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OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF USA

GYMNASTICS UNIVERSITY

DONNELL WHITTENBURG 2017 LONDON WORLD CUP ALL-AROUND SILVER MEDALIST

ON THE ROAD AGAIN! GYMNASTS TRAVEL GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING SIX THINGS TO REMEMBER WHEN AN ATHLETE SWITCHES GYMS CREATING A SAFE, PROTECTIVE COACHING ENVIRONMENT FOR YOUR ATHLETES JULY/AUGUST 2017– VOL. 37 – #4

PREVIEW 2021–2029 ELEMENTS FOR THE WOMEN’S COMPULSORY PROGRAM COLLEGE ATHLETICS RECRUITING DEVELOPING A PERSONAL RECRUITING INVENTORY GREENING YOUR MEET ...AND MORE!


EVENTS E V E N T S

S C H E D U L E

2017

JULY 6

National Qualifier (W)

Huntsville, TX

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Hopes Classic (W)

Huntsville, TX

8

American Classic (W)

Huntsville, TX

20–30

World Games (AG/R/TT)

27–29

U.S. Classic/Hopes Championships (W) Hoffman Estates, IL

Wroclaw, Poland

AUGUST 17–20

P&G Gymnastics Championships (M/W)

30–Sept. 9 World Championships (R)

Anaheim, CA Pesaro, Italy

International Junior Japan (W)

2–8

World Championships (M/W)

Montreal, Canada

13–15

Pan American Championships (AG/R)

Datona Beach, FL

NOVEMBER 9–12

World Championships (TT)

Sofia, Bulgaria

16–19

World Age Group Competitions (TT)

Sofia, Bulgaria

Nov 28–Dec 2 TOPs A National Team Camp (W)

Huntsville, TX

DECEMBER Dec 2–6

SEPTEMBER 17–18

OCTOBER

TOPs B Team Camp (W)

Huntsville, TX

Yokohama, Japan

W = Women, R = Rhythmic, TR = Trampoline, M = Men, GFA = Gymnastics for All, TU = Tumbling, AG = Acrobatic Gymnastics, B = Business, TT = Trampoline/Tumbling NOTE: Dates and events are subject to change or cancellation.

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TECHNIQUE • JULY/AUGUST 2017


OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF USA

GYMNASTICS UNIVERSITY

J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7 • V O L U M E 3 7 • #4

16

PUBLISHER

Paul Parilla EDITOR

Scott Bregman

GREENING YOUR MEET By Lainy Carslaw

Jeannie Shaw

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TECHNIQUE is published bi-monthly by USA Gymnastics, 130 E. Washington St., Suite 700, Indianapolis, IN 46204 (phone: 317-237-5050) or visit online at www.usagym.org Subscription prices: U.S.—$25 per year; Canada/Mexico—$48 per year; all other foreign countries—$60 per year. If available, back issue single copies $4 plus postage/handling. All reasonable care will be taken, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited material; enclose return postage. Copyright 2017 by USA Gymnastics and TECHNIQUE. ­All rights reserved. Printed by Sport Graphics, Indianapolis, IN. Member Services 1-800-345-4719. Unless expressly identified to the contrary, all articles, statements and views printed herein are attributed solely to the author, and USA Gymnastics expresses no opinion and assumes no responsibility thereof.

GYMNAST HANDS By Robin Stewart

SIX THINGS TO REMEMBER WHEN AN ATHLETE SWITCHES GYMS By Anne Josephson

22

USA GYMNASTICS BOARD OF DIRECTORS

CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES: In order to ensure uninterrupted delivery of TECHNIQUE magazine, notice of change of address should be made eight weeks in advance. For fastest service, please enclose your present mailing label. Direct all subscription mail to TECHNIQUE Subscriptions, USA Gymnastics, 130 E. Washington St., Suite 700, Indianapolis, IN 46204 .

6 ON THE ROAD AGAIN! GYMNASTS TRAVEL GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING By Anna Turner

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GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Chair: Paul Parilla Vice-Chair/ Secretary: Jay Binder Treasurer: Bitsy Kelley National Membership – Women: Tom Koll National Membership – Women: Kelli Hill National Membership – Men: Yoichi Tomita National Membership – Men: Mike Burns National Membership – Rhythmic: Natalia Kozitskaya National Membership – Trampoline & Tumbling: Patti Conner National Membership – Acrobatic Gymnastics: Carisa Laughon Advisory Council: Kathy Krebs Advisory Council: Casey Koenig Advisory Council: Rome Milan Athlete Director – Women: Terin Humphrey Athlete Director – Men: David Durante Athlete Director – Rhythmic: Ava Gehringer Athlete Director – Trampoline & Tumbling: Austin White Athlete Director – Acrobatic Gymnastics: Dylan Maurer Public Sector: David Benck Public Sector: Bitsy Kelley Public Sector: Kevin Martinez Public Sector: Cathy Rigby McCoy

FEATURES

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CREATING A SAFE, PROTECTIVE COACHING ENVIRONMENT FOR YOUR ATHLETES By Katelyn Brewer

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COLLEGE ATHLETICS RECRUITING DEVELOPING A PERSONAL RECRUITING INVENTORY By Tom Kovic

DEPARTMENTS

2

EVENT SCHEDULE

4

INSIDE USA GYMNASTICS MESSAGE

18

FREE WEBINARS

34

USA GYMNASTICS UNIVERSITY LIVE COURSE SCHEDULE

38

PREVIEW 2021–2029 ELEMENTS FOR THE WOMEN’S COMPULSORY PROGRAM

44

MEMBER SERVICES UPDATE

22

44 WHAT’S NEW —BANNED MEMBERS LIST UPDATE

47 CLASSIFIEDS COVER: Photo by John Cheng

JULY/AUGUST 2017 • TECHNIQUE

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M E S S A G E

A

F R O M

The summer is always an exciting time for Team USA, and 2017 is no exception. Recently at the USA Gymnastics Championships in Milwaukee, Wis., athletes from rhythmic gymnastics, acrobatic gymnastics and trampoline and tumbling squared off for national titles and national team berths, as well as a chance to represent the red, white and blue at the 2017 World Games. Every year, the USA Gymnastics Championships showcases these disciplines at the highest level. In August, the P&G Gymnastics Championships and USA Gymnastics National Congress and Trade Show will once again bring together the gymnastics community. Scheduled for Aug. 17-20 in Anaheim, Calif.’s Honda Center, the P&G Championships will feature the U.S.’s best gymnasts vying for a place on the U.S. National Team, national titles and is part of the selection process for this fall’s World Championships in Montreal, Canada. National Congress will offer more than 200 presentations, demonstrations, certification opportunities and educational seminars on a variety of topics within the sport. The Trade Show Hall is something

T H E

C H A I R M A N

you won’t want to miss, featuring more than 200 booths from 70 vendors and special events like Live and Hands-on Spotting Lectures each day. For more information, visit USAGymCongress.com. By the time this issue reaches your mailbox, Deborah Daniels, the former federal prosecutor who has been conducting a comprehensive, independent review of USA Gymnastics policies, procedures and guidelines regarding sexual misconduct and abuse, will have delivered her report to the USA Gymnastics Board of Directors in late June. For information on the Daniels report and our plans going forward, please visit USAGym.org/safesport. In May, USA Gymnastics announced the organization will no longer proceed with plans to purchase of the Karolyi Ranch, which serves as the USA Gymnastics National Team Training Center. USA Gymnastics is presently continuing under the current lease arrangement to hold national team activities at the Ranch while it is exploring alternative locations for training activities and camps. Finally, the search for a new USA Gymnastics president and CEO is underway.

The Search Committee, appointed by the USA Gymnastics Board of Directors, is working with the search firm of Russell Reyonals and Associates. The Search Committee includes David Benck and Bitsy Kelley, current public sector members of the Board of Directors; Olympic medalists Raj Bhavsar, Chellsie Memmel, Shannon Miller and Kim Zmeskal-Burdette; and Jim Morris, past public sector Board member. The Search Committee’s goal is to secure a new president/CEO who best meets the ideals and priorities expressed by the gymnastics community, and is capable of leading all of USA Gymnastics into a strong and successful next chapter. USA Gymnastics looks forward to seeing and talking with the gymnastics community in Anaheim during the National Congress and P&G Championships. See you in the gym, Paul H. Parilla

Chairman USA Gymnastics Board of Directors


JULY/AUGUST 2017 • TECHNIQUE

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FEATURE

FEA TURE B Y

A N N A

T U R N E R ,

S T . V I N C E N T

S P O R T S

P E R F O R M A N C E

ON THE ROAD AGAIN! D I E T I C I A N ,

M S ,

R D ,

C S S D ,

B

eing a competitive gymnast means that you are on the road a lot traveling to different competitions. Sometimes, you have the time and capabilities to pack a healthy snack or meal with you for your trip. When you are unable to pack food, athletes need to be able to utilize fast food restaurants to their advantage.

STEP #1

UNDERSTAND WHAT YOUR PLATE SHOULD LOOK LIKE BASED ON YOUR TRAINING. Most gymnasts can follow the U.S. Olympic Committee’s Athlete Easy or Moderate training day plate. Determining which plate you choose depends how intense and long your training sessions are. For longer, more

C I S S N

intense training days, choose the moderate plate with more carbohydrates, and for a lighter day, the easy plate would be most appropriate.

STEP #2

UNDERSTAND WHAT TO LOOK FOR WHEN EATING OUT. 1. Choose foods to fit your Athlete Plate Example 1 Easy Athlete Plate: Chickfil-A Grilled Chicken Sandwich, super food side salad (veggies) and fruit cup (fruit) Example 2 Moderate Athlete Plate: Chipotle salad bowl + rice and beans and chicken/steak.

ATHLETE PLATE

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2. Choose low fat foods

The biggest reason eating fast food isn’t healthy is because it is high in unhealthy fats. Use these key phrases below to know which items are loaded in fat. • Items Loaded in fat: fried, battered, creamy, crispy, cheesey, thick, breaded • Steer clear of sandwiches made largely from mayo such as tuna salad or chicken salad. • Skip the fries

3. Choose healthy sides a. Fruit b. Yogurt parfaits c. Side salads


GYMNASTS TRAVEL GUIDE TO HEALTHY EATING EXAMPLE RESTAURANTS

Chick-fil-A® Breakfast items • Chicken, egg, and cheese on sunflower multigrain bagel • Multigrain oatmeal • Greek yogurt parfait Afternoon Bites • Grilled chicken sandwich + Super Food Side Salad + fruit cup • Grilled nuggets + side salad + Greek yogurt parfait • Grilled Chicken Cool Wrap + fruit cup • Grilled Market Salad + yogurt parfait • Grilled Spicy Southwest Salad (if not a meet day, stay away from spicy on competition day) + yogurt parfait • Chicken noodle soup + side salad + fruit cup

McDonald’s® Breakfast • Oatmeal • Egg white delight McMuffin • Egg McMuffin Afternoon Bites • Hamburger • Artisan Grilled ChickenSandwich • Side Salad • Snack size fruit and walnut salad • Southwest grilled chicken salad

Applebee’s®

Chipotle®

• Pepper Crusted Sirloin and Whole Grains • Bourbon Street Chicken and Shrimp • Napa Chicken and Portobello’s • Cedar Grilled Lemon Chicken • Thai Shrimp salad • Fiesta Chicken Chopped Salad

• Salad + add beans and rice and chicken/steak + add all extra cooked veggies.

Sides • Seasonal vegetables, house salad, fresh fruit

Olive Garden® • • • • •

Citrus Chicken Sorrento Garlic Rosemary Chicken Baked Tilapia with Shrimp Herb Grilled Salmon Chicken Marsala

Sides • Soup—Minestrone • Salad—house

Starbucks® Breakfast choices • Classic Whole-Grain Oatmeal • Egg and Cheddar breakfast sandwich • Hearty Blueberry Oatmeal • Reduced fat turkey bacon cage-free egg white breakfast sandwich • Slow-roasted ham, swiss and egg breakfast sandwich • Spinach and feta, and cage-free egg white breakfast wrap Afternoon Bites • Hearty Veggie and Brown Rice Salad Bowl • Zesty Chicken and Black Bean Salad Bowl

**Tips — Ask to substitute cooked veggies for other side items such as bread or pasta. — Be careful of the breadsticks. Try not to consume them before your plate comes. If you wait until your plate arrives and place the breadstick on your plate, you will see how it fits your Athlete Plate.

Hopefully, you can see that with a little guidance, you can make good choices while eating on the road. The most important thing is to be mindful of your training and which Athlete Plate you are trying to achieve when you place your order. JULY/AUGUST 2017 • TECHNIQUE

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FEATURE . . . F A C E B O O K . . .

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C O N T I N U E D

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GREENING FEATURE B Y

L A I N Y

C A R S L A W

HAS THIS EVER HAPPENED TO YOU?

You’re at the State meet, huddled into a circle around the vault table for your fourth consecutive coaches’ meeting in one day, struggling to pay attention. The meet director passes out rotation sheets and then asks if there are any more scratches. Turns out, there is one: Alexis Smith, in squad D. The meet director grumbles and then proceeds to re-print thirty more rotation sheets to hand out, without Alexis Smith’s name on it.

HAVE YOU EVER THOUGHT ABOUT THIS?

Why on earth did every coach need an entirely new rotation sheet when only squad D was affected? In fact, why did squad D even need a new sheet? Couldn’t the coaches simply have used a pen to make any small adjustment that was required? Or how about this for revolutionary: couldn’t the meet director just post one rotation sheet and the coaches who want a copy can just screen shot it onto their phones, saving hundreds of sheets of paper (and money) over the course of an entire weekend? If you haven’t thought about the paper we waste on rotation schedules at meets, there is probably a good reason. Because this behavior is normal. This is how we’ve always done it because we have not evolved enough when it comes to being environmen-

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tally conscious in our industry. Printing fewer rotation sheets is a good place to start but there are many more things we can do to become greener as a gymnastics community. For example, here is another doozy… t-shirts! Yes, the ever beloved meet t-shirt. Gymnasts love these things! But unless Grandma likes to sew and is willing to patch them into a handmaid quilt someday, they are, most likely, going to end up rotting in a landfill within the next few years. According to an article in the Huffington Post, “The production of one t-shirt uses up to 700 gallons of water. Aside from the harmful chemicals used to dye and fade, cotton uses 25% of the world’s pesticides.” And if that is not alarming enough, the EPA estimates that the average American throws away 70 pounds of clothes, adding up to 11.1 million tons of textiles each year world-wide. What can we give out to our eager young gymnasts instead of a t-shirt, you might be asking? How about a small gymnast charm? A reusable bag with the meet logo on it? Or an inscribed glass that will remind them of your meet each time they drink out of it? And while we are on the subject of drinking, have you ever thought about the massive amount of water bottles used in just one competition? Between spectators and thirsty athletes, an average meet can go through hundreds of bottles of water in just one session. A few years ago, Mary Lee Tracy gave the coaches reusable water bottles

at her meet, The Coaches Spectacular. There were re-fillable water stations throughout the venue saving hundreds of bottles from living out the rest of their toxic filled existences in a landfill somewhere for the next thousand years because, guess what, very few meetsites even recycle. This was generous and conscientious of Mary Lee, but you don’t have to wait for the meet directors—you can bring your own, or get water bottles made up with your name on it for you and your team. The last thing to consider is the awards themselves. I don’t know about you, but as a gym owner, the thought of adding one more dust collecting trophy to our shelves just gives me a head-ache. And as a gym mom, the thought of finding a place to hang one more medal gives me an even bigger one. I understand trophies and medals are tradition, but is there another way we can make the kids feel special other than giving them something shiny to hold above their heads or around their necks for 30 seconds?

HERE ARE SOME IDEAS

The Steel City Invitational in Pittsburgh used to hand out only one award banner over the entire meet weekend to each team. The level and placement were attached to each banner at the end of the weekend. Or how about this? Money! Who doesn’t love money?! I know, it might not be as fun to gaze at as a polished trophy, but you could use that money to take that winning team to din-


G YOUR MEET ner or purchase a piece of equipment and have the kids who helped buy it graffiti their signature on it somewhere. Or how about things we could actually use like equipment—mats, beam covers, or chalk! If you are thinking, “girl, you cray-cray, we love our bling” then don’t forget—there are places that will recycle your old trophies so please look online before dooming them to an eternity in your nearest land-fill. When I asked my students for their ideas, their answer: chocolate! These are just some ideas on how we can work together to become a more environmentally friendly industry, but I am sure there are many, many more. Change is hard. And we, as coaches, know more than anyone that old habits are hard to break. As President

Obama said, “Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we have been waiting for.” Have other green-friendly ideas? I’d love to hear them at lainycarslaw@gmail.com.

JULY/AUGUST 2017 • TECHNIQUE

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USA Gymnastics Digital Resources Our commitment to the gymnastics industry is found with our total mobile strategy. This will revolutionize how we think of our gymnastics learning experience.

Find out what we OFFER! Visit usagym.org and click on STORES for information on our digital technology!

Women’s Artistic Compulsory App Cost: $29.99

Available for download/purchase on the following items: Apple, Android and Kindle tablets.

Xcel Code of Points iBook Cost: $29.99

The Xcel Code of Points on iBook is only available on Apple products through the iTunes bookstore. Please note that the iTunes App is only available on Apple products (iPhone, iPad, iPod or MP3 player).

Women’s Compulsory Music on iTunes

Cost: $9.99 (entire album) • $ .99 (individual tracks) Available for download/purchase on iTunes ONLY. Please note that the iTunes App is only available on Apple products (iPhone, iPad, iPod or MP3 player). The music CD is also available.

Women’s J.O. Code of Points on iBooks Cost: $39.99

The Women’s Junior Olympic Code of Points on iBook is only available on Apple products through the iTunes bookstore. The iBooks edition of the Code includes a listing of all skills, complete with their value plus illustrations of each skill.

Men’s J.O. Age Group App Cost: $29.99

Take the USA Gymnastics Men’s Junior Olympic Age Group Program wherever you go. Available for download/purchase at USAGym.org/Apps on Apple and Android devices.

More products to come! USA Gymnastics mobile technology uses stunning full-color interactive pages as users control their own experience – pinching, stretching, tapping and dragging beautiful illustrations, animations, charts, content and photos. Users can mark pages, highlight content, take notes and create flashcards. JULY/AUGUST 2017 • TECHNIQUE

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FEATURE TURE

FEA TURE B Y

R O B I N

S T E W A R T

GYMNAST HANDS O W N E R / F O U N D E R

O F

R I P F I X . C O M

I

f you search #gymnasthands on social media, you will be sure to find numerous posts of overworked hands with huge calluses and rips. Young gymnasts are so proud of their first rips and love to show them off, but a seasoned gymnast knows that those badges of honor get old quickly. Calluses and rips are inevitable in gymnastics and can lead to unwanted downtime. The key to getting you back on the bars quicker is maintenance.

There is a big difference between a healthy and an unhealthy callus. Calluses are basically layers of hardened dry, dead skin caused by overuse. The minute a callus starts to discolor, turn brown, yellow or white, it’s a good indication that they need to be filed down. Calluses should be pliable. They should work with you, not against you. Think of it this way, the bigger and harder the callus, the bigger and deeper (and more painful) the rip. Hardened calluses plus chalk (which is very drying) plus friction from swinging bars equals rips. Once you rip, the vicious rip/heal/rip cycle can begin. In order to stop the cycle you have to do maintenance. Here are some simple hand maintenance tips that will lead you to healthy hands that rip less. 1. Get a good all natural pumice stone. The all-nat16

TECHNIQUE • JULY/AUGUST 2017


ural stones last a long time as opposed to the drug store pumice, which is usually a fabricated tool made up of ground pumice stone that is glued to a formation. These pumices fall apart with use; the natural stones can last a very long time. 2. Keep your pumice in the shower. Use the wet pumice on a wet palm and gently scrub off the top layer of dead, hard skin. 3. Before bed, use a product like RipFix® to moisturize hands. You need to replenish your hands and combat the daily beating they take in the gym. Do not worry about your hands becoming too soft... If you are a gymnast, this won’t happen. Some gymnasts sleep with socks or cotton gloves on their hands to keep in the moisture from the product.

5. Once healed, make sure to pumice down the skin around the wound to smooth out the rough edges. Those edges can lead to the next rip.

Photo by John Cheng

4. When and if you are ripped, cut the skin off as close to the rip line as possible with some angled clippers, pack in a soothing, healing product and loosely wrap. RipFix is highly effective and does not hurt upon application. It instantly soothes and quickly starts the healing. Loosely wrap your hand so air can also do its magic. Keep re-applying product until you are healed up.

Your hands are your number one tool, and your performance depends on them. Take care of your hands! JULY/AUGUST 2017 • TECHNIQUE

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MONTHLY YLHTNOMMONTHLY

FREE WEBINARS

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It is important for every athlete to maintain a healthy mind, body image, and training schedule to become a well-rounded gymnast. Join us on Aug. 2 at 1 p.m. E.T. for the next USA Gymnastics webinar, Athlete Wellness: Tips for Maintaining and Sustaining a Healthy Mind and Body. This free webinar will cover nutrition, healthy body image, healthy training, and mental health. Register at USAGym.org and help your athletes be the best they can be on and off the field of play.

NEXT WEBINAR

Date: Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2017 Time: 1 p.m. E.T. Duration: 1 hour Register today at usagym.org/webinars! 18

TECHNIQUE • JULY/AUGUST 2017


COMPETITION SCHEDULE Friday, July 28 2:30 pm – Hopes Championships Competition Saturday, July 29 1:00 pm – Jr. Women’s Competition 6:30 pm – Sr. Women’s Competition Schedule subject to change. All times are Central.

USAGymClassic.com

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

GROUPS:

19 773.327.3778

JULY/AUGUST 2017 • TECHNIQUE


Arizona Grand Invitational Phoenix, AZ Arizona Grand Resort

January 19th-21st 2018 Levels 2 - 10 & Xcel • AZgrandinvitational.com

Greetings from

California Grand Invitational Anaheim Convention Center

Come for the gymnastics... Stay for the fun... in the warm California Sun

J a n u a r y 1 2 t h - 14 t h 2 0 1 8 Levels 2 - 10 & Xcel • CAgrandinvitational.com 20

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FEATURE TURE

FEA TURE B Y

A N N E

J A G

G Y M ,

J O S E P H S O N C U L V E R

C I T Y ,

C A

SIX THINGS TO REMEMBER

WHEN AN ATHLETE

SWITCHES GYMS

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W

ith the end of the competitive season comes some real plusses: weekends free of travel, a chance to welcome new kids into the beginning ranks of team and the fun that comes with workouts free of the stress of full routines. And then there is the real downside: when a competitive athlete chooses to leave our gym for another. One of the harder things I have dealt with and watched coaches deal with is an athlete departing from our club and moving to another. It’s a mourning that is seldom fully understood by our family members and friends who aren’t coaches or club owners. Sure, sometimes it comes with the relief of knowing that a family that caused distress to the coaching staff has moved on to be someone else’s problem. But sometimes, it is an event that is made sad because the staff genuinely loved and cared about the child and family. Stick around the sport long enough, and you will have your heart broken at some point. For as much as owning or coaching at a gym is a business, it is a business that comes with deep connection to the kids and families with whom we work.

So here are six things to remember when an athlete you adore switches gyms:

strong philosophies. Strong philos-

REMEMBER THAT MOST DECISIONS HAVE LESS TO DO WITH YOU THAN YOU THINK.

are selling.

Decisions are complicated. Often people making them are not even fully aware of the reasons they are making the choices they are making. But this I can tell you: you likely have far less to do with the decision than you think. People don’t think of us as often as we believe them to. They are thinking about themselves and their needs.

REMEMBER THAT MAKING A DIFFERENT CHOICE DOES NOT NECESSARILY INDICATE A PROBLEM WITH YOUR COACHING/PROGRAM.

If you are a conscientious person, you are likely to labor over what you could have done to make the client happier. You might think you need to change your program to be more like the program your athlete left to go to. Maybe. But probably not. Just because someone doesn’t choose you, does not necessarily mean there is anything wrong with what you are doing. If after reflecting you realize that there are things you do need to change, then go right ahead and make those changes. A professional coach or club owner is always learning, adapting and growing.

REMEMBER THAT YOU CANNOT BE FOR EVERYONE.

If you appeal to everyone, you appeal to no one. Great programs have

ophies mean there are going to be people who don’t like what you

REMEMBER THAT THINGS CHANGE, AND EVEN IF IT WAS ONCE A FIT, IT MAY NO LONGER BE. Maybe your program was a great fit for recreational classes, but the team philosophy doesn’t match what the parents want for their child. Or maybe the coach who was so terrific with the athlete as a pre-teen is not the right fit for the athlete as a teen. It happens.

REMEMBER THAT THERE ARE OTHER FAMILIES WHO ARE HAPPY WITH YOUR PROGRAM. It’s easy to focus on the small percentage of people that are not happy, wring your hands over the ones who complain. But remember there are people who are thrilled with your training, whose kids are happy and thriving.

REMEMBER THAT THE MORE YOU CAN SMILE BECAUSE IT HAPPENED, THE HAPPIER YOU WILL BE. Of course, you will feel a loss when a kid you adored goes to another gym. But try to focus on the time you had teaching that athlete and let the rest go. Allow yourself a little time to mourn the loss of interacting with that athlete on a regular basis and then get back to work because undoubtedly you have a whole bunch of other kids that want to learn from you!

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FEATURE TURE

FEA TURE B Y

K A T E L Y N

D A R K N E S S

B R E W E R ,

T O

P R E S I D E N T

&

C E O

L I G H T

Let’s face it. Coaching can be complicated. As a coach, you’re a mix of coach, parent, educator, and motivator. You see the promise in your athletes, pushing them to achieve things they might not have thought possible. Celebrating their successes and counseling them through short-comings, you develop a close personal relationship with the athletes you train. You’re also a master of bringing many disciplines to the table when it comes to the development of your teams. There’s the strict physical development required to execute the sport, seeing athletes through physical growth and development of special skills. Psychology is involved, too. There’s considerable mental preparation needed to bring out the best in your team. And through all of this, how do you balance the requirements of excellent coaching while respecting personhood and bodily autonomy? Here are a few ideas for promoting a safe environment that puts your athlete’s boundaries first.

COMMUNICATE, COMMUNICATE, AND COMMUNICATE SOME MORE

• Set Expectations. Explain your expectations and style of coaching, not only to your athletes, but also to their parents and guardians as well. This should include an explanation of the child protection policies that you adhere to as put forth by your club and USA Gymnastics. Having this open conversation with both athletes and parents ensures that everyone is on the same page and are prepared to hold each other accountable.

• Empower peer-to-peer support. Empower athletes to support one another in regard to safety issues and concerns. For instance, after you explain your style and the policies in place, encourage them to speak up if they see another teammate whose boundaries are being violated.

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• Match your physical and verbal communication. Understand the nuances of the way you communicate, both verbal-


ly and nonverbally. Listen to your tone. Does the tone of your voice match what you are saying? Is your body language convincing? Are you telling an athlete that something is OK, but your body language is rigid or your arms are crossed?

UP YOUR AWARENESS GAME

• Be aware of your style. How often do you or your fellow coaches make physical corrections? How do you tend to do it? Is it done in a way that is respectful of the athlete? • Be aware of the policies of your club and USA Gymnastics. Are you aware of the current guidelines? Do you know where to find updates or policy recommendations? If not, we recommend visiting the USA Gymnastics Safe Sport website to review the many club-specific policy resources available to club owners and administrators. Information may be found online at usagym.org/SafeSport. • Be aware of your club’s culture. Does your club create an

atmosphere that allows the athlete to communicate concerns without fear of repercussions? While sport-specific coaching techniques may not be up for discussion, questions from your athletes about personal boundaries should always be allowed and encouraged. Remember, your goal is to promote a safe boundary that puts personal safety first.

can’t put their finger on exactly where it came from. Be there for your athletes and listen for both the spoken and unspoken. • Have a plan to speak up. Be ready to address your concerns with the athlete, parent, and club management. Know and follow your policies and consistently encourage others to do the same. All that’s required to put any of the above

TAKING COACHING TO A NEW LEVEL

• Anticipate needs. Develop a new/ expanded awareness of your athletes and their needs. Take notice of new behaviors or emotional reactions, especially where touching or privacy are involved. • Become trauma sensitive. Trauma impacts people in many ways, sometime affecting behavior at odd times and in unusual ways. There can be actions that trigger emotional responses you’ve never seen before. It’s not unusual for an individual to have a strong response to a trigger and not be aware of the cause. They know something upset them but they

in place is a willingness to be informed and aware, to respond to concerns and to make changes, as needed. When you commit to promoting a safe environment for your athletes, they have a place where they can grow and excel. Share this article and talk to other coaches and coaching assistants, asking them to be open and consider the tips above as well.

DID YOU KNOW? As a member of USA Gymnastics, you can become certified in child sexual abuse prevention by taking the Stewards of Children® certification. You can find this course, as well as other Safe Sport courses, by visiting usagym.org/SafeSport or by following this link: https://usagym. org/pages/education/courses/U301/.


30

TECHNIQUE • JULY/AUGUST 2017


JULY/AUGUST 2017 • TECHNIQUE

31


FEATURE TURE

FEA TURE B Y

T O M

K O V I C

COLLEGE ATHLETICS

RECRUITING DEVELOPING A PERSONAL RECRUITING INVENTORY

T

he college recruiting process has developed into a highly competitive arena. It has become an intricate process that requires sound planning, the development of an accurate information base and the willingness to take a proactive approach in carefully executing the recruiting plan. Each prospect is unique in their goals, timing and student-athlete abilities, but there is one common thread that should run through every well-planned college search: The development of a personal recruiting inventory. Developing a personal inventory is a great exercise that can serve families well in organizing for the college quest, but it can also act as a tool that will develop a confident level of self-awareness as the prospect moves forward in navigating a potentially daunting path.

ACADEMIC GOALS Goals give meaning to any worthy effort and a quality academic experience should be at the top of the priority list. Roughly 75% of prospective college student-athletes are undecided about declaring a specific academic major and most colleges and universities do not require students to declare until after the sophomore year. This is a great time for a “team discussion” where the prospect, parents and the high school guidance counselor can sit 32

TECHNIQUE • JULY/AUGUST 2017

down and discuss the many options available to the prospect. You may not know the exact academic direction you plan to choose, but this exercise could very well begin to point you toward a general academic direction. Athletic Level: Knowing your true level of athletic ability will help you narrow down your potential college choices. The important component here is being honest in the evaluation of your raw athletic talent and again, I suggest utilizing the team approach and bring your club coach into the family meeting! By executing a fair and impartial assessment about your current and potential talent as an athlete, you can help avoid “spinning your wheels” when searching college options that are well above or below your talent level. There is nothing wrong with “reaching” toward college programs that are a level above your current ability, but you want to set realistic goals, especially as it pertains to being a potential impact player in a particular program.

NCAA DIVISION OPTIONS This is a great time to learn about the differences between NCAA Division 1, 2 and 3 athletics. “Option” is the operative word here and whether you would like to play at a big time Division 1 school or for a smaller division 3 program depends on several factors. If gaining an athletics scholarship is a critical element in your decision to attend college, the Division 3 option will need to be eliminated since these institutions do not offer athletics aid. On the other hand,

if you are looking for a well-balanced student-athlete experience, Division 3 schools are outstanding choices and should be at the top of your list!

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION How far are you willing to travel away from home and still enjoy your college experience? This might sound like a marginal area of concern, but first determine if you are more of a “home body” or an “explorer.” Some kids can’t wait to shuffle cross country to enjoy their college experience, while others are very content with attending a school that is only a few hours drive from home.

SIZE OF SCHOOL When I was an undergraduate student-athlete, I shared a campus with 35,000 other students. It was an urban environment that was invigorating, exciting and sometimes overwhelming, but it was the right fit for me. Do you wonder if the grass is greener on the other side of the road? I suggest you get out there and take a look! Begin by visiting several colleges that consist of small (up to 5,000 students), medium (up to 15,000 students) and large (over 20,000 students) undergraduate populations. Spend a half day on each campus and try to get a general feel for


the environment. At the end of each visit, you will sense a “gut” feeling for each institution that will serve as a good reference point of comparison. By developing a college inventory, prospects and families will begin to grow a basic awareness about the college recruiting process. First, you will grow a greater appreciation for the variety of college options that are available and secondly, you will begin to develop a stronger sense of self-awareness and self-confidence as you begin to execute

your plan that will lead to a very important life decision. The college recruiting process is competitive, grueling and sometimes frustrating. That being said, the college search should be an exhilarating time in the lives of our children. The more concrete information they gather and the better prepared they are to successfully execute their individual plans, the greater the chance for a more positive experience.

Tom Kovic is a former Division I college coach and the current director of Victory Collegiate Consulting, where he provides individual advisement for families on college recruiting. Tom is the author of Reaching for Excellence, an educational guide for college athletics recruiting. For further information, visit: www.victoryrecruiting.com.

Copyright © 2017 Victory Collegiate Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

WHAT’S NEW WHAT’S NEW

IMPORTANT NOTICE

The following Membership Statement has been adopted by the Board of Directors of USA Gymnastics: Membership in USA Gymnastics is a privilege granted by USA Gymnastics. That privilege can be withdrawn by USA Gymnastics at any time where a member’s conduct is determined to be inconsistent with the best interest of the sport of gymnastics and of the athletes we are servicing.

The following former members are permanently ineligible for membership within USA Gymnastics. Based on an amendment of Article 10.16 to the USA Gymnastics Bylaws, effective January 1, 2012, any individual who is declared ineligible will have the USA Gymnastics’ Bylaw, rule, regulation or policy that was violated and resulted in his/her expulsion listed next to his/her name.

Name State Violation Name State Violation Name State Violation Name State Violation Name State Violation

Ray Adams

FL

Anthony Engelke

PA

Steven L. Infante

Julian Amaro

CA

Matthew H. Erichsen

WA

PA

Charles Theodore Bates

MN

Rick Feuerstein

CA

Faye Lorraine aka Heather Kristian King

James Bell

WA

Christopher Ford

VA

Dana Koppendrayer

FL

Morgan Bennett

TX

William Foster

AL

Kristopher Berry

SC

Joseph Fountain

MD

Jeffrey Bettman

OR

Neil Frederick

MD

Phillip Bishop

MI

Roy Larry Gallagher

PA

Patrick Bogan

MD

TN

Douglas Boger

CA

Robert Allen (Bob) Garner

Paul Bollinger

MD

Sean Gilham

CA

Joseph Bowers

OH

Timothy Glas

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Shawn Bowlden

IL

Bryan Brown

IL

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

IL/CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Christopher A. Brown

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

CT Code of Ethical Conduct II.D./II.F.

OK

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

David Reiakvam

CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Jeffrey Richards

FL

Rudy Rodriguez

CA

Miguel Rosario

NY

John H. Row aka John Howard aka gymnasticszone.com

DE

Chris Wagoner

TX

Jeremy Waldridge

OR

Russell Wallace

CT

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

MI

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Ronnie Lewis

AR

Jung Min Lim

PA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Johnathan Mackie

CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Parker Madison

TX

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

William McCabe

GA

NE

Dean McCollum

CO

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Gabriel Salazar

TX

Ricardo “Chico” Goddard

NY

Joel Mertes

TX

Code of Ethical Conduct II.H.

Adam Savignano

NJ

Nathaniel Goodale

VT

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Mark Schiefelbein

Marcelo Guimaraes

OR

Steve Waples

TX

Robert Mollock

OR

Jason Scofield

CA

Vernor Gumila

John S. Moore

WV

Robert Shawler

Donald Watts

KY

IL

CA

Patrick Wehrung

CA

Mike West

WA

Jonathan White

CA

Lyf Christian Wildenberg

MN

Bill Witthar

MO

Joel Woodruff

TX

James Woollums

AZ

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Daniel Zera

NY

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Daniel Zmrzel

CA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Johnny Gutierrez

TX

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

William Munsinger

MN

Steven Todd Siegel

CO

Ronald Smith

TX

Michael Cardamone

IL

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Paul Hagan

MI

William Newcom

GA

Darin Caviness

OH

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (i)

Robert Dean Head

KY

Jeena Nilson

UT

Blake Steven Starr

UT

Ted Hicks

TN

Nolan Knuckles

AZ

Paul Summers

OK

Michael Hinton

TN

Paul O’Neill

CA

Mark Swift

FL

Nicholas Hitchcock

MI

Patrick Okopinski

WI

CA

Robert Hoefer

FL

Marian Penev

NY

Freddie Eugene Tafoya, Jr.

FL

NY

PA

William M. Permenter

Thomas Tellez

Frank Hohman, Jr. Milos Hroch

CA

Don Peters

CA

*Newly added.

David Paul Waage

IN

PA

TX

OR

TX

Keith Callen

Steven Elliott

Joel Velasquez

TN

MO

Bylaw 9.1 (c)

CA

CA

Steve Shirley

AR

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

IL

Anthony Van Kirk

Jason Miguel Mesa

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

ID

Vannie Edwards

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Jon Valdez

Brooklyn Walters

Gregory Muller

MI

TX

Sandro Ramos

IL

Jeffrey LeFevre

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Thad Cypher

WA

Bruce Unger

AZ

OR

CO

Brent Trottier

David Pyles

Richard Gustafson

James Craig III

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Bylaw 9.2 (a)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Lyndsey Wesley Cox

Brian Townsend

CT

KY

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

LA

Vincent Pozzuoli

Thomas Burdash

TX

NC

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

SC

TX

Phillip Thompson

PA

Vince Brown

Edward Trey Coniff

VA

CA

Cynthia Posmoga

Zac Lawson

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (i)

Jon Oliver Kenneth Thomas

Timothy Picquelle

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Jay Thomas

LA

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

Code of Ethical Conduct II.H.

JULY/AUGUST 2017 • TECHNIQUE

Bylaw 9.2 (a) (iii)

33


LIVE COURSE SCHEDULE

LIVE COURSE SCHEDULE

U310 — REGIONAL CONGRESS REGION 1 (NATIONAL CONGRESS) August 17–20, 2017....................... Anaheim, CA REGION 2 September 15–17, 2017............... Louisville, KY REGION 6 August 4–6, 2017........................Providence, RI REGION 7 June 16–18, 2017........................ Baltimore, MD REGION 8 June 23–25, 2017............................. Atlanta, GA

R102 — PRESCHOOL FUNDAMENTALS HANDS-ON TRAINING (HOTPS)

Visit the course page for more course information and location details.

August 3......................................Providence, RI August 16...................................... Anaheim, CA September 14.............................. Louisville, KY September 16............................... Oak Lawn, IL

July 9........................... Rancho Cucamonga, CA August 6............................................ Lincoln, RI Sept 17......................................... Louisville, KY

R103 — SCHOOL AGE/RECREATIONAL HANDS-ON TRAINING (HOTSA)

Visit the course page for more course information and location details.

Visit the course page for more course information and location details.

July 21.......................................... Redmond, WA July 30......................... Rancho Cucamonga, CA August 16...................................... Anaheim, CA September 17............................... Oak Lawn, IL

August 3......................................Providence, RI August 16...................................... Anaheim, CA

Visit the course page for more course information and location details.

U101 — SAFETY CERTIFICATION (LIVE)

W200 — DEVELOPMENT COACHES COURSE HANDS-ON TRAINING (HOTD)

Visit the course page for more course information and location details.

R301 — BRAIN & BODY—BEYOND THE BASICS

W300 — JUNIOR OLYMPIC TEAM COACHES’ COURSE

Visit the course page for more course information and location details.

August 24–27.............................. Huntsville, TX

Y200 —RHYTHMIC DEVELOPMENT COACHES COURSE

Visit the course page for more course information and location details.

August 16...................................... Anaheim, CA

August 16...................................... Anaheim, CA M200 — MEN’S DEVELOPMENT COACHES’ COURSE—HANDS–ON TRAINING July 22.......................................... Redmond, WA August 16...................................... Anaheim, CA

To register for a congress/course, visit the USA Gymnastics website at www.USAGymnasticsUniversity.org. Register online or download the registration form.

34

TECHNIQUE • JULY/AUGUST 2017


JULY/AUGUST 2017 • TECHNIQUE

35


FEATURE

FEA TURE B Y

P A T T I

K O M A R A


WHAT’S NEW WHAT’S NEW B Y

T O M

K O L L ,

C O M M I T T E E

N A T I O N A L

C H A I R ,

U S A

J U N I O R

O L Y M P I C

G Y M N A S T I C S

PREVIEW

2021–2029 ELEMENTS FOR THE WOMEN’S COMPULSORY PROGRAM

T

his article provides the community with a “sneak preview” of the proposed elements for the 2021-2029 elements for the Women’s Compulsory Program. The information in this article is very tentative as the official text and finalization of the routines will not be completed until 2020. The Junior Olympic Committee will be finalizing the list of elements in the fall of 2017 after you have opportunity to share your ideas. The system will continue with 5 levels of compulsory exercises (and 5 levels of optional) with the new cycle.

Current level of routine

2021–2029 level of routine

NO CHANGE IN THE LEVEL SYSTEM Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5

ELEMENTS FOR THE 2021–2029 JUNIOR OLYMPIC COMPULSORY EXERCISES FOR WOMEN 5 LEVELS OF COMPULSORY EXERCISES

Level 1 gymnasts must be a minimum of 4 years of age to compete. Level 2 gymnasts must be a minimum of 5 years of age to compete. Level 3 gymnasts must be a minimum of 6 years of age to compete. *Level 4 gymnasts must be a minimum of 7 years of age to compete. Level 5 gymnasts must be a minimum of 7 years of age to compete. *First required entry level in the J.O. Program.

38

TECHNIQUE • JULY/AUGUST 2017

VAULT LEVEL 1 Min. 4 yrs. old

LEVEL 2 Min. 5 yrs. old

Straight jump onto min. of 16” mat, then Kick up to Handstand fall to flat back LEVEL 3 Min. 6 yrs. Handspring over min. 32” mat stack w/mat stack turned sideways

Jump to Handstand onto min. of 16” mat stack (no block required) Fall to flat back

LEVEL 4 Min. 7 yrs.

Handspring over vault table

LEVEL 5 min, 7 yrs. Onto a Mat stack… Choice of 3: -Handspring -Tsuk timer -Yurchenko timer


BARS LEVEL 1 Min. 4 yrs. old

LEVEL 2 Min. 5 yrs old

Back Hip Pullover

Back Hip Pullover

Cast

Cast

Back hip circle

Back hip circle Single leg cut forward Forward stride circle OR

Dismount: Cast Straddle on sole circle dismount OR Underswing dismount

Single leg basket swing (hooking knee on the bar on the upswing to complete either element circle is allowable) Single leg swing backward Cast , Dismount: Squat OR Pike on, piked sole circle OR underswing dismount

LEVEL 3 Min. 6 yrs. Mount: Glide swing out (straddle or pike) and return to stand with feet together — Back Hip Pullover OR Glide kip (both a 10.0 SV) Front hip circle, small cast, return to support

Cast, single leg shoot through

Stride circle forward OR Single leg basket swing (both legs must be straight throughout) Single leg cut the leg backward

LEVEL 4 Min. 7 yrs.

Mount: Glide Kip (straddle or pike)

LEVEL 5 Min. 7 yrs.

Mount: Glide Kip (straddle or pike)

BALANCE BEAM LEVEL 1 Min. 4 yrs

LEVEL 2 Min. 5 yrs

Mount: Jump to front support

Mount without a board

Relevé – lock position – hold

Swing to push up – jump to tuck stand

Arabesque– 30º below horizontal (show-no hold)

Arabesque- 30º below horizontal (hold)

Cast to horizontal and return to support… LEGS together

Cast to above horizontal (no specific degree) Option to straddle cast…ONLY in Level 5

Stretch jump

Stretch jump

Lever – Hold position

Lever to beam– “Hiccup”

Step, Leg swing, step Leg swing

Front leg swing –close – back leg swing – close to stand, plié relevé lock

Cast squat or pike on

Clear hip circle to above horizontal (no specific degree) OR Backward Sole Circle to Clear Support OR Backward Stalder Circle to Clear Support

Leg balance in forward passé on flat foot (mark)

Leg balance in forward passé (hold 2 seconds)

Long hang kip

Cast to horizontal (legs together) Back Hip Circle

Glide kip (straddle or pike), Cast squat or pike on back tuck sole circle jump to high bar OR Squat or pike on/jump to high bar Long hang kip, Cast to above horizontal (no specific degree) Option to straddle cast…ONLY in Level 5 Cast to above horizontal (no specific degree) Option to straddle cast…ONLY in Level 5

Cast

Long hang pullover

Pivot (180°) turn From kneel on one leg, Cartwheel to partial handstand lower to stand facing beam dismount LEVEL 3 Min. 6 yrs.

Cartwheel to Handstand lower to stand facing beam dismount LEVEL 4 Min. 7 yrs.

LEVEL 5 Min. 7 yrs

Mount without a board

Mount without a board

Mount without a board

Pivot turn – step, Pivot turn

½ (180°) turn forward passé

Full turn in forward passé. Arms in crown

Arabesque (>45º) below horizontal

Cartwheel

Back walkover or Back extension or back handspring step-out

Straight leg leap (90º) to plié arabesque – hold.

Scale (at horizontal)

Scale (above horizontal)

Cross Handstand Mark (no angle requirement)

One step entrance, Straight leg leap (120º)

One step entrance, Straight leg leap (150º), stretch jump

Cross Handstand with legs together - hold 1 second

Cross Handstand with legs together (hold 2 sec.) step down backward relevé walks

Back hip circle

Underswing

Underswing

Dismount: Underswing

Counter swing to 30º below horizontal Straddle allowed on the back swing

Counter swing to 15º below horizontal Straddle allowed on the back swing

Tap Swing forward

Tap Swing forward

½ (180°) heel snap turn in forward passé

Counter swing to 30º below horizontal Straddle allowed on the back swing

Counter swing to 15º below horizontal Straddle allowed on the back swing

Stretch jump, Stretch jump

Split jump (120º), stretch jump

Split jump (150º), Sissonne

Dismount: Tap swing forward with ½ turn

Dismount: Tap swing forward to Flyaway in tuck, pike, or layout position

Cartwheel to side handstand, (mark the position), ¼ turn dismount

Cartwheel to side handstand, (hold 1 second) ¼ turn dismount

Cartwheel to side handstand, (hold 2 seconds), ¼ turn dismount

JULY/AUGUST 2017 • TECHNIQUE

39


FEATURE TURE

FEA TURE 2 0 2 1 – 2 0 2 9 F O R

T H E

E L E M E N T S

W O M E N ’ S

P R E V I E W

C O M P U L S O R Y

P R O G R A M

. . . C O N T I N U E D

FLOOR EXERCISE LEVEL 1 Min. 4 yrs

LEVEL 2 Min. 5 yrs

¾ Handstand

Handstand

Forward entry Cartwheel ¼ turn in

Power hurdle OR 1 step hurdle, round-off

Backward roll tuck

Backward roll to push-up position

Candlestick

Candlestick

Forward roll tuck

Bridge — Back kick-over

Forward passé balance –mark/press to relevé

Passé, relevé, Heel snap ½ turn

Forward Chassé

Forward Chassé – straight leg leap (60°)

Stretch jump

Split jump (60°)

LEVEL 3 Min. 6 yrs.

LEVEL 4 Min. 7 yrs.

LEVEL 5 Min. 7 yrs

Split jump (90°)

Straddle jump (120º), stretch jump ½ (180°) Not connected

Straddle Jump (150°), Stretch jump 1/1 Not connected

Stretch jump

Front handspring stepout, Cartwheel step-out running steps backward to lunge finish

Two Front handspring step-outs, Cartwheel step-out running steps backward to lunge finish

40

TECHNIQUE • JULY/AUGUST 2017

LEVEL 3 Min. 6 yrs.

LEVEL 4 Min. 7 yrs.

LEVEL 5 Min. 7 yrs

Handstand Bridge, Back Kick-over

Back walkover (150°)

Forward salto tucked OR Front or Side Aerial

Forward split

Forward split

Forward split

Chassé, split leap (90°)

Split leap (120°) dance passage

Split leap (150°) or switch-leg leap (150°) dance passage

Backward roll tuck with straight arms to push-up position

Backward roll with straight arms to Handstand

Backward roll with straight arms to Handstand

½ (180°) turn in forward passé… arms in forward-middle or crown.

Full turn in forward passé… arms in forwardmiddle or crown. Turn direction optional.

Full turn in forward passé… arms in crown. Turn direction optional.

Round-off, 2 flic-flacs – rebound to stick No specific # of running steps

Round-off, flic-flac, back salto tuck stick No specific # of running steps

Handstand forward roll (with arms straight) Round-off, Flic-flac, rebound-stick No specific # running of steps.


JULY/AUGUST 2017 • TECHNIQUE

41


A

s the 2017 National Congress & Trade Show approaches, we would like to remind you of the great educational opportunities this event has to offer. The Anaheim Convention Center, Anaheim, Calif., will host this year’s event and will provide a unique opportunity to attend more than 200 presentations, demonstrations, certifications and educational seminars on a variety of topics within the sport. Held in conjunction with the 2017 P&G Gymnastics Championships, this event will have something for everyone!

Club owners are invited to join USA Gymnastics Staff, Business Advisers and National Instructors for guided discussions and networking with other club owners from around the country. Attendance to the event is free, but lunch is not provided. However, attendees will have the option to purchase lunch from one of the fun lunch trucks.

NATIONAL TRADE SHOW HALL

ARE YOU REGISTERED?

Individuals have until July 27 to register online. If you are unable to register prior to July 27, no worries, just register when you arrive. Onsite registration will be available starting at 11 a.m., Wednesday, Aug. 16 at the Anaheim Convention Center. Onsite registration fee is $340 for current USA Gymnastics members. Non-member fee is $450.

NATIONAL CONGRESS REGISTRATION HOURS:

• Wednesday, Aug. 16... 11:00 a.m.– 7:00 p.m. • Thursday, Aug. 17........7:00 a.m.– 4:00 p.m. • Friday, Aug. 18............. 7:00 a.m.– 4:00 p.m. • Saturday, Aug. 19...... 7:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

FINAL DAILY PRESENTER/SESSION SCHEDULE

The final presenter and session schedule is now available. Visit usagymcongress.com/sessions to view.

42

CLUB OWNER NETWORKING LUNCH • Thursday, Aug. 17.... 12:30–2:30 p.m.

The 2017 USA Gymnastics National Trade Show will feature over 200 booths of products and information from over 70 different vendors from the gymnastics community. Special events, such as Live and Hands-on Spotting lectures and more will occur daily in the exhibit hall. A visit to the Trade Show Hall is definitely a location any congress attendee should not miss! If family and friends are in town and not registered for Congress, they can buy a one-day Trade Show Hall Pass for $5. To see a list of exhibitors visit usagymcongress.com/exhibitors.

2017 P&G Gymnastics Championships discounted all session ticket packages available to National Congress attendees. To view tickets and competition schedule, visit usagymcongress.com. Please note: The last day of both junior and senior women’s competition will be Sunday, Aug. 20. For additional details regarding the 2017 National Congress & Trade Show, please visit usagymcongress.com. Additional questions please call/email: 800.345.4719/ membership@usagym.org.

USA GYMNASTICS UNIVERSITY IS EXCITED TO INTRODUCE THE NEW

USA GYM CONGRESS APP!

The USA Gym Congress event app provides an interactive congress guide experience for attendees to the National Congress & Trade Show and the following Regional Congresses; 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. The interactive features include planning tools that allow you to view and select which lectures to attend, the ability to view exhibitor and trade show hall activities, receive important on-site event notifications and more!

National Con

TRADE SHOW HOURS

• Wednesday, Aug. 16...............5:00–7:00 p.m. • Thursday, Aug. 17....... 7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. • Friday, Aug. 18.............8:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. • Saturday, Aug. 19........ 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

The USA Gym Congress app is available now in both the iTunes® and Google Play® stores.

Visit usagymcongress.com for registration information and more!

TECHNIQUE • JULY/AUGUST 2017


JULY/AUGUST 2017 • TECHNIQUE

43


UPDATE UPDA TE M E M B E R

S E R V I C E S

M E M B E R

S E R V I C E S

USA GYMNASTICS 2017/2018 COMPETITIVE SEASON REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN!

A

ny individual membership that is created/renewed at this time will expire on July 31, 2018.

IMPORTANT NEW UPDATES FOR 2017/2018 SEASON MEMBER CLUBS

• All OWNERS of USA Gymnastics Member Clubs will be required to be a current Professional member in order to maintain an active Member Club status. • Upon becoming or renewing Member Club membership, each club will be required to provide the name of their club’s insurance provider for participant liability/accident medical insurance.

PROFESSIONAL & INSTRUCTOR MEMBERS • All Professional and Instructor members 18 years and over will be required to complete Safe Sport specific educational training every two years. • The required course is titled: U110: U.S.O.C. SafeSport and is provided complimentary to all USA Gymnastics members. PLEASE NOTE: The Safe Sport educational requirement is in addition to the required criminal background check screening for all members and for professional members, U101 Safety/

Risk Management course and U100: Fundamentals of Gymnastics Instruction

ALL MEMBERS • All members of USA Gymnastics agree to abide by and be bound by USA Gymnastics Code of Ethical Conduct, Safe Sport Policy, sport rules, and procedures promulgated by the U.S. Center for Safe Sport, as they may be amended from time to time, along with any applicable criminal codes. • The Safe Sport Policy, formerly known as the Participant Welfare Policy is part of USA Gymnastics’ efforts to strengthen its current safe sport initiatives, as well as to incorporate the authority and jurisdiction of the U.S. Center for Safe Sport. USA Gymnastics policies and procedures related to misconduct are presently under review, and further revisions to this policy may be necessary in the near future. Available online at usagym.org/SafeSport, changes are effective immediately unless otherwise noted in the policy. For complete details regarding the new season and new membership requirements, visit usagym.org/memberservices or contact the Member Services Department at 800.345.4719 or via at email membership@usagym.org.

IMPORTANT REMINDERS • When club administrators are creating and/or renewing a membership for any individual under the age of 18, name and contact information of the parent/guardian of the individual must be provided. To ensure a smooth registration process, collect the parent/ guardian information prior to beginning the online registration process. • All athletes MUST complete a NEW 2017/2018 athlete/introductory membership application, regardless if the athlete is a new or renewing member. A copy of the form MUST be kept on file at your club, as well as a copy provided to parent/guardian. Forms can be found online at: www.usagym.org/memberservices • Clubs should renew their member club membership and register their owner as a member prior to renewing their athletes online.

2017/2018 MEMBERSHIP PRICING • Athlete $57.00 • Introductory Athlete Membership $25 • Member Club $160 • Domestic Sanctions $100

For additional questions, please contact Member Services Department at 800.345.4719 or membership@usagym.org.

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TECHNIQUE • JULY/AUGUST 2017


CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS POSITION AVAILABLE

FOR SALE

PARAGON GYMNASTICS of Norwood NJ (Bergen County), is looking for an OPTIONAL HEAD COACH TRAINEE for USAG levels 8 and up. Full-time or Part-time and flexible hours available. Requirements: Positive attitudes, responsible, reliable, and enjoys working with children. Company sponsored certifications (safety, CPR, First Aid, Concussion, various seminars and USAG National and State Congresses). Benefits: Medical/Prescription/ Dental/Vision, paid vacations, Paid sick days, Matching Retirement Plan. Facility, approx. 11,000sq ft. Actively looking to expand into a larger facility. Located in the NY/NJ Metropolitan area, easily accessible from all major highways. Contact: email: customerservice@paragongym.com, Website: paragongym.com, Tel: 201-767-6921 or fax to 201-767-6693 or at 49 Walnut Street, Suite 4, Norwood, NJ 07648.

STATE-OF-THE-ART GYMNASTICS GYM with excellent reputation for sale in Brattleboro, VT. Located off exit 3 on I-91, WOODMAN ATHLETICS draws students from surrounding towns in Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts.  Built in 2005, specifically for gymnastics, the 13,750 sq ft air-conditioned building has high ceilings, pits, in-ground trampolines, a separate office, lobby, and mezzanine viewing area, private parking lot, and a large yard.  Everything you need for preschool to team gymnastics programs and more.   Sale includes the real estate. See cersosimo.com/realestate/vt or Woodman Athletics on Facebook. Contact Vicki at 802-257-7076, vgragen@cersosimo.com.

WOGA GYMNASTICS in Plano and Frisco, Texas seeks dependable and highly motivated COACHES for women’s gymnastics team. This position requires an enthusiastic team player who is able to adapt within our gyms philosophy. Applicants must have strong technical knowledge and experience with elite gymnastics. WOGA Gymnastics, Plano is looking for an enthusiastic, highly motivated, extremely organized person to run an exclusive gymnastics facility. The ideal candidate thrives on being good at their job and finding creative solutions to an infinite number of account and client management topics while remaining professional. Candidates must love children and must be confident in dealing with parents. Position reports directly to the business owners. Proficiency in writing, communication, computer skills, event planning, team administration and customer service required. Full-time positions. Salary will commensurate with experience. Please e-mail cover letter/resume to Melissa Sanders at wogaplano@aol.com.

NOW offering FREE outbound shipping, plus new styles, fabrics and colors to give your Pro Shop the largest assortment of the best fitting gymnastics apparel. In addition, GK now offers free scrunchies with each leotard, price-coded merchandise and an online order form to make it even easier to sell GK in your Pro Shop. There is nothing to lose; you only pay for what you sell. Sign up today! Call Risk-Free Customer Service 1-800-345-4087 for more information. Email: ProShopPros@gkelite.com EDUCATION

GYMCERT COACHES TRAINING PROGRAM:
GymCert’s Online Courses & Training manuals for sale, Safety Awareness Posters, FREE article downloads & Online Certification for Recreational & Competitive Gymnastics Instructors Levels 1 through Level 5. Now offering Boys level 1 & Girls Spanish Level 1. GymCert is a MUST for staff training; cuts lesson planning time significantly; use to coordinate class progressions & skill training

methods; quick & easy reference guide including Lesson Planning & Class Evaluation Forms. Includes updated “Skills & Drills” for 2013-2021 Compulsory Routines! The GymCert manuals provide concise instruction, clear illustrations, & several coaching, spotting & safety tips. Group discounts! Order Now:   www.gymcert.com or direct by calling 407-444-5669 EST. GYMNASTICS; YOUR BEST MEET EVER! (LATEST BOOK) Gymnastics; Your Best Meet Ever! was written to help Beginning & Intermediate level gymnasts focus on making each competition the BEST possible. Great book as a reference for all gymnasts. Fears are a major cause of poor performance. If the gymnast is able to face each fear or worry & take specific action to minimize its effect on her performance, she will take a giant step toward winning in both gymnastics & life!  Preparation is the base that supports the ability to adapt to new & changing competition scenarios! Find the Secrets to a Successful Competition! Author, Rita Brown; Two-Time Olympic Coach — Available @ www.amazon.com.

FOR INFORMATION on how to publish a classified ad in Technique, go to

www.usagym.org/publications

or call Scott Bregman at 317-829-5650.

CENTRE ELITE GYMNASTICS is looking for a full-time HEAD BOYS TEAM COACH for our growing boys team. We have 30+ boys team gymnasts from Level 4 through JE and multiple Future Stars athletes. We are located in State College, PA, just 2 miles from Penn State University. Great town and growing gym with owner committed to the team program. Boys coaching experience required. Salary/paid vacation/company health plan available. Please send resume to tracy@centreelitegym.com.​

JULY/AUGUST 2017 • TECHNIQUE

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Technique Magazine - July/August 2017  

Technique Magazine - July/August 2017