return your RISKFREE garments. We offer customized packages for your pro shop, meets and summer camp. You only pay for what you’ve sold and may return the rest, there is absolutely NO RISK! If you haven’t tried us lately, it’s time you started earning extra profits with our RISK-FREE merchandise. Call 1-800-345-4087 for more information on how you can get started today! Email: customerservice@gkelite.com SCORE MASTER – Scorekeeping software interfaced to many different score boards: EliteScore, BetaBrites, TV’s & Projectors. Download team rosters from the USAG website. Features include: random draws, create rotations, assign #’s, the most comprehensive reporting and results can go directly to your website. Supports: womens/ mens, individual/team, artistic/rhythmic/ trampoline, compulsory/optional. Download a FREE demo at www.Score-Master.com. EDUCATION

AVAILABLE NOW! THE NEW GYMCERT Gymnastics training manuals (Levels 1, 2, 3, & the NEW Skills & Drills for the Compulsory Coach Level’s 4, 5 & 6) a must for training your staff; cut your lesson planning time significantly; use to coordinate class progressions and skill training methods; and, best of all have a quick reference that is easy to use which includes Lesson Planning Forms and Class Evaluation Forms by level. The GYMCERT manuals provide concise instruction, clear illustrations, and several coaching, spotting, and safety tips. Will your staff be ready for your fall students? Order direct by calling 407-444-5669 EST or online at www.GymCert.com.

GYMNASTICS TRAINING BOOKS: Gymnastics Drills and Conditioning, Handstand, Walkover/Back Handspring, Legs/Ankles, Gymnastics Journal, Exercise Programs, E-Books, and more! Check out the Swing Set Fitness books, Fitness Journal, and Strength Training Journal too. Read reviews or buy these books, www.GymnasticsBooks.com. And be sure to check out our gifts and apparel at www.GymnasticsTees.com.

FOR INFORMATION on how to publish a classified ad in Technique, go to www.usagym.org/publications Or call Luan Peszek at 317-829-5646.


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Technique - Mar. 2012 - Vol. 32, #3  

Technique Magazine - March 2012 - Vol. 32, #3

Technique - Mar. 2012 - Vol. 32, #3  

Technique Magazine - March 2012 - Vol. 32, #3