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USA Gymnastics

Certification Program _____________

The Obstacle Course, Building the Basic Skills of Accomplishment

USA GYMNASTICS

UNIVERSITY

DOORS ARE OPEN! AUGUST 2011 – VOL. 31 – #8


EVENTS 2011 AUGUST

MARCH

5–7

Region 6 Congress

Boston, MA

9–12

Junior Olympic Optional Levels Training Camp (W)

17–20

Visa Championships (M/W/R)

Saint Paul, MN

18–20

USA Gymnastics National Congress and Trade Show

Saint Paul, MN

25–28

ODP Selection Camp (TT)

26–28

Region 1 Congress

Huntsville, TX

Huntsville, TX Santa Clara, CA

SEPTEMBER 9–11 13–26 15–18 17 17 23–25

Region 2 Congress Rhythmic World Championships State and Regional Chairman’s Workshop (M) National Gymnastics Day Handstand World Record Attempt (everyone) Region 5 Congress

Everett, WA Montpellier, France TBD various locations various locations Indianapolis,IN

30–Oct. 2 National TOP Testing (W)

OCTOBER

Huntsville, TX

1–3

National TOP Testing (W)

7–16 13–16

World Artistic Championships (M/W) JO Team Coaches Course (W)

Tokyo, Japan Huntsville, Texas

14–30

Pan American Games (M/W/R/TR)

Guadalajara, MX

22–25

JO National Team Training Camp (W)

Huntsville, TX

27–30

Level 9/10 Training Camp (W)

Huntsville, TX

NOVEMBER

Huntsville, TX

10–13

Fut. Stars Champs./Coaches Wrkshp.(M)

Colo. Springs, CO

16–19

T & T World Championships

Birmingham, ENG

20–26

World Age Group Championships (TT)

Birmingham, ENG

30–Dec. 4 National TOP Team Training Camp (W)

Huntsville, TX

DECEMBER

2

Nastia Liukin Supergirl Cup (W)

TBD

3

AT&T American Cup (M/W)

TBD

16–18

Pacific Rim Championships (M/W/R/T)

TBD

23–24

USA Gymnastics Collegiate Champs. (M)

TBD

APRIL TBD

Acro Gymnastics World Championships & World Age Group Competition TBD

MAY 3–6

Level 9 East/West Championships (W)

7

USA Gymnastics Special Olympics Championships (M/W/R/GG) Marietta, GA

7–13

JO National Championships (M)

Cincinnati, OH

10–12

JO National Championships(W)

TBD

13

JO–NIT (W)

TBD

24–26

CoverGirl Classic (W)

TBD

31–June 3 Open Championships (W)

7–10

Visa Championships

San Jose, CA

28–July1

San Jose, CA

U.S. Olympic Team Trials–Gymnastics (M/W)

JULY 5-11

T&T Junior Olympic Nationals

Long Beach ,CA

2013 MAY 2–5

Level 9 East/West Championships (W)

TBD

9–11

JO National Championships (W)

TBD

12

JO–NIT (W)

TBD

Huntsville, TX

31–June 2 2013–20 JO Compulsory Master Workshop – East (W)

8–18

National Rhythmic Open Camps (R)

Huntsville, TX

JUNE

Olympic Test Event

St. Louis, MO

28–July1 USA Gymnastics National Congress and Trade Show

TOP B Training Camp (W)

10–18

Orlando, FL

JUNE

4–8

2012 JANUARY

TBD

7 – 9

Orlando, FL

2013–20 JO Compulsory Master Workshop – West (W)

Reno, NV

London, ENG

FEBRUARY 2–4

Winter Cup Challenge (M)

Las Vegas, NV

W = Women, R = Rhythmic, TR = Trampoline, M = Men, GG = Group Gymnastics, TU = Tumbling, AG = Acrobatic Gymnastics, B = Business, TT = Trampoline/Tumbling

NOTE: Dates and events subject to change or cancellation. 2

TECHNIQUE • AUGUST 2011


TECHNIQUE

an official publication of USA Gymnastics University

AUGUST

2011

•VOLUME 31 • #8

PUBLISHER

6

Steve Penny EDITOR

Luan Peszek GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Jeannie Shaw

USA GYMNASTICS BOARD OF DIRECTORS Chair: Peter Vidmar Vice-Chair: Paul Parilla Secretary: Gary Anderson Treasurer: Jim Morris National Membership – Women: Tom Koll National Membership – Women: Steve Rybacki National Membership – Men: Yoichi Tomita National Membership – Men: Russ Fystrom National Membership – Rhythmic: Brooke Bushnell-Toohey National Membership – Trampoline & Tumbling: George Drew National Membership – Acrobatic Gymnastics: Dr. Jay Binder Advisory Council: Mike Burns Advisory Council: Ron Ferris Advisory Council: Carole Ide Athlete Director – Women: Terin Humphrey Athlete Director – Men: John Roethlisberger Athlete Director – Rhythmic: Jessica Howard Athlete Director – Trampoline & Tumbling: Karl Heger Athlete Director – Acrobatic Gymanstics: Michael Rodrigues Public Sector: Frank Marshall Public Sector: Bitsy Kelley Public Sector: Jim Morris Public Sector: Mary Lou Retton

CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES: In order to ensure uninterrupted delivery of TECHNIQUE magazine, notice of change of address should be made eight weeks in advance. For fastest service, please enclose your present mailing label. Direct all subscription mail to TECHNIQUE Subscriptions, USA Gymnastics, 132 E. Washington St., Suite 700, Indianapolis, IN 46204 . TECHNIQUE is published monthly except bimonthly in Sept/ Oct and Nov/Dec by USA Gymnastics, 132 E. Washington St., Suite 700, Indianapolis, IN 46204 (phone: 317-2375050) or visit online @ www.usagym.org Subscription prices: U.S.–$25 per year; Canada/Mexico–$48 per year; all other foreign countries–$60 per year. If available, back issue single copies $4 plus postage/handling. All reasonable care will be taken, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited material; enclose return postage. Copyright 2011 by USA Gymnastics and TECHNIQUE. ­All rights reserved. Printed by Sport Graphics, Indianapolis, IN. Member Services 1-800-345-4719

F E AT U R E S 6 USA Gymnastics University Doors are Open! 12

The Obstacle Course, Building the Basic Skills of Accomplishment

30

Handstand World Record Attempt

12

D E PA R T M E N T S 2 Event Schedule 4 USA Gymnastics Message 20

Congress Information

21 .Congress/Visa Championships 2011Schedule 31

What’s New: Banned Members List

33

Spotlight

38 Women’s Committee Minutes 46

Classified Ads

20

30

Unless expressly identified to the contrary, all articles, statements and views printed herein are attributed solely to the author and USA Gymnastics expresses no opinion and assumes no responsibility thereof.

Cover: Center photo of 2010 Congress Session by John Cheng.

www.usagym.org A MU AG RU CS HT 2 0 1 1 • T E C H N I Q U E

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INSIDE INSIDE INSIDE

T

he Visa Championships and the USA Gymnastics National Congress and Trade Show are here! I really look forward to this event every year – it is a true celebration of our sport, and the line-up of events and activities in Saint Paul this year are an indication of just that. In addition to amazing gymnastics and outstanding educational opportunities, other activities range from an expanded Taste of the Visa Championships to a variety of exhibitions, post-event fun at the Visa Fan Fest, and, of course, don’t forget to bring your workout clothes for Morning Fitness. This year’s “Go Green!” effort will bring some new and innovative initiatives to our annual gathering.

Our athletes continue to embody the very best the sport offers. With returning Olympians and eager newcomers, the competition is already intense because the London Olympics are only a year away. You will see some of the world’s top athletes showcased at Xcel Energy Center and Roy Wilkins Auditorium in men’s, women’s and rhythmic gymnastics. More than 200 sessions are planned for this year’s Congress, plus certifications, an exhibit hall, raffle, Hall of Fame luncheon, and hospitality for every credentialed participant. Congress attendees are invited to pre- and post-event hospitality on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at 317 on Rice Park, which is adjacent to the RiverCentre and Roy Wilkins Auditorium and just steps away from Xcel Energy Center. For four days, Rice Park will become the site for the Visa FanFest and host Morning Fitness, gymnastics demonstrations, Painting in the Park and the post-event celebrations. This year, 14 downtown Saint Paul restaurants are participating in the Taste of the Visa Championships. Everything will kick-off at 11:30 a.m. on Aug. 17 at Rice Park with a street renaming and the official start of Painting in the Park. To see all of the activities and opportunities available championships week, go to page 18 for an overview and schedule. We are also very excited about our efforts to make this year’s event the “greenest” Visa Championships and Congress to date. More information about the competition, Congress and ancillary activities will be at your fingertips than in past years via our traditional and mobile websites and in the venues. For the first time, the Visa Championships program will be available digitally; we are reducing the amount of paper disseminated to support the competition and Congress; Windsource® is offsetting our energy demands; recycling is in place for paper and plastics; and we are finding technological solutions for information access on the field of play. We hope you will embrace these efforts while you are in Saint Paul and when you return home. The 2011 Visa Championships and National Congress and Trade Show are shaping up to be an incredible week of gymnastics and opportunity. See you in the gym,

Steve Penny

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SCHOOL OF RECREATIONAL GYMNASTICS

UNIVERSITY DOORS ARE OPEN!

CERTIFICATIONS INSTRUCTOR DEVELOPMENT TEACHER ADVANCED TEACHER DIRECTOR

SCHOOL OF JUDGING

EXPERIENCED COACHES!

Based on previous education and experiences, you may apply for accelerated placement in the university.

CERTIFICATIONS WOMEN’S JUDGES

http://usagym.org/pages/women/pages/judging.html

MEN’S JUDGES

APPLY NOW at

www.usagymnasticsuniversity.org 6

TECHNIQUE • AUGUST 2011

http://usagym.org/pages/men/pages/judges_information.html

WWW.USAGYM


SCHOOL OF COMPETITIVE GYMNASTICS

WOMEN’S ARTISTIC

MEN’S ARTISTIC

TRAMPOLINE &

TUMBLING

RHYTHMIC

GYMNASTICS FOR ALL

ACROBATIC

CERTIFICATIONS INSTRUCTOR JUNIOR OLYMPIC DEVELOPMENT COACH

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

JUNIOR OLYMPIC TEAM COACH NATIONAL COACH For course descriptions, visit www.usagymnasticsuniversity.org

CERTIFICATIONS ADMINISTRATOR MANAGER DIRECTOR

Please go to our website for more information on specific course requirements for each school.

EXECUTIVE

YMNASTICSUNIVERSITY.ORG AUGUST 2011 • TECHNIQUE

7


USA Gymnastics Certification Program Redefining Gymnastics Education! USA GYMNASTICS UNIVERSITY STRUCTURE

USA Gymnastics University is a collection of resources for gymnastics education. The University provides greater educational opportunities for coaches, instructors, teachers, judges, and administrators at all levels and in all of the disciplines and areas of gymnastics. Included as a part of the University are educational courses and programs, technical materials and publications, and a professional certification program. There are four “Schools” of study within the University: COMPETITIVE

UNIVERSITY CERTIFICATION PROGRAM

The goal of the certification program is to organize the educational offerings of USA Gymnastics into the University and provide a means to achieve logical progressions, a well-rounded knowledge base, and recognition of professional education and experience levels. Certifications can be earned by completing designated “core” course work and school specific courses. Courses and other requirements vary depending on the school of study and tier of certification.

ACHIEVING CERTIFICATION

USA Gymnastics recognizes that a vast majority of our members have completed and are actively involved in many of the educational opportunities the University has to offer. USA Gymnastics is actively working to place all members who have completed educational courses into at least one of the Schools within the University. Placement within the schools will be based off of USA Gymnastics course work completed.

RECREATIONAL Continued on pg. 10...

BUSINESS

JUDGING

Each school is divided into several different tiers to which one may achieve certification. Certifications are progressive and completion of one tier is required prior to obtaining next certification. Coursework for the next certification tier can be pursued at any time.

CO

URS EC S ___C_HOO ATALO ____ L G: ____ OF ____ CO WO ____ MP MEN ____ ET ____ ITI U1 ’S A ____ VE 00: RTI ____ GY Fund U1 ____ MN S T a 01: men I ____ AS C tals Sa __ T

____ ICS fety of G U10 & Ri ____ ymn 2: sk M astic ____ First U1 a s ____ A nage Instr 03: id ____ uctio men USA U2 ____ n t Gym 00: ____ n ____ astic Deve U3 s Fitn ____ lopm 10: e e s n s R t U4 egio C o a nal C 10: ches ongr Cou Nati W2 rse: ess onal 00: Spor Con Deve W2 ts Sc g r e lopm ss 02: ienc ent C e NE Wom W3 o W a e 0 c n’s M Regardless of what area of study one chooses, everyone 0: hes Cou Wom eet D W3 rse: e i 1 r n e 0 ’s ctor : R Han within the University must ... Junio Cou ds O W3 egio r Oly rse nal J 11: n Tra mpic unio ining Nati W3 C r Oly oach onal Cou 12: m e rse ( J p s u i n Cou c Co TOP ior O W3 HOT Be a current USA Gymnastics Member r s mpu se N 13: B Tra lymp D) N lsor y E W i i EW n c N i ng C Com W31 ation W (Professional, Jr Professional, Introductory o rksh puls amp al TO 4: o o p r TOP y P W3 s W Train s Inv orks 15: Coach, Jr Introductory Coach, Instructor) ing C itatio hop Junio W3 nal C amp r Oly 16: a m mpic ps Hot W3 Regi Shot 17: onal cam Successfully complete U100: Fundamentals Inter W4 Train p- Be med 00: i ginn iate/ ing O ng Cam W Adv W41 of Gymnastics Instruction Course (online) ome p ption ance n’s A 0: al (L Opti dvan Deve W4 evel onal ced lopm 11: 6/7 Coa Cam ent T ) Junio W4 ches p (Le raini r Oly 12: C v n e o g l 8-1 urse mpic Cam Junio W4 0) p Nati r Oly 13: onal mpic Nati W4 Team 9/1 onal 14: T 0 raini Train Cam Elite ng C ing C p Zone amp amp

UNIVERSITY GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

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WWW.USAGYMNASTICSUNIVERSITY.ORG

Information regarding certification placement will be accessible to members soon. Please note: Those that are interested in achieving certifications within the University will also have the opportunity to be preplaced at a higher level than the entry level. These applicants must have vast work experience/achievements as well as received higher education through USA Gymnastics University. If interested in pre-placement, please visit www.usagymnasticsuniversity.org for detailed instructions.

USA Gymnastics believes that education is an investment in the future of the sport of gymnastics. We believe that all of those who have and will participate in all the University has to offer can achieve gymnastics excellence through education!

GET EDUCATED! In order to fully understand the university schools and certification programs, please take a moment to visit the new University website. Visit www.usagymnasticsuniversity.org for complete details regarding USA Gymnastics University. If you have not yet done so, complete U100: Fundamentals of Gymnastics Instruction Course. It’s free to current Professional members and only $15 for all other member types.

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ENROLL NOW!

U100 Fundamentals of Gymnastics Instruction This course is required to enter USA Gymnastics University. The course covers basic fundamental principles of coaching and teaching gymnastics, including topics such as safety and risk management, communication, athlete development and techniques for teaching gymnastics skills and much more. Gymnastics professionals new to the sport will find this course provides a valuable foundation on which to build their education and skills. Experienced professionals can use this course as a self-assessment to fine-tune their own skills and coaching philosophy as well as align with industry best practices. The Online course covers all five gymnastics disciplines: Women’s, Men’s, Acrobatic, Rhythmic and Trampoline & Tumbling. Videos of fundamental skills are presented in the Coaches Clinic section at the end of each unit. This course is FREE of charge to current Professional, Jr. Professional, Introductory Coach and Jr. Introductory Coach members (individual registration still required) Instructor, Foreign Instructor, Athlete pay just $15 Non-members pay $25

www.usagymnasticsuniversity.org TECHNIQUE • AUGUST 2011


by Gene Hurwin

H

umans move before learning to think or speak. We reach for our mothers, we seek to see, we reposition our bodies constantly to explore and understand our environment. Any obstacle that appears grabs our attention, and before we have words to describe our motion, we use it to overcome the obstacle.  As we grow, our motion is more specifically prescribed, but just as integral to being human.  The obstacles we face grow exponentially more challenging, and we begin to perceive each as the challenge to surmount a personal goal. This response to each obstacle measures our ability to stay engaged. The dictionary defines an “Obstacle Course“ as a military training area containing obstacles such as hurdles, ditches and walls, that must be surmounted or crossed in succession, or as an event, situation, course of action, or the like, that presents many challenges or difficulties.  The universal obstacle course is made up of the daily tasks a person must complete to be active in the world.  These tasks challenge an array of abilities; the

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degree of difficulty experienced in meeting them is dictated by the individual’s mental acuity, physical strength, skill level, and the ability to execute a plan. Regardless of the starting point, however, as the obstacles are met and overcome, the individual begins to create a cognitive scaffold upon which future challenges might be accomplished.  This article will explore how the use of a physical obstacle course in a gymnastics setting significantly ignites the ability of both typical and special needs children to meet the challenges and obstacles of everyday life. Recently, I watched a men’s gymnastics squad warm up on tumble track (a modified trampoline, created for lengthy tumbling passes.  It has a long, narrow bed with minimum to moderate spring for repulsion).  The leading gymnast rehearsed the same pass over and over.  As an elite athlete, his tumbling pass was intricate and presented significant obstacles for successful completion.   Each skill was


multi-stepped – moving just the needed part(s) while maintaining the shape for dynamics and demanding great air sense during intense gravitational pull. Yet, the gymnast appeared almost casual as he moved with such speed and g-force, flowing from one skill to the next. He seemed unaware of the level of difficulty, yet cognizant of the need to complete the pass precisely, as he combined the necessary power, speed and timing to hit each mark and punch it.  Rotation of the head, or left shoulder, or the forearm at just the right moment allowed him to set up for the next movement, which altered his body’s shape while maintaining or increasing the required speed and inertia to flow into the following task. I asked him what he thought about as he rehearsed and practiced his skills in the tumbling pass.  He replied, “Nothing really, school stuff.  I don’t think about anything, but a lot of stuff passes by when I’m tumbling.  It’s only when something goes wrong that I think about what I’m doing.”         The brain meets challenges and overcomes obstacles by experiencing and learning specific functions.  Repeating these functions affords a degree of familiarity and expertise.  The human develops at the rate the brain permits development.  The brain acts like a computer where information is acquired and stored; an individual file for everything; learned, tasted, seen, felt, smelled, touched, sensed, heard, experienced, is logged in to this computer and as the files interact, new files are created.  As the brain develops higher functional interactions, it increases its potential.  The human computer constructs systems that cross reference, schematize, color-code and multi-filter, files for everything at a speed measured in nanu-seconds.   Banks of qualified/quantified information are created and a scaffold series of experiences are stored and drawn upon for future use.  This is defined as “active memory” and exemplified by the gymnast’s response about what he is “thinking” as he tumbles.  When nothing “goes wrong,” his brain simply pulls up information from the acquired files.  The overwhelming majority of time, human existence is lived in active memory.  It is what makes us creative and musical – able to memorize a melody from a song from our youth and recall where we were when we first heard the song decades later.  Humans develop active memory in order to respond to novel situations with an appropriate balance of problem-solving and rehearsed understanding.  Active

memory is on-going and develops on a continuum; riding a bicycle with dad sets the brain to understand changing directions and distance (aka; topographical memory), speed, gravity, which 18 years later, allows the same person to drive a car from one location to several more and back to the start. A key to helping students learn more effectively is in defining the difference between the state of ACTIVE MEMORY and WORKING MEMORY, which the gymnast will engage the moment something “goes wrong.” Think of driving on the freeway, making lane changes and noting traffic flow, music coming from the speakers, while simultaneously planning for your day, or engaging in another separate task; this is using active memory.  When, however, a pickup truck swerves into your lane, what is already known (active memory) will not suffice.  The driver must now engage in WORKING MEMORY, as the gymnast will when something goes wrong. WORKING MEMORY is the ability to be present in the moment which is currently unfolding.  It requires an alert awareness of the environment and a reflexive, active participation in problem solving. An individual will most likely be able to recall in vivid detail what occurs during this time. Learning occurs in working memory.  Thus, as the gymnast began the obstacle course of learning his tumbling pass, he engaged his working memory.  But the rehearsal of the entire tumbling pass, regardless of each component’s difficulty, was done in active memory; One subskill to the next, to the next and so on.  Only when something had changed, or went wrong, did he need to engage working memory. Children love to play; play is a child’s primary occupation, one which supports the learning of specific life skills.  In our program, young gymnasts play “dragonball” on the trampoline.  As the gymnasts bounce, one or more large therapy balls are introduced.  Gymnasts must avoid the ball while performing skills.  Clear enough, but as gymnasts bounce, they depress the bed which creates a gravitational pull of the ball’s weight towards the lowered surface.  In essence, the dragonball follows the bouncer.  Gymnasts must attend to their movements as well as the therapy ball(s) while performing the skill(s).  This develops multi-sensory awareness and processing; essential for advanced gymnastics.  As gymnasts’ spatial awareness grows, they are able to increase their skill set,

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...CONTINUED

changing the body’s shape and position, maintaining bounce and performing the skill(s) and avoiding the incoming moving ball. Novice gymnasts first learn to avoid the ball, more seasoned gymnasts are doing sequential, multi-progression skills while avoiding the balls.  Novel tasks were mastered by the gymnast in working memory; being present until novelty turned to skill.  As the gymnast develops, skill connected to skill is learned in working memory, yet the rehearsal is in active memory. If children are intrigued by climbing, they will be drawn to a ladder, leading to other ladders. If children love trampoline bouncing, they will be drawn to springboards, mini-tramps, tumble tracks and pits. Children are constructing their own sensory wish list, and the obstacle course is a tool to satiate children’s sensory-seeking by “doing.”  Through a predictable process of engaging working memory, children problemsolve the novelty of the ladder.  By continuing the process of scaling ladders via repetition, children demonstrate mastery and experience success.  Success for all people is part of the internal construct which creates our individual scaffold.  From small successes, the structure on which further skills are built is strengthened.  The process, not the product, helps define self-worth and selfesteem. For recreational gym coaches and recreational programs, the use of the obstacle course allows a motivated instructor a functional method to engage the child in developing working memory.   

in prolonged working memory, it’s too intense, hence we live the vast majority of our lives in active memory. Working memory demands great energy resource, and our brain is constructed to store so much input and information which must last a lifetime.  The shape and make-up of a course should be rectangular, in order to include changes in direction.  In order for the gymnast to develop sequential thinking, the course should include six to 10 connected steps, which allows for sequential motorplanning development as well.  Each step of the course should be connected to the previous one and following apparatus (so the children never touch the ground) interspersed with random gym equipment (mats, shapes, ladders, bars, ropes, swings, trampolines, etc.) so the gymnast becomes familiar with the environment on a developmental scale.  One or more unstable surfaces (trampoline, see-saws, bounce houses, etc.) should be introduced in order for the child to develop tolerance for random gravitational challenges. The selection and placement of each obstacle in combination with the previous and following obstacle should challenge working memory as novel problems occur and must be solved.  Though at times randomly selected, each component of the obstacle course demands attention to motor planning, sensory processing and organizational thinking by the instructor and the results from the child should address function via sequential motor planning, developing praxis, and the coordination of the brain’s visual-perceptual systems together with the developing motor cortex.   Constant changes in the environment allow the brain to rehearse novel motor planning sequences while perceiving visual sensory input.  In combination, both lead the child to the luxury of considering what choices are possible and assemble a response to the changing environment.  The obstacle course a three-year-old faces in the gym is as intense as a 13-year-olds optional routine.  Obstacles exist on a continuum which enables us to face challenges and create, invent, and engage a plan of action.  As the elite gymnast did, it’s only when something goes wrong that we engage working memory.  Developmental gymnastics, perhaps the most vivid sensory environment constructed on a progressive scale, has taken the obstacle course from its elementary baseline; the Mommy and Me gymnastics, to the international arena; the Olympics.

It should be known that human beings can shift from active to working quickly, yet each person has a limited tolerance to being in working memory. Some can sustain long periods of extremely focused attention while others have difficulty with even brief moments.  Regardless of anyone’s capacity to tolerate duration is that we, human beings, cannot live

Gene Hurwin, MA, OTR/L is owner/director of BIG FUN Therapy and Recreational Services in Los Angeles, California. His company, BIG FUN, provides gymnastics and recreational services to children with diagnosis.  Hurwin lectures nationally for several organizations as well as presentations for USAG.  BIG FUN offers certification in teaching special needs gymnastics coaches how to teach gymnastics to children with special needs.  Currently, BIG FUN Method is used in over 40 gyms and in 6 states. Mr. Hurwin can be heard twice a month as host of Autism Streets, on Autism One Radio.

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ACTIVITIES LINE-UP FOR THE 2011 VISA CHAMPIONSHIPS

A number of activities and opportunities are scheduled around the Visa Championships and USA Gymnastics National Congress and Trade Show. This will give you a quick overview of what’s available and when. We hope you will take advantage of them! MORNING FITNESS Start your day off right, Thursday, Aug. 18, through Saturday, Aug. 20, with a 60-minute workout that includes exercises for strength and cardio conditioning and flexibility. The 6:30 a.m. sessions will be hosted by Olympian John Macready and Denise Brumsey, with local trainers to assist with the cool down. LUNCH-TIME ACTIVITIES From Aug. 17-19 from 11 a.m-1 p.m., gymnastics demonstrations and Painting in the Park are scheduled during the lunch hour at Rice Park. PAINTING IN THE PARK Come and help create an original painting presented by Art of the Olympians that will become a part of the legacy of the 2011 Visa Championships. Interested individuals will have the opportunity to dip their hands and/or feet into paint and do handstands, cartwheels or other gymnastics skills across the canvas, developing a communal piece of art. Painting in the Park will be available to the public from 11 a.m.–1 p.m. on Aug. 17-19 and from 3:30-6:30 p.m. on Aug. 20. TASTE OF THE VISA CHAMPIONSHIPS, PRESENTED BY ST. VINCENT SPORTS PERFORMANCE The Taste of the Visa Championships features 14 Saint Paul-area restaurants that have created a special, healthy entrée that will be judged during Visa Championships week. The goal is to produce a tasty, but nutritionally sound dish that will dazzle a panel of judges led by legendary gymnastics coach Bela Karolyi. The restaurants are American Burger Bar, Cork’s Irish Pub (Embassy Suites), Eagle Street Grille, Great Waters Brewing Company, Headwaters Café (RiverCentre), Kincaid’s, Liffey Irish Pub, M St. Café (Saint Paul Hotel), Pazzaluna Urban Italian, Restaurant 11 (Crowne Plaza), Sakura, Senor Wong, St. Paul Grill (Saint Paul Hotel), and Tom Reid’s Hockey City Pub. Karolyi will officially announce the contest winner during the Visa Fan Fest at Rice Park on Saturday, Aug. 20. The Taste of the Visa Championships is a joint effort between Visit Saint Paul, USA Gymnastics and St. Vincent Sports Performance to promote healthy eating in conjunction with the 2011 Visa Championships. USA GYMNASTICS FITNESS ZONE Kids can have fun and gain knowledge about the importance of fitness through the interactive USA Gymnastics Fitness Zone. The zone features activity in building strength, flexibility and cardiovascular exercise, along with teaching a handstand in recognition of the Year of the Handstand (including a world record attempt for simultaneous handstands on National Gymnastics Day, Sept. 17, and as a possible fundraiser for Children’s Miracle Network). The Fitness Zone will be featured on the concourse at Xcel Energy Center and at the Visa Fan Fest on Saturday, Aug. 20. VISA FAN FEST Fans can gather for fun between the women’s gymnastics sessions on Aug. 20 and post-competition on Aug. 19-20. Following the competition on Friday and Saturday nights, the Visa Fan Fest will be a great place to mingle and enjoy interviews, food, music, fun activities; and celebrate the great competition earlier in the evening. Rice Park will be the place to be after the chalk dust has settled in the arena. Also, on Aug. 20 at 3:30 p.m. at Rice Park, fans can enjoy music, autographs, food, Painting in the Park, the USA Gymnastics Fitness Zone and other fun activities, as well as buy merchandise, during the break between the junior and senior women’s competition.

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2011 NATIONAL CONGRESS & TRADE SHOW August 18 – 20, 2011 Saint Paul, MN

What to Expect in Saint Paul!

A

s the 47th Annual USA Gymnastics National Congress and Trade Show approaches, USA Gymnastics would like to remind you of the great educational opportunities this event has to offer. The event will take place Aug. 18-20, and is held in conjunction with the 2011 Visa Championships. National Congress provides a unique opportunity to attend more than 200 presentations, demonstrations, certifications and educational seminars on a variety of topics within the sport – all in one location. NATIONAL CONGRESS REGISTRATION SCHEDULE – SAINT PAUL RIVERCENTRE • Wednesday, August 17 –12:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. • Thursday, August 18 –7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. • Friday, August 19 – 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. • Saturday, August 20 – 8:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. DAILY PRESENTER LIST Please refer to this issue of Technique for the daily congress schedule Or visit www.usagymnasticsnationalcongress.org.

NATIONAL TRADE SHOW HALL

The 2011 National Trade Show, proudly sponsored by the United States Gymnastics Suppliers Association, will feature more than 160 booths of products and information from more than 65 vendors in the gymnastics community. Special events such as the USGSA Mega-Raffle will take place in the Exhibit Hall. The National Trade Show Hall, is definitely a location no Congress attendee should miss! TRADE SHOW HALL HOURS Wednesday, Aug. 17       5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 18           7:30 a.m. – 5:45 p.m. Friday, Aug. 19               9:00 a.m. – 5:45 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 20          9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. GET UP & GET FIT! Start your day off right and join us for Morning Fitness at Rice Park during your stay in Saint Paul. Improve your strength, cardio and flexibility skills. Morning Fitness will be held from 6:30 – 7:30 a.m. Thursday through Saturday. This workout will be hosted by Olympian John Macready. NATIONAL CONGRESS ATTENDEE PRE/POST EVENT HOSPITALITY Credentialed National Congress attendees will have complimentary access to the 317 on Rice Park Hospitality Center located outside of the Saint Paul River Centre. It will 20

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be the place to gather and socialize. 317 on Rice Park will be open to credentialed Congress attendees on all three days of Congress. USA GYMNASTICS HALL OF FAME USA Gymnastics is pleased to announce that we are partnering once again with the National Gymnastics Foundation, to induct the 2011 USA Gymnastics Hall of Fame Class. The 2011 Hall of Fame Class includes, 1972 Olympian Jim Culhane of Tomball, Texas (men’s gymnastics); six-time world tumbling champion Jill Hollembeak of Chicago; 1992 Olympian Tamara Levinson of Los Angeles (rhythmic gymnastics); 2000 Olympic team bronze-medalists Kristen Maloney of Dover, N.H., Elise Ray of Reisterstown, Md., 1988 Olympian Chelle Stack of Clermont, Fla. (women’s gymnastics); and coach Stacy Maloney of New Berlin, Wis., who coached 2004 Olympic all-around champion Paul Hamm and his twin brother Morgan, both of whom competed in the 2000 and 2004 Olympic Games. Held as part of the National Congress and Trade Show, the 2011 Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony will take place on Friday, August 19 from 11:00 a.m –1:00 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza Riverfront Hotel. Individual tickets and table seating are still available for this very special event. For ticket information visit the National Congress registration booth.

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Did you forget to pre-register for the 2011 National Congress & Trade Show? USA GYMNASTICS HAS A SPECIAL OFFER FOR YOU! Bring this coupon to the Registration Booth located in the Saint Paul RiverCentre and receive $50 off your onsite registration fee. As a USA Gymnastics member, you’ll pay only $285!* Registration opens Wednesday, August 17th at 12:30 p.m. at the Saint Paul RiverCentre.

Don’t miss out on the best educational investment you’ll make all year just because you missed the deadline

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We hope to see you there!

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Expiration date: 08/20/11


CONGRESS AND VISA CHAMPIONSHIPS

2011 SCHEDULE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. National Business Conference

RiverCentre

5:00 – 6:30 p.m.

Pre–Event Hospitality

317 at Rice Park

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Opening Event/Gym Club Demos

Rice Park

6:30 p.m.

Sr. Men’s Competition – Final Day

Xcel Energy Ctr.

1:00 p.m.

Jr. Men’s Competition – Day 1

Xcel Energy Ctr.

9:30 p.m. – 12:00 a.m. Post-Event Hospitality

317 at Rice Park

1:30 – 6:30 p.m.

Safety/Risk Management Course

RiverCentre

Rice Park

2:30 – 6:30 p.m.

Preschool Fundamental Hands On Training RiverCentre

10:00 p.m.

5:00 – 7:00 p.m.

Trade Show Hall Opening

RiverCentre

6:30 p.m.

Sr. Men’s Competition – Day 1

Xcel Energy Ctr.

12:30 – 7:00 p.m.

National Congress Registration Hrs.

RiverCentre

SATURDAY, AUGUST 20 6:30 – 7:30 a.m.

Morning Fitness

Rice Park

8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. National Congress Registration Hours

RiverCentre

8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Congress Sessions (15 concurrent tracks) RiverCentre

THURSDAY, AUGUST 18 6:30 – 7:30 a.m.

Visa Fan Fest Post-Event Celebration (music, athlete interviews)

Morning Fitness

Rice Park

9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Trade Show Hall Hours

RiverCentre

9:00 a.m.

Rhythmic Jr. & Sr. All-Around Finals

Roy Wilkins

1:00 p.m.

Jr. Women’s Competition – Final Day

Xcel Energy Ctr.

3:30 – 6:30 p.m.

Visa Fan Fest (music, autographs, food) Rice Park

5:00 – 6:30 p.m.

Pre–Event Hospitality

6:30 p.m.

Sr. Women’s Competition – Final Day Xcel Energy Ctr.

7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. National Congress Registration Hrs.

RiverCentre

7:30 a.m. – 5:45 p.m. Trade Show Hall Hours

RiverCentre

8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Congress Sessions (15 concurrent tracks)

RiverCentre

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Gymnastics Club Demonstrations

Rice Park

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. National Congress Lunch Break & Raffle

RiverCentre

1:00 p.m.

Jr. Women’s Competition – Day 1

Xcel Energy Ctr.

4:30 – 5:45 p.m.

Trade Show Reception & Raffle Drawing

RiverCentre

5:00 – 6:30 p.m.

Pre-Event Hospitality

317 at Rice Park

6:30 p.m.

Sr. Women’s Competition – Day 1

Xcel Energy Ctr.

*All times and activities are subject to change.

9:00 – 11:30 p.m.

Post-Event Hospitality

317 at Rice Park

All times are Central. Doors open 60 minutes early for each session at Visa Championships.

Morning Fitness

Rice Park

317 at Rice Park

9:30 p.m. – 12:00 a.m. Post-Event Hospitality

317 at Rice Park

10:00 p.m.

Rice Park

Visa Fan Fest Post-Event Celebration (music, athlete interviews)

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19 6:30 – 7:30 am

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. National Congress Registration Hrs.

RiverCentre

8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Congress Sessions (15 concurrent tracks)

RiverCentre

9:00 – 5:45 p.m.

Trade Show Hall Hours

RiverCentre

9:00 a.m.

Rhythmic Jr. & Sr. AA Prelim & Event Finals Roy Wilkins

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. National Congress Lunch Break & Raffle

RiverCentre

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Hall of Fame Ceremony & Luncheon

Crowne Plaza

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Gymnastics Club Demonstrations

Rice Park

1:00 p.m.

Jr. Men’s Competition – Final Day

Xcel Energy Ctr.

4:30 – 5:45 p.m.

Trade Show Reception & Raffle Drawing

RiverCentre

AUGUST 2011 • TECHNIQUE

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NATIONAL CONGRESS & TRADE SHOW SCHEDULE

2:15 – 3:15PM

1:00 – 2:00PM

10:00 – 11:00AM

8:30 – 9:30AM

THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2011

SESSION Trampoline and Tumbling: Your Key to Growth and Retention Basic Floor Exercise for Boys Still Rings: Strength Development and Stabilizing the Handstand Partner NOT Problems Welcome to the Land of Lost Skills: Where Did They Go and How to Get Them Back USA Gymnastics Fitness Program + CMN How to Start a Special Olympics Program Beam Dance JO Update TOPS Skills and Curriculum for Floor Running a Small Gym: Forms, Systems and Marketing New! Rhythmic National Team Physical Preparation… Understanding the Preschool Child Basic Bars for Recreation

PRESENTER Susan Jacobson Hideo Mizoguchi JD Reive Michael Taylor Windee Weiss

Denise Brumsey Cindy Bickman Neela Nelson & Myra Elfenbein Tom Koll & Connie Maloney Tammy Biggs Tom Forster Elizabeth Darling Beth Gardner Tony Retrosi

TRACK ROOM TT Meeting Room 4 M Meeting Room 5 M Meeting Room 6 B SS SS SO WT WJO WA B HOS PRE SA

Meeting Room 7 Meeting Room 8 Meeting Room 10 Meeting Room 12 Ballroom A Ballroom B Ballroom C Ballroom D Ballroom E/F Ballroom G Ballroom H

SESSION PRESENTER TRACK ROOM JO Tumbling Progressions, Skills & Routines Sergio Galvez TT Meeting Room 4 Basic Pommel Horse for Boys Hideo Mizoguchi M Meeting Room 5 Horizontal Bars: Where's the Top of the Bar, Giants, Nori Iwai M Meeting Room 6 Turns and Hops Eliminating Privacy, Involving Parents, Educating Students, Scott Himsel RM Meeting Room 7 and Other Steps To Guard Against Sexual Misconduct How to Start a Team Gym Program Martha Lally GFA Meeting Room 8 10 Key Factors for Championship Floor Exercise Dr. Gerald George SS Meeting Room 10 NCAA Collegiate Judging Updates for 2011– 2012 Kathy Feldmann WT Ballroom A 2013-2020 Women's Compulsories Preview Tom Koll WJO Ballroom B Low Beam: Developmental Skills and Curriculum Tammy Biggs WA Ballroom C Guerrilla Marketing for Gymnastics Schools David Holcomb B Ballroom D Preschool Safety and Spotting Beth Gardner & Cheryl Cupples HOS Ballroom E/F Parent Child Classes: Start Confidently Linda Thorberg PRE Ballroom G Recreational Gymnastics Philosophy and Progressions Jeff Lulla SA Ballroom H SESSION PRESENTER TRACK ROOM 100 Combinations Before going Upside Down George Hery TT Meeting Room 4 Basic Still Rings for Boys Mike Serra M Meeting Room 5 Pommel Horse – How to Hit a Pommel Horse Routine, Michael Ashe M Meeting Room 6 Increasing Routine Stamina and Confidence Dealing With the Media in Crisis Communication Scott Himsel RM Meeting Room 7 Increase Artistry & Improve Flexibility From Rhythmic for ALL Lana Lashoff & Elizabeth Darling RHY Meeting Room 8 Twisting Mechanics: Influences in Picking a Direction Peter Pidcoe SS Meeting Room 10 How To See The Angle Repulsion for Vault Laurie Reid & Linda Thorberg WT Ballroom A Skill Choices for JO Gymnasts – How to Use the Rules to Byron Hough WJO Ballroom B Compete Successfully Bars: Developmental Skills and Curriculum Tom Forster WA Ballroom C Gymnastics Business Basics David Holcomb B Ballroom D School Age Spotting: Beginner to Level 4 Cheryl Cupples & Spotting Staff HOS Ballroom E/F Best Parent and Tot Teaching Techniques Sandi McGee PRE Ballroom G Vaulting, Tumbl Trak and Trampoline Brant Lutska SA Ballroom H SESSION PRESENTER TRACK ROOM Trampoline Progressions: Jump High, Have Fun, Stay Safe! Judy Cline TT Meeting Room 4 Vault: Arm Swing Technique, Making It Work Tom Meadows M Meeting Room 5 Still Rings: Honma and Yamawaki Juha Tanskanen M Meeting Room 6 Background Check for ALL! Trish McGonnell RM Meeting Room 7 How to Add Cheer to Your Gym Program Jim Lord & Chris Calvert B Meeting Room 8 WT=Women Technical WJO=Women Jr. Olympic WA=Women Advanced M=Men TT=Trampoline & Tumbling RHY=Rhythmic B=Business RM=Risk Management SS-Sport Science SO=Special Olympics PRE=Preschool SA=School Age

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Acro=Acrobatics GFA=Gymnastics for All HOS=Hands On Spotting


3:30 – 4:30PM

2:15 – 3:15PM

THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2011

...CONTINUED

SESSION PRESENTER TRACK ROOM Ankle Injury Prevention in the Gym: Coach and Therapist, Brandi Smith Young & Tony Retrosi SS Meeting Room 10 a Team Approach Floor Acro Char Christensen & Bryon Hough WT Ballroom A Level 7/8 Bars Brad Harris WJO Ballroom B Leg Conditioning Mihai Brestyan WA Ballroom C Managing Staff Through Systems Steve Greeley B Ballroom D Hands on Spotting Tumbling Joy Umenhofer TT Ballroom E/F Preschool Bars… "Pullover Beethoven" Lynn Moskovitz PRE Ballroom G The Dirty Dozen: Mistakes Teachers' Make Patti Komara SA Ballroom H SESSION PRESENTER TRACK ROOM 100 Combinations Before You Are Ready to Flip George Hery TT Meeting Room 4 Starting a Boys Program: Just Do It! Dusty Ritter M Meeting Room 5 Vault-Yamashita: How, Why and Where it Leads Tom Meadows M Meeting Room 6 Free! Free… Assistance with Hosting an Event! Donald G. Schumacher B Meeting Room 7 Helping Athletes Return from Injury: Keeping Their Windee Weiss SS Meeting Room 8 Head in the Game Building and Leading Teams in the New Millennium Mike Lorenzen SS Meeting Room 10 Evaluating Level 6 Bars Laurie Reid & John Carney WT Ballroom A Level 5/6 Compulsory Beam and Floor: Are you still Cheryl Jarrett & Tom Koll WJO Ballroom B doing it right? TOPS Skills & Curriculum on Tumbling Enrique Trabiano WA Ballroom C Maximize Profits: Creating and Working with Budgets Sean Dever B Ballroom D Spotting Technique for Trampoline: Double Mini and Joy Umenhofer TT Ballroom E/F Trampoline Bounce…Vault and Trampoline for Preschool Annette Thomas PRE Ballroom G Make Warm Ups Fun! Quin Shannon & Mik Nelke SA Ballroom H

8:30 – 9:30AM

SESSION The X Factor of Twisting, Flip Flop and Front Fly Spring Parallel Bars-Upper Arm Skills: Basic to Advanced Worker's Compensation Risk Management Gymnastics for All Programming Motor Learning: The Theory of Muscle Memory Beam: Acro & Mixed Connections Beginner Vault Advanced Combination Tumbling How to Raise Team Tuition: Parental "Buy-in" Spotting Horizontal Bar: Giants and Pirouettes 50 Great Rules for Teaching Preschool Gymnastics Understanding Basic Techniques for Beginning Coaches

10:00 –11:00AM

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

SESSION PRESENTER TRACK ROOM Using Trampoline Progressions for Backward and Joy Umenhofer TT Meeting Room Forward Twisting Technical Sequence Development for 2013-2016 Kevin Mazeika M Meeting Room Basic Vault for Boys Juha Tanskanen M Meeting Room Insurance Issues – What Question do You Have? Pat O'Conner RM Meeting Room Straight Line Handstands and the Tap Rule of 180 Degrees Jeff LaFleur W Meeting Room Shocks, Stops, Balks and Blocks: 10 Crazy Solutions for Fear Dr. Allison Arnold SS Meeting Room Beam: Mounts, Dismounts and Acro Skills Linda Mulvihill & Carole Bunge WT Ballroom A Vault/Bar Side Stations: Drills to Compliment Optional Chris Burdette WJO Ballroom B Level Workouts Phases of Conditioning John Geddert WA Ballroom C Leadership for Program Managers Steve Greeley B Ballroom D Intermediate Gymnastics Skills: Level 5/6 Cheryl Cupples & Hands-on Spotting Staff HOS Ballroom E/F The Preschool Handstand Sandi McGee PRE Ballroom G Teaching Progessions: Critical for Safety and Success Jeff Lulla SA Ballroom H

PRESENTER Judy Cline Justin Spring Michael Swain Cheryl Cupples Peter Pidcoe Tammy Biggs John Geddert Valeri Liukin Jeff Metzger Vitaly Marinitch Linda Thorberg Dr. Gerald George

TRACK ROOM TT Meeting Room M Meeting Room RM Meeting Room GFA Meeting Room SS Meeting Room WT Ballroom A WJO Ballroom B WA Ballroom C B Ballroom D HOS Ballroom E/F PRE Ballroom G SA Ballroom H

AUGUST 2011 • TECHNIQUE

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NATIONAL CONGRESS & TRADE SHOW SCHEDULE

3:30 – 4:30PM

2:15 – 3:15PM

1:00 – 2:00PM

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

...CONTINUED

SESSION PRESENTER TRACK ROOM Trampoline Progressions for Multiple Twisting Flips Joy Umenhofer TT Meeting Room 4 Sports Physiotherapy for Gymnastics Tyler Yamauchi M Meeting Room 6 The Ups and Downs of Alternative Recreation Steve Cook B Meeting Room 7 Promoting Athletes for Collegiate Gymnastics Kurt Hettinger ALL Meeting Room 8 Strengthening your Core Larry Nassar SS Meeting Room 10 Level 7 & 8 Bars - What's the Start Value? Linda Thorberg WT Ballroom A Developing a Large Team Program for the Long Term Mike Hunger WJO Ballroom B TOPS Skills and Curriculum for Vaulting Neil Resnick WA Ballroom C How to Hire the RIGHT Employees Jeff Metzger B Ballroom D Kips, Kips, Kips Jason Jarrett & Tom Forster HOS Ballroom E/F Skill Deconstruction Beth Gardner PRE Ballroom G Positive Teaching (Part 1) Steve Greeley SA Ballroom H SESSION PRESENTER TRACK ROOM Ready to Fly? Time for a Trampoline and Tumbling Team Shaun Kempton TT Meeting Room 4 Floor Exercise – Whip Back, Layout Front, Pike Open Back Joy Umenhofer M Meeting Room 5 Functional Assessment and Corrective Exercise: Reducing Rob Schwartz M Meeting Room 6 the Risk of Injury and Increasing Longevity Organization + Great Teacher = Success Jeff LaFleur B Meeting Room 7 Acrobatic Gymnastics = Athlete Retention Selena Peco & Ronda Francis ACRO Meeting Room 8 Facebooking Flippers & Twittering Twisters. The Potential & Dr. Allison Arnold SS Meeting Room10 Pitfalls of Social Networking in the Gym Level 7/8 Beam & Floor – Improving Artistry Kristie Phillips-Bannister WT Ballroom A Level 4-6 Bars (Part 1) Brad Harris WJO Ballroom B TOPS and Developmental Program Overview Gary Warren WA Ballroom C Business Ethics and the Double Coat of Arms Lynn Ledford B Ballroom D Special Olympics Artistic Gymnastics plus Certification Cindy Bickman HOS Ballroom E/F (Open Session) Everything I Learned About Teaching, I Learned in Annette Thomas PRE Ballroom G Kindergarten Drills and Stations for Any Age Doug James SA Ballroom H SESSION Progression Trampoline Training Skills and Circuits The Balanced Gymnast – Sports Psychology Structural Strength Development for Gymnasts: Specifically ages 15 and under College Recruiting 101 Introduction to Team Gym How to Create Confident Competitors Bar Mounts and Dismounts Level 4-6 Bars (Part 2) Twisting Yurchenkos Catching and Keeping Customers Advance Skills: Level 7/8 Hundreds of Stations for Preschool Drills Active Participation Games

PRESENTER George Hery Robert Andrews Rob Schwartz

TRACK ROOM TT Meeting Room 4 SS Meeting Room 5 M Meeting Room 6

Kurt Hettinger ALL Steve Whitlock GFA David Benzel SS Connie Maloney & Neil Resnick WT Brad Harris WJO Steve Rybacki WA Sean Dever B Cheryl Cupples & Hands-on Spotting Staff HOS Patti Komara PRE Brant Lutska SA

Meeting Room 7 Meeting Room 8 Meeting Room 10 Ballroom A Ballroom B Ballroom C Ballroom D Ballroom E/F Ballroom G Ballroom H

8:30 – 9:30AM

SATURDAY, AUGUST 20, 2011

SESSION Arabians and Twisting Salto's Motivating Boys - Practical Application Women J.O. Compulsory Tumbling Themes, Tactics, Tips for Successful Camps How To Maximize Revenue With Apparel Sales Credible Coaches Create Fearless Competitors Bars: Casts, Circles and Pirouettes 24

TECHNIQUE • AUGUST 2011

PRESENTER Judy Cline & Tammy Biggs Dusty Ritter Larry Goldsmith Patti Komara with Brian Foster Michelle Weaver David Benzel Connie Maloney & Tom Forster

TRACK ROOM TT Meeting Room M Meeting Room WJO Meeting Room B Meeting Room B Meeting Room SS Meeting Room WT Ballroom A

4 5 6 7 8 10


NATIONAL CONGRESS & TRADE SHOW SCHEDULE

2:15 – 3:15PM

1:00 – 2:00PM

10:00 – 11:00AM

8:30 – 9:30AM

SATURDAY, AUGUST 20, 2011

...CONTINUED

SESSION PRESENTER TRACK ROOM Games for Warm Up on Bars John Carney & Laurie Reid WJO Ballroom B Big Bar Releases Neil Resnick WA Ballroom C The Why's Have It Lynn Ledford B Ballroom D Spotting Parallel Bars – Support Skills Jeff Robinson HOS Ballroom E/F Preschool Warm Ups and Stretch Beth Gardner PRE Ballroom G Recreational Beam Tom Koll SA Ballroom H

SESSION PRESENTER TRACK ROOM The Trampoline and Tumbling Talent Development Pipeline Shaun Kempton TT Meeting Room 4 Basic Horizontal Bar for Boys Mike Serra M Meeting Room 5 Reducing Injuries with Jump Landing Training Wendy Ebeling, PT & SS Meeting Room 6 Dr. Heather Cichanowski, MD Saint Paul Medical Center This Old Gym Michael Rizutto RM Meeting Room 7 Backhand Spring Clinic Michael Taylor SA Meeting Room 8 Hey That's Cool! New cutting edge gadgets that help Dr. Allison Arnold SS Meeting Room 10 your athletes get into the ZONE! NAWGJ Open Forum Evelyn Chandler WT Ballroom A Floor Level 1–3 Great Drills for Great Skills Tom Koll WJO Ballroom B Beam and Floor: Training Advanced Leaps Tammy Biggs WA Ballroom C How to Get the Most Out of Full Timers Tom Forster B Ballroom D Spotting Advanced Skills on Parallel Bars: Peach Basket, Jeff Robinson HOS Ballroom E/F Morise and Belle New Ideas for Bars and Beam for Preschool Linda Thorberg & Brant Lutska PRE Ballroom G Teaching Boys – "Need I say More!" Beth Gardner SA Ballroom H SESSION PRESENTER TRACK ROOM Tumbling through Big Skills Sergio Galvez TT Meeting Room 4 Horizontal Bar– In Bar Skills: Endo, Stalder and Jam Brett McClure M Meeting Room 5 Pommel Horse: Circle Development – Side Support, Cross Xioping Li M Meeting Room 6 Support, Single Pommel and Flair 5 Sure Ways to Get Sued! Michael Swain RM Meeting Room 7 Special People in Our Gyms: Opening the Doors to Beth Gardner ALL Meeting Room 8 Special Needs Wrist Injury and Prevention in the Gym: Coach and Brandi Smith Young & Tony Retrosi SS Meeting Room 10 Therapist, a Team Approach Judging Level 1,2 & 3 Marian Dykes & Char Christensen WT Ballroom A Team Retention – How to Handle the Teen Years Bryon Hough & Mike Herd WJO Ballroom B Bars: Invert Skills and Development Tom Forster WA Ballroom C Growth Strategies for Any Business Patti Komara B Ballroom D Cheer Stunt Technique Jim Lord HOS Ballroom E/F Preschool Theme Week April Sawyer PRE Ballroom G Positive Teaching (Part 2) Steve Greeley SA Ballroom H SESSION Gymnastics Physics: 10 Simple Rules to Learn Pursuit of Perfection – What and Why Basic Parallel Bars for Boys Staff Development vs. Staff Training End of the Year Show Choreography…Now your doing GFA 10 Key Factors for Championship Vaulting Q&A USA Gymnastics Member Services Bar Releases The Progressive Motivation Cycle Advanced Tumbling Things I Used to Know, That Just Weren't So… Let's Get Spotting! Level 4/5 Pair/Group 101 things To Do On…. Basic Floor for Recreational... including the Backhandspring 26

TECHNIQUE • AUGUST 2011

PRESENTER George Hery Kevin Mazeika Jeff Robinson Michael Taylor Cindy Bickman Dr. Gerald George Erica Koven Marian Dykes & Tom Forster Mark Folger Enrique Trabiano Jeff Metzger Selena Peco & Ronda Francis Annette Thomas Tony Retrosi

TRACK ROOM TT Meeting Room M Meeting Room M Meeting Room B Meeting Room GFA Meeting Room SS Meeting Room ALL Meeting Room WT Ballroom A WJO Ballroom B WA Ballroom C B Ballroom D HOS Ballroom E/F PRE Ballroom G SA Ballroom H

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3:30 – 4:30PM

SATURDAY, AUGUST 20, 2011

...CONTINUED

SESSION PRESENTER TRACK ROOM The Take Off Position: The Key to Altitude and Amplitude Joy Umenhofer TT Meeting Room 4 Interactive Judging: Why is that a 0.3 Deduction? Doug Hills M Meeting Room 5 Parallel Bars: Support Swing, Bail for Long Hang Swing and Gene Watson M Meeting Room 6 Basket Swing Rhythmic Gymnastics Code of Points 2013: A Preview! Caroline Hunt R Meeting Room 8 Shoulder Injury and Rehabilitation Peter Pidcoe SS Meeting Room 10 Explaining USA Gymnastics University Lynn Moskovitz ALL Meeting Room 11 Floor Dance Neela Nelson & Myra Elfenbein WT Ballroom A Meet Preparation Bryon Hough WJO Ballroom B Elite Conditioning Neil Resnick WA Ballroom C Facility Design and Efficiency: Think Inside the Box Jeff LaFleur B Ballroom D Let's Get Spotting! Level 6/7 Pair/Group Selena Peco & Ronda Francis HOS Ballroom E/F Toys, Toys, Toys Doug James PRE Ballroom G Fun Vault Drills for Class Quin Shannon SA Ballroom H

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2011 WORLD GYMNAESTRADA

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ore than 300 individuals represented the USA at the 2011 World Gymnaestrada, July 10 –16, in Lausanne, Switzerland.

An estimated 20,000 participants of all ages from around the world and representing 55 national federations performed as part of the World Gymnaestrada, which is held every four years.

Nine gymnastics clubs from across the United States participated in this year’s event including Biron Gymnastics from Houston, Texas; Carolina Gymnastics Academy from Wilmington, N.C.; Chattooga Gymnastics and Dance in Marietta, Ga.; Columbia Gymnastics in Columbia, Md.; DeVeau’s School of Gymnastics in Fishers, Ind.; La Jolla Y in La Jolla, Calif.; Skyview Gymnastics in Mt. Airy, Md.; West Bend Gymnastics in West Bend, Wis.; and Westport-Weston Family Y in Westport, Conn. USA Gymnastics was honored to have the Biron Gymnastics Show Team represented at the FIG Gala. continued on pg. 44 28

TECHNIQUE • AUGUST 2011


AUGUST 2011 • TECHNIQUE

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& HANDSTAND WORLD RECORD ATTEMPT 2011 is the Year of the Handstand, and USA Gymnastics hopes gymnastics clubs across the country will join forces to break the world record for most handstands done at one time! This is a fun and easy way to build interest in gymnastics in your community, generate excitement with your gymnasts, and be a part of breaking a record!  Here’s a quick snapshot of this year’s plan. Who: Gymnasts, families, friends and enthusiasts from gymnastics clubs across the country. Why: To celebrate National Gymnastics Day and build awareness of gymnastics by attempting to break a world record. The handstand initiative is also a fun way to raise funds for Children’s Miracle Network, which benefits children battling illnesses in each club’s local community. What: As part of your National Gymnastics Day celebration at your gym, organize all interested students, families and friends to perform a handstand at the designated time to break the record for the most simultaneous handstands.  It also provides a fun way to raise funds for Children’s Miracle Network hospitals. Where: Gym clubs may host their activities at the gym, a local park, the local Children’s Miracle Network hospital, or as part of a community event.  This is a great chance to be creative and involved in your community. When: Saturday, September 17, at 1 p.m. ET.  It is important that all handstand participants have “feet up” at the same time across the country.  Activities can be planned leading up to and after the attempt,

but the actual handstands must be done on the dot. How: Spread the news to your club’s students and families, share the information with the local media, schools and children’s groups. Don’t worry about how to organize it. Member Club Services will have sample action plans that may be used as a template. It really can be as simple as having your students show up 30 minutes before the event; practice the simultaneous inversion of the handstand a few times; and right before the attempt, have cameras ready, start the countdown and have them perform the handstands for the world record attempt. You will need to count how many gymnasts successfully do a handstand so we can let everyone know if we broke the record. We need your club to email the number of successful handstands, the name of your club and your city and state by 2:00 p.m. ET on September 17 to worldrecordattempt@usagym.org. Also be sure to submit any photos and video clips! Success: We will announce if we broke the world record on our website at usagym.org and we’ll send participating clubs an email with the news!

Right now, you only need to decide to participate and spread the word. Send an email to worldrecordattempt@usagym.org, and we will send you more detailed information, including the template for the timeline and activities.  Please join together and help USA Gymnastics celebrate the Year of the Handstand and National Gymnastics Day by breaking the world record! 


IMPORTANT NOTICE

WHAT’S NEW NEW NEW

The following Membership Statement has been adopted by the USA Gymnastics Board of Directors: • Membership in USA Gymnastics is a privilege granted by USA Gymnastics. That privilege can be withdrawn by USA Gymnastics at any time where a member’s conduct is determined to be inconsistent with the best interest of the sport of gymnastics and of the athletes we are servicing. The following former professional members are permanently ineligible for membership within USA Gymnastics:

Name Julian Amaro Charles Theodore Bates James Bell Phillip Bishop Patrick Bogan Douglas Boger Joseph Bowers Shawn Bowlden Vince Brown Edward Trey Coniff James Craig III Thad Cypher Steven Elliott Anthony Engelke Matthew H. Erichsen Rick Feuerstein William Foster Joseph Fountain Roy Larry Gallagher Robert Allen (Bob) Garner Sean Gilham Timothy Glas Ricardo “Chico” Goddard Marcelo Guimaraes Vernor Gumila Paul Hagan

State Name CA MN WA MI MD CA OH IL SC TX CO MI TX PA WA CA AL MD PA TN CA NE NY TX IL MI

Robert Dean Head Ted Hicks Michael Hinton Nicholas Hitchcock Robert Hoefer Frank Hohman, Jr. Milos Hroch Steven L. Infante (197212, 197213, 197214) Dana Koppendrayer Ronnie Lewis William McCabe Robert Mollock John S. Moore Gregory Muller William Munsinger Jeena Nilson Paul O’Neill Patrick Okopinski Marian Penev William M. Permenter Timothy Picquelle David Pyles Jeffrey Richards Rudy Rodriguez John H. Row Gabriel Salazar

State Name KY TN TN MI FL PA CA CT FL AR GA OR WV ID MN UT CA WI NY FL CA AZ FL CA DE TX

Mark Schiefelbein Robert Shawler Steve Shirley Steven Todd Siegel Blake Steven Starr Paul Summers Mark Swift Freddie Eugene Tafoya, Jr. Jay Thomas Jon Oliver Kenneth Thomas Brent Trottier Jon Valdez Anthony Van Kirk Joel Velasquez David Paul Waage Chris Wagoner Jeremy Waldridge Russell Wallace Brooklyn Walters Steve Waples Donald Watts Mike West Jonathan White Lyf Christian Wildenberg Bill Witthar Joel Woodruff

State TN CA MO CO UT OK FL CA LA VA WA IL CA OR OR TX OR CT IN TX KY WA CA MN MO TX

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LIVE COURSE SCHEDULES Live course schedules are updated weekly on our website www.usagymnasyticsuniversity.org Please see the website for the most current schedule.

Preschool Fundamentals Hands On Training (Part 2): Certification: Course Description: This is a live, hands-on training course designed for preschool instructors and teachers. Course topics include fundamental movement for children, class safety overview, games, activities to avoid, manipulatives, lesson planning, inclusion of music, thematic teaching, parent/child teaching, and the use of apparatus. This is a great hands on follow-up to the theory course, with course instructors demonstrating practical examples of many of the concepts taught in Part 1. Completion of Part 1 is recommended, but not required, prior to registering for Part 2. The course is scheduled for four hours and will provide a great deal of hands-on instruction for participants. Participants will be challenged with activities during the course. The cost for the live course is $70 for professional, junior professional, instructor or athlete members; $120 for introductory coach, junior intro coach, and non-members. 

SAFETY/RISK MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATION COURSE Safety/Risk Management Certification is required for all Professional, Junior Professional, Introductory Coach, and Junior Introductory Coach Members. *Course dates and times are subject to change and/or cancellation.

aValuable risk management information for everyone in the gym, from administrators & owners to coaches & athletes, aCertification is valid for four years a2009 Handbook available through the online technical materials store Course Description: The primary goal of this course is to increase safety and risk management awareness. The course has been designed for a variety of audiences – gymnastics coaches, teachers, instructors, club owners, meet directors, judges, athletes and others. The course addresses the two basic areas of risk in gymnastics – risk of injury, which is the primary risk, and risk of a lawsuit. Education, preparation, and vigilance are the primary tools gymnastics professionals need to deal with risk and uncertainty in the sport of gymnastics.

UPCOMING LIVE COURSES

SAFETY CERTIFICATION
 • • • • • • •

August 4 (Boston, MA) August 17 (St. Paul, MN) August 25 (Santa Clara, CA) September 2 (Austin, TX) September 8 (Seattle, WA) September 22 (Indianapolis, IN) October 7 (Kent, OH)

PRESCHOOL FUNDAMENTALS

Hands-on Training (Part 2)
 • August 7 (Boston, MA) • August 17 (St. Paul, MN) • August 28 (Santa Clara, CA) • September 2 (Austin, TX) • September 25 (Indianapolis, IN)

To register for a course, visit the USA Gymnastics website at www.usagymnasticsuniversity.org. | Register online or download the registration form. **Save $5 by registering online!**

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TECHNIQUE • AUGUST 2011


CHILDREN RAISE MORE THAN $4000 Aidan Sandova helped Jeff Lulla raise money for the Red Cross.

TUMBLING AND CARTWHEELING FOR THE AMERICAN RED CROSS TO HELP JAPAN EARTHQUAKE & TSUNAMI VICTIMS

The students and parents of kids enrolled at Fun & Fit Gymnastics Centers in Burbank, Simi Valley and Santa Clarita rolled up their sleeves (and opened their wallets) to raise money for the American Red Cross efforts to assist the victims of the earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan recently. Students as young as 12 months performed rolls down soft incline mats while older kids and teens, performing cartwheels and other tumbling skills, asked sponsors to donate for each skill performed.   “I wanted to provide the kids an opportunity to help others in need”, says Jeff Lulla, President of Fun & Fit Gymnastics. “In the past we have supported the Children’s Miracle Network, and following hurricane Katrina, we raised thousands for the Red Cross to support flood victims in New Orleans. It feels wonderful to know that we can help make a difference.”

AUGUST 2011 • TECHNIQUE

33


A BIG ACCOMPLISHMENT FOR BIG HAITI PROJECT By Lauren Reiken

B

alance Institute of Gymnastics (BIG) in Burr Ridge, Ill., shut its doors over the June 24–26 weekend and turned into a mobile food-packing unit to host their Second Annual BIG Haiti Project. With approximately 2,000 volunteers, BIG, in conjunction with the Clarendon Hills Men’s Parish and Feed My Starving Children, packed 404,352 meals which will feed 1,108 children for an entire year. All of the meals packed at this event will be sent to Haiti to help the kids who are still struggling after the devastating earthquake that hit in January of 2010. These meals are “hope” packaged in a box for many children and families who have no where else to turn. The volunteers who came and participated in this event, worked in two-hour shifts and each shift provided enough meals to feed about 120 kids for a year. At the beginning of each shift, volunteers sat through an orientation led by the Feed My Starving Children staff. This orientation informed the volun-

teers of where their donations go and how the food is distributed around the world. When packing, everyone was separated into groups where each person had a specific duty to perform. The goal of each group was to pack about 30 meals in the given time. Some people had the task of scooping chicken flavoring, vegetables, soy and rice into pre-labeled bags, while others had the job of weighing each bag, sealing them, and packing boxes. Bob Elliott, Steve Dockery, and Chris Hughes did an outstanding job putting this fundraiser together; they exceeded their goal of raising $77,000. They also were great motivators during the entire event. Every person who came out and volunteered his/ her time, saved a child’s life and that is an accomplishment that is well worth some praise. Balance Institute of Gymnastics is proud to say that they were a part of this event and is excited for next year’s event.

KIDS RAISE FUNDS FOR JAPAN G ymnastics clubs from around South Texas participated in a Handstand Together event to raise money to assist the American Red Cross in the relief efforts in Japan. More than 150 boys and girls participated in the handstand event that took place in Nelson Wolff Stadium prior to a San Antonio Mission’s baseball game. The event earned $2051 and

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TECHNIQUE • AUGUST 2011

will be donated to relief efforts in Japan, which is still recovering from a huge earthquake and tsunami in March.

Stacey Campbell, a founding board member of Handstand Together, was ecstatic that the organization was able to sell more than 300 tickets.


MEMBER UPDATE MEMBER SERVICES MEMBER SERVICES SERVICES UPDATE UPDATE

HOW DO I UPGRADE..?? HOW DO I TRANSFER..?? ATHLETES One of the most common questions that is asked by our

When a new student joins your facility, you have two options

members is how do I upgrade and/or transfer athletes.

in order to transfer them to your club roster.

NEW TO YOUR CLUB TRANSFERS

Option 1: Email the Member Services Department at membership@usagym.org and provide the athlete name and member number (if it is known), and the club number they will need to be transferred into. USA Gymnastics will fulfill this request within 24 business hours.

Option 2: An athlete can personally change his/her club affiliations by following these steps:

When the new season opens clubs often receive a flood of new athletes that have competed with other gyms. It is important to transfer these athletes to your club and not to create a new record.

o Step 1: Go to www.usagym.org and click on the Login link located in the top right corner. o Step 2: Click on the Click Here to Register Link o Step 3: In the first section of the form it will ask the athlete to enter in his/her member number and personal information.

continued...

AUGUST 2011 • TECHNIQUE

35


MEMBER UPDATE MEMBER SERVICES MEMBER SERVICES SERVICES UPDATE UPDATE o Step 4: Once the user information has been created he/she will then click on Member Services

You may place these requests via email at membership@usagym.org or phone at 800-345-4719.

o Step 6: He/she will click the white My Membership link located on the left hand side. My Membership will allow an athlete to access his/her personal membership information, change club affiliation and print membership card.

Please be sure to include the name and member number of the member you wish to upgrade. The request will be processed within 24 business hours. Once the upgrade has taken place they will appear on your athlete renewal roster to renew.

o This transfer will be instant and the athlete will appear on the clubs athlete/introductory athlete roster to renew.

Special Note: For those Introductory Athletes already having paid for a 11–12 season membership, a completed 11–12 Athlete application form must be faxed and/ or mailed to the USA Gymnastics Member Services Department with the upgrade fee of $38. This is not a function that can be completed online.

NO LONGER INTRODUCTORY ATHLETES Another situation that clubs often encounter is the need to upgrade Introductory Athletes (Level 1-3 & Xcel- PREP Optional-) to Athletes (Level 4 and up). The Introductory Athletes already have member numbers, so they are not considered “new” Athletes. At this time, the option to upgrade them using the online registration system is not currently available. Therefore, you will need to contact the Member Services Department directly.

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TECHNIQUE • AUGUST 2011

If you have any questions regarding the upgrading or transferring athletes please contact the Member Services Department at 800-345-4719.


AUGUST 2011 • TECHNIQUE

37


MINUTES MINUTES WOMEN’S ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE MEETING

Motion: L. Perrott Second: J. Schlott PASSED

May 15, 2011 Long Beach, CA The meeting was called to order at 9:00 am by Chairman Kathy Ostberg. I.

II.

III.

ROLL CALL Region 1 Region 2 Region 3 Region 4 Region 5 Region 6 Region 7 Region 8 VP-P JOCC DPA

Jennifer Krause Meg Doxtator Cori Rizzo Jim Schlott Bobbi Montanari Jen Scannell Lynn Perrott Deb Kornegay Kathy Kelly Tom Koll Rachel Brazo

KATHY OSTBERG WELCOMED THE COMMITTEE AND THANKED THEM FOR THE WORK THEY DO ON A DAILY BASIS.

The Technical Committee reviewed this section and made recommendations to the National Office for changes in the R & P. D.

RECOMMENDATION to the Technical Committee to review the Rights and Obligations section (R & P, page 12 ; D; 5) to be consistent with the Technical Committee’s November 2010 minutes regarding use of cell phones on the field of play. Motion: C. Rizzo Second: M. Doxtator PASSED

E.

RECOMMENDATION that an athlete is officially entered in a USA Gymnastics competition only after valid entry fees are received (R&P pg. 37 F). Motion Kornegay Second Perrott PASSED

F.

RECOMMENDATION regarding Injury/Illness petition (R&P page 52); (Move III. a. to D.I.), the intent to petition must be sent to the respective Regional Technical Committee Chairman by the Monday following the State Meet and documentation is due to the RTCC by Wednesday following the meet. Motion: C. Rizzo Second: D. Kornegay PASSED

G.

RECOMMENDATION to accept the following amendments to the Rules and Policies. Motion: B. Montanari Second: M. Doxtator PASSED

RULES AND POLICIES

The committee reviewed the 2010 – 2011 Rules and Policies and submitted recommendations to the appropriate committees and made editing suggestions. A.

B.

C.

38

RECOMMENDATION to the Junior Olympic Committee and Technical Committee to review the number of compulsory gymnasts allowed per session. The committee recommends that the number of competitors per session be reduced to 80 or less. Motion: L. Perrott Second: J. Krause Note: No changes were made by the JOC and TC. RECOMMENDATION that the current judge’s fee for Xcel (Prep Op) only be applied when the recommended entry fee of $35 or less is followed. Motion: D. Kornegay Second: L. Perrott PASSED RECOMMENDATIONS to the Technical Committee to instruct the judges on how to handle infractions if the Rights and Obligations, as listed in the R&P pages 11-13 are not met.

TECHNIQUE • AUGUST 2011

p. 15 Athlete & Club Eligibility B. Residency 1.

change – the physical location of the gymnast’s training facility determines the residency of the gymnast.

2;a;1. change – the state in which the training facility is physically located. 3.

change – a club must compete in the State Meet[s] of the state in which the training facility is physically located.


AUGUST 2011 • TECHNIQUE

39


MINUTES MINUTES ...continued p. 29

Jr. Olympic National Championships – Level 10

individual who is accused and/or the Meet Director. Hosting institutions may also be denied sanctioning privileges if violations are repeated with multiple Meet Directors.

G; 1; ADD d.

The Regional Administrative Committee will lend financial support to the J.O. National Championships. Each Region will contribute $300 to the Meet Director. Effective May 2011.

p. 38; F; 4; CHANGE – Entry fees for the Junior Olympic Nationals [Level 10] and Eastern/Western Championships [Level 9] will not exceed $125.00. p. 38 II. Pre Meet Organization

STATE ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN HANDBOOK

The committee reviewed and updated the State Administrative Committee Chairman Handbook. V. OPERATING CODE The committee reviewed and updated the Operating Code and submitted the following recommendations to the Women’s Program Committee. p. 9

3. Spectator admission fees for Level 9 East/ West and JO Nationals/JO-NIT change to 1 session

2-day competition

3-day competition

Adults

$15.00

$25.00

$35.00

Children/ Seniors

$10.00

$20.00

$30.00

p. 63

Penalties for Violations

First Time …$100.00 for one violation plus $100.00 for each additional violation

6. Election Procedures Call for nominations for Regional Officers shall be by the RACC. Include the following statement: Nominations for the position of RACC will be sent to the National Administrative Committee Chairman. p. 10 h. Change to:

Regional officers shall be elected by a majority [1 over 50%] of the votes cast.

Second Time … $500.00 for one violation plus $500.00 for each additional violation

n.

Election results will be posted on the USA Gymnastics website.

Third Time… $1000.00 for one violation plus $500.00 for each additional violation.

p. 63, B.

e… has submitted a brief resume/statement of purpose [no more than 300 words]. Endorsements should not be included. Any incumbent should not use non-public e-mail or mailing labels for campaigning.

1.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

7.

40

IV.

A letter from USA Gymnastics will be sent to the USA Gymnastics member and/or Meet Director and host club accused of violations. The accused individual and/or organization will have 30 days to respond. Letters may be sent to the individual who is accused of the violation and/ or the Meet Director and the host club, but fines apply only to the

TECHNIQUE • AUGUST 2011

p. 11

p. 22

Q; Use the accounting office of USA Gymnastics to add to and access regional funds.

DELETE – R; S; T ADD:

shall be accountable for all regional funds and publish each year the financial statement reflecting activity as of July 1 – June 30.


AUGUST 2011 • TECHNIQUE

41


MINUTES MINUTES ...continued p. 23 J.

Attend state Championship meets or send a state committee member as a representative.

p. 24 delete N VI. CALENDAR JO LEVEL 9/10 COMPETITION DATES

2012

State

March 24–25 or March 31/Apr. 1

2013

2014

March 23–24 or March 16–17

March 22–23 or March 15–16

April 12–14 L10 only–April 20–21

April 11–13 L9 only April 5–6

April 13–15 Regionals

L10 only Apr. 20-22 Exception– R4 has L9/10 on 4/20-22 May 3–6

East/West

Nationals/NIT

East: tentative Landover, MD West: tentative Boise, ID

May 2–5 East: Region 5 or 8 West: Region 1 or 3

May 10–13 Tentative-Hampton, VA

May 9–12 Tentative: Minneapolis, MN

May 1–4

May 8–11

NCAA DATES

2012

2013

2014

March 24

March 23

March 22

Regionals

April 7

April 6

April 5

Nationals

April 20–22 Univ. of GA –Gwinnett Center Duluth, GA

April 19–21 UCLA –Pauley Pavilion UCLA

April 18-20 Site TBD

Conference

VII. NEW BUSINESS The committee discussed the current system they used for room blocks at JO Nationals. The committee also discussed the spreadsheet that was used this year for East/West and JO Nationals. They requested that a coaches’ tab be added to the spreadsheet that includes all info on the hard copy entry.

Meeting Adjourned at 5:00 pm.

42

TECHNIQUE • AUGUST 2011


AUGUST 2011 • TECHNIQUE

43


2011 WORLD GYMNAESTRADA The performances ranged from small to large, with some groups having as many as 1,100 members. The Opening Ceremony had approximately 1,900 participating gymnasts, while 16 groups performed over a four-night period, leading up to the closing ceremony. The Pan American Gymnastics Union participated in the Closing Ceremony, with the USA contributing approximately 120 performers. Participating countries included: Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Great Britain, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Trinidad & Tobago, and the United States.

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TECHNIQUE • AUGUST 2011

...continued

Six U.S. clubs participated in three evening performances: Chattooga Gymnastics; La Jolla YMCA; Skyview GymDancers; Westbend Dance and Tumbling; DeVeau’s School of Gymnastics; and Westport-Westin YMCA. The next Gymnaestrada will take place in 2015 in Helsinki, Finland. For more information on Gymnastics for All go to www.usagym.org/group.


CLASSIFIEDS

for sale • position available • seeking employment • education • consignment

POSITION AVAILABLE

GYMNASTICS COACHES/INSTRUCTORS WANTED. Great with kids? Head Over Heels Gymnastics is looking for enthusiastic, positive and motivated people to join our team. Class instructors and  prep-op coaches needed and program director positions available. We are also looking for team players to work with our  Men’s and Women’s JO team programs.  Part time and full time positions available . Full time benefits include health, retirement, dental, and sick/ vacation days.  Salary is based on experience. Visit us at headoverheelsma.com. Email resume’s to headoverheelsgym@verizon.net or call Patricia at 781-659-3378.

INSTRUCTOR/COACHES. Paragon Gymnastics of Norwood NJ (Bergen County), is looking for instructors and coaches, P/T – F/T. Requirements: Positive attitudes, responsible, reliable, and love of children. Position available for COMPETITIVE TEAM COACH LEVEL 4 AND UP with flexible hours. Also preschool through intermediate instruction/cheerleading. Company sponsored certifications (safety, CPR, First Aid). Benefits available, paid vacations & sick days. Salary commensurate with experience. NEW facility, state-of-the-art approx. 11,000sq ft. Located in the NY/NJ Metropolitan area, easily accessible from all major highways. Contact Dot: email: paragongymnastics@verizon. net, 201-767-6921 or fax to 201-767-6693 or at 49 Walnut Street, Suite 4, Norwood, NJ 07648. www.paragongym.com

GIRL’S ARTISTIC TEAM DIRECTOR. Premier Gymnastics in Omaha, NE is looking for a full time position with the responsibility of overseeing the entire girl’s artistic team (80 girls - Pre Team through Level 10). Coaching responsibilities include:  Level 7-10 vault, bars and tumbling.  Supervisor responsibilities include: maintaining/building a strong cohesive staff, ensuring all levels are working toward set goals and standards, setting meet schedules, staff education, lesson plans and more. Applicants must complete forms found at: www.premier-gymnastics.com/positions.php Club information found on website.

SCORE MASTER – SCOREKEEPING SOFTWARE interfaced to many different score boards: EliteScore, BetaBrites, TV’s & Projectors. Download team rosters from the USAG website. Features include: random draws, create rotations, assign #’s, the most comprehensive reporting and results can go directly to your website. Supports: womens/mens, individual/team, artistic/rhythmic/trampoline, compulsory/optional. Download a FREE demo at www.Score-Master.com

Nashoba Gymnastics Academy at One Stop Fun, Westford, Massachusetts is looking for an enthusiastic, experienced, highly motivated TEAM COACHES FOR PRE-TEAM, compulsory and optional teams. Ideal candidates are team players, mature, career-minded, energetic and have a positive attitude. Compensation based upon experience. Benefits available to full time coaches. Send resume to Glen Mair: onestopfun@charter.net

GK RISK FREE PROGRAM: Get with the program! It’s better than ever, with a terrific assortment of NEW styles and fabrics and incomparable sales potential. Plus, it’s easier than ever to order, sell and return your RISK FREE garments. We offer customized packages for your pro shop, meets and summer camp. You only pay for what you’ve sold and may return the rest, there is absolutely NO RISK! If you haven’t tried us lately, it’s time you started earning extra profits with our RISK FREE merchandise. Call 1-800-345-4087 for more information on how you can get started today! Email: customerservice@gkelite.com

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TECHNIQUE • AUGUST 2011

EDUCATION

Available now! The NEW GYMCERT Gymnastics training manuals (Levels 1, 2, 3, & the NEW Skills & Drills for the Compulsory Coach Level’s 4, 5 & 6) a must for training your staff; cut your lesson planning time significantly; use to coordinate class progressions and skill training methods; and, best of all have a quick reference that is easy to use which includes Lesson Planning Forms and Class Evaluation Forms by level. The GYMCERT manuals provide concise instruction, clear illustrations, and several coaching, spotting, and safety tips. Will your staff be ready for your fall students? Order direct by calling toll free: 1-866-591-8500 or online: www.GYMCERT.com.

FOR SALE

FOR INFORMATION on how to publish a classified ad in Technique, go to www.usagym.org/publications Or call Luan Peszek at 317-829-5646.


USA Gymnastics 132 E. Washington St., Suite 700 Indianapolis, IN 46204

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. Postage

PAID

Indianapolis, IN Permit No. 7867

CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

Technique - Aug. 2011 - Vol. 31, #8  

Technique Magazine - August 2011 - Vol. 31, #8

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