Page 1

The

UNITED STATES

GYMNASTICS FEDERATION

USGF NEWS

March 1976 Official Publication of the United States Gymnastics Federation P.O. Box 4699 T ucson, Arizona 85717 U.S .A.

NADIA COMANECI


EDITORIAL - MARCH 1976

The Romanian qualification matches are now history and both our men's and women's teams performed extremely well and should be advanced into the 1976 Olympic Games scheduled for Montreal in July. The men's team did a very outstanding job and defeated the Romanians in their official match held at the University of California at Berkeley. The women lost to the team from Romania but scored well and looked impressive at the same time. We received a number of compliments on the appearance and technical work of both teams that will hopefully pay off for us in the Olympic Games later this year. One must speak candidly about the Olympic Qualification System currently being used ... or perhaps a better term is mis-used. The qualification scores from almost all parts of the gymnastic world are so high as to be unbelieveable. It might well be that before the teams march on the floor in Montreal that every team from seventh place through twelth will have qualified with a higher score than the six top teams already qualified. Perhaps we should have an international lottery to place bets on which team scores closest in Montreal, to it's qualification score. Might prove to be very interesting. The American Cup will be held March 27-28th in New York's Madison Square Garden. Both days are afternoon competitions and both days are for men and women, and the names are indeed impressive. Tsukahara and Yoshida from Japan. Comanechi and Grecu from Romania, Magyar and Nagy from Hungary and Carr and Conner from the USA, along with Canada, Great Britain and Mexico and more to confirm soon including the USSR. This is a super event in our bicentennial year and we hope this initial event will be received well by the public and television and will become the annual event it should be. The Championship of the USA for our women gymnasts will be held in New Haven in mid-April and after that it's on to the Olympic trials for the top 20 in that meet. The men will have a semi-final trials at Berkeley and then move on to Penn State for the finals in June. We should be fielding the two strongest teams the USA has ever entered in Olympic competition. Lets all hope that Montreal sees-them receive fair scores- and finish in-the position they deserve based on gymnastics performances alone.

1


RUMANIA VS. UNITED STATES The Rumanian Gymnastics Teams, after a competition with the Canadians in Kitchener, Ontario, were flown to California to see the famous Disneyland. They enjoyed Disneyland so much that they were still talking about it even as they prepared to leave at the end of their tour. They arrived in Tucson to practice for their match here at about the same time our girls arrived with our coaching staff. Our girls used the week as a training camp since nine girls were invited as were four coaches. On Tuesday, February 26, the Rumanians were flown to Albuquerque, where the Rumanian Men's Team was to meet Coach Rusty Mitchell's University of New Mexico's Gymnastics Team, while the Rumanian Girls were to give an exhibition on Wednesday. newspaper article The Rumanian Teams returned to Tucson on Thursday for the Official Qualification Match which was held on Thursday and Friday, F-. uruary 26 and 27. Before about 8,000 people, the Rumanian Team barely defeated our girls by a score of 381.10 to 379.20. Nadia Comaneci, the European Champion, was the star of the competition with an all-around score of 78.25 out of a possible 80.00. A recap of the two competitions, shows that we scored 375.20 in Toronto and 379.20 in Tucson for an average of 377.20. This score would have won a second place silver team medal in the World Championships in Varna in 1974, however, at this point, we do not even know if we will qualify for the Olympic Games in Montreal this summer.

Romanian Gymnasts Thrill Arena Fans

By Danny Robbins The Romanian and New Mexican gymnasts performing at University Arena Wednesday night may have had some trouble conversing with each other, but their body language did more than enough talking. The Romanian Olympic team defeated a team composed mainly of University of New Mexico gymnasts, 219.25-218.55, in an exhibition men's dual meet, while petite Nadia Comaneci thrilled a crowd of 6374, the largest to see gymnastics in New Mexico, during an exhibition staged by the Romanian girls. No scoring was kept for the girls, but the crowd gave Miss Comaneci - considered to be as good as Russia's Olga Korbut - high marks in the form of two standing ovations after her uneven bars and floor exercise routines. "She's got everything it takes to win at the Olympics," said UNM coach Rusty Mitchell of the 14-year-old Romanian. "So far, she's way over everybody else's head." But Mitchell didn't have such kind words for the Romanian men, who will compete against the United States in an official Olympic Qualifying meet in San Francisco as their whirlwind tour continues. "I think they're going to get creamed by the U.S. in San Francisco," he said after watching his team slip in just two events, rings and pommel horse to lose. Farmington native Hemo Walters, an assistant for Mitchell this year while training for the Olympics, finished first in two events, vaulting and parallel bars, and tied for first in another, high bar, with Romanian Dan Grecu. Grecu also captured first place in rings, an event in which he was the 1974 world champion, with a flawless, muscle-tight performance and won all-around honors with a score of 56.05. He was named the outstanding male performer after the meet with Miss Comaneci taking similar honors for the girls. N:w Mexico's Steve Ortiz finished second in the all-around competition at 54.95, taking second in vaulting and thirds in rings and high bar while never scoring below a 9.0 in any event. "Steve was good in spots and not so good in spots," Mitchell said. "But this competition was good for him and he'll continue to improve." UNM athletes finished first in five of the six events, with Perry Genovese first in floor exercise and Chuck Walter first in pommel horse. The Lobos were actually ahead of the Romanians after one event and trailed by only one-fourth of a point after four events. "I didn't even follow the score," Mitchell said later, "but I think the level of competition helped us do better." Grecu, a 25-year-old former European all-around champion, drew the evening's highest score from the four judges, a 9.65 for his rings routine.

Coach Rusty Mitchell

2

• •


SCORE TODAY WIT H . ..

Toronto, Canada Qualifying Meet

RECO MM ENDED BY

SUBJECT: United States Versus Canada Olympic Quifying Meet - Men

UNITED STATES

GYMNASTIC FEDERATION

Our first Olympic Qualifying Meet in Toronto, Canada on February 7 and 8 was extremely successful. The attached results attest to this from a statistical point of view. However, many other benefits were accrued than merely outstanding individual and team scores, and an apparent secure slot to the Games in Montreal. 1. National team awareness in the possibility of ending our Olympic Medal "44 year drought." 2. International credibility establ ished through Mr. Gander (FIG President), Mr. Timmer (German judge), Mr. Schrivener (English judge) and Mr. Fink (Canadian) judge). The latter was especially exuberant about our aspirations in Montreal. 3 . The re-emergence of Steve Hug to our National I Int ernational scene. 4. Most of all a certain "momentum" wh ich I t rust will continue until and through the actual competition at the Olympic Games. wish to take this opportunity to thank the U.S. Gymnastics F_ederation for all of the arrangements associated with this trip. Mr. Bare (Executive Director) and Mr. Cumiskey (Technica l Director) are to be congratulated for their excellent support and outstanding personal attention to the athletes and other dignitaries involved. I believe this competition to have been an important indicator of what can be done when we really "put it all together." What is wonde rful is the fact that we could even have done it better. The Romanian Qualifying Match is next. Hopefully , it will be as rewarding a step as our trip to Canada.

@!)

~

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'112.10 111.50 111.15 110.40 109.20 108.20

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3

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USA VS. CANADA- OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION MATCH York University - Toronto, Canada February 7 and 8, 1976 The USA competitive delegation was composed of the following gymnasts as selected by the Foreign Relations Committee for Women: Kathy Howard, Kolleen Casey, Ann Carr, Trish Reed, Roxanne Pierce, Debbie Wilcox, and Tammy Mannville - alternate. Official coaching staff was represented by Dale Flansaas, 1976 Olympic Coach and Bill Coco, serving as assistant. Other coaches present to assist with training sessions were: Ron Cresentini, Mary Welin, Mary Ann Hachette, and Rod Hill. Judges for the Women's Competition were: Head Judge - Mrs. Valerie Nagy representing FIG, Mrs. Mary Gould Canada, Mrs. Valerie Nye - acting neutral, Ms. Ursula Baer - neutral (Great Britain), and Mrs. Jackie Fie - USA. Both the men's and women's competition in compulsories were scheduled in the same gymnasium Saturday evening at York University Tait McKenzie Physical Education Building. The crowd was most acceptable in size for a compulsory competition and was most appreciative and rewarding for our gymnasts, who performed the compulsories on all events with exceptional international flair and technique to average 9.45 as a team with a compulsory total of 189.05. Seven USA gymnasts competed in all events with Mannville performing first in all four events with no possibility of a counting score as alternate. In vaulting we performed well totalling 4 7.10 for a 9.42 team average. We showed no identifiable fault that was common to all gymnasts. Each Yamashita performed seemed to be slightly lacking in only one area of technical execution. One execution showed too early a pike in preflight, another slightly insufficient hip rise, the next late pike, another late extension, one an insufficient length, etc. Carr's vault was superior in all categories of execution, receiving a 9.6. On the uneven bars, we again executed very well earning 47.05 for a 9.40 average. The most common fault occurred during the hecht dismount due to incorrect body position during flight and insufficient extension before landing. A total of 1.0 was lost from team score on this move alone. The other faults were

slight, but noticeable on i:he cast 'h turn-straddle amplitude, length of the LB gl ide, minor arm flexion at the end of the front hip circles, and insufficient height of the cast on HB preceding the hecht dismount. Debbie Wilcox performed almost flawlessly earning a 9.6 afte r breaking the LB on the hecht. The score could have been a 9.7 had this not occurred. We performed very solid beam routines to equal our vaulting total of 4 7.10, an average of 9.42 for the team. Only one of the 5 counting scores showed an error of 0.2 for any movement or element; all other errors were of a 0.10 nature with the exception of the dismount. With an improvement in the dismount height, completion of twist, and landing an additional 0 .7 could have been added to the counting scores. Casey performed a lovely solid routine with less than 0.1 deductions except on the dismount to score 9.55. Floor Exercise was definitely our superior event with a total of 4 7.80 team points, an average of 9.56! The most common error occurred with the second phase of the handspring step-out and dive handspring lacking slightly in amplitude. Other errors were visable in not more than 1/2 tenths. Howa rd performed brilliantly to score 9.7. Optionals were held Sunday evening for both men and women with a standing room only crowd - an audience that was both gymnastically educated and quick to show their enthusiasm with generous applause . With both men and women's events running simultaneously, the physical set up was necessarily somewhat congested. This might have been a factor causing the t1nsteady beam performances which occurred. In vaulting the gymnasts performed below the level at which they are capable. The team score totalled 46.70 for a 9.34 individual average. The girls performed 6 handspring full twists and 6 Tsukaharas. The 3 handspring fulls earned 27.95 and an equal score total was earned for the Tsukaharas. However, 3 handspring fulls and only 2 Tsukaharas counted toward the team total. In general the height, distance, and completion of turn in the post flight of the handspring

4

fulls could have h~en better, as they have been . during this year's competition. The Tsukaharas must show better defined position of tuck or pike, more complete opening and extension before landing, and the necessary force and proper angle of repulsion in order to accomplish these techniques. Landings in general could have been improved to add about 1.0 point to the team score. Casey 's handspring full tied with Wilcox's Tsukahara for a 9.40. Each of the girls has performed much better during the last 1 and 2 years of competition. During the uneven bar competition, we drew two 0.5 point deductions for hand supports on the mat after dismounts. Our resulting team score was only 46.30, or a 9.26 average, which could have easily been 1.0 full point higher without these two large errors. The level of superi.or difficulties, the risk and originality are definitely there. The errors evident are in the category of predominantly 0.1 deductions for lack of complete amplitude and optimal fluency . It was unfortunate also that two of the better executed routines were the two that faulted with the hand support on the dismounts, moving these two scores to the lower end of the team scores. Wilcox performed with her usual excellent technique and power to score 9.5, an exercise that could have received 9.6. As previously stated, the area around the beam was quite congested. Within about 8 feet of the beam was the parallel runway for men's long horse vault. Coaching, flashing of vault number, gymnast readiness, and start of the run were all taking place while the girls were competing on beam. Due to the vaulting in progress, it was not possible for two women judges to sit on that side of the beam. In retrospect, these two events should not have been run simultaneously. This might have contributed to the 6 falls by five of the seven USA gymnasts. We scored a very unfortunate 45.55 to average 9.11 on an event that we have internationally proven our excellent ability. It is possible that the beam score in this event could have been 1. 70 more. However, there were large errors, some fatigue due to the long meet, a great deal of risk in the routines, and nervousness

. •


USA VS. CANADA (Cont.)

El El l!a:l B pl.

pi.'

NAME

COUNTRY

c Howard Kathy

U. S.A .

compounded by 12 falls by 9 of the 13 gymnasts in the competition . We must avoid these circumstances in the future · and in some cases slightly reduce the risk in the routines. The gymnasts know and have demonstrated that they can do much better . Wilcox and Reed both showed steady routines to score 9.4 and 9 .3 respectively. In any event, we saved the best for last! The girls did a beautiful job on floor to score 4 7.55, an average of 9.51. Casey scored only 8.95 but had a deduction of 0.5 for a fall on a full twisting front somi. The cumposition, elegance, acrobatic and tumbling execution and ge neral amplitude of all performances were exceptionally good. Each girl has shown improvement in styling, expression, and rhythm . Carr performed very well for a 9.55 with Howard taking the honors with a lovely and inspiring performance at 9.65. Considering the problems on optional beam and on bars to a lesser extent, the girls did a very fine total performance to score 375.20 (9.38 average). We congratulate them and their coaches with pride and wish them the best of luck in Tucson for an even better tea m total of which they are most capable. · It is most fitting that we comment on the fine performances of Nancy McDonnell and her sister Teresa, who both placed 5th and 7th respectively for C~nada . These girls, working for their third Olympic team, showed very good composition and much improvement in difficulty, styling, and amplitude . They reflected the fine coaching that they are receiving. We would like to recognize and thank the CGF, in particular Mr. Cal Girard Executive Director, Mr. Bryce Taylor President of CGF, Mr. Ross Hunt- Meet Director for organizing this opportunity for the USA to qua Iify on "foreign soil." York University has been the scene of many significant events in international gymnastic compet1t1on and judging courses. We always enjoy and look forward to returning there to meet with our Canadian neighbors and enjoy their continuing friendship and hospitality .

Cas e y kolleen

U.S.A.

Carr Ann

U.S . A.•

0

9;..1

T

18 . 6

c

Reed Patricia

9 . ~

3

9 •.4

4

9.3

4

9 ·•.05 8

18 . 7

Pierc;::e Roxanne

Wilcox Debbie

9.6

b

8.8

8.95

111

T

18. 3 p

8 . 65

18.55

c

9. 4

0

7

4

9 .0

6

Murphy Kathy·

CAN

7 9.4

2

9 . 55

1

9.2

~8.8

3

30.20

6

73 . 95

6

37 . 9(

2

2 37.15

3

3

8.8

75 . 05 !

3

9. 4

9 .2

8

9;5

3

37 . 5

5

0

. 03

9 . 35 3 9.2

5

9.5

3

37 . 3 p 2

T

18 . 7 p

2

0

3

18 . 7 p 9.3

19 . 05

-··

'7 4. 9

19.0

P. 0 . 4 9. 3

6

9. 3

7

36 . 9

7

6

9 . 15 7

9.4

5 l:J6 . 05

8

18 . 4 ~

18 . 7

73.0

8

18 . 5

c

9.2

7

9.4

:i

9.6

1

9.5

0

9.4

1

9.4

1

9.5

l

9 . 45 4

T

18.6 47.10

4

6

8 . 25 ioV:-z:>

18 . 8

19 . 1

47.10

47 . 05

3

\18 . 95

37. 7(

4

37 . 7

l

75.d l

47.80

1 89. 05

0

45.6

46 . 7

46 . 3

47.55

186

15

T

92.7

93.8

93 . 35

95 . 35

375

•2

l<-tl lrd P'-1 lrl j p1.

c

8-.4

0

8 •.75 8

11 8 . ?

11

9 .1

0

9 .1 5 3

8

r'-

9. 3 6

8 . 75 12 9; _2 17.6:

c

T jl. 8.2si

c CAN

5

18.5

I -~

I

pl. TOTAL: PLACE

9". .2

101:J5 , _00· 1 0,

8 . 95 11 35 ; 6' 10 18 . l'

71.4S 10

11 8.95 11 9.3

7 p 6 . 20

9

8 . 85 11 8 . 65 10 9.25

8 35 . 90

9

8. 9

Thibau l t Chrisitann

0

8.8

1 7 . 75

7 .75 1

MCDonnell Theresa

9 . 25 6 9 . 2

0

0.2sp.o

9 .1 7

8.2 p. 2 9 . 2

~

8. 3

~o

9 9,.o

c

9 . 35 5

9.5

µ

9 . o: 5

9.3

4

18 . 8

0

43 . 50 45 . ,45

2

9

8·5

45. 75

9 .0 10 34 .l

i 2

9 . '4

6

36 . 95

7

935

7

36.20

6

73. 1 5

7

11 9 . 2

In

12

69 . 9

18 . 7'

17. 4.

o

44. 9

9

9 •4

8.9

18.2

c

72 . 1

18 . o'

18.5

c

88.40 91.20

5

~

~. 2

o

T 18 . 4

Jackie U. Fie Judge - USA vs. Canada

17 . 30

18.4

T 1 6.5

McDonnell Nancy

9 8 . 25 1 2

18 . 0

T 17. 5

St . Laurent S.

9. 1

c

18.5 ~

17.6Q

10 9.0~ 1 0 9 . 05 12 35 .8 0 10

10 8 . 9

T jl.6. 5

CP~

9. 5

37 .7 5

Rope Patti

CAN

CAN

2

2

c 9 . 45 3

T 17 .l!

CAH

9.6

9. 4

75 .1 0

18 . 4

NAME

COUNTRY

jl. 8 . 35

1:

9 .. 65 1 37 .:10 19 . 35

9 . 25 7 9 . 35 5

c

IF.Rf1 TOT,A1S

38 .• 0

9 . 40 1 9 .0 5 8

T 17.3

U. S . A .

p. 0. 4 5

~

9 .,7

9.55 1

c 9.05 9 U.S . A.

2

2

pl. TOTAL: PLACE

0

T

U.S . A.

9.;;

pl.

1 0 35.55 12

9.15

9 34 . 95 11

18.3

70.45 11

9.4 2

9.3

7

37 . 55 5

9.3

9.4

5

37 .0 5 5

46.40

p. 02 . 8 5

46 .1 5

1 80.l f>

92 . 55

363 . 0 p

4

18 . 7 45 . 00 45 . 05

1 8 .7

74 . 6

5 1


KURT THOMAS Sophomore at Indiana State from Miami, Florida . . . won four individual medals at the 1975 Pan American Games, including AA bronze, PH and V silver, HB bronze ...also was third of 15 in a Barcelona invitational last December. . . NCAA AllAmerican (5th) on parallel bars and also 9th in AA in 1975 . .. former national Junior Olympic champion ... 19 years old.

BART CONNER Senior at Niles West High School in Morton Grove, Illinois ... tied for 1st in all-around at the 1975 USGF meet, also winning PB,PH, 2nd HB ... took 3rd in floor exercise and rings in 1975 Pan American Games ... heavily recruited ... 18 years old.

STEVE HUG 1972 and 1968 Olympian from Northridge ... 31st in All-around in 1972 Olympics ... 26th AA In 1974 World Games. .1972, 1973, 1974 NCAA and Pac-8 AA champion . . . 1973, 1974 NCAA PB champion . . . Stanford graduate.

â&#x20AC;˘ PETER KORMANN Junior at Southern Connecticut State from Braintree, Mass ... captured USA's only individual gold medal in 1975 Pan American Games, in floor exercise ... 1975 USGF FX winner, 4th in Allaround .... 1975 NCAA All-American in floor exercise (3rd), and Division II winner in AA, FX... 20 years old.

6

.

â&#x20AC;˘


WAYNE YOUNG

TOM BEACH

Brigham Young graduate from Provo, Utah ... 1975 NCAA All-around champion, 4th R, HB, PB ... 3rd in 1974 NCAA AA ... 25th in 1974 World Games AA with 110.625, top American. . .appeared in Berkeley against the Japanese in 1975.

Junior at Univers ity of California, Berkeley, from Torrance . . .really came into his own at 1975 NCAA meet with 108.40 all-around score and 1st place finish in vaulting to help Cal to the team title .. .went on to tie for first in USGF AA, and win R, V, HB. . . first international meet was against Japan in Berkeley, 1975. . .was the U.S. representative at the prestigious Chunichi Cup invitational in Japan last fall.

U.S.A. 568. 75 RUMANIA 564.60

Wayne Young

114.70

Bart Conner

114.20

Kurt Thomas

114.05

Peter Kormann

112.35

Steve Hug

111. 70

Bob Farb

109.95

BOB FARB One of the United States' most promising young gymnasts ... A 19 year old sophomore at Stanford University ... placed 6th in the USGF all-around competition last year ... a member of the U.S. elite team ... comes from New York.

7


U.S.A. TEAM

United States

Gymnastics Federation

DIANE DUNBAR

ANN CARR

KATHY HOWARD

DEBBIE WILCOX

ROXANNE PIERCE

TAMMY MANVILLE

COLLEEN CASEY

â&#x20AC;¢

TRISH REED

DEBBIE FIKE

8

DENISE CHESIRE

DALE FLANSAAS

COACH


Classement par eq ulpes Results of the teams Resullale der Mannschaflen

Rang Rang Rang

Sol

FIOor Boden

Roum.~ ~~e ...

.... ~

······························

USA

Poutre· Beam Balken

S•.rt Vault Sprung

Banes TOTAL

Barren ""'

96.7 5

.. 95.20

95. 30

93.B5

3Bl. l0

96.70

94 . 00

94.55

9 3 . 95

379.20

l9.B5

19 . 05

19. 70

19.65

19. 55·

19 . 45

i9:3ii

19 . 20

'17/so

19 . 30

76.15

l B.BO

75. BO

Classement l nd lviduel, lndlvld ual res ult• Elnz.elk lassem ent Nom Name Name

Comaneci

Prenom firs l neme Vorname

Rouma nie

Nadia .................... .... .......

··········-····

......... ··································- ...........

Teodora

Roumanie

~

Urugeanu

3. ············ ...........

~.~!~~?'.': ...................................... Q~~e.~~ ...........................?..~~····· ..

..

Howa r d

··········· ......I<":t.hx. .. .

19.1.5...... J B.... 4.5... 19.25

USA

19.60

lB. 75

lB . 65 .

7B . 25 .... ...................

I .. ..

5.

Car r

Ann

USA

19.35

lB.B5

lB . B5

lB . 60

75. 65

~

Goreac

Alina

Roumanie

1 9 . 05

lB.B5

19.00

lB . 60

75. 50

7.

Manvi l le

Tammy

USA

1 9.50

19.05

l B. 75

lB .1 0

75. 40

~

Dunba r

Diane

USA

19 .10

lB.75

lB . BO

18.35

75 .oo

..

Grigoras

JUlC8

Roumanie

18.95

19 . 10

18 . 65

18. 1 0

Casey

Colleen

USA

18. 85 ·

iii :'io 10 :90 · 10 : 60 ··

19 . 35

18 . 75

1~

74 . 80

74/ 65

................................ ········· 1

~.?:?.~.~.... .

11 . ..................

~ e .a .~9~.....

II

Federation Federation Ve1band

...............~e.~;:9..~~-~-~ ................ ~~~~~~-~~··· · · f.1~ rJ. l

e.qn ...

B.o.uma nie..

...18 . 45

lB.30

18. 65 18. 5.0 ·· ·

1 7 . 90

~· ~ -~~r

.··

+ 74 . 6.~ 73 . 45

Who's Who • 1n Gymnastics''

The 1976 Edition is being compiled and is destined to be larger and more informative than the original edi t ion . All those appearing in the 1973 Ed it ion will remain and new names from all parts of the gymnastics world w ill be added . Judges, gymnasts, officials, equipment representatives and enthusiasts are all included, along with background informat ion and honors achieved, present posit ion and addre.ss . To be a part of th is newest and most up-to-date publication for gymnasts, please complete the follow ing and ma il immediately . (Deadlin e fo r entr ies is October 1, 19713

HERE IS HOW YOU CAN BE PART OF THE 1976 EDITION: (Complete the following - please type or pr int)

CITY /STATE/ZIP _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ BIRTH DATE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ Resume of your activities in gymnastics. Include earliest to latest involvemen t in t hat order, past records, present profession. Limit your entry to 100 words please . We reserve right to edit all copy, for size .

Complete the information as requested above and enclose check for $15.00 made payable to the USGF and mail to the USG_F, Box 4699, Tucson , Az. 85717. Price includes the 1976 edition of " Who 's Who in Gymnastics," personalized copy and registry within that edition.

9


INNER-DIMENSIONS - Niles West High School

by

KA T HY

B URKE L

MAY WE PRES ENT ... Bart Conner, Niles West senior and gymnast, who rece ntly competed for the U. S. in th e Pan America n Games. Of this experience Bart says that it "made all preparations worthwhile " and "that it 's a gre at feeling to get to know people you 've seen on T. V. " He feels that there 's a great fellowship among all athletes and that for him the total experience was very wor thwh ile. With this artic le, N iles We st salutes his achieve men ts thus fa r, and those yet to co me, and wishes to share with the Niles West parents the pride we ha ve in being able to be a p art o f his achieve me nts.

Outside Mexico C it y th e re is a pyra mid ca ll ed the Sun P yra mid, whic h stou t-hea rt ed in d ividu a ls can cl imb , if th ey so des ire. O n th e face of thi s pyra mid a re so me 250 med ium-size d , prac ti ca ll y ve rtica l ste ps which he lp th e c limbe r reac h the to p. It is pe rh a ps most a pp rop ri a te th a t Ba rt Conn e r sho uld be prese n ted w ith his go ld a nd two bro nze Pa n A me ri can Ga mes m ed a ls in th e shad ow o f th e ~ un Pyramid , beca ti se abo ut seve n yea rs ago Ba rt bega n c li mb ing his pe rsona l pyra mid , with but a sing le goa l in m111 d. ""to be th e best gy mn as t th at I ca n be."" Th e firm fo un da tion fo r hi s pyra mi d is provide d by a ho me and fa mil y to ta ll y co mmitt ed to o ne a no th e r. Th e me m be rs of hi s fa m ily a re d edi ca te d to h L~p in g eac h o th e r ac hi eve wha tever eac h ind ividu al's goa ls mi ght be. Ba rt 's pare nt s' de di ca tio n to h is goa l bega n the day th ey kn ew th ey had a skill ed boy with a goa l, who neede d a pl ace to lea rn a nd wor l. . ~ in ce th a t tim e , they h ave bee n o n th a t clim b with him every s te p of th e way. Th ose ste ps have som e• imes co nt a in ed success a nd somet imes di sappo intm e nt , b ut th ey a lways co nt a in e d a meas ure o f how fa r Ba rt had p rogressed towa rd h is goa l o f be ing th e best gymn ast he could be . Thus, th e th eory w hi c h h as , a nd still d oes guid e hi s c limb, is th a t a win o r a loss is impo rt a nt prim a ril y as a n in d ica ti o n o f progress, no t as a n end n itse lf. Like th e c lim be r of th e S un P yra mid , who di scove rs th at it's imposs ibl e to keep cl im b ing wi th o ut occasio na l wo rds o f e ncouragement , o r eve n a ph ys ica l boos t now and th e n , so Ba rt fo und tha t he needed the kn ow ledge, th e he lp o f m any o th e r peopl e to kee p him go ing. H e c ites coac hes fro m a c ross th e na ti o n , th e Illin o is gy mnas ti cs sys te m w ith it s pa rti c ul a r coac hes , the Niles W est High School with its perso nn e l, a nd o the r gymn asts, as th ose who 've provided fo r hi s needs a t va rio us tim es during hi s cli m b thus far. T o get the he lp o f ma ny coach es, Ba rt so me tim es a tt e nde d c amps a nd. c lini cs th ro u ~ h out th e U nit ed Sta tes, from Orego n to Pe nnsy lvant a. At o ther limes, h e's stayed in Illino is, going to Ca mp Sears o r C a mp Ts uk ara. Oft e n . he had th e be ne fit o f pri va te instruc tio n eithe r by hi s ow n coac h o r coac hes like Sid Drain .fro m Maine W est or T o m W a ltho use fro m A rlingto n . Guiding Bart's climb right fr o m the beg inning has bee n a Niles W es t Coac h , John Burke l. Wh a t is

10

he to Ba rt '! ··Eve rythin g ... says Ba rt . th e n ooes o n to ca ll him no t o nl y his coac h . b ut a lso h is coun se lo r - .. ~o he lp eva lua fe wh a t a ll th e ot hers te ll us a nd the n ma ke it a ppl y to me."' Ba n fee ls th a t he has in th e past and sti ll "" can lea rn a lot'" fr o m o th e r gy mn as ts. pa rti c ul a rl y co ll ege gy mn asts. "" It may be just a little pe rso na l thi ng. li ke ·work from th e toes' o n the ho rse. whic h will be mos t be ne fi c ia l in the lo ng run ."" he sa id. . Conn er g il'es no sm a ll amo unt o f c re dit fo r hi s suppo rt to his ow n hi gh sc hool. beg innin g wit h In d ia n Coac h John Arm o ur. ··who's all owed us la titu de in tra ining." ' to the fa c ilities (I have n' t fo und a be tte r sit ua ti o n .a nyw he rel. to th e ad mini stra tio n a nd fa c ult y a t Nil es W est. who l'e a ll owe d him fl ex ibilit y with hi s studi es, the fe w tim es whe n he's ha d a gy mn ast ics co nfli c t. And Co nn er's no slo uc h in hi s studi es e ith e r. O f the 25 to tal c redit s he's e a rn e d thu s fa r. 14 o f th e.m a re in Ho no rs Co urses . re po rt s hi s co unse lor . H a rry Sort a !. Hi s sc ho las ti c a1·e rage 1s a B plus (3.280 l. It's easy to see tha t it was no ha rds hi p for his teac he rs to p ro l'id e him with s uppo rt. All o f th e m who ex pressed a n o pini o n o n Ba rt ao0 ree th at he's a oood stud e nt. a good c iti ze n a nd a "" lik ea bl e kid ... As hi s an teac he r T o m Blac kburn said . "" he's re all y go t a stra ight head o n his sho ulde rs ... · Ha ~ a)! thi s success go ne to Ba rt 's hea d '' If yo u as ked Ba rt how it feels to be a sta r. he'd mos t lik e ly loo k aro und to see wh o you're talking abo ut. and th e n furth e r d i1 en yo u by te lling yo u how te rrific · hi s two brothers a re. Wh a t's nex t fo r Bar t. how far does he have to go ye t to beco me th e bes t gymn as t he ca n be" Yo u c an be s ure th a t wh e re l'e r he find s a tes tin g gro und to he lp him rn e asure hi s pra°gress. that's wh e re h.e ·ll be fo und in th e nex t mo nth s a nd ye a rs. be it aga inst the Ru ssians next ye ar . the 1976 O lympic trial s o r e l'en the 1980 Olympic Gam es. He II go as far as he ha s to o n hi s c limb to reac h hi s o wn "" top ... But. how far ca n he go'! W e ll. he's 'a n Ari es. and a ccordin g to the Astrol ogi ca l C ha rt s. a n Ari e s is fo rc eful. with plenty o f drive . with smgle ness o f purpose a nd det e rmin a ti o n . . . "" he 's Ya liant. ga ins 1·1c to ry a nd ho no r . th e re by ma kes himself famou s in his G eneratio n. som e time s e l'e n beyo nd his c apac it y o f Birth ...


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IX CRITERION INVITATIONAL GYMNASTICS MEET Barcelona, Spain

Dec.9, 1975 by Roger Counsil, Gymnastics Coach Indiana State University

Having been selected to accompany Kurt Thomas to the Criterion Invitational in Barcelona, we departed the United States on December 3. The trip to Spain occurred without any problems. However, it was the first experience with "jet lag" for both of us, and we lost the better part of the next day napping and readjusting to a time zone that is six hours later than our own. The air terminals both at Madrid and Barcelona appeared more austere than our own, but the austerity stopped there. We were met at the Barcelona airport by Senior Salvadora Vallve, the president of the Catalonian Gymnastics Judges Association. He was very accommodating, providing us with workout areas for the first two days in private gymnastics gyms until the competition arena, Palacio Municipal de los Deportes, was available for practice. There were to have been ten nations represented in the meet. However, the entry from the U.S.S.R. withdrew from the competition for political reasons prior to our departure from the U.S.A. After our arrival in Spain, it was subsequently ruled that the Japanese entry, Shogo Hitomi, was ineligible to compete since we had been working as a coach in Madrid. Consequently, the field was narrowed to nine gymnasts from eight nations with Spain fielding two gymnasts - one from Madrid and the other from Barcelona. All competitors, coaches, and judges were housed together in the same hotel, The Crystal Palace, in the hea rt of downtown Barcelona about fifteen blocks from the Mediterranean sea port. The accommodations were quite good and the housing arrangements provided a rare opportunity to get to know the representatives from the other nations. Among the luminaries from the world of gymnastics were Mr. Jack Gunthard, Swiss national coach, Mr. Nik Stewart from the British Gymnastics Federation, and Mr. Silviu Magda, of the Romanian Gymnastics Federation. Our accommodations were close to many wonderful shops; the Barrio Gotico (Gothic Quarter) with its very narrow

streets and ancient buildings housing quaint shops well attended by foreign tourists. With our mornings free, we had time to shop and become acquainted with this picturesque Spanish city which is rich in tradition. The Barcelonians are very urban and the city appeared to be quite cosmopolitan . The people were always warm and friendly. Although English is not spoken fluently by all, there is enough spoken that one can get by with relative ease. The most difficult adjustment was to the fact that "noon hour" was between 2:00 and 4:00 p.m. when lunch was eaten and shops closed. We were bused to the meet site for practice two days prior to the day of competition. Although the equipment was mostly of Spanish manufacture, it was quite satisfactory. We were provided with an interpreter who spoke five languages, and who made communication among the various nations much easier. The countries which competed were: Belgium, Great Britian, Spain, Romania, Switzerland, Finland and France, America. On the day of competition we arrived at the Palacio Municipal de los Deportes, surprised to find that this very modern athletic facility was set up to televise the meet nationally throughout Spain. I had no knowledge of the Spanish attitude toward Americans, but any apprehensions were quickly dissolved by the warmth of the crowd and its obvious partiality to Kurt Thomas. After the competition he was besieged by autograph seekers. The competition itself was close among three competitors - Cepoi of Romania, Borio of France, and Thomas. Kurt began well, winning floor exercise, but encountered slight difficulty prior to his unique scissor break, making good execution impossible. Kurt created quite a stir during the daily practice sessions with his side horse leg work. It was obvious that the other gymnasts were studying his technique closely. Kurt also had some slight problems in rings and a zone violation in vaulting; however, he had no major breaks and his problems were only minor. He finished second with

12

Roger Counsil

9.15 on parallel bars behind Borio's 9.2, and third on high bar with a 9.1 behind Kartunnen of Finland, who scored 9.25 and Borio from France who scored a well-deserved 9.6 with the outstanding exercise of the competition, including staider in cubital grip, Veronin, and double-twisting flyaway. In the final point-total Kurt Thomas placed third in all-around scoring, 53.15 behind Cepoi of Romania who scored 53.4 and first place finisher, Henri Borio of France who scored 53.65. There was only a five-tenths of a point spread between Thomas and Borio. I was proud of Kurt because he represented the United States extremely well in his performances, and in his informal associations with our Spanish hosts and the other gymnasts during our stay. Barcelona, a city of three million, appeared to be wildly enthusiastic about gymnastics. There was a capacity crowd of approximately twelve thousand, which was very vocal about its gymnastics preferences. When they disapproved a score, they would whistle loudly, and wave their handkerchiefs. They were equally vocal when they approved. It was also interesting to observe that the new FIG rule changes are being implemented at the same rate as in the U.S., and that the scores appeared to be about the same for a given performance as those in the U.S. Our memories of Barcelona and the competition will be most happy ones. The warm hospitality of our Spanish hosts made our stay a most memorable one.

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UNITED STATES OLYMPIC GYMNASTICS COMMITTEE (MEN) OLYMPIC TRAINING CAMP The Olympic Training Camp for Men held at Penn State Un iversity from December 26 to January 2 was very successful. Hopefully, the proof of this will surface through the semi-final and final t rials and, most importantly, at the Games themselves. Major emphasis was placed on the compulsory program. This was accomplished through extensive meetings, demanding workouts, and a competition devoted to the improvement of the level of performance of the compulsory routines. However, one meeting and workout was devoted to optional program concerns. All gymnasts essentially worked all six events each day. The groups (4) and events were rotated in such a manner as to facilitate maximum exposure for comparison purposes. The meetings were generally (exception - films, TV tapes) held u t iii zing the committee/discussion technique. An outstanding film showing

the top six Japanese _compulsory routines in a recent competition served as a base our discussions and eventual ¡ for conclusions regarding these routines. A TV instant replay capability was present at all workouts and, also, for more detailed viewing in the mornings and evenings at the gymnasts living quarters. In addition, personal interviews of approximately one hour duration were conducted with almost all of the athletes. These were basically designed to critique the individual regarding technical problems and future planning considerations. Wayne Young and Marshall Avener we re appointed at Athlete Representatives and, additionally, served as captains of the two teams for the competition. They held meetings of their own (2) and were given maximum responsibilities during the daily workouts and competition. They also arranged for a social gathering for all in conjunction with a TV viewing of the competition on

the evening of January 1. A definite plus was the close working relationship between myself and the Manager, Mr. Gene Wettstone. As usual, the arrangements for the Camp at Penn State provided a truly excellent working environment. Mr. Tom Dunn assisted in various ways to include assistant coaching and judging duties. Mr. Bill Meade also was present for the competition and served as a judge. Attached are the training camp roster, schedule and competition results. Th is type of a training camp is a must for future development considerations. I believe all of the gymnasts thoroughly enjoyed and profited from this kind of exposure to each other. I feel it will definitely provide a higher level in compulsory performance in the ensuing months and I consider this a must if we are to have a chance at being among the top three in Montreal. KARL K. SCHWENZFEIER 1976 Olympic Coach

OLYMPI C TRAINI NG C!\MP SCJ!F.DULE Dec

26

Gymnasts

Dec

27

Open

Arrival

2000 hrs Squad Meeting (Init i al Briefing)

28

Dec

1300 h rs Film

1500 hrs 4 Hours

1 500 hrs 4 Hours

Practice

Practice

(Comp . )

(Comp . )

Dec

29

Dec

30

Dec

31

Jan

1

Jan

2

1100 hrs

1100 hrs

Gymnast o

Squad Meeting

Departure

1000 h rs Comp . Meet i ng

1100 h rs Opt ionals Meeting

Squad Meeting

~ Hou

1500 hrs 4 Hours

1500 hrs 4 Hours

Practic e (Comp.)

Practice

Pract i ce

(Opt . )

(Comp . )

1600 Meet (Comp.) 2000 hrs Squad Party

Open and other time periods wer e util iz ed with TV tape viewings and personal interviews . COMPULSORY COMPETIT ION RESULTS

1 Janu~ 12I 6

1.

NAME

FX

PH

YOUNG

9 . 00

9.00

y

!1 .

~

HB

TOTAL

9.60

9.30

9 . 30

9.15

55.35

9 . 00

9.30

54 .80

8 . 80

9 . 50

54 .40

2.

CONNER

9.00

9 . 40

9. 30

8.80

3.

BEACH

9.40

8.20

9.30

9.20

4.

GERARD

9.20

8.80

9. 50

8.90

8. 60

9 . 00

54 .oo

5.

WHELAN, G

9.10

8.80

8.60

8.90

9 .20

9 . 20

53 . 80

6.

KORMANN

9 . 60

8.20

9. 40

9 . 00

9.20

8 . 30

53. 70 52.80

7.

GRIFFITH

8.

FITZJ ARRELL

9.

WHELAN , J

9 . 30 9 . 10 9.00

8 . 90

8.80

8.50

9 . 00

8.30

8. 70

8.20

8.50

8.80

8 . 40

51. 70

9.00

6.50

9 . 30

8.50

8.90

51.20 51.10

10.

FARB

8 . 50

8.85

7 . 20

8.60

9. 00

8.90

11.

THOMAS

8.30

7.95

8.30

8 . 50

9.40

8.45

50 .90

12.

IVICEK

8 . 50

7. 00

7 . 80

9 .10

8 . 70

6.oo

47.10

8 . 80

8 . 40

8.90

43.70

13.

AVENER

14.

JOHNSON

8.10

9 . 50

14


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" Questionable Olympic Oual ification System in Gymnastics" By Ferd . Ochsner

Taken from an article in a German magazine

What everyone suspected has come true. The Olympic Qualification system in Gymnastics has turned into a farce. The best proof are the scores of some matches already held. The International Gymnastics Federation (FIG) decided on a Qualification system in which teams must compete twice, with freely selected opponents, and then score 87.5% of the maximum score possible in order to qualify for the Olympic Games in Montreal. Exempt from this rule are those teams, who placed 1 - 6 at the last World Championships in Varna, 1974. All other nations must battle for a ranking from 7 - 12. In addition to the 12 teams, 4 teams of individual gymnasts will compet e in Montreal. This system has brought about a tug of war game between nations to gain that ever important ranking. Teams select their opponents with tactical and strategic forethought, true to the saying : You feed me and I will still your thirst, and despite neutral judges, doors were opened wide for all sorts of manipulations. Let's take the Italian girls for example: In Varna, their team total was 344.55 points - 13th ranking . The highest individual score was 70.30 points - 58th ranking . In Olympic Qualification matches with Rumania and Hungary the Italians received total scores of 373.95 and 378.70 with individual high scores of 76.95 points and 76.80 points. In Varna, that score would have been sufficient to win bronze. These results are simply incredible. The same hold true for competitions between Norway and Holland, in which both teams scored 20 full points more than they did at the previous Wor ld Championships. It is simply impossible that a team can improve that much in that short a time. In Men's Gymnastics the situation is the same. In Fall, in a competition between Switzerland and Poland, Poland was defeated by a score of 529.85 - 528.80. Shortly thereafter in an Olympic Qualification Match with Hungary, Poland scored 543.80 with Italy they scored 548.55. Italy improved their score by 23 full points. It is obvious that it cannot continue in this manner. The FIG must find a better quali f icat ion system, either the Cup system with all neutral judge or qualification by ranking at the last World Championship.

17


SANLAM CUP - 1976 Pretoria, Republic of South Africa, February 6-7, 1976 by Les Sasvary On January 27, 76 I boarded a British Airways L 1011 for the longest and most interesting trip I have ever taken to the Republic of South Africa. My responsibility was to conduct an FIG Refresher Course for the South African judges who had cards from the 3rd FIG circle, and to be the head judge for the 7th South African Cup sponsored this year by the Sanlam Insurance Company of South Africa. Before my departure I was told by several individuals in gymnastic circles who were fortunate to visit there that the hospitality and friendship of the people there is unequaled by anyone. When you finish reading this report you will be certain yourself that it was true. Arrived in London on the morning of the 28th of February with 14 hours to spare. I took the bus to Picadilli Circus, looked at the prices, drank some good english beer, checked everything out on Trafalgar Square and around Big Ben. It was 1 C in London and I was dressed like a Californian, no overcoat, no hat, could not last as long as I would have Ii ked, so I spent the rest of the time in the famous London Museum of Fine Arts. After another long flight to Nairobe, and a shorter one to Kenya Johannesburg, I arrived at my destination. Hennie Loew, Technical Director of the South African Amateur Gymnastics Union greeted me at the aiport. Hennie is an old friend of mine, we met in Thonon, France during the 4th Intercontinental Judges Course in 1975. He is a great guy with a good sense of humor but I thought he was not funny when he asked me to start the Judges Course at 5 PM that afternoon. He drove me to Pretoria, the capital of South Africa, droped me off at the Burgerspark Hotel for a few hours rest. Incidentally, Burgerspark is a beautifully modern place with a fabulous restaurant made out of brass, yellow and brown velvet. A few hours of rest did mircles, I was beginning to feel great and ready to go to work. At 5 PM we started the FIG Refresher Course with 9 participants, Hennie, J.C. Cloete, and myself as instructors. The response of the South African judges were great. They were eager to learn the new rules and I found them very knowledgeable. We concluded the course with their national tryout for men and women with 0

compulsory & optional exercises. This was the first time I had an opportunity to see the South African men and women gymnasts. They impressed me very much, with their excellent difficulty level, poise and great pride. Their national coaches are with them all the time, exercises a full and complete command over the selected gymnasts. I was informed at this time that they are hosting the men & women's team of the Republic of China from Taiwan and the Sanlam Cup will have Chinese participants as well. This sounded very interesting and I thought their participation will give the competition an extraordinary international flavor. As I found out later, it did. That evening I had the pleasure meeting their team leader who is presently the President of the Gymnastics Federation of the Republic of China, Mr. Penney Tung. At the closing of the FIG Course I met Mr. Olle Areborn, the President of the South African Amateur Gymnastics Union who complimented our work with some kind words. Olle is a wonderful person, he is a great leader and a very good friend of our USGF. I have spent a great deal of time with him and learned a lot from him. He conducts his business with ease has a great sense of humor which h~ exercises frequently in most critical situations and turns them into good times. He is a hard worker and his associates are hard workers. I will not be surprised to hear in a few years time that the South African gymnasts are among the leading gymnastic Nations of the world. They need international experience very much, but that is a very expensive proposition. On February 2nd, we greeted Diane Dunbar, Mike Carter, Markku Karttunen Finland, Tommy Wilson, England, Phillip Caille, Brigitte Girardin and their coach from Switzerland at the airport in

Johannesburg and with their arrival and the 1976 Sunlam-Cup was on its way. All participants were housed at the Burgerspark Hotel where we spent the ne~t few days of getting acquainted, training and visiting interesting places around, or in Pretoria. The Sanlam Cup Gymnastics Competition takes place annually in one of the major cities in South Africa. This was the 7th competition and Pretoria was selected as the site. Only voluntary exercises are required. On February 6th they held three events for men and two for women and the next day the rest of the events. For the men we had 5 Chinese, 4 South Africans, Tommy Wilson champion of Great Britain Markku Karttunen the number gymnast from Finland, Phillip Caille a young upcoming star from Switzerland and Mike Carter, formerly LSU representing the USA. The ladies had 4 South Africans, 1 Swiss, 4 Chinese, and Diane Dunbar from the USA. The pressure was on Mike all the way since being a black gymnast he was in the center of attraction. Television and the press gave him a tremendous publicity which seemed to bothPr him " 1.-.+

on:

In Men's compet1t1on on Floor Exercise, Carter overspun his double twisting salto, fell down, and out of the area (the Reuter floor contributed a great deal to that mistake) but recovered beautifully and won the event with 8.90. Basically all gymnasts committed serious errors and I did not notice anything new or original. There was a very unfortunate accident on floor. Phillip Caille, Switzerland collapsed after his double twisting mount and was in agony of pain. Later we found out, he reinjured his old ankle problem and was out of competition.

f I

Sanlam Cup: Results Women NAME

NATION

v

UPB

BB

FX

TOTAL

Dunbar Girardin Theron Bingham Serfontein G. De Jong S.H. Fang C.Y. Chiou C.S. Chin

USA Swiss S.A. S.A. S.A. S.A. R. of China R. of China R. of China

9.05 9.05 9.20 8.75 8.95 8.85 8.56 7.90 8.00

9.50 8.95 8.95 8.60 8.80 8.30 7.10 5.85 5.00

8.80 9.30 8.70 9.00 8.60 8.60 7.80 8.30 7.40

9.45 9.20 9 .05 8.95 8.80 9.10 8.65 8.30 7.50

36.80 36.50 35.90 35.30 35.15 34.85 32.00 30.35 7.50

18

¡-


On Pommel Horse as a great surprise to me no one did a great execise (they looked excellent in practice). Mike had bad luck, sat on the horse and finished 3rd behind two South African gymnasts who tied for 1st place with 8.60. Markku Karttunen hurt his shoulder on this event and was not a contender any longer. On Rings Mike Carter was outstanding and even with severe judging he scored 9.15 for 1st place. Next to him Alwyn Gerber S.A. with 8.45 Karttunen with 8.4. The Chinese were yet to place a gymnasts in the top 3. Their routines were very difficult but could not execute them well. The ladies competition was in good hands with Carol Anne Letheren of Canada being the head judge. She has conducted the comeptition smoothly and efficiently with the minimum amount of conferences. South African girls looked very impressive particuarly Theron, Serfontain and De Jong. I was concerned that Diane will have problems, but after she finished her uneven routine receiving a 9.50 my worries were gone. Theron won Vaulting with a nice Tsukahara piked, and Dunbar took first place on Uneven Bars with her usual great performance. The second night the people filled the Exhibition Hall completely. I estimated the crowd 5000. Mike was limping all day due to an ankle injury he suffered during warm up on Floor Exercise the previous day. When I found out that he was hurt, advised him to simplify his vault to a full twisting handspring which he did and finished 3rd with 8.80. On Parallel Bars and High Bar he had no problems with 9.15 and 9.45 respectively to capture the all around crown and the Sanlam Cup. Diane did exactly just that capturing the ladies all around championship. Her floor exercise routine was so captivating that the crowd demanded that she would repeat it one more time. I had tears in my eyes during the ceremonies. It was so good to see the Americans being celebrated for change. I was very proud to be an American and even more proud of both Mike and Diane. After the competition we were all invited to a great banquet held at the Burgerspark Hotel where we exchanged

gifts, speeches and had a fabulous time.

Sanlam Cup: Results Men

NAME Carter Gerber K. Stander Wilson F. Stander Levin Lin Dien Yu Wang Min Yen C. Jen Cheng K. Sin Yuan T. Tzen Fu Karttunen Caille

NATION FX

PH

R

v

PB

HB

TOTAL

(USA) S.A. S.A. G.B. S.A. S.A. China China

8.90 8.80 8.10 8.60 7.25 8.00 8.50 7.25

8.20 8.60 8.25 7.05 8.60 7.60 5.00 5.20

9.15 8.45 7.05 7.95 7.65 7.00 7.50 5.80

8.80 7.25 9.00 8.90 7.45 6.30 8.00 7.75

9.15 9.30 7.45 7.05 9.00 7.85 7.50 8.35

9.45 9.40 8.30 9.00 7.50 9.05 6.30 7.50

53.65 51.80 49.05 48.55 47.45 45.20 52.80 41 .90

China China China Finn. Finn.

6.55 7.05 7.15 8.40 0.75

4.75 3.90 4.60 6.20

7.60 7.40 5.80 8.40

6.45 6.80 7.75

8.40 7.05 6.40

7.70 8.00 6.30 9.30

41.45 40.20 38.00 32.30 0.75

1--""'~''" -¡¡ .~

truly become emotional when I said good-bye to all the good gymnastic friends and particularly Olle and Hennie who were such fantastic hosts. The next morning we were on the plane flying back to good old USA.

DIANNE DUNBAR & MIKE CARTER

19


.

ALL-AROUND WINNERS

. J

NADIA COMAMECI

KATHY HOWARD

20


AMERICAN GIRL'S TEAM

RUMANIAN MEN'S TEAM

21


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OFFICIAL TECHNICAL BULLETIN Old Deductions Refer to Those from World Games 1974 Deductions are same for Elite & International Competition J. Fie Jan. 12, 1976 The following rule changes from the FIG Code of Points will apply to 1975-79 Certification Examination for Judges of Women's Gymnastics. They are released by Shirley Bryan, Women's Gymnastics Certification Committee, and Jackie Fie, USG F Women's Technical Committee: Landing penalties: Landing penalties for all events both National Compulsory and Optional Routines

Falling onto or from apparatus Support with one or both hands on floor Fall on pelvis Touching floor with one or both hands Falling against apparatus after landing Fall to the knee Steps or jumps

0.5 0.5 0.5 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.1

Distribution of Optional Exercises Composition A. Value of elements (Difficulties) Superior elements 3 required each worth 0.6 (1.0 bLD) Medium elements 4 required each value 0.3 (0.5 OLD) Total

10.00

1.80

3.00

1.20

2.00

3.00

5.00

B.

Originality and value of connections

1.5

C.

Value of General Composition

0.5

Total Composition

OLD 1.0 Bars .5 Beam 1.0 1.0 0.5 1.0 0.5 0.2 0.2-0.3

Same

5.00

Execution Execution (1.5 OLD) and amplitude (0.5 OLD) 4.0 of movement B. General Impression 1.0

A.

Height of Vaulting Horse Elite Applies to USGF Age Group, Program Jr. Division

2.0 Same

5.0

3.0

1.20 m

')LO 1.10

1.101.20 m 1.20 m 1.101.20 m

Sr. Division Children's Division

Value of following vaults OLD 9.0 USA 8.5 Layout stfaddle and stoop Layout squat USA 8.0 8.5 FIG 9.7 Cartwheel 9.0 FIG 9.7 Handspring 9.2 Yamashita FIG 9.7 9.4 FIG 9.4 Cartwheel with 1/4 turn 10.0 Handstand pivot cartwheel eliminated With the exception of the hecht vault, all other vaults must have a minimum of 1/2 twist to be classified as a 10.00 pt. vault. Hecht value = 10.00

23


Horse Vault All vaults must be performed with placement of the hands on the horse (which is) placed sideways. For compulsory vau lts as well as optional vaults, t he gymnast is allowed to execute 2 vaults. The best one counts. For optional vaults, the 2 vaults mus t be different. In the finals (Elite o nly) , the gymnast must perform 2 different vaults, 1 with at least 1/2 turn (180) around the longitu dina l axis or the width (transverse axis). Both vaults must have the value of 10.00 pts. An extra run (approach) is allowed for both vau lts, in the condition that the gymnast has not touched the horse. If the horse is touched, the attempt is con sidered a vau lt. The difficulty of the vault is fi xed according to the annexed sca le. The compulsory vault is always worth 10.00 pts. If the vault executed is not shown in the table, the terminology must be sent to the President of the Technical Committee one month prior to the competition , with a copy to the Secretary. Place of the Coach The place of the coach is beside the landing. It is forbidden for the coach to be between the board and the horse, to put a hand on the horse or to make signs/signals to the gymnast up until she begins. General faults (valid for all 5 groups) 1. Of the 12 vaults executed by the team, 6 may be identical. If this total is exceeded, the ded uction s for the team will be each time 2. The executed vault not corresponding to the indicated number 3. If the gymnast executes only one vault in the f in als 4. The gymnasts fails to exec ute a vault with a turn in the finals or executes 1 of the vaults under the value of 10.00 Deduction 5. If the gymnast executes t he same vault twice during the finals Deduction 6. Coach between the board and the horse 7. The coach touches the horse 8. Aid of the coach during the vault Void Vault Second flight phase 1. Insufficient height 2. Insufficient extension of body before lan ding 3. Bad direction 4. Bad form (legs bent, apart transversely latera lly) Specific Faults Group 1. Vaults at the ho rizontal , Number 1 and 2 All Groupings Are New 1. Body under horizontal in first flight phase 2. Body too bent 3. Alternate support 4. Repulsion insufficient 5. Touching ho rse with the feet First Flight Phase 1. Trajectory insufficient according to the technique of the vault 2. Body piked 3. Legs bent or apa rt transversely or lateral ly Support Support 1. Too long a support 2. Support with arched body 3. Arms slight ly bent 4. Arms Completely bent

24

0 .3 0.5 1.00

1.00

OLD

1.00 0.50 0.30

up up up up

to to to to

1.0 0.2

1.50 0.50 0.50 0.50

1.00

0.3

up to 1.00 up to 0.50 0.30 0.50 up to 0 .50

3.50

OLD upto1.0 up to 0.5 up to 0.5

1.5 0.3

OLD 0.2 0.3 0.2 1.0

up up up up

to to to to

.3-.5 .5 .5 2.50


Group II. Vaults by handspring, Yamashita No. 3 and No. 4 1. Body piked or arched in 1st phase 2. Alternate support or repulsion 3. Body arched or piked in second flight (handspring

OLD 0.30 0.30 up to 0.50

.5 .3

.5 4. Insufficient or early pike of the body

0.50

Group 111. Vaults necessitating turns around longitudinal axis No. 5-18 1. Body arched in first flight up to 0.30 2. Turn beginning too soon up to 0.30 3. Turn not finished 0.50 4. Bad form during the turn up to 0.50

0.5

Group IV. Vaults necessitating turns around the horizontal axis No. 19-21 All New 1. Body insufficiently tucked or piked 0.30 2. Technical faults of the turns 0 .30 3. Legs apart during the turn 0.20 Group V. Vaults necessitating combinations of turns around one or more axes of the body No. 22-29 All New 1. Support incorrect 0.30 2. Turn beginning too early 0.30 3. Turn finishing too late 0.50 4. Body insufficiently tucked or piked 0.20 5. Legs apart during the turn 0.20 General faults and Faults specific to the apparatus that have changed Aid by the coach during the exercise Aid by the coach upon landing Presence by the coach on the podium during the exercise (both beam and floor) Old rule was 0.5 for floor only, not beam Coach touching apparatus during the exercise Coach between the board and the horse Coach standing between the bars or passing under the low bar Coach blocks view of the judges Using supplementary support to regain position on bar Regaining support without supplementary support on bar Competitor leaving competition area without permission of the head judge

Floor Exercise Hands touch floor for balance Hands supported on the floor for balance Not ending with music Pianist aids gymnast Beginning of exercise missed by- personal error Fault in rhythm

Balance Beam Hand support to maintain balance Hand touch to maintain balance Foot against side of beam

1.0 0.5

0.50 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.3 0.5 0.3

0.2 1.0

No Penalty 1.0 0.5

0.5 Not Listed Before

0.3 0.5

0.5 1.0

0.3 0.2 ea. time 0.5 0.2 ea. time

0.5

0.5 0.3 0.2

25

OLD 1.5

1.0

0.4


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PHILOSOPHY OF THE ELITE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM BY MRS. JACKIE FIE USGF Women's Tech. Com. What is an Elite gymnast? The required 8. 75 average score represents a level of achievement and performance that might indicate an approach to excellence that can well be respected. Beyond this, "elite" represents a qua Iity of striving that merely begins with that 8. 75 score. Several levels of commitment exist which seem to be the key to the Elite Program. The commitment is assumed by the gymnast and coach to improve, to excel and not just to "be" in the program. Striving for the best techniques right from the beginning with much perseverance will foster that commitment. This commitment should be "total" and planned rather than the result of a moment of excellence that is seized upon without the proper understanding of the program. Coaches, judges, and administrators must work together to do everything possible to commit to a concept of Elite that will put the U.S.A. in its proper place world wide at any given point in time . . . the "best" of the Elite must be ready .. . The Regional Pre-Qualification System offers opportunity for early commitment to the Elite Program and can give perspective to what skill level and potential a gymnast has at that time. Regional concept and a chance to get information and guidance "at home" rather than waiting for information, etc. to filter down from the National level, as in the past. Each region has a Regional Head Coach who represents that region on the Women's Technical Committee and who is in continual communication with the National Head Coach on all matters that pertain to the Elite Program.

A gymnast can commit tp pre-qualifying without losing the chance to compete in other competitive programs. Therefore, there is no "double jeopardy" if a gymnast is almost ready, but perhaps not quite there. And yet the purpose of the program can be defeated very easily if too many gymnasts are encouraged to enter before they are ready. Every good gymnast cannot necessarily become an elite gymnast. The National Elite Qualification Meets afford two opportunities for the gymnast who appears to be ready score-wise to compete with the best in the nation and thereby gain further perspective and experience, even if she does not qua Iify for the Elite National Championships. This meet can be viewed, perhaps, as an end in itself - but it should be more than that - a stepping stone to becoming one of those "best." Once a gymnast becomes nationally qualified for the Elite Championships, the commitment becomes even greater, as does the jeopardy and hopefully, above all, the rewards. That reward of membership on a National Team, the possibility of international competition, and the chance to be No. 1. Training for this level of competition means not just doing enough to score well and meet m1n1mum standards, but working ceaselessly for the future in a way which would insure doing well for oneself and the country on the floor of an international competition - well enough to garner some of those coveted medals for the U.S.A. The whole qualification system, as it is now set up, gives equal opportunity to all those gymnasts at an 8. 75 level to proceed through their regional meet (after one or two attempts) to either or

Clara Schroth Lomady

HALL OF FAME

Born in Philadelphia, Clara Schroth (Lomady) participated in a number of sports in junior and senior high schools basketball, hockey and track and field . She competed in gymnastics as a member of the Leader Club, and later the Philadelphia Turners, under the Guidance of Gustav Heineman. She was National A.A.U. balance beam champion in 1941 . This spurred her on to greater heights, as she continued to score in National Championship competition. So versatile

Games at Helsinki, Clara returned to America with her husband, by ship. En route home, the ship crashed into anoLher, and caught fire, but the blaze was subsequently controlled. Clara is a talented secretary, but devotes much of her time, currently to the teaching of gymnastics for children. When she won the All-Around Medal in the National Turnfest in 1954, she was the mother of a daughter born in 1953.

27

both of the National Qualification Meets and, if successful in re-earning their 8.75 average, continuing to the Elite Championships of the USGF. The training and development of gymnasts in this program is being more and more coordinated from the National Head Coach, the eight Regional Head Coaches, and the Foreign Relations Board of the USGF so that everything pertaining to the present and future of Elite gymnasts is being very well thought out so that it can be instituted in a systematic manner. This systematic approach insures that each gymnast can be individually serviced in the best way for her. The program has been set up to give equal opportunity to all gymnasts who are ready to be involved. The Committee feels that the Elite Program is an all-encompassing program that should be entered on the regional level as a result of designated commitment. Coaches and administrators involved in the Elite Program are then in a position to return that commitment. Much though, then, must be given to the concepts outlined above before a coach and gymnast consider themselves truly working and committed towards Elite goals. In this way, a realistic exchange between the gymnast and the program can occur. Note to Women's Technical Committee: Administrators and workers, as well as the gymnasts and coaches must be well aware of the goals and aspirations of this program and just how high the stakes are, for we cannot afford to do a poor job in translating these concepts. Policy Approved by: USGF WTC - (Nov. 1975) Submitted by: S. Valley RTD VI

was Clara Schroth, that she was a medalist in the standing long jump in the National A.A.U. Track and Field Championships in 1945. She was a bronze medalist in Team Gymnastics in the Olympic Games of 1948 at London. She was also a member of U.S. Olympic Teams in 1952 and 1956. She was married to Wendell Lomady, now a Physical Education teacher at Sandy Run Junior High School in Upper Dublin, in 1951. Following the 1952 Olympic


ENGLISH TERMINOLOGY COMMITTEE Representing 13 Nations Mrs. Jackie Fie, Chairman USA KEY TO NEW ENGLISH GYMNASTIC TERMINOLOGY AS APPEARS in 1976 ENGLISH EDITION OF THE FIG CODE OF POINTS Please read carefully the key to terminology which precedes each event, since this will provide you with necessary terms and definitions indispensible to the easy understanding and interpretation of the English Terminology . All terms and wordings are in English with the exception of the words "hecht," "flic-flac," "Tsukahara," "Yamashita" and "Stalder," which have other language origins. However, it was recommended to use these words for the sake of brevity. I.

TERMINOLOGY - TABLE OF HORSE VAULTING KEY :

11.

A. Hyphen indicates separation between movement in first and second flight. B. "Outward" indicates direction of turn in second flight. C. "Out" indicates that the movement in the second flight is done out of an inverted pos ition - handstand - and does not indicate direction of turn .

TERMINOLOGY - BALANCE BEAM AND FLOOR EXERCISE KEY:

Below is a list of terms and movements to assist in understanding the listing of medium and superior difficulties. The most common term, as a result of the study, is stated in the left column and is used throughout the uneven bar section of the CODE OF POINTS. A. DANCE AND MODERN RHYTHMIC GYMNASTICS

MOST COMMON TERM

LEAST COMMON TERM OR DESCRIPTION

arch jump (body stretched with legs together or body arched with rear foot to head height) cabriole cat leap

hollow jump or sheep jump

corkscrew 1 % turn scale (an arabesque performed with upper body lowered forward and balletically termed an arabesque penchee) scissors leap series stag leap stag-split split leap (180°) stride leap tuck jump waltz

leap with beat of legs leap with flexing of legs in front of body or foal leap 1 % turn on one leg descending from stand to squat arabesque (or low arabesque (balletically : an arabesque is performed with an erect torso and free leg raised at least to right angle to support leg) ciseau or hitchkick 2 or 3 movements in succession and refers to medium and superior elements deer leap bending, then stretching of forward leg during split leap grand jete denotes less than 180° split during leap squat jump with legs bent forward in front of body three moving steps in rhythm

'I(

B. GYMNASTIC AND ACROBATIC MOVEMENTS, SUPPORTS AND MOUNTS arabian aerial walkover bridge stand

jump with 1/2 turn into somersault forward piked, tucked, stretched, of with step-out free walkover crab stand

28

'If


cartwheel forward flic-flac flic-flac step-out fl ic-flac or handspring flyspring step-out

illusion knee scale kneeling lunge limber needle scale pike-stretch somersault pike support (clear) press roll backward or handstand round off snap down split sit split forward split lateral stands : 1. cross

2. side stag handstand straddle support (clear) stretched somersault thief mount tinsica "V" support (clear) valdez walkover whip back wolf mount

cartwheel forward or 1 /4 turn into cartwheel, 1/4 turn out of cartwheel facing start (inward) back handspring or back flip fl ic-flac on one leg denotes landing on 2 legs denotes handspring from 2 legs (tuck or pike) to step-out a separation of legs during the flight phase and landing on one leg (in particular the flic-flac and handspring) turn on one leg passing through a scale forward into a scale backward knee stand kneeling sit on one leg with the other leg stretch ed backward turnover backward or forward with legs together vertical standing split with forward grasp pike somersau It "L" support or leg lever support raise legs to handstand without spring back extension roll arabspring courbette or 1/2 flic-flac split cross or transversal split split sideward when the breadth axis of the gymnast is at right angles to the length axis of apparatus when the breadth axis of the gymnast is parallel with length axis of apparatus lunge handstand straddle "L" support layout somersault or hollow back somersault jump passing one leg stretched, the other bent to a rear support arabwheel kid support backward tirisica to or through handstand position from sit or tuck stand turnover forward or backward from 1 leg stand to 1 leg stand flic-flac without hand support squat stand with support leg bent and free leg stretched sidewards

C. TERMS AND DEFINITIONS aerial clear free turn

twist

pirouette

to squat to stoop

verbs

denotes a tumbling or acrobatic movement performed in the air designates a 'position with a hand support with body and legs not'touching apparatus or floor designates a position or movement accomplished without hand support used when a minimum of 1/2 turn is described and specifically used to describe a revolution around the long axis in vaulting used to describe a full revolution around the long axis in tumbling and in uneven bar movements where a full turn is demanded used to describe a full turn on one foot or tour enl'air in ,dance or occasionally to describe a full turn to Gatch HB on the uneven bars (around long axis) tuck the adjectives describing that pike position in relation to another, e.i .: clear pike support, etc.

29


HALL OF FAME

EN GLISH TERMINOL OGY (contd) Ill.

TERMINOLOGY - UNEVEN BARS

stoop pike fr ee clear

designates action designates position designates movement without hand support designates a hand support with body away from the bar designates a kip onto the bar to a front or rear support designates a kip movement only, not onto the bar to a support

kip-up kip

KEY TO UNEVEN BAR TE.RMINOLOG Y

Regular Grip

Front Stand

FlrE?etFPon°ef! Mu Mort

Reverse of Palmar Grip

Mixed Grip

Cross Stand Left

Cross Stand Right

Rear Stand

r

~ ~

Clear Front Su,oport

Fro nt

Rear

Supnort

~

~L~

Front Lying

Glide

Haniz;

t~ Back Kin - Un to Rear support.

~

Cast to Clear Prent Sunnort

~~{\ Reverse Kio - Un

Back Kip Swing:

~-b ~iide ~ -Stoen Throup:;h o Inverted Pike ~ Ha n? or S1·1in1<

1 ',~~ Back Droo to Inver-

~ ~~ { ~

r--r' i-r I

HALL OF FAM E Herbert Vogel As Women's Gymnastic Coach at Southern Illinois University, 1962 to present, his teams posted dual match records of 116 wins and but four Iosses. From 1956 to 1962, he served as coach at Mott Foundation, Flint, Michigan, building the program which included 2,200 participants, and 90 advanced participants. He held special classes for the blind, handicapped and mentally retarded, and also served the Michigan School for the Deaf. During the years from 1946-1956 he was identified with the Chicago Turners, Illinois Turners Camp, Indiana U., Dade County, Florida. In 1957-1962 he was coach of U.S. teams which participated in the USA-Canada dual matches. He has produced numerous National, Pan-American, and Olympic Games gymnasts, eight National Championship teams, at A.A.U., USGF, and collegiate levels, including 21 All-Americans. He has contributed many articles on Gymnastics to magazines and publications. Over the yea rs, he has participated in Gymnastic Clinics in the U.S.A., Canada, Mexico and South America. He has been responsible for many innovations for the benefit of Gymnastics, and was one of the found ers of the United States Gymnastic Federation.

u

Rear Ly ing Hang , Kip - Up

Free

to Clear Front Support = Short Kip - Up

Inverted

Pik~

Swing - Dislocate

Stalder Circle Back ward

Inverted Straddle Roll ~ Backward

H~1f:c 1rcle

Backward

Hecht

to Eagle Catch HB

Clear Hin Circle Backward

CONGRATULATIONS TO GRETE TRIEBER WHO JUST RECEIVED HER INTERNATIONAL JUDGES BREVET

Beat Swinp:- Back Unrise

Stratltll e Cut Backward

11!( Underswing from Clear Front Support

30


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FROM: FEDERATIO ROMANA DE GIMNASTICA TO: UNITED STATES GYMNASTICS FEDERATION P.O. Box 4699 TUCSON, ARIZONA 85717 U.S.A.

gymnastic a.ides NORTHBRIDGE, MASS. 01534

~~ PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHING SYSTEMS

Dear Friends, Last October I was appointed by the International Gymnastics Federation (FIG) to conduct a continental course for international Gymnastics judges in Toronto. I wish now to compliment your Federation for the excellent performances of your two representatives Mrs. Jacqueline Fye and Mrs. Delene Darst. Their contributions were soundly documented and very competent. I also wish to congratulate all the women judges from the USGF who attended the course for their seriousness, thorough preparation and active contribution in improving the FIG Code of Points. At the CTF meeting in London during the World Cup I reported on the unanimous opinions of the judges in connection with the FIG Code of Points and emphasized the high quality and efficiency of the women judges from your country. I am sending you herewith enclosed 3 FIG stamps for three of your judges who obtained their FIG license, namely Mrs. K. Patoile, Mrs. E. Weaver and Mrs. E. Wachtel. For the remaining judges, who are of national category, you will receive their licenses and the respective stamps after confirmation by the CTF of the FIG. With cordial greetings and best wishes for 1976.

BASIC SYSTEM (charts with teaching manua 1) Girls (6J ····· · ·· · ···· ·· ····· · ····· ········ · : .... . . 10.00 Boys (8 .. .. ...... . ......... .....•....... ......... 12.00 Teacher's Manual only ..... ...... • .... ....... .. • ... . . 2.00 (specify Girls' or Boys')

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7.00 5 . 00 4.00 6.00 6 . 00 5 .00 8.00

Girl's

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Int. to Advanced Balance Beam (6) . . ... . . ... : .. . .... Basic to Advanced Tumbling (4) . .... . . . .....•. ... . .• (same as above) · Competitive Vaulting (3) ............ ... ... .... ..... Int. Uneven Parallel Bars (5) .. ... . . .. . ...... .... . . Adv. Uneven Parallel Bars (4) ............ .. . .. .....

8. 00 6.00 5.00 7. 00 6 . 00

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32

School ... . ..•......... .. . ... • . . .... Zip . ..... . .... .... ••·•


MINUTES WOM EN'S TECHNICAL COMMITTEE Minutes Not for "official" publication until I I I D. approval at March WTC Meeting. The motion was made, seconded and However, minutes may be released as passed to have the top three scores in "unofficial." both Compulsories and Optionals (total of eight events) count toward team scores at Junior and Senior Meets only. The Women's Technical Committee same system was recommended for 9:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. Nov. 13 Regional Competition. However, the final 11:15a.m . -1:00p.m. Nov.14 decision on team scoring at Regionals is Region I the responsibility of the Regional Officers RTD J. Pasquale - Present RC, RTD, RHC, and Class I Coach RHC D. Flansaas - Present Advisors. It was decided that each state RC C. Wagner - Present has the power to handle team awards for Region II Class I, 11 and 111 meets as they wish. RTD K. Patoile - Present Ill E. RHC G. Lewis - Present Report on height of horse for juniors (2nd meeting only) and children: It has been moved Region Ill seconded and passed to accept the FIG RTD S. Weber - Present heights of 120 centimeters for all classes RHC R. Hill - Present of seniors. The children's and junior RC M. Mahoney - Present divisions may elect to use the FIG height Region IV of 120 centimeters or adjust the horse RTD E. Weaver - Present down to 110 centimeters as desired by RHC C. Johnson - Present the individual gymnast. The horse may RC C. Robertson - Present not be set at 115 cm. Region V RTD G. Treiber - Present 111 I: Meets with problems: (2nd meeting only) For addition to the National Bid Form RHC C. Caudill - Present for Elite, Class I Jr. & Sr. I J.O. : All RC C. Leidtke - Present technical procedures and regulations Region VI pertaining to the competition must be RTD S. Valley - Present cleared through the National Technical RHC G. Coco - Present Chairman. These matters must be RC L. Chencinski - Present finalized no later than one month prior to Region VII the competition. If the technical matters RTD A. Schweyer - Present and regulations are in violation of any RHC B. Strauss - Present USGF Rules and Pol icies for (Donna Strauss) Competition, the Chairman of the RC R. McBride - Present Women's Committee, after Region VIII recommendation and approval of the RTD D. Darst National Technical Chairman and the RHC V. Edwards National Head Coach, has the authority RC L. Taylor and obligation to withdraw the scheduled Attending guests: competition and immediately designate Nichole McDuff, Canadian Coach - an alternate site. 2nd meeting only; J. Fountaine, For addition to Regional Bid Form Equipment Specification Committee. Elite and Class I: All technical procedures and regulations pertaining to the New Address: Cap Caudill, 3103 Fern Valley Rd. competition must be cleared through the Director. These Suite 107, Louisville, Ky. 40213 - Phone Regional Technical matters must be finalized as soon as (home) 5D2-49J -0981. possible after all regional entries are New Phone: known no later than April 1, 1976. If the Vannie Edwards Office techn ical matters and regulations are in 318-222-2116; Home - 318-378-4482 violation of any USGF Rules and Policies for competition, the Regional Chairman, 11. Minutes after consultation with the RTD and From the August WTC Meeting were R HC and after approval of the National approved with the following Technical Chairman and Women's amendments: Committee Chairman, has the authority

33

and obligation to withdraw the scheduled competition and immediately designate an alternate site. For addition to the State Meet Bid Form Class I, 111 & 111: All technical procedures and regulations pertaining to the competition must be cleared through the "Class 11" RTD by the SC. These matters must be finalized as soon as possible and no later than one month before the competition. If the technical matters and regulations are in violation of any USGF Rules and Policies for competition, the Regional Chairman, after recommendation and approval of the RTD and RHC, has the authority and obligation to withdraw the scheduled competition and immediately designate an alternate site. 111.

Elite Program

A. Regional Elite Boards - Muriel will send written report (to be sent at a later date and approved by mail or at the March WTC Meeting). B. Criteria! for "exceptional cases" in the Regional Elite program will still be handled by each Regional Coaching Board. C. Regional Elite Clinic Reports are all in except for Region I, after the Clinic Director has not sent his report to D. Flansaas after repeated request. (WTC Chairman needs copy of VI 11 Report from NHC). D. Regional Elite Qualifiers, Oct. 31, Nov. 1 Region I 17 + Archer & Fike II 6 Ill 2 IV 2 +Casey V Meet not being held until Nov. 22, 23 (J. Fie spoke strongly to the point that the RTD had no right to change this date from the designated weekend and that this should never occur again). Projected entry: 2-5 VI 8 +Walker VII 12+Jocum VIII 5 +Shotwell This adds 52 qualifiers to the present 30 who are already


qualified from last season (12 of those must compete in Houston). This means that there will be a possible minimum of 64 competitors (plus Region V's). Entry deadline is November 22. E. Regulations governing the Elite Program for 1975-76 were accepted with the following changes: # 4 will read : Those gymnasts who were qualified for the 1975 Elite National Meet, failed to compete at 1975 Elite Nationals due to injury or illness that was duly recorded and approved, and participated as a USGF representative in an official FIG competition during 1975, are eligible to go directly into the 1976 Elite National Ch am pionships." These gymnasts are: Dunbar, Carr, and Fike. # 7 Scratch last sentence of a, be, and c referring to the J.O. Program.

All other gymnasts must go through the Regional and National Qualifying system. F. 1st National Qualifying Meet December 5 and 6 - Houston. It was moved, seconded and passed that we use open scoring (with all scores being flashed) on a trial basis starting at the 1st National Qualifying meet in Houston through the Championships of the USA. Individual judges scores will also be published immediately after the meet. Th is is for the National Elite level only. It has been introduced on a trial basis for 1975-76 Elite Competition and is to be evaluated at the end of the season. (Open scoring is not to be used for Class I, 11, & 111 competitions). It was then moved, seconded and passed that the 18 judges in the Elite rotation must attend the three symposium workshops after the 1st and 2nd National Ou al ifying and Elite Championships. (Statement of Elite Judges attached). IV.

Review of Current Regional Structure

These recommendations will be taken to the Women's Committee Executive Board :

needing to be in a continuous series fo r superior difficulty. REMINDER: All levels of Age Group Competition will use "old" green FIG Code of Points pl us supplement difficulties as will USGF/DGWS Certification Exam.

A. Wyoming be moved to Region 111. (approved) B. Missouri be moved to Region IV. (approved) Louisiana be moved to Region VIII. (approved) Temporarily in lieu of creating a IXth region which is under study. Hawaii will stay in Region I. W. Virginia is in Region VI I. It was recommended that Region VII could have 2 clinics and regional meets in different sections, if they so desired. V.

Also : "National Network" of USGF Competitions 111. B The Class II optional score is 7.0 (28.00) and total is 56.00. It was recommended that these Rules & Policies be distributed immediately with these changes indicated.

Class I Program Total Age Group Program

A. It was moved, seconded and passed that each RTD appoint a Class I RTD for the 1976 season to assist with this phase of the program and take over as Regional Class I competition if R TD's schedule becomes overloaded. B. Review of Age Group Program Regulations Rules and Policies as assembled and mailed by Ruth McGinty. These Rules and Policies were excellently done. There were these small changes that should be noted: A. Equipment Specifications: 1. Balance Beam - should read: FIG specification 120 cm or lowered one or two notches : 115 cm - 45" + or 110 cm 43" + Seniors - "as written" Juniors - "as written" Children - "as written" 2. Uneven Bars - Between bars dimensions are 55 - 88 cm 4. Vaulting - Juniors and children may elect FIG specifications of 12- cm or 11 - cm (43"+) B. 3. Vaulting - Cartwheel Y.. turn Old Value/10.0 not 9.7 Horse Vault Regulations Second paragraph should read: "For optional vaults, the two vaults must be different, in the finals. The gymnast must perform 2 different vaults, one with, etc." Also: Only one extra run (approach) is allowed for both vaults, etc. First Flight Phase 1. Trajectory insufficient according to the technique of the vault not up to 0.5/should be up to 1.0 Floor Exericse Strike completely the 3 lines on aerial cartwheel and walkovers

34

â&#x20AC;˘

C. Class Regional Coaching Committee/Staff D. Additional proposal for Class Regional Program E. Report on Regional Class Clinics C - E to be sent later when report is received from NHC F. Proposal for Jr. and Sr. Nationals Ginny Coco proposes that Jr. and Sr. Nationals be run with a Compulsary Day, an Optional Day, and then a top 36 or 24 day, as in the Olympic Structure. To be considered at the March meeting. G. Statement by WTC Chairman in reference to USGF Regional and State Meets following USGF Rules and Policies will be added to all National, Regional, and State Bid Forms. VI. Philosophy pertinent to other National Organizations qualifying into the USGF Elite Program. Due to the conflicting dates for their National Championships (being scheduled after our Elite National Championship Meet in March, 1976), it is impossible to consider this proposal this year. The WTC will consider proposals of AIAW, AAU, YMCA, and Turner organizations for the 1976-77 season.

'I

VI I. Sub Committee Reports: A. Teacher Educations - S. Thielz 1. Edwards will prepare in writing for the next meeting a statement in reference to qualifications of clinicians a statement in reference to qualifications of clinicians and possible ways of policing the sanctioning of these Teacher/Coach Education Workshops and Clinics. S.

'I


MINUTES (Cont.) Theilz reported only 21 sanctions Clinics for the year and a recommendati <;)n for further education of ,,; USG F Personnel. " B. Judges Training - D. qprst has resigned this ChairmansP, ip, and C. Wagner has taken :6ver. C. Wc,rnner asked and r eceived approval of the following people to be added ¡ to her committee of Judges ,Training Clinicians: A. Schw~ yer, S. Valley, S. Theilz, J. Ashenbrenner, and C. ;Leidtke. J. Fie recommended t hat the Old Judging Guides sf1ould not be used anymore, as over 1 /3 of the information is ri:o longer correct. C. Equipment Evaluation .1. It was stated that the Equipment E1/ aluation Committee is not J nder the authority of the USG,F because the USGF cannot provide the legal liability for the / individual members. The Comrhittee will continue to function as an advisory task group ¡ to ASTM Sub-committt F-8.11 (Gymnastics). 2. Concerning the new equipment in the field , the USGF has made these recommendations : (a) Boards Nissen 2 and 3 coil boards; American spring leaf steel board; Porter Super Board; Ajr Board, Gym Master Rheuther Super Board. It was moved, seconded, and passed that all these board designs are legal equipment for USGF age group compet itions. If competitors wish to use one of these boards, they may bring their own. It is only required that the meet director provide a regular standard board that meets current FIG specifications. Meet Directors _ __ may also provide any of the above listed boards. It was moved, seconded, and passed that the only board used at all Elite Meets will be a regular standard FIG specification board.*

(b) Covered Beam It was moved, seconded, and passed that a covered beam may be provided at any Age Group Competition. If the meet director provides a covered beam, he must also provide a regular wood beam for competitors to choose from. (Gymnasts may not bring their own covered beam, but must use the beam or beams provided by the meet director). Both beams must then be available during both warm up and competition areas. It was moved, seconded, and passed that, at all Elite Level competitions through the Elite National Championships, only a wood beam will be provided. At the Championships of the USA a covered beam will be used. The USGF will recommend that a covered beam also be used at the Olympic Trials. * (c) Fiberglass Rails With Wood Covering It was moved, seconded, and passed that fiberglass rails with wood covering are approved for all USGF Age Group Competitions. However, regular wood rails must be provided at all Age Group Competitions. If a meet director wishes to provide fiberglass rails with wood covering, he must do so both in the warm up area and the competition gym, in addition to the regular wood rails in both the warm up area and the competitive floor. Only wood rails will be used at all Elite Competitions this season. This will be recommended for the Olympic Trials also. * (Recommendations for all Elite Competitions are based on equipment that will be used at the 1976 Olympics.*) (d) Junior Olympic Committee Although they had not officially met auh.e...t ime of thisreport, S. Valley indicated that they expected to follow the same format and structure as last year. With the one change from 4 to 3 competitors qualifying from State to Regional Competition.

35

The Advisory Board which makes recommendations for the future consists of: J . Pasquale, D. Peters, V. French, M. Hoschette, and B. Davis. S. Valley stated that they would try to put out a greater amount of publicity on this program this year. Again this year the top all around competitor from the National Championship will be given the opportunity to attend the Olympic Development Championships which should be held in May this year. There is a guarantee of $500 plus 25% of the net profit. VII I. Criteria for Qualifications of an Elite Judge S. Weber reported that she must have some input from others before finishing this report. J. Fie reported that there are tentative plans for 2 National (FIG) courses to be in 2 areas of the country in January or February. IX.

New FIG Code Regulations

J. Fie informed us that the Interim Code of Points from the Canadian FIG course may not be distributed or sold. This is the sole responsibility of the FIG. She hopes th at the new i= IG Code wi II be ready for distribution by Feb. 1, 1976. It was moved, seconded, and passed that a new point range for the 2 middle scores be established as follows : .1 from 9.5 to 10.00 .2 from 8.5 to 9.45 .3 from 7.0 to 8.45 .5 below 7.0 for use at all State, Reg ional, and National Age Group Competitions and all Elite Level Competitions in both preliminary and final aspects of the competition. All other age group competitions will follow the present FIG Code of Point spread of points. J. Fie stated that a State or Regional competition may be held the weekend it is scheduled or 1 week later, no other time. If it is to be 1 week later, approval must be gained from the RTD at the state level and from the W4C at the Regional level. At the next meeting there will be a discussion on landing mats. Respectfully submitted, Ruth Ann McBride, R.C. VII Jackie Fie, WTC Chairman


First Regional Elite

Responsibilities for Class I Coaches 1975-76

Clinic - 1976

To work under the direction of the Regional Head Coach and organize, direct, and facilitate the USGF official Regional Clinic to be held on the day following the USGF Class I Regional Championships. In the future the USGF regional program will grow. We will endeavor to increase the numbers of Class I clinics to parallel the elite program. Meanwhile, some regions may be more active at the Class I level than others. Class I Head Coaches By Region I

Region Region

II

Region Region

Ill IV

v Region Region VI Region VII Region VIII

George Kreutzer Joe Rooney Mc Clements Jim Lucero Mary Ann Hachette Bill Robertson Steve Whitlock Bob Hanscom Robin Bleamer Netwall Bruce Davis

Class I Regional Clinics - 1976 I.

Dates All eight Class I clinics will be held on the Sunday immediately following the Regional Class I Championships. 11.

111.

Membership and Fees A. All adult participants and observers (coaches, judges, etc.) must be members of the USGF Women's Committee. Membership blanks will be available at the clinics. B. For the first clinic, in order to encourage participation, the following fee structure will be used. 1. Coaches of any gymnast qualified for the Regional Class I Championships - no charge. 2. Nationally and Regionally Rated judges - no charge. 3. Gymnasts, observers, or other coaches - $5.00. Content A. Class I Compulsories Around B. Dance Experience

-

All

IV. Additional Class I Clinics may be conducted in some of the regions. Most regions will have only one clinic in the spring of 1976.

REGIONAL ELITE COACHES BOARDS

1. Regional Head Coach will be 1. Structure responsible for clinic site, staff, etc. Regional Head Coach, chairperson 2. Regions will adhere to the agreed Regional Technical Director calendar. If there is a special problem Three (3) coaches (some regions will RHC will consult with NHC. have four (4) ) 3. The first 1976 clinic will be held on Regional Chairman may sit in - No the day following the January vote Regional Elite Qualification Meet. 2. Coaching Personnel by Region Exceptions already agreed upon are I Region Flansaas, RHC Dale Region IV Jim Gault, coach Regional Elite clinic will Jim Fountaine, coach immediately precede the Regional George Kreutzer, coach Elite Qualification Meet. Region II Region Ill George Lewis, RHC Regional Elite Clinic will be held in (no personnel as yet) conjunction with the Regional Elite Region 111 Fundraising Exhibition. Additional Rod Hill, RHC qualifiets will be helped following Ron Crescentini, coach the Regional Elite Qualification Mary Wei in, coach Meet. Bill Valentine, coach 4. Participants for the first 1976 Tom Heineke, coach Regional Elite clinic are limited to Region IV gymnasts qualified for the National Chic Johnson, RHC Oual ification Meets. Mary Ann Hoschette, coach 5. Basic Schedule (1st '76 c) Les Fischer, coach (1) Regional Elite clinic gymnast Bill Robertson, coach participants will be broken into Region V two basic groups Cap Caudil, RHC Group A - 70.00-72.00 Steve Whitlock, coach Group B - 72.00 and up (score Herb Vogel, coach earned in Regional Elite or any Colleen Eckel, coach National Elite Meet - 1975/76) Region VI (2) Equal time will be given each Ginny Coco, RHC group even if there is only one Bob Hanscomb, coach participant in group B. Don Peters, coach (3) Coaches Workshop - one hour Phil Douvali, coach Each coach is asked to bring one Region VII idea to share with the other Bill Strauss, RHC coaches - coaching, inspiration, Ed Knepper, coach technique, conditioning etc. Rest to be announced shortly Coaching session will be separate Region VIII (private) . Vannie Edwards, RHC (4) RHC will work with the RTD and Bruce Davis, coach of a request scheduling Fred Martinez, coach compulsory session in each event Bill Chase, coach and any extra sessions the 3. Duties RTD/RHC thinks would be ( 1) Special cases for Regional Elite helpful to the participating judges. Clinic gymnast participation (5) Regional Elite Clinics will finish a. To participate in the Regional with a motivational/inspirational Elite Clinic session - even if it is short. We b. To be placed in a certain believe that 15 minutes should be category in the Regional Elite the minimum time for this clinic session . help (2) To recommend and determine funding priorities with regional Elite funds. General priorities -

36

'

.

'


Regional Elite Coaches Boards

(continued) a. b. c. d.

Staff expenses for clinics Gymnast travel Regional Head Coach travel Regional Technical Director travel e. Elite judge travel (3) To help Regional Head Coach determine clinic sites for Regional Elite and Regional Class I Clinics (4) Ethics and Conduct a. To promote and insist upon correct channels of operation and communication b. To police coaches conduct relative to Regional Meet officials c. To police coaches conduct relative to other coaches gymnasts at Regional competitions ::>onie examples are warm up time violations, unsolicited comments, improper emotional outburts, etc. (5) Injury petitions In anticipation of this taking place regiqnally we feel this board would be a good vehicle for facilitation of these petitions. This is a recommendation for the future from the NHC and RHC's.

Official NAWGJ Elite Judge's Statement The Elite Judges will make every effort to service and attend the following Elite functions during the 1975-76 season: 1. An FIG international or continental or National judges course. 2. The symposium immediately following the National Qualification Meet in which they are judging in the capacity of: A. Course instructors on matters of juding and routine evaluation B. Course participants in coaching technique and-training s-e-ssions 3. The symposium clinic on the Elite Regional Level in January in the same capacity as stated above in 2A and 2B.

MODERN RHYTHMIC GYMNASTICS 1976 NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS Modern National Fourth The Rhythmic Gymnastics Championships, sponsored by the United States Gymnastics Federation will be held Saturday, May 22, 1976, in Fort Worth, Texas. The Championships meeting will be conducted according to the rules for the 1977 World Championships. The events will include: 1) group exercise for six gymnasts, each with two clubs; 2) individual exercises with ball, hoop, ribbon and rope. Musical accompaniment for all exercises must be on one instrument - preferably piano. The requirements are as follows: FOR GROUP EXERCISE : Duration 2:30 - 3:00 minutes Routine must include a minimum of six different formations, and a minimum of 2 elements of superior and six elements of medium difficulty. The equipment must meet specifications listed below. FOR INDIVIDUAL EXERCISES: Duration: 1 :00 -1 :30 minutes Routine must include a minimum of two elements of superior and six elements of medium difficulty, three of which must be performed with the left hand. UNIFORM AND EQUIPMENT REGULATIONS ATTIRE: Leotards are to be two-colored or with wrist and/or neck band in a different color. Any trim must be part of the fabric and not sewn on. BALL: Material: Rubber or plastic Weight: minimum of 400 g Size: 18-20 cm in diameter HOOP: Material : Wood or plastic Weight: minimum of 300 g Size: inside diameter 80-90 cm The cross section of the hoop may be square or round

In addition a sincere effort will be made to attend those National Elite Meets to which they are not assigned as acting judges if schedule and finances permit.

37

CLUBS: Material: Wood or plastic Shape: Like a small bottle, slender neck, which may end in a small ball (the head) with a maximum diameter of 3 cm; length 40-50 cm long; weight 150 g RIBBON: Material: The ribbon itself may be made of any material, the weight of which must be a minimum of 35 g Width: 4-6 cm Length: 6 m Material of the baton: wood, bamboo or plastic Length: 50-60 cm Diameter: maximum 1 cm The part of the baton held in the hand may be covered by a thin layer of anti-slip material

ROPE: Material: Hemp, without handles. The rope may end in a small note, and the part held in the hand covered with anti-slip material. The middle section of the rope may be reinforced (weighted) Length: The length of the rope should be proportionate to the height of the gymnast. The color of the apparatus may be any color except bronze, gold or silver. Acrobatic elements as used in artistic gymnastics are prohibited. Only pre-acrobatic elements, such as rolls (all directions), transitory splits, momentary pressure on one or both arms (no stopping and the legs should not reach the vertical position), and chest or shoulder support from prone position(legs raised backward-upward, no use of hands) are permitted. For further information write to: MILDRED PRCHAL, 2419 Scoville Ave. Berwyn, Illinois 60402 Submitted by: Anne/is Strange Hoyman


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8.90 8.65 8.70 9.10 8.95 8.60 8 .95 9.25 9.20 8.35 8.60 9 .00 9.00 8.60 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.20 8.85 8.85 8.95 9.05 8 .85 9.00

31 GO'v' Ith LYNtl

27 TA'l'LOR, r:J TTY

17T

8.95 9.10 8.~o e.60 8.90 8.95 8 . 90 8.80 8.80 8 .45 8.85 9.00 8 .90 9.00 9.30 8.70

8.70 8.60 8.60 8.80 9.00 8.559.10 9.05

14T 17T

8.70 s.7s 8.90 9.05 9;20 8.60 8.70 8.60

8.65 8.90 8 .70 8.90

~.15

9.15 9.20 8.80 8.85 9.25 8.95 8.75

35 HEMBERGER, KAREN

4 3 WATKINS , JEANNE

6 LE VHIEo MARCY

16 HOPPER,

55 CORNELL, BARB

18 ALSTON, DEBBIE

36 HARRIS, LE SLIE

30 ZOMCHICK1 MARY

38 LANTERMAN, PATTI

57 INGEBRETSEN, LI SA

14T

14T

12T

12T

11

9T

'?T

8

7

i::.

5

3

2

73 . 30 . 73 .10

74 .90

·;.. 35 8.95 9.05 36 . 250 72 .85

·~:6.60C

37 .0SC 37 . 850 36 .25C 37 .05 0 36 .30 C 36.800 36 .05C 36 .95 0

TOTAL PLACE

9.oo

c:. 90

9. 25 9. 00 9.10 '?.25

39 ENGLERT, CARRIE

41 CHASE1 KIM

46 MARINO, LIZ

~~15

9.30 8.95 9.25 8 .95

9.45 9.15 9.40 9 . 25 9.25 9.20 9.35

SUB VA BARS TOTAL

9.75 9.00 9.15 9. 15 9.20 :3 .95 9.40 8 . 90 :=:~ 65 9.30 9.50 9 .1 5 8.95

BE

9.41) 9.25 9.25

FX

9. 35 9.15 9 .25 8.95

54 CAS EY1 KOL LEEN

GYM tM1 tlAME

ALL AROUND GYMNASTS

l'"!RST u.s.G.F. NATIDtlAL ELITE OUALIFICATIDN MEET

.5 9 HE I DEN~IOLF 1 MARY

70 .20

7 0.20

70.20

70 .35

70.40

70.55

70 .75

70 .85

70.95

70.95

71.05

71.10

71.10

71.15

?1.2s

70 .1 5

68.85

69 .05

69 . 25

69.40

69 . 65

.

69.65

69.8 0

69 . 85

15C

.

(I

oc

34.45C 34 . 000 33 . 95C 34 . 250 33 .60C 3 4 . 400 3 4.1 5C 32 . 950 35 . 33C 23.900 24 . 20C 33.650

:c::.. 4'.'·0

:;: :~:.

r:.o

57 . 85

59 .23

67 . 10

68 .00

68 . 20

68 .4 5

E.8.

34 . 700 68 .7 3 :;: 4. 05 C :~:4. i:.c10 r;.::: . r;:.5 ::::4 . 1 oc 34. 5 (10 6:::: . 6 1)

3 4.20C 35 . 950 35 . 20C 34 . 650 34.70C 35 . 100 34 . 45C 35 . 200 34 . lOC 35 . 550 34 . 85C 34.55 0 34.25C 35 . 000 34 . 20C 34 . 850 34 . 60C 3 4. 250 34. 03C

36 . 100 70.15

35.90C 35.350 35.55C 35 . 60 0 35 .7 0C 35.400 35 .35C 35 . 750 35 .1 5C 35 .900 35 . 80C 35 .1 50 3 5 .6 0C 35 .350 34.80C 36 .050 35.65C 35 .100 34 . 90C 35 .650 34 . 70C 35 .7 00 35 .1 5C 35 . 200 34.85C 35 . 350 34 . 90C 35.300 34.65C 35.550 34.05C

65

E.4

63

i:;.2

~· 1

60

5:::T

5::: T

._it:·

55

54

50T

SOT

4·;.

4~·

46T

4;:.T

43T

43.,T

4 '.H

42

41

40

39

3:3

36T

36T

35

33T

33T

32

30T


TRIBUTE TO OUR GIRLS These gymnasts have learned the Compulsory Exercises better than any other U.S. team I have seen. She says about Debbie Wicox ... Never in my life have I seen a forward salto on the beam executed as well . . . the form ... the landing ... just excellent . .. a very promising young gymnast. About Kathy Howa rd ... an excellent gymnast all around . .. the height on beam and floor. About Tammy Manville .. . one of your best ever. And Ann Carr .. . very good gymnast ... very powerful. Your team weakness, she says, are the Uneven Bars Routines. Shape up girls, you've come a long way. You can't be stopped now. Apparently, Women's gymnastics in the USA has come a long way at least in the eyes of the President of the FIG Women's Technical Committee, Mrs. Valerie Nagy of Hungary ... Following an Olympic Qualification Match held in Tucson on February 26 and 27 against Rumania, she made the following comments: I have been in gymnastics since 1928, when I was a competitor myself and have been involved . with the International Gymnastics Federation since 1948 ... I have seen many American gymnasts come and go, but never before have I seen a U.S. Women's Team as strong as this one. She predicts that OUR girls will definitely be among the top six teams in the Olympic Games in Montreal . .. and adds ... my own team (the Hungarian girls that is) will have a hard time defending their third place ranking ...

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Profile for USA Gymnastics

USGF News - March 1976  

USGF News - March 1976