Page 1

June 1975

Official Publication of the United States Gymnastics Federation P.O. Box 4699 Tucson, Arizona 85717 U.S.A.


•

•

COVER: Ann Carr did a terrific job in Riga scoring 37.00 i n the A ll- Around in 4th p l ace. Dronova was first w ith 37.75. Ann also tied for 3rd on Bars, 3rd in vau lting,6th in Beam and 5th on Floor.


lnitrh 8'tatra

~ymnasttrs 111 rhrrattnn

Executive Offices: P. 0. Box 4699, Tucson, Arizona 85717 (602) 622-3865

Cable Address "USGYM"

EDITORIAL: June 1975 The Pan-American Games are just around the corner and Mexico will host them in the middle of October. It will be a good opportunity to see how the Cubans have progressed and for us to see if Mexico has maintained the excellent progress they demonstrated in the Central American Games of 1974. There is considerable information about the trials and training program for the USA athletes aspiring to the team for Mex ico City, in this edition of the USGF NEWS. The Modern Rhythmic Gymnastics nationals were hosted in mid-May at San Francisco St at e University and host coach Andrea Schmidt and Chairwoman Mildred Prchal (Master of Sports) had the event well in hand. It was well attended and the performances demonstrated a tremendous improvement by our American girls in this event. Every aspect of the competition was well done and there can be little doubt that M RG is on the way to becoming a viable part of our growing program. Just at a time when the nation's economy seems to be in bad condition, we see a number of sports being dropped from major collegiate institutions (Mass., Eastern Ill .) and in many cases it will no doubt include gymnastics. Our sport requires a lot of money for equipment purchase but on the other hand our equipment lasts for a number of years . One great help would be, in my opinion , for the colleges to ad opt an al l-around program for men and limit team travelling squad s to five, or even four, with all the team members working and dropping the low score from the team score. A t the recent NCAA Championships and the coaches' meeting there, we saw a movement toward that goal but it was stopped by t he NCAA Rules Committee . . . for what reason I cannot speculate. I mention this now as other universities see the sport being dropped for financial reasons, to po int out that it will be far better for our sport to see smaller teams on the road (wh ich can be accomplished by the all-around-team format) than to see the sport dropped from the athletic program. In this day and age the good of the sport, not just what is good for any particular team for a period of a few years, surely must be of prime consideration. By the time this reaches most of you, the FIG Congress will be in full swing in Bern, Switzerland and hopefully it will be one marked by gymnastics progress as opposed to political maneuvering such as marred the last special congress in Montreux. I go to this meeting, however, with special concern because the small comments heard informally recently have rather ominous tones and only in Bern will we learn if they are rumors or predictions of problems to come. Let us hope the next report is all positive. The new version of the National Compulsory Rou ti nes for Girls (USGF-DGWS) is nearing completion. A number of changes made final printing a ser ious problem but the new publication is well done and will contribute much to the continued growth and proper development of women 's gymnast ics in America. One other new item for schools or clubs you should be aware of is beautiful, full-color posters for men and women are not available for purchase from the USGF Office . Write for information . For the US Gymnastics Federation:

Frank L. Bare, Executive Director

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'MOSCOW NEWS' AND RIGA '75 By Bill CoCo - Wornen's Coach We (Ann Carr, Barbi e Myslak, Jod i Yocum and I) left for Moscow on Wednesday, April 2, at 9 p.m. from JFK Airport in New York and arrived in London at 8:30 a.m. Thursday morning. We had difficulty getting a connecting flight because the flight which had been booked for us did not fly to Moscow on Thursdays. However, a TWA agent assisted us and we eventually got on a flight to Warsaw and went on to Moscow from there. We arri ved in Moscow at 9 p.m. instead of 3 p.m ., as planned , and by the time we got to our rooms at the hotel it was after 11 p.m. So we had been travelling for nearly 24 hours. It took awhile to adjust to the time difference and I think thi s affected the girls a little in competition. The hotel where we stayed was one of the best in Moscow. There were over 2,000 rooms and the hotel covered an area of four blocks. Although we found the service to be better in Riga, the food was good and the rooms nice. The next afternoon (Friday) we v_vorked out from 4 to 6 :30 p.m. We were put into our competition squads and spent approximately 20 m in utes at eacha A NN C A RR '. BA R B IE M Y SL A K , J O D Y Y O CU M event. In our squad there were two girls from Great Britain and one from East We got to the Sports Hall the next day hecht fu lI and ended instead with a very Germany. Our draw for the competition was very good since we were placed in the well before Opening Ceremonies were to fine hecht off the high bar . On beam there were no gifts given to second round and our first event was to start. The Ceremonies were very be uneven bars . The Russians we learned impressive and the teams were all lined up our girl s. In fact , it was very hard to were also schedu led to compete in the and given numerous gifts . We received a understand some of the scores that were second round . There were two rounds for carving and decided we would give it to given until it was realized that there were women and one round for men. We had a the one who had p laced the highest. As it two Russian and one Korean judge on sli ght problem in widening the uneven worked out, Doug Fitzjarrell placed third beam . Jodi was again first for our team bars and when it was time for the in floor exercise and we presented him and even though she fell on her mount Russians to warm up, specia l extenders with the wood carving . Following she turned in a fine routine earning an were found to widen the bars . However, Opening Ceremonies, round one of the 8 .15. Barbie's score of 8.8 came as a they came over to us and said that we women's competit ion began and we did surprise because the routine had the could have 15 minutes at the end of not see any of the competition since we necessary difficulty and few bobb les. She workouts to go back to bars again with were in the warm-up gym getting ready looked a littl e nervous but no more than the specia l extenders . So we were ab le to for our competition. Our competition a few other competitors. Ann had quite a adjust the bars to fit Jodi. After everyone order was to be bars, beam, floor and stop after her tuck back and missed her ¡ handstand straddle down but covered it else had compl eted workouts, the Cubans vaulting. Jodi was the first one up for us on nicely by rolling out of the handstand. came in and worked out for quite awhile. We took Jod i over to the doctor to bars. She had some difficulty and finished She received an 8 .6 . As sometimes happens, the Russ ians exam in e her eye sin ce it had been crooked on her hecht full twist dismount. bothering her. It was quite an experience Her score was 8.7. Barbie was next up were on bars at the same time we were on since we did not have an interpreter but , and although her front semi was very¡ floor . So most of the audience attention the doctor drained her eye and bandaged high, her hands just slipped from the bar was centered on bars . One interesting it and we went back the next day and he and she fell. But the rest of the routine note should be made about Ann's routine drained it again and it seemed to be went well and she finished with a 7 .9. on floor . Most of the music was put better . The people were cordial to us, Even with such a low bar score, Barbie together on a master tape played over the public address system. Ann was up on They supplied us with a bus so we could managed to finish 18th in th e all around get to the Sports Hall and the bus driver out of 49 competitors. Although Ann's floor at the same time Ne ll i Kim of the waited for about half an hour while we bar routine looked slightly rushed, she Soviet Union was up on bars. When Ann scored 9.1. She decided not to throw her started her routine, the music was very took Jodi to see the doctor.

2


soft. Immediately after Kim dismounted, the music became very loud, almo st so loud that it hurt the ears. Scores on floor were 9 .1 for Ann, 9.05 for Barbie and 9.0 llo• CO!l for Jodi. On vaulting, the judges seemed to like Noa, pr6a oll! Jf Barbie's handspring front . The first one she landed on her seat but the second she 1 na lfelll landed well and although she placed one · 2 Gorb11' Lidia hand down with support she st ill scored J Xnal Olga 9.0, which I felt was a good score. Jodie 4 !egU&OTa LllboT had a slight prob lem twisting too early . 5 Glebova A.lltoaiu. She was given an 8.8 for her handspring 6 Gehr.1.aeh Keib full. Ann's cartwheel back received a 7 E.uaniM. Tuan. 9 .25 . She has a problem kicking it out a Carr Au and landing_iLgraight and when she - - -9 'l'waoTa Zd•na learns to do this I'm sure she'l l receive a 10 cou~utia Jlariana better score. 11 Saollll8r AAnA As it worked out, Nelli Kim had a 38.3 12 .tu.w:hczak .r~a in the all around, followed by four other 13 .lloldny Jllliit Russians. The fifth place Russian had a 14 Gabor G.org•b 37.3. Then the East German in our sq uad 15 De Ke\U:eleir. J04tll.e finished 6th with 36.8. Th en another 1G T.maCC\ Gabrhla Russian followed with 36.75 and Ann 17 Ishiau.1:'9. llil.chiko finished 8th with 36.2. We were real ly 18 Guile ba working to pull scores . Barbie finished in 19 JIJ'9 le.k: Bar\lh 18th place with 34.75. Jodie had 34.65 20 AlldiJi Hadiae and finished in 22nd. Our girls did a 21 Cabell c. Isab:ll commendab le job, especially con sidering 22 TOC<IR Judy the problems of adjusting to time changes 23 Ma•~ Ev!!. and new equipment. 24 Skau L1.ll Equipm ent was definitely an 25 Souknpova VaolaTa important factor. The girls competed on a 26 B9ntohGT& Harie~ vinyl covered beam which Ann said was 2? Ze Iwa Khj. much springier and difficult to use . The 28 lfi4-r Ella rails on the bars were smaller and also 29 Kalcaaara llioko JO Deklcer J.aa much livelier . The board for vaulting had 31 Rol.aen Ull.lli a much higher arc than we were used to 32 B11Cci Stef"ania working with in thi s country . The on ly 33 Van de n Brillk Petra board which is perhaps similar is the new 34 Cruz ata Vic en11a American board, onl y w ithout th e metal 35 Codat o s.areue lla part. All th ese factors must be kept in 36 Bartlett Lesley_ mind wh en evaluatin g a perform ance. 37 Avila Leoaor The following af terno on both th e 38 Seggiaro Chantal• men's and women's finals were held. Six 39 Adderley Ruth Russians had qualifi ed for each event 40 Xia Tchoun Soa except fo r vaulting, whi ch Ann was in 41 !la.resewska Jwoaa and ba lance bea m where a Czech girl had 42 Takagi~ qualifi ed. However, only thr ee Ru ssia ns 43 Slivova Tuia went into final s so Ann qualifi ed for 44 Murphy Kathy final s in three events, bars, f loo r an d 45 Sanchez Alicia vault ing. One gymnast dropped out of vaulting so there wer e only fiv e finalists. Olga Koval of the Sovi et Union wa s fir st, scor ing 9.45 for her vault . Lidia Gorbik al so of th e Soviet Union scored 9.35 to t ie with Nilli Kim for second. Kim executed a nice cartwheel back. She also did a hand spr ing 1Y, twist but had problems with her landing . Th en Hieke Gehri sch of East Germany did a half twist on back off to receive 9.3 and fin ished 4th . Ann was fifth scoring 9.3 for her cartwheel back . Howe ver, I still think she wa s und erscored since she is doi ng t hat vault piked.

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2?. 25


"MO SCOW NEWS " INTERN A TI C~A l. G YMNA STIC S COMPETITION

'MOSCOW NEWS' AND RIGA '75 By Bill Coco Women's Coach

ru,:; ~:;:,TATE3

DF::> FINALF::>

WOMEN

The next event was bars . K im scored · 9 .55 t o take f irst. Lid ia Gorbik scored . 9.55 to t ake second . However, her routine doesn't seem quite th e equivalent of Kim 's. She did a st aider but never really kicked out. It just stay ed stooped al I th e way around wi t h st raight ar ms. The judges seemed to get carr ied away with that as a particular move. Ann a Szommer from Hungary got a 9.3 and took thi rd. Her routine wa s quite st ock but she finished with a nice toe on front off. However, one of the things I noticed about some of the Russians and other gymnasts who are throwing toe on fronts is that they're coming off very early, never getting above the bar and then rotating rapidly . Then Ann came up and I thought she did as good a job as she can at this particular time. She threw her hect full but was a little rushed on her handstand pirouette. She arched a bit and this carried her into the bar a little fast so her tiect 'h turn was a little rap id . She received 9.1 to take fourth place. Heinke Gehrisch of East Germany, who led off the event, got an 8.9. She had some trouble but she does a nice move which is a free hip, handstand, front pirouette out, toe on, sol e circle shoot . Very nice combiri- •ion. She does a free hip hech t for a dismount but not near ly with the lift I've seen the move don e. An oth er girl who's an upcoming gymn ast is Tamara Kazanina . She had a rea lly unusual bar rout ine. Sh e does a free hi p, pirouette, f ull pirouette to a stom ach wh ip. She real ly does t hat w ell and also does a t oe on front off for a dismoun t. However, she had troubles in f inals and blew her routine getting a 7.9, giving her sixth pl ace . On balance beam N ill i K im took first place with 9.6. Lubov Bogdanova had a 9.5 tak ing seco nd place. L idia Gorbik took thi rd . It was inte resting to watch on beam that almost every difficult move is set up by an easy skill in front of it. In fact, in our country, a girl would be severely penalized for this . Kim actually stopped before her back although she moved rapidly out of it. She really has no tumbling series so to speak and we noticed this was true with the other two Russians, Lidia and Lubov. So we felt they were a little overscored on their balance beam work.

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On floor Ann was second up and she did a really nice routine . She got a 9.3 and danced the parts better than I have seen her do them. Nilli Kim got a 9 .65 as did Lidia Gorbik, placing th em in a tie for forst place . We then saw an exhibition by some young, upcoming Soviet gymnasts. It was quite good. Some of the music was quite modern and more interpretive. Quite a

4

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few double fulls were shown in this meet so I think in Montreal we'll see m any double fulls. That evening we left Moscow fo r Rig a on the second train. We rode all night and had sleeping compartments. I didn't think badly of the ride and slept well. We arrived in Riga at 11 :30 the next morning.


RESUlll'ATS i.U COMBINE D~

RIGA-75

I

Le 9 avril I975.

We arrived at the hotel a littl e ti~ed POUTRE SOL TOTAL BARRES SAUT and found there were no rooms avai Iable. 9 · , 45 9,4 9,4 9,5 37,75 URS I; Dronova Nina 52 However, they let us use a suite of rooms 9 ·, 3 9,4 9,4 9,45 37,55 URS 2• Pri.raak Elena 55 9,4 8 ,95 9,5 9,4 37,25 3~ Kolesnikova Elena URS 54 to store our luggage and also to change 9 ,4 9,3 8,85 9,45 37,0 4. Kudinova Svetl ana URS 56 USA into workout clothes. When we came 4; Carr Ann --f} ,4 9,35 9,I 9,I5 - 37 ,0 34 GDR 9,3 9,I 9,2 9,25 36,85 6; Gehrisch Heike 35 back that evening, we were finally given GDR 7; Perschau Iris 9, 25 9,3 8,9 9,2 36,65 36 8; Gabor Georgeta ROM 8 ,9 9, I 9,I 9,3 36 ,4 29 rooms. We were supposed to be at a 9; Zo Tun Khi HDFC G·, !l5 8 ,85 9,25 9,I5 36, I 50 IO. Kim Tchoun Son HDFC 5I 9,0 8 ,75 9,I5 9,I 36,0 meeting at 2 p.m. and it was already after II; Soukup ova Vaclava I2 TCH 0,9 9,0 8,9 9,I5 35 , 95 I2; Krauioczek Judyta POL 22 8,9 9 ,0 8 ,8 9,2 35 ,9 1 p.m . so we missed the press conference. I3_; Szol!lfiler Anna HUN 9,25 9,35 0,35 8,9 35 , 85 3 14,;: IAarczeuska l\1ona POL Then we went to the draw. They broke 2I 8 ,8 8,95 8,9 9,I 35 ,75 I5; Zelenko Alla URS 9,I 8 ,I 8,9 9-, 6 35 ,7 59 the Russians down at 4 and 2 and both I6; Myslak Barbie U&A ---S ,4 9,4 8 ,8 9,05 35 ,65 33 I6; Coruitantin Marianna ROM 8 ,8 8,9 3I 8, 75 9,2 35,65 were in the first round . A vote was taken I6~ I shimura Machiko JPN 9,0 9,8 8,7 9, I 5 35 , 65 7 I9: Guzik Th'1:, . POL 20 8,95 8,95 8 ,7 9,0 35 , G among the coaches and · it was decided 2Q: Yocuo Judy USA 32 8,85 9 ,I 8 ,55 ,95 35, 4 5 20; Nakamura Mic ko JPN 9 ,0 9,0 8 ,5 8 , 95 35,45 9 that only two gymnasts fror:n each 22; Holmen Unni 2-4 NO 8 , 8 - - -8 ,95 B, 65- -8 ,95- - 35 , 35- ROM country woula- e allowed- in finals . The --~23: Trusca Gabrie l a 30 8,9 8 ,95 8 , 25 9 ,05 35, I5 24; Audin Nadine 42 Fl<A 9,0 8 ,85 8, 45 8,75 35 ,05 Russians had six different gymnasts in 24; Sanch ez Alicia CUB 8 ,9 8,7 8,7 8, 75 35 ,05 39 26; Bartlett Lesley GBR 8,6 9,05 8 ,6 8, 7 34,95 38 this coro1petition than the one in Moscow; 26. Bontcheva Marietta BUL 8 , 7 8 ,7 8 , 65 8,9 34,95 27 26; Skau Iill NOR 8 ,7 8 , 85 8 ,6 8 ,8 34,95 23 however, the other teams were the same. 29; Murl"q Kathy CAN 8,95 8 ,55 8,6 8,8 34,9 I3 30; Vlidmo r Ella 4 SUI 8 ,75 8, 75 8 ,6 8 ,75 34,85 This time our squad was paired with the 3I ; Van den Brink Potra I6 HOL 8 , 95 8,7 8 ,5 8,65 34 ,8 Czech girls and the other teams in our 32; Mat;yuz Ev a HUN 8,5 9,0 8 ,55 0,7 34,75 2 GBR 33. Adderley Ruth 0,55 8 ,95 8,45 0,7 34,65 37 round were Japan, Sweden, Norway, HOL 8,8 8,8 33 . Dekker AllB I7 8,7 8 , 35 34 ,65 Great Britain, Romania, Canada, 8,2 34 ,45 9,0 8,6 0 , 65 IO TCH 35. Slivova Tana O,I 0 , 45 36; Girardin Brigitte 9 ,0 8 ,05 5 SUI 34,4 Switzerland and Poland . The other teams O, O 37• Cabe llo Maria I sabel 0 , 95 8 , 75 8,65 25 SPA 34,35 O,¢ 38. Do Keuke l eire Joelle in our group did not seem particularly 0 , 05 6 BEL 8 , 95 9 , 05 34 , 25 6 ,6 39. Jarens Ilona 9 ,I 9,I5 9 , 35 57 URS 34 , 2 strong so we felt it might be more 39 ; Corn Kathy 14 C!.N 9,0 8 ,55 7,9 8 ,75 34 , 2 8 ,0 8 ,7 39; Cruzcta Vincenta 4I CUB 0,9 8,6 34 ,2 advantageous to us to be in the other a,o 8 ,0 39. Seggiaro Chant e l o 0,7 8 ,7 43 FRA 34 , 2 43; Moldvay Judit I HUN 8 ,7 0 ,5 8,85 7,95 34,0 round. 44; Bucci Stefania 8 ,6 8 ,6 8 , 05 rn ITA 0 ,7 33 , 95 45; Rope Patti G,45 O, I5 I5 CAN 0 , 75 8 , 55 · The following day the men worked 33 , 9 46 . ilV ila Leonar 8,65 40 CUB 7 ,45 8 , 95 8 ,75 33 , 0 47; Tunova Zdena out and the girls were only in opening 7,8 II TCH 7,85 0 , 95 9, I 33 ,7 48; Je liazkova Ivanka O, O 26 BUL . 7,55 0 , 55 0,7 33 , 6 ceremonies that day while the men 49 ; Codato Serenella O,I 8 , 65 7 ,9 I9 ITA 8,85 33 , 5 ~o . Takagi Ikuyo 3 JPN 0,7 8,05 7,I5 9,05 32,95 competed that nigtit. When we warmed up and finally worked out in the competition area, the girls seemed much more rested and relaxed than they had in . think coaches in the United States should Barbie turned in a sensational bar · Moscow. We began workouts on vaulting . try and work our girls so that they can performance and scored 9.4, which put Many of the problems with vaulting in warm up very quickly and know what to her in a tie for first going into finals. Ann Moscow were still apparent in Riga. Jodi do in a short period of time. This is also made finals with a 9.35. Jodie scored was still twisting early on her handspr ing because most of the workouts had been 9.1 . full. Barbie only did one handspring front in shift type work where you're going On beam, both Barbie and Ann did a and her f eet ki cked out from under her from one piece of equipment to another better job than in Moscow. They looked again. However, she said she didn't fe el and only have 20 minutes at each . And more rested and their routin es really _like doing ahy more so we sto pped w ith for six girls to get through in 20 minutes, moved. Jodi, however, was doing fine one . Ann did about six or eight cartwheel you can't spend much time working until about half way through her routine backs and worked on the kick out . I single moves again and again. and then she seemed disoriented and talk ed to the girls about the vaulting Wh en the compet ition began, we were confused . She fini shed wi t h an 8 .55 . technique I had observed, which is a low up first on floor exercise. In this At the conclusion of the preliminary preflight with an angle break in the body competition, the girls, for some reason, competition, Nina Dronova, of the Soviet and arms . I think we would be deducted seemed more nervous than in Moscow. Union , was first all around, Ann was tied for this technique in this country, . Ann went out of bounds on her first for fourth with 37.00, Barbie was 16th especially since the FIG pictures show tumbling pass primarily because she went with 35.65, and Jodi was in 20th place straight body position in preflight . But crooked and went off to the right instead with 35.45. this position seems to be one of the of going down the diagonal. Barbie Men 's and women's finals were held reasons the Russians get tremendous seemed very disoriented after her routine, the next day. Ann had securely made afterflight. and, in fact, walked by all four corn ers of finals in vaulting, bars and beam and was We went to uneven bars and again we the floor before coming off the platform. an alternate on floor. Then one girl were working with a thinner rail which But Ann did receive 9.15, Barbie got a dropped out of floor finals so Ann the girls seemed to like . 9.05 and Jodi finished w ith an 8.95. qualified. Barbie was to be in bar finals . On floor, Barb ie warmed up on a few Then next was vaulting, where Ann d id Ann was f irst up in vaulting and double fulls . Jod i did some fulls. Ann a fine cartwheel back and rece ived a 9.4, received a 9.3. She did a ver y good job on worked parts of her routine to get to a which later earned fo r her a spot in finals. her second vault . Dronova, who fin ished better corner position on her last Jodi scored an 8.85 for a handspring full . first , ~J a handspring full and although tumbling pass . Barbie was still uncertain of where she she landed with her feet apart scored 9.4 . Our girls looked very good on beam. was in the air and underturn ed the first Ann finish ed third . One thing I noticed about workouts is handspring front and overturned the (continued on next page ) that t hey must be run very quickly and I second. Sh e received an 8.4.

5


RIGA - FINALS FOR WOMEN

'MOSCOW NEWS' AND RIGA '75 By Bi ll Coco Women's Coach

Dronova hit a very nice bar routin e t o take first on that event . ·she was followed by Elena Perm ak with 9.35. I felt though that Permak's routine was sloppi er and showed poor form. Ann and Anna Szommer, of Hungary, tied for third . Barbie, who was tied for first going into f inals, fell on her front somi catch and dropped down to sixth place. During the three-minute warmup before the event started, Barbie didn't get a chance to get on bars . Then t he buzzer sounded as I . was adjusting the bars for her but she went running off the platform . I told her, even though the buzzer sounded to end warmup, she could still warm up because she hadn 't been on the bars . She declined and wou ld not rem o unt the platform but probab ly that warmup would have helped a great dea l. Again Dronova was first. Th is time on beam. Ann went ha rd at her routine but came off o n her back som i. I th ink the t~ree-minute warmup affected her , but really, the time limit shouldn't have made that much difference . • So Ann finished with two-thirds and a sixth on floor and beam. Barbie finished with a sixth on bars. After the competit ion, there was a party and we left Riga at 2:15 a .m . for a f light to Moscow and then on to Washington D.C., by way of Paris . OBSERVATIONS: On each of the events, I noticed litt le t hings that are different from what we do in this country and I have tried to point them out. On vaulting, I me ntioned t he t echn ique I o bserved and al so t he ty pe of board t hey are us ing. I should also mention t ha t most of the va ul ters in fi na ls used handspr ings w ith full o r 1 Y, t wi sts o r ca rtw hee l backs. On bars I mention ed t he new ra il and I sh ou ld also ment io n two other moves I saw that were q u ite n ice. O ne was a hec htYitwist back out and the other was a so le circle shoot Yi twist back out. On beam t here was not much that was particularly new but on floor there is much more modern as opposed to classical dance and more facial expression by the Russians. The Russians use much simplicyt and will often do a simple move but make it very dramatic. Also, the Russians seem to set up their tumbling passes w ith fairly easy dance combinations.

Dames

Saut de cheval

4, GGhrisch Heike

35

GDR

5. Perschau Iris

36

GDR

3

HUN

6. Szommer Anna

9,35 9,4 9,3

9,45 9,4 9, 4

I. Dronova Nona 52 UFtS 2. Kolesnikova Jclena 54 URS 34 USA 3, Carr Ann

I8,8 I8,3

I

I8,7

3

1

9,3 9,3 18,6 4 9 1 25 9 1 25 lG,5 5 9,25 9, 25 J8,5 5

Dames- Barres Paralleles Dronova U. Prir.iak E. Szoroer· _A. Carr A. Myslak B. Per schau I.

52 55

URS URS

3

HUN

34

USA USA GDR

33 36

9,4 9, 4 9,35 9,35 9, 4 9,3

9,5 9,35 9, 35 9,35 8 ,25 s,15

18 1 9

I

rn, ?5 18 ,? I8,7 17, 65 17 1 45

2

3 3 5 6

DAMES - POUTRE Ko l esn i kova E, Dr onov:. N Zo Thun Khi Ki rn Tchoun.Son Gehr isch H. Carr A.

54 52 50 51 35 34

URS URS RDPC RDPC GDR USA

9, 5 9 14 9 1 25 9 1 15 912 911

9, 5

19,0

I

9 ,45 9 , 25

18 ,85 18 ,5

2

9,25 8, 7 8, 6

18 , 4

4

17, 9 17,7

5

Dames - EXERC l CES Se l enko A. Dronova_N, Gabor G. Gehri sch H. Kr m-:ioczelc J. Carr A.

59 52 29 35 22

34

I t hi nk our girls must wo rk for mo r consisten cy a n d become to ughe com petitors. However, o ur girls d id ver y we ll and I not iced severa l oth er teams th at had im proved a great dea l, notab ly Great Brita in and Po land. I thi n k perhaps one reason for t he Russians' success is their tremendous motivation. Motivation that ·comes from the knowledge that being a top athlete means more freedom, prestige and a chance to travel that would not be ordinarily given to them. However, I think there is no comparison between our two systems and I think eventually we will be on the same level with the Russ ians. It may take time but we are slowly narrowing the gap.

6

URS URS ROM GDR POL USA

3

6

!~USOL

19,2 19 ,05

1

9,3 9 ,3

rn,6

3

9 , 25 9, 25 9 12 9 S 25

18 , 5 rn ,45

L;

9, 15 9,3

rn,45

916 9,5

9,G 9 , 55

2

5 5

' COCO, CARR, & WILLSON


'MOSCOW NEWS' AND RIGA '75 By Mike Willson - Men's Coach Neverthe less , compet1t1on began on On April 2, 1975, th e ent ire group m et J ohn helped us out with his request for at JFK A irpo rt and short ly thereafter a lemonade, which was th e equ ivalent of the 5th and eve ryone appea red quite trend started that should have been the weak ginger ale. Afte r breakfast we went nervous . John Crosby did not have his slogan for t he trip - be late . The airpl ane to the Sports Palace, where competition usua l c lean routin es exce pt in fx-9 .35 and was about 30 minutes late lea ving and was to take place and had the draw of LHV-9.25 . I felt John should have been in the final s on both of th ese events ; John Crosby almost didn't make the teams and competitors and events. plane. I think in reflection John was Th e m e n drew parallel bars first and however , the judges didn't ask for my smarter than all of us because it appears were first up . A brief discu ss ion followed opinion. John's All Around total was best to not worry too much about time with the Sovi et officials feeling that our 52.40. I fe lt John was under a lot of sched ules with the Soviets . order of compet1t1ors was not too pressure sin ce in this meet the year The plane schedule was so organized important . The USA delegation then before, he had won 1st in FX and ABC with d i ks, a - ree cjgarettes and liqu0i:-,_stayed foF a presso€0Aference tt:iat was, we ::r=v was there with cameras=t urning'-. - - - - - followed by supper , the late movie, a found out later , only for the press . Doug F itzjarrel I was also very nervous continental breakfast and touchdown in The competition was in a large ice in the Moscow competition; however, his London . I kept thinking the stewardesses hockey arena on a raised platform. The routines were very solid and clean until forgot to put sleep somewhere in their training facility, however, was upstairs in the fou 1·th event . In the Pommel Horse, schedule. another section of the bui lding . For those he "kinda went bananas" as he put it. Arriving in the London airport, I was of us who were new to foreign Priot to Pommel Horse, his scores were expecting a first impression of something competition , there were severa l days in P.B.-9, FX-9.45 (made finals), LHV -9 .0, very British. I found it , I guess - very which we began to form new gymnastic Rings-8.75, H. Bar-8 .85, and on Pommel large rubber fire hoses all along the wal ls. friends. After ap!)roximately one or two. Horse a so lid 7 .35. Naturally Doug was Having just seen "The Towering Inferno" days, our groups seemed to be adjusted to very d isappointed and we discussed using before leaving., I was having visions of the their new routine~-. friends, schedule, and a slightly easier routine on pommel horse Towering Inferno AirporL Our airline the diet. On the 4th of April, the fi_rst and at Riga . tickets were incorrect and four of the only dav of ·'p ractice for the group in Hug looked his usual technically group had to chase their baggag_e through Moscow, we were limited to 15-minute correct self on horse with a beautiful severa l London terminals. -practice on eac h event starting in the routine . However, the judges only scored Since our group was going back and order of your competition draw. it 9 .3 . Thi s did put him in the finals; forth between terminals 1 and 2 and 3 , I Naturally, the group was disappointed however, it did appear to be an asked the clerk how iong it would take us that we had arri ved in Moscow too late underscore on the part of th e judges. In to walk to these terminals. Mistake No . 1 on the day of the 3rd to practice. As a the Long Horse Vaulting, Steve had for the men's coach , I was told it was coach , I felt an extra day of practice troub le with his running approach, zone on ly a four-minute walk around the wou ld have been very beneficial to fau lted and scored a low 8 on hi s Hdsp corner. The British should have allowed everyone. full twist. Steve also had problems on the the Americans a little more tim e - it (co ntinued on next page) took us about 20 minutes around severa l corners. Our tickets were rewritten to Warsaw, Poland. We arrived t here with severa l other teams and then finally arrived in Moscow late in the evening. My baggage had gotten lost en rciute and ended up in the Moscow Customs Office , s~a l ed shut with wax. After some difficulty with Soviet Customs, I rejoined our group and we went to the newest hotel in Moscow . I think someone in the group figured up 36 hours of tra vel time. We had supper that even ing as a group of 22 nations in a large banquet room . Apr il 4, breakfast was at 9:00 and we sat down to three sardines (h ead and tails still on) . A couple of the men gymnasts did double takes while looking at the sa rdines. Breakfast seemed to be a problem for most of our group while in Moscow; co nseq uently, the men sk ipped thi s meal frequently unless they could get hard-boiled eggs. Beverage and drinking HUG , WILLSON, & FITZJARRELL was also an adjustment for those who were across the ocean for the first time .

7


Mesa1.eu....'"tl

Place

No!!!., pr6aoa

DJ.aeako

1 2

3

4

5

6

?

v.

X:uae !.

!'.aji18JI& H.

28

w.

Kry& P:ia G.

9

i '+

T8.IUlenbergH• J.. H!IMchP R. K.ia 8 Ol\ Diil ·.-~b!!l-~ ;. Shl. ~:-~ 1-Ri>i g _;(.'-.~ Coli !:t·

16

:e~-.:;1. · !•JV G.. Ia;, "~&le

'l )

·15

17

18 19

zo 21

22

23 24

..

GDR

2

8

10 11 12

35

1

Ditiat111. J.. ~aa.

30

UliS JP!J UBB UliS JPN

3 29

Jr.asaJl&taU S • ~&OT V.

4

'1

7

3G

9.3

9.15

s.s:•

1'l· 8

IGJPC !CB:

9.?.5 9. ;_~

Z1

~

9 ~~

1 ·; 20 26 4()

IJ3.\ G!JB £UI E!ra

10 .\1

44

4'i 25

:-; . -.~.1 ·::..~.

v

l

!J

ffi.~

J

f-l..,,: :· O..!: .H ~

:;.

·.i·~ "1S_(..,·~

:t· ~.r.~kdw k .. Bl!<c!lal;:.;.:sll', tr. ~ ilit

i:faffk

L,

w.

Vaa llhrea 'E.

But lei' G.

J.adrin

.

8.

() ,;

C•

:l ;·;

r..·

;: )

8.;1:i5

..,

:

P.

HalTOrae• II.

Halv ora• n 'l'.

Ga.Nia F.

'l'ellah !I. Se rradj J.. Yal..awroa o. Lab111d :a. S s.ndoval J..

i 'J

9

23 41

;2

;:t:;J•. 'ff'~~.

8 .-:.-

"'·

..:.2 ·:. !J

45

'? .)

fa[;f

9.5

50 49

BUL. lfOR NOB.

·1- <'

5~8

'i .35

IDJN

51

Ho r izo nta l Bar; howe ver, he co vered u p a crooked sw in g out of an ono - did not va ul t - but did execute a pretty good free h ip. His sco re o n H. Bar was 8 .85. That nig ht the coaches and judges of several nationas went out to see some of the Moscow even ing life; however , most of the restaurants were c losed or packed with people so the hardy and late birds stayed and the weak, weary, ear ly birds went back . On April 6, Fitzjarrell drew first up in the FX finals. His routine was excellent; however, he ended u p 3rd. Hug a lso loo ked ve ry good on th e Po mm e l Horse ; however, he did not place in th e t op thre e.

i

:::-B.Jt

POL HOL

52 16

... :>

:s~::.:,

ROY

33 5

-'~

d ,., i \

19 46

11 34

.•;. l )

}'Ilf ;;lf!-'.

sux

6 22

I

&.4 8.85

a.75

.8. 3

Oil

6. 55

7. 55 5.5 6.85

e.o

' CUB

7. 95

ilU ilU

6. 5

5,5

CJ.B

r.~·

ilU

SPJ.

...

8~ 75

·,

·~'· > ~

~ .i..·;

5:? .. ,

'"' ~r~5

·.• ;, S

'? ~- .J 8.8

:n

42

9.05 a.35

,~

'

··1r:

°;Jf.I ' ·

~. t.:.;

.

C'

; ., -~

'"_,, :. c..8.,C;

r::;

'~•.:;

:_..,

f:.

a., ·:;

,

5 • .,

c_

l

8.a·

<JU .-

Gl/E

~-: :.-. ~ 1. ~-f . ';~· ~

b,f ':4 ~:-: ~~, ~

'30 (,

J?(JL Ili )f!ll ::;

C). 0

... 9cC

~-:,,

()."Oi-1 :7 •.f"

9.15

'.)

RDFC .llOM G-11·.li UOI!

ro:i:.

8.8

9.1

GDR

'l-8

(; . ;" :".'((

9.5 9 .~5 9.2 9.1 9.. 05

UBS 1'0H

'iu;.i : owld. P . H~ S , "iUchl ~i.<l R. Gi".l?.P R. t-lz.ir ..n J . ~L kii.t: '. yk R. >.'.Lia·.. a·ctc :!, •'.

9.1

9.5 9.45

9.15

1a

' .~; -·. ; :

9. 5

9.35 9.4

JPI'

Bx'!'ln <> R.

~"i ·~·;,}

9. 6 9.1

;~ .- _ ·::~

~ -?. ft ::., ,~

·i

~

do<{·

5

. '

f, ,. ,_ . ...

' ·· j

iJ .,

~; ; ;?

J

··~./

.7 ':

...

·,i~! . .

Ci-;

"L 1

';;' :·_r..

;:t. ~~5

,'1. ')'.>

51tt ·;

8.65

" 0

;;: 75

.' )1. 6.'.'·

9. 1

8 , 25 8.4. 8.65

51. 25

•~·• ..r

6

u•.:~ 8.8

a.25

8,55 7. 85

8. 2

a. 75 8. 75 8. 4 7. 5 7. 6 e. 55 7.6 a.75

51 .35 51.35

51 . 2

8. 4

51.1

8. 5

4-8.5

8.65 8.6

7.85 9. 05

e. o

8.1

8,0

7. 4 7.0

50. 95 50,05

47. 8 46.75 45.25

45.05

4). 2

'IC.75 38.1

• C R OSBY · R E PACK I NG AGA I N '

8


April 7, the group took an all-night train ride to Riga. The train was met by 1! Moscow e the organi zing committee and a large 'ii NE S ~i : :1 · Men banner above th e train station lobby 1=1.. ,, 1:1 welcomed the gymnasts. There was an .:_,_•=•'""-~! RESUIII'ATS DES FIN.ILES PAR SPEC I J\LI TES extremely long wait for rooms at the Hote l Riga, followed by t he competitive draw. The draw was signifi cant due to the fact that 19 nations voted to allow only T~k..iloncv Vladimir URS 9.4 18.75 9.35 two gymnasts from each nation to Jl'N 29 9.2 9.5 18.7 ·- Kas!i!r.atsu 8higeru participate in the finals . It was probably l'itzjar::-ell Doug USA. 9.4 9.25 18.65 39 the only democratic vote ever taken in a 'I Jrr:yssiu f1e"Juad!. 4 URS 18.6 9,35 9.25 Communist country; however, it didn't Kwne 'I'ake shi JP!! 9,4 5 30 9.15 18.55 really seem to solve the po li t ical judging 6 Ditiatia A.lex•ndr 2 URS 8.8 18, 15 9,35 - - - - - - - - -problem I the- finals ·n- Biga tb othe.__ _ _ __ 1 part1c 1pating Communist countries ~ managed to get ·more competitors in the Ditiatia Alexandr 2 UBS 9,2 18.8 9.6 finals due to the ruling of only two 2 Puskaa Bela HUN 43 9,25 18.75 9.5 competitors from each country in each 10 CUB 9.1 18.5 9.4 3 Richards Roberto event fin als. 18,4 4 Hug Steve 40 USA. 9,3 9.1 The USA men drew P. Bars again as the first event; however, they weren't up 4 Thune lolfga~ GDR 18,4 9.3 9.1 35 1st - this time we drew places 5, 6, and 6 Tikhonov Vladimir UJlS 17,5 9.25 8.25 7. T he workouts prio r to the m eet in Riga I' I Ll ciJ were very productive for o ur men and a great deal more time wa s allowed for each Klimenko Vilctor UllS 3 9,6 9,3 18.9 group on each event. In Moscow, the 2 Ditiatia Ale xandr 2 UJlS practice time was fifteen minutes for each 9.45 9.25 18.7 group on each event . Since there were 3 Kim Son Din 14 RDFC 9,25 9.2 18.45 nine people in each group, that didn't 4 T1.khoaov Vladimir UJlS 9,5 8.9 18.4 allow much time for anyone . In Riga, we Tabak Jiri 5 8 TCH 9,2 18 ,2 9.0 were allotted 30 minutes for each group 6 Krysein Gennadi 4 URS 9,3 8.8 18.1 on each event . April 8, in the early morning and afternoon, I spent a great deal of time ·1 '!'9.b&k Jir.I. 8 TCH 9,4 9. 3 18.7 w ith the Soviet interpreter for our group 2 Tuaub~rger A.ugustia 7 TCH 9,35 9,2 18.55 sightseeing in Riga, asking questions 2 k.rf;hel l!alf GD!! 37 9,35 9;2 19,55 about the Soviet training methods for 4 Kli.aenko Viktor 3 URS 9.4 men and women . 8.95 18,35 5 Kasamatsu Shigeru In Riga, the ceremonies pr ior t he 29 Jl'N 8,9 9.J5 18. 25 6 Tikhoaov Vladimir compet1t1on was perhaps the most URS 9,25 8.675 17. 925 beautiful rh ythmic gymnastics I have ever seen . The group was composed of young boys and girls who used wands, ribbons, Kasamatsu ShigeJ:'Q 29 Jl'If 9.6 9.6 19.2 free handbalancing, duo handbalancing, 2 Jra;li7811la Hiroaili 28 Jl'If 9.25 9,4 18.65 large flags, and other implements to 3 lill So11 Dill 14 l!DFC display their grace and talent. 9,1 9.3 18.4 4 Th\iae lfolfgug In the competition, Crosy scored 8.45 35 GD!! 9.2 9.0 18.2 on the Parallel Bars, Fitzjarrel missed a 5 ~enlro Viktor 3 UBS 9,5 8,25 17.75 front toss and scored 8.25. Hug scored 6 J!i.~a Alexandr 2 UBS 9,25 a.15 17.4 8.95 on Horizontal Bar, Crosby covered up a bad ono with a free hip and scored 8.85. Fitzjarrell was very clean and solid Kum.a Takeahi JO Jl'lf 9,5 9, 55 19.05 for an 8.95. Hug scored a 9.2 with an 2 Kaji;rama Hiroshi 28 Jl'If 9, 45 18,8 9,35 excellent routine that had only a few leg Cuervo Jorge 3 CUB 9 breaks. 9; 3 18,65 9; 35 4 Thii.Ae Wolfgang In FX, I talked John into his old GD!! 35 9,2 9;4 18.6 mount - whip back to double back since 5 Shiraiahi 8hinzo 27 Jl'lf 9 ~2 9,25 18.45 he was having trouble with his full in. He 6 Ti.kho11ov Vladillir 1 UBS 9.4 8. 5 17.9 scored a 9.4 and made the finals. Fitzjarrell was also high and clean and scored 9.45 . He too made the finals . Steve scored an 8 .85. It's my opinion that he could have scored much higher in form pants. .. MOSCOW HEWS"'INTERNATIONAL GYMNASTICS COMPETITION

~

R

[R]

[j

9


RESUI/J'ATS AU COMBINE RIGA-75 I.

2. 3. 3, 5. 6; 7; 8; 9;

Kajiuana Hiroshi Kasnmatsu Shigeru Shiraishi Shinzo Safronov VladimiI¡ Kume Tclrnshi Schamugia Paata Kim Son Din Tabak Jiri Thune Wolfgang Tikhonov Vladimir Richards Roberto Cuervo Jorge Ian Noa.le Paunescu Gheorge Fitzjarroll Doug Barthel Ralf . Kartunnen Marku Hug Steve Woselo'7ski Piotr Kim Son Ir Branea Radu Puskas Bela Milanetto Maurizio Giess Renato Farkas Arpad TkaczukRoman Marek Walde= Crosby John Dachm= Ueli Butler Glen Tcdorov Guoorgi 3ziron Janos Van Eltcrcn Frans

MESSIElJRS

28 JPN 29 JPN 27 JPN 56 URS 30JPN 54 URS I4 R.D.P.C. 8 TCH 35 GDR I URS IO CUB 9 CUB 26 GER 20 ROM 39 USA 37 GDR I7 FIN 40 USA 48 POL I3 R.D.P.C. I8 ROM 43 HUN 25 ITA 4I SUI 45 HUN 47 POL 46 POL 38 USA 42 SUI 6 CAN 23 BUL

SOL 9,6 9,5 9,I5 9,I5 9,35 8,9 9,I5 9~4

9,I5 9,25 8,85 I2; 9,2 I3; 9,05 I4. 8,8 I5. 9,45 I6; 8,6 17; 8,9 I8. 8,85 I8; 8,8 20; 8,95 2I; 9,05 22; 8,8 8,8 22. 24; 8,45 25. 8,8 26. 8,3 27. 8,55 28; 9,4 28; 8,5 30; 8,8 8,85 30; 32; 44 HUN 8,85 8,5 33. 5I HOL 8,6 ITJ. 24 )4. Zucca Arcgc lo 8 , 85 CUB II 35. G3.I'cia ~~ancizco 8 ,6 FRli. 32 36 . Lesage Cl:J.ude . 8,5 SPA I6 36. Sandoval ,\gustin cun 8,95 I2 38. .'lrago Rob erto R011 a ,7 I9 39. Mazilu Liviu URS 9,2 40; Mikailian Eduard 53 HOR 8,45 49 4I; Halverson Frede BUL 8,3 22 42. Andrccv Plamene NOR 8,4 50 42. Halvorsen Mognc Cill'l 8,7 44; Walstrom Q\.7cn 5 R.D.P.C. 9,I5 I5 45. Son Sun Pon ,i.ffi 7,85 46. Fell= Fuad 34 8 ,0 ilil52 47. Lobed Ruad 1lLG 7,95 48. Scrratz ,ibdel aziz 33 URS 49. Fcdorcnko Nikolai 59 9,2 GD:R 36 50. Hancshke Rainer IO; II.

CHEV.AL .ARC 9,55 9,35 9,25 9,35 9,35 9,5 9,I 9,I5 9,3 9,5

9,5 8,9 8,85 9,I 9,4 8,8 9,0 9,35 8,6 8,05 8,35 8,9 8 ,65 9,I5 8,35 9,4 9,I5 7,8 9,2 9,I5 8,35 8,5 8,9 9,0 8 ,5 8 ,75 8,85 8,I5 8,95 G,85 8,9 G, 35 ¡8,4 7,I5 3,0 7,3 6,25 4,5 9,35 9,35

Le 8 avril BARR BARRE P1\RALL FIXE ANNEAUX S,\UT 9,4 9,4 9,6 9,25 9,I 9,4 9,5 9,7 9,6 9,25 9,25 9, 3 9,4 9,4 9,I5 9,35 9,0 9,0 9,25 9,55 9,0 9,25 9,3 9,5 9,4 8,95 9,25 9,3 8,7 9,25 9,2 9,35 8,7 8,95 9,6 9,25 9,4 8,95 9,25 8,5 9,0 8,7 9,0 9,I 9,2 8,75 8,75 9,3 8,75 8,9 9,05 9,25 8,7 9,I 8,95 8,95 8,6 8,85 8,25 8,95 a,85 8,4 9,45 9,3 8,4 8,8 9,2 9,05 8,0 8,9 8,95 9,2 8, 75 9,0 9,0 9,I 9, I5 8,9 8,95 9,2 8,8 8,75 8,9 9,2 8,8 8, 7 9,05 8,75 8,85 8, 75 9,0 8,95 8,8 9,I 8,7 s, 75 8,85 8 ,75 9,0 9,I 8,65 8,85 8,95 8,55 8,85 8,8 8,25 9,05 8,85 8,75 8,45 9,35 8,8 8,65 9,I 8,35 8 ,6 8,5 8,7 8,7 8,65 8,85 8,7 9,05 8,I5 8,3 9,25 9,2 8,2 8,_z ___ 8, 75 9,05 8 ,9 8,7 8,65 8 ,2 8 ,4 8,6 8,6 8,9 8,2 8,7 8,85 8,55 8,6 8,7 8,55 8, 45 8,8 8,3 8,3 8,95 8 , 65 7,05 8,9 8, 75 6,0 9,25 8,2 9 ,35 8,0 8,2 8,3 8,55 G,65 9,0 8,5 9,I 8,4 8,5 8,85 7,35 7,8 8,45 8,85 8,7 8,I 9,I 8,95 9,35 8,3 7,4 7,95 7,65 8,I 6,9 7,95 7,7 7,4 8,35 7,45 7,7 9,2 9,25 9,25 9,3

On the Pommell Horse, Crosby had a lot execution and difficulty in both events is better than Fitzjarrell's. of trouble and scored 7 .8. Fitzjarrell left April 9. After breakfast, we had a out double leg circ les on one pommel! leisure day, shopping, sightseeing on foot. and scored 9.4. Hug executed brilliantly Mr. Cu m iskey and I saw several for a 9.3 In the Still Rings, Crosby was interesting sights, including the oldest clean and had a good do ubl e back dismount for 8.75. Fitzjarrell was church in Ru ss ia , and we had a Pl um milkshake in Russia. There are so many smoother and was swinging much better than John for an 8.85. Hug had a great peop le shopp ing and walking, it is routine . His giant was with striaght arms, difficu lt to move on the streets and in the excel lent whippett, and a nice double stores. back 8.95. Paota from Russia followed, I took pictures of our girls in the fell out of a whippett, had two preliminar ies today. Ann Carr shou ld intermed iate swings and scored 9 .0 on have been 3rd in AA but the scor ing had Rings. Naturally, our entire men's her 4th . Mr. Cumiskey pointed out to me delegation was speechless on that score. I the Ru ss ian s have their trash cans asked the head judge from N. Korea to attached to walls . The boys shopped exp lain to me why Hug scored so low on today and slept. I think the trip finally the Rings . His only comment was USA no caught up with them. April 10. We went good. to the oldest historical church in Riga Crosby and F itz made finals in FX . with Mr. Cumiskey. It was built in 1206, Hug vaulted poor ly for an 8.0. F itzjarrell rebuilt in 1215, 1251, 1400 and again in started his vaulting run on the wrong 1700's. It was destroyed in WW 11, rebuilt foot, almost hand faulted and scored an in 1972. The museum guide was from 8.6. Crosby had an excellent cartwheel Au~tralia and he spoke English and has back for a 9.35 and probably an been trying to get out of Riga for three underscore. However, John did make the years. Also, we met an engineer who finals in LHV . Hug did not make the makes 25 rubles a week and I ives in a finals in PH or SR even though his tenant house with his family and four

10

Tar AL 56,8 56,55 55,8 55,8 55,5 55,45 55,I5 55,05 54,95 54,85 54,I5 54,I 53,85 53,6 53,5 53,4 53,35 53,25 53,25 53,2 53,05 53,0 53,0 52,95 52,82 53,7 52,65 )2,6 52,6 52,45 52,45 52,45 52,I 52,05 5I,85 5I,65 5I,65 5I,45 5I,O 50,85 50,4 49,9 49,9 49,65 47,65 46,45 44,9 43,35 37,05 27,85

other fami lies. The five wive s share the kitchen and the five families share the bath. By contrast, our Russian interpreter Yuri has two TV's, car, has two children and makes 300 rubles a month or about 450 dollars if my currency exchange rate is correct. Rent for the engineer is 10 rubles a month, for Yuri it's about 20 rubles a month . We also met a gir l and her sister outside the Riga Sports Palace who is se lf-ex il ed from the USA beca use she doesn't care for our government; however, in our conversations, she also said that Riga and Russia were not a pleasant place to live and that they were moving to Holl and . Air pollution is a problem - there have been no clear, bright, su nny days at any time . The sun almost breaks through and then it doesn't. We leave for Moscow at 2:15 a.m . and get into Washington at 6:00 p .m. In summary, it was a great trip for me and a disappointment to the USA men and women who were scored politically rather than gymnastically. Thanks to the U .S.G.F . for asking me to go with the teams.


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MOSCOW -ST BASE L S CHURCH

ARRIVING I N RIGA

RIGA 路 FINALS FOR MEN

Exercises au sol

I, Kasaroatsu Sigoru 2. Fitzjarrell Doug 3, Kumo Takeshi 4. . Crosby John 5, Tabak Jiri 6, Tikhonov

Vladi~ir

9,5 9,45 9, 35 9,4 9,4 9, 25

JPN USA JPN USA

29 39 30 38 8 I

TCH URS

9,6 9,5 9,5 9,3 9 ,2 9,I5

19 ,l 18,95 IB ,85 IB ,7 IB ,6 IB ,4

Cheval Arcons I. Ka>aroat su Sigoru

2, 3, 4. 5,

29 l

Ti chono v Vladimir Richards Roberto Fitzjarr ell Doug Tkaczuk Roman

39 47

JPN URS CUB USA POL

9, 35 9,5 9,5 9,4 'J ,4

9,4 9, 25 9, 15 9,0 8 ,45

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Schamugia p., Safronov V, . Kasamatsu S, Tabak I, Barther R, Crosby J,

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RDFC 9,35 JPN 9, 25 CUB 9,2 TCH 9, 25 Messieurs - SAUT DE CHEVAL

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JPN JPN GDR RDPC URS URS

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27 35 I 56 I4

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URS IB ,875 9,5 9,375 URS 9,4 9,425 I8 1 825 JPN 9,4 9,425 18,825 TC!i I8 1 65 9,35 9,3 GDR IB,6 9,45 9,15 USA 9,35 9,175 rn,525 Messieurs - BARRES PA!C,\LLELES

54 56 29 8 37 38

Kaaamntsu S, Sh;Waisi S. Thune

9,4 9,3 9,15 9, 2 9,0 8 ,9

9,35 9,4

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RDPC

9,5 9, 3 9,25 9, 25 9 1 15 9,25

9996 9,4 9 ,25 9,2 9, 3 9,0

I9, I IB,? rn,5 I8 ,45 rn,45 IB,25

OUR INTERPRETERS

6

I 2 2 4 5 6

l 2 3 4 4 6

BARRE FIXE

9,7 < 9,6 9,6 9,4 9,4 9,3

9,55 9,5 9,3 9,45 9,2 9, I5

19,25 19,I 18,9 18,85 I8 1 6 I8 1 45

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DE LENE DARST 路 JUDG I NG

11


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Left to Right: Dronava & Kolesnikova scored 18.8 in Vaulting in Riga Ann Carr was 3rd with a debatable 18 .7

12


gymnastic aides 'P.O. BOX 4 75 NORTHBRIDGE, MASS. 01534 PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHING SYSTEMS BASIC SYSTEM (char t s with teach i ng manua l )

~~;~ s m: ::::::: ::::::::: ::::: ::::::: :::: ::::::: ::1 ~:6~

Tea c her ' s Ma nua l on l y .. .. . ... .. . .. . . . . .. . . . ... . . ... . 2 . 00 (sp ec ify Gir l s' or Boys')

GYMNASTICS CHARTS Me n ' s Int . Para ll el Bar (5) .... . . . .. . • . . . .. .. . . . .. . . . .... Int. Rings (3) .. . .... .. . .. . ... . . . . . . . . . .•.. .. . . . . .. Bas i c to Int. Side Hors e (2) . . .. . . . .. .. . . ... .. ..... Bas i c to Advanced Tum bli ng (4) . . .. .. ..... . ... . . .. . . Advanced Para ll el Bar (4) .. ... . . . . . . ... . . . . . . ... . .. Advanced Rings (3) . .. .. .. .. .. . .. . . .. . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . Basic to Advanced Hor iz ontal Bar (6) . .. . . . . .. • .... . .

7 . 00 5 . 00 4.00 6 . 00 6.00 5 . 00 8.00

Gi rl ' s Int. to Advanced Balance Bea m ( 6); . .. . .... . ........ Basic to Advanced Tumbling ' (4) .. .....•. . . .. .... ... . (same as above) Compe t it i ve Vau lt i ng (3) ........ .• ..... . .. ... • . . ... In t . Uneven Para ll e l Bars (5 ) . .... . . .. .. . . . .

8.00 6 . 00 5 . 00 7.00

RECORDS A ND CASSETTE TAPES Musi c fro m t he Ol ymp ic Ga mes Vo l . 1-Record .. .. .. . .. . . . . ....... . .... . . .. . .... . . . .. Casse t te . ... . . . • . .... ...• . . .•. . . • . . . . . . .••. . . Vo l. 2- Reco r d .. . . .....•. . . . •... . . . . .. .. •. . . .. . . . • . .. Casset t e . ... . . . .. . . .. . .. ... . .. .. . . ... . .. . . ...

8.00 5 . 00 8 . 00 5 . 00

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BOOKS Gymnastics Illustrated . . .. .. .... . ....... . ..... . ..... 9 . 50 The Side Horse... . ..... . . .. ... . ...... . . ... . . .. . . 3 . 50

AIDS Meet Ad vertising Pos ters . . . . . • ............. .. ... . _ _ _Boys _ _ _Gir ls Sco rin g Ki t s .... _ _ _Gi r l s

1. 00 . 50

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Boys

Ha ndgu ards . .. . . . Sm Med _ Lge Gym nasITc s Emb 1em:-:-.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . Add Posta ge and Hand l ing 50¢ for orders under $10 . 00 Sl . 00 for orders over $10 . 00

25 . 75

Total s _ _ __ Name . . . . .. .. .. . . .. ... . . ·· ·· ·· · · ·· ··· · · · · · ·· ·· · · · · · · · ··· ·· Street . . ..•. .. . . .. . •............ .. . . . . .... • . . . • .... . · · ·· · City . . ..

. . ... . .. .. . . . State . . . .. ..... .. • .. .• . . .. .. . . .

Schoo 1 ......•.... • .. ... . ........ . .. Zi P ....... .. ....... . . .

SCENES FROM RIGA

13


MINUTES WOMEN'S GYMNASTICS NAGWS-USGF March 17, 1975 CERTIFICATION COMMITTEE: The meeting was called to order at 7:45 p.m. by Chairperson S. Bryan with all Committee members in attendance. The primary purpose of the meeting was to establish revisions in the 1975-79 Certification program as deemed necessary by the Committee. Each sub-committee chairperson gave a brief report which indicated the current status of her committee work . All sub-committees are functioning satisfactorily, and evaluations for revisions in procedures were presented. The following items of business were duly brought to the floor and approved by the Committee:

e. National: $5.00 (theoretical only) F . The 1975-79 Certification Procedure is attached. Committee members are requested to review this item carefully and notify S. Bryan of any errors. II.

CERTIFICATION EXAMINATION The Certification Committee will be responsible for the development of the 1975-79 theoretical examinations, under the chairmanship of Lu Wallace. The deadline date for submiss ion of exam ination s was established as May 1, 1975. All examinations are to be sent directly to L . Wallace, who will then forward them for final revisions to D. I. TESTING PROCEDURE Darst and J. Fie by May 15, 1975. REVISIONS/CHANGES Finalized copies are due to Lu Wallace A. A Test Administrator who elects to June 1, 1975. The Chairman, S. Bryan . take the Certification Examination must was requested to send copies of the table be tested prior to the time of her of penalties on March 18, 1975 to scheduled test administrat ions with in facilitate this process. each Certification Year (Sept. 1 - Aug . A. Content of Theoretical 31). Examinations B. Any examinee who elects to re-test 1. Apprentice - Class 111 within the Certification Year must (a) Form A & B: 50 questions present her current rating card to the TA (b) Beginning Compulsories prior to the examinat ion. In the event 2. Associate & State - Class 11 that the card has been lost, a duplicate (a) Form A & B: wil.I be issued upon request by the 50 questions general Certification Coordinator. ¡ knowledge and optional C. The Rating card for judges certified judging within the 1975-79 Certification period (b) 50 questions will include the following addit ion al Intermediate Compulsories information: 3. Reg ional & National - Class I 1. Test date (a) Form A & B: 2. Name of TA 50 questions general 3. Rating status knowledge and optional D . Rating report forms for the , judging 1975-79 Certification period will be sent (b) 50 questions Advanced by the TA to the Examination Compulsories Distributor and the Certification Coordinator. Corrected or original forms B. Assignments for Composition of w il l be then sent by the CC to the Theoretical Examination Examination Distributor, Chairman of 1. Balance Beam: V . French the USGF Women's Technical 2. Vaulting : S. Ammerman Committee, and Chairman of th e 3 . Uneven Ba rs: D. Darst Women's Gymnastics Judges Associ ation. 4 . Floor Exercise : J. Fie E. The following fee changes were 5. Optional and General Knowledge: approved: L. Wallace Film Rentals: $25.00 1. Examination Fees : 2. a. Apprentice: $2.50 (theoretical only) Ill. CERTIFICATION FILM b. Associate : $ 5.00 AN D PU BLICATIONS (theoret ical and practica l) A. The Chairman announced that the c. State: $5 .00 publication of the 1975-79 National (theoretical and practical) Compul sory Routines may be slightly delayed because of unanticipated legal ci. Regional : $5 .00 matters concerning the music. (theoretical and practical)

14

B. These legal aspects regarding the music may prevent publication of the sheet music in the NAGWS and USGF publications. C. An official tape of the music for floor exercise will be produced and made available for purchase by the USGFWC. D. A review of the current financial status of the Certification Committee was presented: Checking Account - $126.45; Passbook Savings - $3089.07; Certificate of Deposit $2000.00; Total $5, 115.52. The checking account balance will be maintained; the savings account andCD will be depleted to cover partial expenses of the Certification Film. IV. COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP A . Term of Office: Present Members 1. Lu Wallace : term expires Sept. 1 , 1977 2. Sue Ammerman: term expires Sept. 1, 1976 (will accept reappointment) 3. V. French: term expiresSept. 1, 1976 (wi II accept reappointment) 4. J. Fie: term expires Sept. 1, 1976 (will accept reappointment) 5. D. Darst: term ex pi res Sept. 1, 1976 (requests replacement, but is willing to work with new appointee through 1979) 6. S. Bryan: term expires Sept . 1, 197 5 (wi II accept reappo intment) B. All members of t he Committee were charged with sending recommendations for the Chairmanship of the Compulsory Sub-Committee to S. Bryan by July 1, 1975. C . The Committee was further charged wi t h searching and mak ing recommendations for well-qualified individuals to fill all positions as and when the need arises. Th e Chairman expressed her thanks to the Committee and extended commendations to all sub-committee cha irmen for thei r excellent service to th e National Certification Progra m. There be ing no further business to come before the Committee, the meeting was adjourned.

NOTE: The music has been com~osed and will be available for publication.


â&#x20AC;˘

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A gymnast is only as good as his hands. American gymnastic equipment is only as good as the hands that make it. That 's why we take pride in the craftsmanship that goes into each and every piece of American equipment. That assures you of top quality you can depend on. Send today for our free catalog of gymnastics equipment, mats, and trampolines. You'll find AMF American equipment is designed to bring out the best in you .

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HOW TO BECOME A REGISTRANT IN THE 1976 EDITION.

}

I

WhoJs Who


II

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Who's Who in Gymnastics'' 1976 WHO'S WHO IN GYMNASTICS Compi led and edited by the U.S. Gymnast ics Federation

The 1976 Edit ion is be ing comp iled and is destined to be larger and m ore informative than the orig ina l edition. Al l those appearing in the 1973 Edition wi ll remain and new names from a ll parts of the gymnastics wor ld w ill be added. Judges, gymnasts, offic ials, equipment representatives and enthus iasts are all included, along with background information and honors achieved, present position and address. To be a part of this newest and most up-to-date publication for gymnasts, please complete the following and mail immediately. (Deadline for entries is October 1, 1975) .

HERE IS HOW YOU CAN BE PART OF THE 1976 EDIT ION: (Complete the following - please type or print)

CITY/STATE/ZIP _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ BIRTHDATE _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ Resu m e of your activit ies in gymnastics . Include earliest to latest in vo lvement in that o rder, past records , present profession . Limit you r entry to 100 words p lease. We reserve right to ed it all copy, for size.

Cross the square that applies to you. (X )

D

You were a 1973 registrant. Your resume will be printed in the 1976 edition exactly as it was in the 1973 edition; however, if you wish to update your resume, adding additional honors, awards, corrJplete rewrite, etc., there will be a $5.00 fee. Just list the changes in the 'resume space' above and mail with the $5.00 fee. If, in addition, you wish to purchase a copy of the 1976 edition, the cost is $10.00. The total cost will be: (1) Resume change only .. .. $5.00. (2) Book only .... $10.00. (3) Resume change and book .... $15.00. Please mail applicable fee to the USGF Box 4699, Tucson, Az. 85717.

D

You want to be a 1976 Registrant. Complete the information as requested above and enclose check for$15. 00madepa yable to the USG F and mail to the USGF, Box 4699, Tucson, Az. 85717. Price includes the 1976 edition of "Wh o 's Who in Gymnastics," personalized copy and registry within that edition.

17


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-/.______,,:\ (I_ THE MOST UP-TO-DATE,INFORMATIVE MAGAZINE EVER PUBLISHED ABOUT GYMNASTICS Up-To-Date

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Every month GYMNASTS OF AMERICA will bring you the news while it 's still current. Our deadlines are designed to get the latest information, changes, developments, and results in the world of GYMNASTICS.

To insure the dependability and reliability of what we print, our information will directly come from some of the most knowledgable and informed peop le in gymnastics. G.O .A. representatives wi 11 personally cover major gymnastic events . In other words, we will tell you what's happening, who it's happening to, how it's happening, who's making it happen, where it's happening, and when it's happening.

You'll get to meet top national and international gymnasts, both male and female . They will let you know how and why they got where they are today along w ith . a host of other interesting items. If there is something happen ing in gymnastics, G.O.A. will be there to tel l you about it quickly. There will be monthly technic al articles from some of the most knowledgab le coaches and instructors in the sport. In essence, we are go in g to bring you everything of interest and value that happens in gymnastics.

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USGF

2ND NATIONAL ELITE

QUALIFICATION MEET April 25-26, 1975

Reno, Nevada

On April 25 and 26, 1975, in the "Biggest Little. City In the World" - the "Most Determined Little Gymnasts In the World" were entered into the 2nd National Elite Qualifying Meet. Gymnasts from across the country were there to try their best to earn the 70.00 AA score that would qualify them for the Elite National Championships in Carbondale, Illinois. Anyone viewing the competition, which ran smoothly due to the thoughtful preparation of meet directors, Mike and Dale Flansaas, had to be impressed with the young gymnasts who ·are displaying a wide variety of new and difficult moves on all the events. Exciting, original, and daring routines all combined to create an encouraging picture of hope and promise for the future of women's gymnastics in the United States. It would be impossible . to remember this meet without speaking of the spectacular vault executed by All-Around winner COLLEEN CASEY. Her super handspring with a full twist in the second flight generated an excitingly enthusiastic response from spectators, coaches, gymnasts, and judg$S, who rewarded the vault a well -deserved score of 9 .70 . The excellence of this vault, along with the beautifu l and courageous performances by many of the girls on all the events, spoke to us more clear ly than a multitude of fancy phrases. These hard-working gymnasts are providing us with all the proof we should need. YES FOLKS; IT IS ALL WORTHWHILE!! -Audrey Schweyer

The

UNITED STATES

GrMNASJLC-8 FEDERATION

ALL-AROUND RESULTS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20 . 21. 22 . 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32 . 33. 34 . 35 . 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43.

Casey Cheshire Englert Dunbar Willcox Shotwell Muncey Wolfsberger Spira Manville Archer Beadle Liviere Hansen Payton Wyckoff Shapiro Gross Schuchman Anten Litowski Anthony Heidenwolf Jones Reed Heggie Baker Johnson D. Cantwel l Mirtich Beltz Phillips Halle Huck Tubis Gachenbach Atkins Levine Redulski Cavendish Stach Govin Clark Ludwig

--'4 "'4""·~~ s~ tephensen

45 . 46 . 47.

Godward Hemberger Reiser

19

73.35 73.25 73 .20 73.05 72.70 72 .70 72.65 72.60 72 .00 71.95 71.90 71.60 71 .17 71.10 71 .00 70.95 70.80 70.80 70.50 70.40 70.35 70.20 70.20 70.15 70.05 70.00 70.00 70.00 69 .75 69 .55 69.50 69 .35 69.25 68.95 68.90 68 .55 68.50 68.50 68.45 68.275 68.05 68.05 67.85 67.60 67.50 67.00 65.60 -50.05

Did you know thnt • , . ? !'resi dent Lincoln and President Kenned y we~e hoth cor.cerned with the issue of C ivi l Rights. Lincoln was clcctcct in 1860. Kenr.edy was elected in 1960. Both were slain on a Friday, in the p resence of th eir wives. Buth we re shot m the head, from beh ind. Th ei r successors, both named Johnson, were . Southern Democrats and were both 1n the Senate. Andrew Johnson was born in 1808 . Lyndon Johnson was born in 1908. John Wilkes Booth, who killed Lincoln was born iii 1839. ' Lee Harvey Oswald, who killed Ken- . nedy, was born in 1939. Bt,n th and Oswal d w"r" b,l\h l<illcd before t ri a I. Both Preside:its' wives lost children · ihrough death whilst at the White H o use. Jo ;1n W ilkes P.ooth 'hot Lincoln in a 1hc•iire and ran t11 a warehom·e. Le.:: Harvey Oswald sho t Kennedy from a wa rehoilse un J ran to a thc<itre. Linco ln's sccrelury, .,..,:10s<: ri ;dnc was Kennedy, ad vised him not to go 10 th e thea tre. Kennedy's sec retMy , whose nail1.! wus Lincoln, advi>c d him not In go to Dall as. T he names Lincoln and Ken nedy each conta;n seven letters, the numec; Andrew Johnson and Lyndon Johnson each conrnin thirteen lette rs. The na mes John Wilkes Booth and Lee Harvey Oswal<l each contain fiftee n letters. Just a coincidence or. . .

(From the Silver Street, Hull 11ewsle11er)


MINUTES U.S. OLYMPIC WOMEN'S GYMNASTICS COMMITTEE March 9, 1976 Chicago, Illinois The March 9, 1975 meeting of the United States Olympic Women's Gymnastics Committee was called to order at 11 :00 a.m. by Shirley Bryan, Chairman. Roll call was taken and the following members were absent: Lewis Chase, Cathy Rigby Mason, Norma Zabka (excused). Guests at the meeting were: James McHugh - Director of Operations, USOC and Jerry Lace - USOC Assistant Director, Operations. The minutes of the last regular meeting, held November 10, 1974 in Ch icago , Illinois, were approved as written . Recommendations from the USGF Foreign Relations Committee - Women's Division regarding competition format and organization for the Pan American Trials were brought to the floor by Mrs. Bryan. The meet will be conducted in two days with compulsory and optional competition to be held each day. Two sets of judges and a meet referee will officiate. A ll competitors will perform all four events in each session, as recommended by Dale Flansaas. The two bid sites are Los Angeles and Miami . The propo sed dates are August 8-9, 1975, with a possibility of August 2 if necessary. A motion was duly made, seconded and carried to accept the Miami bid site. The USG F injury clause from last year does not apply to the Pan American Games. A mbtion was made, seconded and carried to request the USG F Women's Technical Committee to formulate an injury clause before April 23, 1975, to be submitted to the Women's Olympic Committee for approval. Said injury clause will be utilized in the USGF Elite Nationa l Championship Meet and the Pan American Trials. The following competition format and organization was approved for the 1976 Olympic Trials: a three-day meet for the top twenty competitors from the USG F Master Elite Meet in 1976 to compete in compulsory and optionals on day one, compu lsory only on day two, and optionals only on day three . All four events would be performed in each session. Two sets of judges would be used. Day one would consist of two sessions, with two events running

simu ltaneously. Days two and three would consist of one session each day, with two events simultaneously. The question of an in jury c lause was tabled. A review of the team selection system began with the USOC time table for entries moving the usual gymnastics season to an earlier schedule. The following 1975-76 USGF Season is unofficial, subject to the approval of the USGF Women's Technical Committee in April: First Regional El ite Qualifying Meet: Oct. 31-Nov. 1 First National Elite Qua lifying Meet : Dec . 5-6 Second Regional Elite Qualifying Meet: Jan. 16-17 Second National El ite Qua lifying Meet: Feb. 6-7 USGF Women's Committee National Elite Championsh ips: March 4-5-6 Master Elite Meet: April 9-10 Olympic Trials: * May 6-7-8 Departure fo r Olympic Games: Ju ly 5-14, 1976 NOTE: (*The Olympic Trials will be held May 13, 14 and 15, 1975. The dates were changed due to a schedule conflict with the site.) The top 15 gymnasts from the 1975 Elite Championship Meet will be waived from competition in the 1975-76 season. They will then compete against the top 15 from the 1976 Elite Championship Meet in a Master Elite Meet. This Meet will determine the twentv gymnasts who will participate in the Olympic Trials. There have been requests from other gymnastic organizations regarding the use of their national championships as means for qua li fication into the Olympic Trials. .This issue was tabled, but the Committee is responsible only for Pan American and¡ Olympic Tria ls. If an organization wishes to petition into any other meet, those petitions shou ld be directed to the Women .s Technica l Committee of the USGF, chaired by Mrs. Jackie Fie. Discussion concerning the Pan American Games Training Camp began with a recommendation from the foreign Relations Committee - USGF presented

20

by Shir ley Bryan. 1. The camp should be held ten days prior to departure. USOWGC accepted. 2. Event special.ists should be responsible for assisting the Pan American Games Coach at the camp. These specialists would be recommended by the USGF Foreign Relations Committee Women's Division, and approved by the USOWGC . Accepted by USOWGC . 3. The top 9 (revised from 10) gymnasts in rank order will attend the training camp. USOWGC accepted. 4. If a gymnast arrives at the tra ining camp unprepared, she should be reviewed by the coaching staff and rep laced if necessary by the next girl in rank order. Rejected by USOWGC. 5. The Pan American compulsory routines will be d istributed after the National Elite Championship Meet to those who qualify for the Final Pan American Trials. Accepted by USOWGC. Dale F lansaas recommended that: ( 1) selected coaches of participants be included in the staff; (2) the schedule be planned well in advance; (3) the training sess ions be a 2-3 hour morning and afternoon sessi on, with the evenings free; (4) the girls be together in the living situatio n, possibly renting a house with a hired cook; and (5) an ad ministrator for the camp be available, in addition to the gymnastic staff . It was decided that the specifics of the training camp would be left to Dale Flansaas to present by mail to the Committee by March 30. A response should be made to Shirley Bryan on the proposal by April 18, so that she may have a firm proposal by April 23, 1975. A question was raised as to the procedure used for the selection of team officials for the Pa n American Games. Shirley Bryan indicated that the procedures we used were totally within the rules of order. It was decided that for the Olympic Games Officials, more than one ballot would be used. Mrs. Bryan will invite applications for the various positions. Information relative to the present situation in gymnastics development was discussed by Mrs. Bryan. A USGF Olympic Development Training Camp will be conducted for the top junior and senior gymnasts from the USGF Junior Olympic Meet and promising gymnasts


1976 OLYMPIC GAM ES

MINUTES U.S. OL Y MPIC WOM EN 'S GYMNASTICS COMMITTEE

SCHED U LE

March 9, 1976

Montreal

Chicago, Illinois

July 17 - August 1, 1976

from various meets, to comprise a total of 20 gymnasts. The camp will include event spec iali sts, a coaching coordinator (Muriel Grossfeld), and an administrator. The gymnasts wilt observe the final Pan American Trials and then participate in the USGF Olympic Developm ent Camp immediately following the t rial s. The top three girls from the USA-West Germany Meet (Carr, Myslak, and Yokum) will be competing in th e Moscow News Meet in Riga in April. Bill Coco will coach and Delene Darst will be th e judge. When discussion concerning our selection arose, Mr. Jerry Lace brought up the point that Mexico makes the decision of selecting judges for the Pan American Games. Olympic Trial bid presentations were to begin at 1 :45 p.m. Mr. Bruce Davis, Di rector of Flordia Sports Meet, Inc. of Miami, Florida, wa s unabl e to appear . Mr. William Coco, representing Phil ad elp hia '76, Inc. of Phil ade lphia, Penn sy lvania, spoke from 2 :30 to 3:00. Mr. Jam es E. Hardy, repres enting th e Southern CiJ l ifornia Committee for the Olympic G ames of Los Angele s, California, appeared from 3: 15 to 3:45 p.m . After considerable di scussion fol lowing the presentations, a motion was made, seconded and unanimously carried to accept the bid of the Southern California Committee for the Olympic Games from Los Angeles, California . In view of the fact that the Meet Director for such a meet is of vital importance, the Committee discussed the issue and decided, after voting, upon Mr. Bud Marquette. The next regular meet ing of the Committee will be held prior to t he Pan American T rials, either the fi rst or second week of Augu st. The meeting was adjourned at 5:00 p.m. by the Chairman, Mrs. Shirley Bryan. Respectfully submitted, . Sharon Weber

--~

--~

S ports Op enin g ceremonies

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21

• •• • • •• •••• •• • • • ••• • •••• • • •••• • • • • • • • ••••••••• • • •• • • • ••••• • • • ••• • • •• •• • • • • • •••• • • • • •• • • • •••• • • • • •• • • • • •• •••• • • • • • • •• •• • • •• • •• • •• • • • • •

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA - BERKELEY WINS NCAA TEAM CHAMPIONSHIP From the moment they stepped on the floor to the final event, California out-dueled Louisiana State and Southern Illinois to win the team title at the 33rd NCAA Gymnastics Championships Satu rday afternoon at Hui man Center . The Golden Bears, in winn ing their second NCAA crown and first since 1968, scored a 220.10 in the ir final optional routines and combined with their average score of 217.15 from the preliminary rounds T hursday and Friday, gave them a total for t he meet of 437 .325. LSU, in the final three for the first time, scored a 218.725 in the finals and combined its prelim inary average score of 215.40 to finish second behind California with a score of 433.70. Third went to Southern Illinois, who was competing in these championships without their star all-arounder Jim lvicek, who broke his arm in a recent practice. The Salukis scored a 217 .325 in the finals and, combined with its preliminary total of 214 .10, scored a 431.50 for the three

• days of competition . .

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Nonetheless, Greg Lewis of the Southeastern Conference Tigers had the top indiv idual score of 9.275, followed by Cal's Tom Beach with 9.225 and his teammate Tom Weeden with a 9.175. Yesterday, floor exercise had close Weeden, who finished second in the competition when the finals began. all -around competition, competed for the Louisiana State scored a 36.80, Ca liforn ia individual championship in the event last 36.25 and ISU a 36.65 for the event. Top night. honors went to the Tigers' Tony Jaeger, In the parallel bars, the team scores who scored a 39.55, followed by Jim were close as only .25 separated the three McFaul of Southern with a 9.45 and teams, with California scoring a 36.45, Steve Shepard, also of the Sa lukis, with a Louisiana State a 36.35 and Southern 9.40. Illinois a 36.60. Side horse also was close as the Golden SIU's Glen Tidwell had the top Bears scored a 36.05 and the Tigers a individual p-bar score, a 9.40, with LSU's 36.20, while Southern tailed off in the Mike Godawa second with a 0.35, with event, scoring a 35.25. Salukis Jack Laurie third in the event Blaine Dahl of LSU and Ma rk Adams with a 9.25 score. of Cal tied for top score on the pommel With Southern Illinois virtually horse, each receiving a 9 .4 score for their eliminated from the title after vaulting, routine. Ed Hembd had the third best LSU and Ca lifornia were still waging a score, a 9 .35. close battle for the championship until Two LSU competitors, Mike Carter the ho rizonta l bar event, the last event in and Todd Kuon i, tied for the ne xt best the meet, came up . score with each getting a 9.45 . The T igers It was in that event where the Bears also had the best team event score, 37.40, clinched their crown as Louisiana State, with the Pacific-8 group getting a 37. 15, one of only two teams that defeated and the Salukis a 36.20. Indiana State this season, came up with A low score of 35.925 on vaulting only 35.35 score . virtually eliminated Coach Bill Mead's Chief cause for the score was a bad Salukis for a shot at their fifth national routine by the Tigers' best gymnast and crown, while LSU scored a 36.275 and Nisse n Award nominee Mike Carter, who California had top score ·in the event of struggled on the apparatus and almost fell 36.50. from it during his performance, and was Unlike a regular meet in which one given a 6. 75 score by the judges. vault counts toward an individual's score, On the same event, Cal ifornia came up each of the competitors took two vaults, with scores of 9.00 or better from its five and the scores were averaged to give the performers. individual score . BEARS OUTDUEL LSU, SALUKIS

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WAYNE YOUNG - NCAA A.A. CHAMPION An absolutely brill iant performance on every event Friday night gave Brigham Young's Wayne Young the 1975 all-around championship at the NCAA Gymnasti cs Championships at Hulman Center. Young, who didn't compete in high schoo l gymnastics because there is no high schoo l program in his hometown of Provo , Utah, proved he's come a long way in four seasons. After placing third in all -around as a junior last season, he scored 53.00 in hi s compulsory exerc ises and a whopping 56.65 in his optiona ls to out-distance t he f ield by more than a point . "It's th e best I've ever done," Young told The Star after his optional performances . The BYU se nior had no event below a 9.25 Friday night, and also qualified for the individual fin als in rings, parallel bar and horizontal bar whil e finishing just .05 below the qualifiers in long _h_or_se_ va_u_lt1_ ·n_g._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

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1975 NJCAA GYMNASTICS CHAMPIONSHIPS MIAMI, Fla. - Odessa Junior College captured the 1975 NJCAA Gymnastics Championship scoring a record shattering 157 .65 points in the process. The annual affair, hosted by Miami-Dade Community College, North on March 7-8, had eleven teams represented covering the United The final team results were States from coast to coast. College Pts. Three of the nine records currently in Odessa, Texas 157.65 the NJCAA annals were smashed in this year's event . Odessa broke the previous Long Beach City 154.35 College, Calif. team total of 154.46 by scoring 157 .65 points . The previous record was set by Farmingdale, New 144.55 York Odessa in 1974. 127 .10 Individual records were broken in the New Mexico trampoline and all-around categories . Jeff . College of 125.90 Aiani (DuPage) scored 17 .85 points in the Dupage, 111. 102.80 trampoline competit ion, breaking the Cuyahoga, Ohio previous record of 17.40 set by Bill Miam i-Dade 91 .80 Austin of New Mexico in 1972. Tom North, Fla. 86.10 Phil li ps (Odessa) scored 50.25 points in Triton College, Ill. the all-around competition, breaking the Oueensborough, NY 78.80 58.60 record set by Gary Rafaloski of Odessa in Schoolcraft, Mich. 12.65 1973. Montgomery, Md.

'

NJ CAA

as follows: Place Champion

'

Runner-up 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th

..

FLOOR EXERCISE FINALS Place

1 2

3 4 5 6

College Odessa New Mexico Farmingdale DuPage Long Beach Odessa

Name Junior Perez Jose Lovato Mike Punda Mark Schludt Carl Cruz David Sanders

Prelim

Final

Average

9,15 8.95 8,55 8.50 8.55 8.65

8.65 8.45 8.45 8.20 7 ,85 7,65

8.90 8.70 8.50 8.35 8.20 8.15

Prelim

Final

8.60 8.70 8.55 8.45 7.80 7,85

8.70 8.15 7,90 7,45 7,65 6.20

Prelim

Final

9,30 8.85 8.75 8.50 8.80 8,55

8.85 8.15 8.05 8.10 7.65 7.90

â&#x20AC;˘

POMMEL HORSE FINALS Place

1 2 3 4 5 6

Name Harold Maghe Mike Colvard Dave Parent Chuck Dakin Jody Austin Kent Ewart

College Long Beach Odessa Long Beach Farmingdale Odessa New Mexico

Average

8.65 8.425 8.225 7,95 7,725 7.025

'Ill

STILL RINGS FINALS Place

1 2 3 4 5 5

Name Elliot Schnee Rick Aguirre Angel Adams Joe Cipolla Jeff Gutknetcht David Sanders

College Long Beach Odessa Farmingdale Farmingdale Odessa Odessa

24

Average

9,075 8.50 8.40 8.30 8.225 8.225

â&#x20AC;˘


LONG HORSE VAULTING Place

1 2 2 4 5 6

College Odessa Odes sa New Mexic o DuPage Odessa Farmingdale

Name Mike Booth Jerry Dengler Jose Lovato Scott Reid Rick Aguirre Seth Hertz

Prelim

Final

9.15 8,75 8,95 8.95 8.95 8.95

8.725 8.80 8.60 8.525 8.45 7,95

Prelim

Final

9.00

8.80 8 ..50 8.35 7.60 7.90 7.70

Average

8,9375 8. 775 8. 775 8.7375 8.70 8.45

PARALLEL BARS FINALS Place

1

Name Larry Cox ~ollLEhilli.p_s

3 4 5 6

Jerry Dengler Fred Schreiber Angel Adams Sal Rizzo

College Odessa OCle.s sa Odessa Farmingdale Farmingdale DuPage

9.10

9.10 8.75 8.35 8.35

Average

8.90 8.80 8.725 8.175 8.125 8.025

HORIZONTAL BAR FINALS Place

1 2 3 3 5

6

Name Junior Perez Dave Linquist Mike Booth John Hart Tom Phillips David Sanders

College Odessa Odes sa Odessa Long Beach Odessa Odessa

Prelim

Final

9,35 9.20 9.15 9.05 8.95 8.95

9.0 9.05 8.90 9.00 8.75 8.55

Average

9.175 9.125 9.025 9.025 8.85 8.75

TRAMPOLINE FINALS Place

1 2 3 4 5 6

Name Jeff Aiani Jerry Folta Don Zasadny Mark Schuldt Scott Reid Pat Vosnik

College DuPage DePuage Triton DuPage DuPage Triton

Prelim

Final

8.90 8.35 7,25 6.80 6,55 6.10

8.95 8.90 9.10 7.90 7.15 6.25

Average

·~

8.925 8.625 8.175 7.100 6.85 6.175

ALL AROUND COMPETITION

Place l

2 3 4 5 6 6 8 9 10 11

12 13 13 15

College Name Odessa Thom Phillips Odessa David Sanders Long Beach Carl Cruz Odessa Mike Booth Long Beach Frank Martin Farmingdale Ismael Adams Long Beach Steve Schatz Queens borough Bob Novo . New Mexico Jose Lovato Cuyahoga Joe Gura Miami-Dade North David Arthur DuPage Scott Reid Cuyahoga Mike Eckhoff Jeff Sindl inger Farmingdale DuPage Sal Rizzo

FX

8.35 8.65 8,5 5 7.80 6.95 7.75 7.80 8. 40 8,95 7,45 7.15 7.25 5.90 7.40 7,55

25

PH

R

v

PB

HB

Total

6.35 6.75 6.05 5.70 8.25 4.95 7.40 3.25 3.90 4.70 6.20 2.95 3.10 2.80 2.75

8 .85 8.55 8.40 7,75 7,75 7,85 6.70 8.10 6.45 6.65 4.25 7,45 7.10 6.95 7,85

8.65 8.65 8.70 9.15 8.85 8.35 8.40 8.30 8,95 8.25 8.20 8.95 8.15 8.60 6.80

9.10 7,75 8.35 7,75 6.85 8.75 7,60 8.25 7,35 7,15 7.60 6.00 6,95 8.05 8.35

8.95 8.95 8.60 9,15 7,95 7.45 7.20 7.25 7.20 6.30 6.05 6.10 5,45 2.85 2.65

50.25 49.30 48.65 47.30 46 . 60 45.10 45.10 43.55 42.80 40 . 50 39.45 38.70 36.65 36.65 35 .95


FIRST F.1.G. INTERCONTINENTAL JUDGING COU RSE COMPETITIVE RHYTHMIC GYMNAST ICS Madrid, Spain February 2 1 25, 1975 On Fe bruary 20 , we arrived in Madrid as representatives of t he USG F Modern Rhythm ic Gymnastics Co mmittee. Up to the point of arr ival in Madri d, ou r trip was un eventf ul. T hereafter , o u r sta y can be summ ed up as be ing very educationa l, very inter es ting, an d certainly a worthwhile ex peri e nce . To be more specific, some moments wer·e pleasant, some surprising, some frustrating, and some unbelievable. We both agree that two representatives from the U.S.A. was important in many ways - from our point of view, from the USGF's point of view and from the competitor's point of view. Arrivals were scheduled for Thursday, February 20. The communication from FIG indicated that accommodations were at the City University . However, th is was not the case and while one of us .restrained the taxi driver outside the Univers ity, the other spent one-half hour seeking information about where we were to stay. We hesitantly made our way to the Hotel Principe Pio, as the information we received was not given w ith assurance. F19rtunately, we then found that the Hotel Principe Pio was indeed our "accommodation. " The hotel was ceh tral ly located and a good selection for ou r purposes. On Thursday, our morning started with a welcome address from the Presid ent of the Spani sh Gymnast ic Federation and greeting s and introd uction of the F IG Competi ti ve Rhythmic Gymnasti cs Comm ittee and participants. FIG Competitive Rhythmic Gym nastics Committee Mme . A. Gotta Italy (Presid ent) Mme . H. Abad Hungary Mme. V. Bataen USS R Mme . I. Tchakarova Bul ga ria Mme. S. Urzynicok East Germany Mme. K. Cerna Czechoslovakia (absent due to serious family ill ness) Mme. I. Foerster West Germany In all, 48 part icipants fr om 21 countries attended. The breakdown was as follows : North and South America Arge nt ina 1 Bra zil 3 / "' Ca nad a 3 U.S.A. 2 9

East Germany Bulgaria East Germa ny Poland USSR Yugoslavia

2 1

3 2 9

West Europe Belgium Eng land France Italy Netherlands Norway Portugal Spa in Sweden Switzerland West Germany

2 1 2 3 3 1 3 8 1 2 1

27 Orient Japan 3 Each Federation was permitted to send a maximum of 3 persons, but the host country, Spain, was given special permission to sponsor more . We were surprised to note that neither Czechoslovakia nor Hungary were represented. One of the reasons, we were told, is that they have a sufficient number of Brevit judges. For the remainde r of the day and the following two days, our program consisted of lectures, participation, and films cov er ing the various CRG di sciplines. The committee d iv ided its teaching responsib il it ies as follows : 1. Indian Clubs Mme . Abad Mme. Gotta 2 . Jump Rope 3 . Genera l Code Mme. Urzynicok of Points Mme. Bataen 4. Ribbon Mme. Tchakarova 5. Hoop Mme. Urzynicok 6. Group Exercises for Mme. Cerna 7 _ Musical AccomAccompaniment - Mme. Gotta 8 . Ba ll Mme . Foerster Each instructor conducted the lessons in her specialty in her own individual way . Mme. Abad very carefully covered the 8 compulsory Indian club elements to be used at the Worl d Champi onships in Madr id, 1975. Her p rogression for each c om pulso ry was exce llent and he r teachi n g hints were, in ou r o pinion, mo re va luable t han any rece ived d uring t his

26

,

Andrea B. Schmid Norma B. Zabka course. We also vi ewed a fi lm p repared by the Hungarian Federation fo r F IG , w h ich showed Indian club element s of su per ior and medium difficulty . This film is bot h an educat ional and artistic presentation . The cost to each federation will be approximately $100 and we certainly will strongly recommend that this film be purchased for use in the U.S.A . For the rope, Mme. Gotta made much use of a demonstrator. Her presentation included no part icipation nor work on progressions. Composition and d ifficulties were stressed. Mme. Urzynicok covered the Code of Points a lmost completely from the book. Very few additonal clarifications or additions were made . Among the few additions to the book were : 1. Each Federation must include the names of Artistic and Competitive Rhythmic Gymnastic judges when submitting lists to FIG. 2 . Acrobatic elements are proh ibi ted . Penalty 1 .0 point. Mme. Bataen had a very good presentation of the ribbon . She a lso showed a f ilm . The film was good, but not as va luable as the film prepared for Indian clubs . Mme. Bataen gave participants an opportunity to judge exercises, but, unfortunately, she d id not feel it was necessary t o ex plain her sco re and method of arriving at this score . Mme. Tchakarova, from the beg inning, informed us that she would not repeat what was alread y in the Code of Points on the hoop. She proceeded to cover the various types of movement possibilities w ith the hoop and demonstration s of superior and medium examples were shown . Among the points that should bear repetition is th at : 1. At no time shou ld the hoop be motion less. It is a m istake to move with an inactive hoop. 2 . When rolling the hoop on the body, it must go the entire intended length in order to rece ive cred it for di ffi cu lt y . 3 . At no time shou ld the gymnast be waiting for the hoop. We also learned that Mme. Tc h akarova, w ho is one of the we ll -k n o wn t ra i ners in Bu lgar ian competit ors, is presently in Spa in under a contract t o work wi t h t he Spanish team

'

'

,


and/or gymnasts for 1-2 years. Mme . Foerster obviously has long experiences as an educator. She relied, primarily, on teaching participants the correct performance of basic elements. Information on Group Exercises was presented by Mme. Urzynicok for Mme. Cerna. The following judging hints were added to those that appear in the Code of Points : • Small errors, made only by 1 gymnast, which do not affect the total harmony .. No pena lty • Sm al I errors made by several gymnasts . . . . . . . . 1 - .2 •- Medium error made by- - - - - - 1 gymnast ........ . .... 1 _ .2 • Medium error made by several gymnasts . . . . . . . . 3 - .4 • Serious error made by 1 or more gymnasts .......... 5 plus We were disappointed that Mme. Cerna could not be present. Both during and at the conclusion of the course, both of us had some time to reflect on the good course she presented in the USA last May . The final two days consisted of written tests, practical tests, and an oral examination. On Tuesday evening, a banquet was held with fine musical entertainment. Mme. Gotta closed the course with hopes that the members who attended had gained knowledge which would be of value to them in their future work. Remarks: The official language was French, but a number of translators were used English, German, and Spanish. the transl a tor for the English-speaking participants was very helpful in many ways during our stay in Madrid but she did not always translate the material clearly, making it difficult for all of us. Waiting for 3 translations did consume a lot of time . All of the members of the Commission are accomplished leaders in this field. At all times, there was something to be learned. However, ·it is our opinion that all of the participants would have gained even more if each discipline was p resented in a manne r that was specifically prepared for th e instruction of judges . It . was cl ear th at the Commissi o n d id not di scuss or did not agree on what was necessary and unn ecessar y in a course of thi s ty pe . Most part 1c1pan t s a g reed t h a t mo re de monstrations coul d have helped; also , t hat discussions regard ing gi ve n scores on judging shou ld have been held. T he ne xt Interco ntinental cou rse will be he ld in fou y ea rs .

NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL FEDERATION NOTEBOOK ANOTHER KIND OF TRAINING FOR COACHES

Co l lege coaches and coaching instructors, high school administrators, and state association officers presently have the general responsibility for whatever training new high school coaches receive. However, college personnel is aware of the deficiencies of the h 'gh school coach who was only an athlete and of the high school coach who was never an athlete; high school personnel recognizes it is often too busy to _.CJive the novice coach the direction he should receive; and state association personnel is cognizant much is left to chance in the process of training coaches by printed bulletins. In short, training has been spotty at best . State associations are obligated to do more. In recent years, some national and state coaching organizations have recognized the need to· provide additional training for coaches by providing clinics at which techniques of sports are discussed. But sound techniques of the game are not all we should expect of high school coaches. There is a dire need for coaches to have training in two primary areas: 1. Imparting an ethical pattern of living to ath letes; and 2. Preventing and treating injuries to athletes.

To our knowledge, nobody is conducting a clinic on developing character, establishing ethics, cultivating sportsmanship or implementing Christian principles in coaching. It amazes us that parents and administrators demand to approve the subjects children learn in the classroom, while displaying passivity for the lessons chi ldren learn on the athletic floor or field. Is it not conceivable that these less scrutinized lessons arising out of emotional situations may be more important for establishing an ethical pattern of living than are academic lessons; and can there be doubt after the political improprieties of 1973 that there is danger in applying academic lessons without the benefit of an ethical foundation. Secondly, there is no justification whatsoever for allowing athletes to be in the charge of coaches who are not cognizant of basic steps in the prevention and treatment of injuries. To allow athletes to be coached by the. untrained is to allow the maiming of those we claim to be educating. No organization is more obligated to provide these two aspects of training than the high school association which for years has set standards for conduct of coaches and athletes' safety. Men and women coaches, who spend more time with our b~ys and girls than do many ' parents, must be special people. They must nurture both the mental anc{ physical welfare of youth. The influence · these men and women have must be an influence which we can justify. To assure that it is, we must help to shape it.

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NATIONAL GYMNASTICS JUDGES ASSOCIATION General Meeting April 6, 1975 Terre Haute, Indiana The meeting was called to order by Ted Muzyczko at 4 p .m . Present were : Muzyczko, Culbertson, Stout, Sasvary, Todd, Fisher, Roetzheim, Orlofsky, Joe Regna, and Allen . Absent was: Don Nelson. The minutes of Nov. 8, 1974 were accepted as written. Ted Muzyczko spoke first and gave summary the following: 1. NGJA Certification Procedures are being revised. 2. NGJA Procedures and Policies for: a. NCAA College and University Division Championships b. Duties of the Judges Director c. Conference meets and Invitationals d. Regional and Hall of Fame Awards John Culbertson gave his Technical Report . Martin Huckabee resigned from the Technical Committee and was replaced by Joe Regna . National Certification ' criteria will be reconsidered . Muzyczko distributed a draft to members of Executive Committee for comments. The National Technical Committee's interpretation on 1976 compulsory exercises were a great hel p to th e entire gymnastics picture. That showed at NCAA. However, the distribution was not done properly . Rules Interpretations will be in forc e for approximately another year (blue book) . NGJA made a considerable amount of money from their sale. Jon presented Gene Wettstone's study on the number of judges to be used on gym meets . A revised copy of. the National Judges Exam will be dist ributed by Bob Stout. Les Sasvary reported on his secretaria l duties. The 1975 •Manual of Nat ionally and Regiona lly Certified Judges is be ing distributed now to Presidents of J udges organi zations, Executive and T ech n ical Committee members. Si nce it will be e lection t im e soon again (Sept. 1975). all voting will be based o n t hi s Manual. Se nd

all necessa ry changes and correction s to Les immediately. He asked all National Technical Directors to follow procedures before, during and after a National Certifying Course. (Complete list and monies must go to Les first.) Bob Stout gave a very comprehensive report on financies of NGJA, and copies of financial report were di stributed . Balance: $1411 .08 as of today. Sob explained the membership from where the NGJA income is coming . 1. Rules Interpretations 2. NGJA Patches 3. NGJA Folders 4. Certification Courses 5 . Annual dues Ted Muzyczko presented his idea about th e Judges Master Brevet. Criteria . is being worked out . Jon Culbertson had the floor again. He presented the following: FIG Courses will be possible in US after the 9th Intercontinental Judges Course in Paris in September , 1975. Pan-Ameri can Games will be held in Mexico City in October, 1975. A possibility of an FIG Course in conjunction w ith the 1975 Coaches Congress is being worked out now . The nomin a tion s o f judg es for the Pan-Ame ri can Games went in . They are: J erry Wright, Les Sasvary, Bob F isher, T e d Mu z y cz ko and Tom Chirco . Selection will be don e within two wee ks. Ted Muzyczko asked everyone to submit any constitutional changes necessary to him . Ken Allen put together the Code of Ethics . It was adopted and will be put into NGJA Constitution . Jer ry Todd spoke on the Frank Cumiskey Hall of Fame Award. Nominations must be in his hands by . January 1 each year, discussed at NCAA and the award s presented during USGF Congress. Meeting was adjourned at 5 p .m .

Respectfully submitted by Les Sasvary Secretary , NGJA

28

GYMNASTICS POSITION AVAILABLE !! E XPERIENCED COACH OF WOM E N'S GYMNASTICS N E EDED · FOR LARGE INDEPENDENT CLUB IN SUBURBAN PORTLAND , OREGON . ADVANC E D TECHNIQUE AND AGE-GROUP EXPERIENCE A MUST. APPLY TO MRS. CARLA WEBBER WITH CURRICULUM VITAE AND REFERENCES. The Portland Gymnastic Center is one of the largest facilities constructed in America for the private instruction of the Dance Arts and Artistic Competitive Gymnastics . Located in the center of the beautiful Pacific Northwest, the Center offers all aspects of classroom programs in men's and women's gymnastics, competitive teams, and Dance . Special programs include College Credit courses through the Oregon State System of Higher Education, Techniques of Gymnastics Instructions, Dance for Gymnastics Instruction, Sports Medicine for Coaches/Trainers, Adult Fitness, and Adaptive Programs for Handicapped . Cal I or write for additional information and applications.

.. •

..

Cordially, Carla J. Webber Director

TUIT . " THIS IS AN INDISPENSABLE item for everybody in th e Dep artm ent. For yea rs peop le have been sayin g, " I' II do it as soon as I ge t a ' round tu i t.' " The above is a round tuit. Cut it ou t, keep it handy and you will have no more trouble getting all those extra j obs done, for yo u've finally g otten a round tuit.


Food Fads Alwavs Make Big Promises.

AMERICAN SOKOL GYMNASTIC CAMP August 10 - 16, 1975 NORTH CENTRAL COLLEGE Naperville, Illinois

Food -fa ds always make big promises, the American Dietetics Assn. (ADA) points out. But "Food Fads Can Fool," and that's the theme of the 1975 observance of National Nutrition Week which begins Sunday.

How do you recognize a food fad? The ADA says it will promise fantastic health and longer life, in- - - - - - - - -stant lenderness;-spiritual wakening nd-eures for- - - - - - The American Sokol will present a planned illnesses. instructional and gymnastically oriented program for all gymnastk enthusiasts at its summer camp this August. The association asserts that food fads often focus It will add to the varied events of the American Sokol on extremes (cottage cheese and grapefruit, meat Organization's work. All Men's and Women's Olympic and water, fruits only, grains and sprouts) . But if ~tand~rds will be practiced. A selected teaching staff, they lack important nutrients, health can be endanmcludmg college coaches with their assistants will gered. provide necessary teaching skills. Br. Paul 'Fina, member of the American Sokol B.O .I. and President of Tucson registered dietitian Kathi Van Deusen, in the National Summer Gymnastic Clinic, held at a talk at the Arizona School Food Service Assn. nutriMichigan State University, will manage the camp's tion seminar last weekend in Chandler , said that activities. "luckily you couldn't stick to many of the fad diets for a long time - they're too different from the way DAILY PROGRAM we eat. They can be dangerous. If you are over8:00 A.M. Breakfast weight, your body is under metabolic stress. Trying 9:00 A.M . Drills - Warm up exercises to correct one imbalance with another can result in 9:30 A.M. Apparatus Instruction (1) still worse imbalance." 10:30 A.M. Apparatus Instruction (2) She suggested that everybody watches weight in 11:30 A.M. 1:30 P .M . - Lunch some way, "but weight charts are only a guide. 1:30 P .M. Apparatus Instruction (3) Choose the weight that you are most comfortable 2:30 P.M. Apparatus Instruction (4) with _ th<it IPts vou eniov some of the foods you like. 3:30 P .M. - 5:00 P .M . Special Events - Trampoline , Tumbling , Ballet, etc. 5:00 P.M. - 7:00 P.M. - Dinner 7: 00 P.M. - 9:00 P.M . - Special Instruction - History , Judging Theory , Spotting, etc. - OR Social Events - Volleyball, Dance, Swimming Drinking water - Forbidding drinking water during pracNOTE: Floor exercise will be co nsidere-d as part of tice or competition, but allowing only sucking on ice cubes or apparatus instruction. rinsing out the mouth, is a mistake, say the nutritionists. Some water is needed to replace that lost in sweating. The Gymnastic Camp schedule includes 4 main worko ut periods for apparatus instruc tion followed by Snacking - The no-snacking rule can cut out suc h needed time for specia l events. Evening periods will include item3 as bread, potatoes and some sweets. These foods are special ins truc tion and social activ ities . mainly carbohydrate and are an important source of energy_

Athletes ' Food Fallacies

Protei n - Urging steak as the best source of protein for athletes is a fallacy because steak contains fat that makes is slow to digest.

Housing will be in college dormitories , 2 to a room. Each sect ion of do rms will have a counselor to supervise curfew and safety . All meals will be served in Dining Room area and supervised by a qu a lified dietician . A full y eq uipp ed indoor gymnasium with modern gym nastic eq uipme nt will be available to all participants with swimming co ndu cted in_ college pool.

--Suggesting eggs should be eaten raw could lead to bacteri al contamination, and eating several eggs a day is considered by food experts as tCY.J many because of egg's high cholesterol content. --Gelatin desserts are popular with some coaches as a source of ex tra calories at pregame meals. However, though they are high in_sugar, they should not be counted as protein.

All gymnas ts will have sup erv ised training. Sunday afte rnoon wi ll co nsist of tes ting of gym nasts for ab ility an d cl ass ification into groups . Enrollment is limited to male and fema le st udents , 12 years of age and over. (No n-Sokol gymnas ts are invited) . Fees for the week of gymnas ti c training , including mea ls and lodging , are $95.00 . Transportation to and from Nort h Central College, Na pe rville, Ill inois. at gymnast's expense. Fill out attached ap plication form fo r enrollment. Additio nal information can be sec ured from America n Sokol Gy mnastic Cam p Committee.

Milk - The beliefs that mil k curdles, causing upset stomach, and that it creates dryness or " cotton mouth" or decreases speed a re not true. It curdles, not because the stomach is upset, but because this is part of the digestion process; the mouth is dry fro m dehydration . Nutri tionists also say it has been shown that milk does not interfere with the ability to perform.

29

Vitam ins and minerals - Supplements are sometimes suggested for a thletes, bu t this is said to be unnecessary if the food eaten makes up a balanced diet. An excessive amount of one or more nutrients could upset the relationship between them.


Letters

m@dern Lines SPECIALTY ITEMS FOO THE GYMNAST P.O. BOX 963 Cl.ARK, NEW JERSEY (201) 381-6644

CHAlK

mues

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LETTER FROM MRS. MIKUS

GYMNASTIC SPECIAL IT I ES

8 Tampa 'Plata, CUerr<1

LETTER FROM 12-YEAR-OLD USGF JR.OLYMPIC CHAMPION Dear Mr. Cumisky, I received my U.S.A. warm-up suit this week just in time to wear it at a big gymnastic exhibition. I was the only one with a U.S.A. suit and so I carried the American flag at the opening ceremonies. I was very proud. I wish to thank you and the U.S.G.F. organization for the suit and also opportunity of going to South Africa. I'II never forget it. Jim Mikus

Shop - 211 ELMER sT. WESTFIELD. N.J. 01090

FOR GYMNASTIC SPECIALTIES

30

Dear Mr. Cumisky, I know that Jim sent you and the U .S.G.F. a small note of thanks fpr his U.S.A. warm-up suit, but I feel that I, too, should thank you. The suit seems to mean so much to him. I feel that the trip to South. Africa has been a turning point in his gymnastic life. He is working very hard just to prove his , worth as a gymnast who had the honor of perform ing for the U.S.A. Again, I want you t o know how much I appreciated the grand opportun ity afforded him at his very young age. Sincerely, . LETTER FROM Vilma Mikus M. D. Gurjar, 32/1 Plot No: 10 Behind Mehendale Garage, Karve Road, POONA : 4 (India)

..

Date: 6-3-1975

Respected Sir, I acknowledge with grateful thanks the arrival of "JUDGING GUIDE." Your genuine interest in the cause of promotion of Gymnastics and your sincere desire to help me has really strengthened my belief that there exist in this world, though in scant numbers, very noble and warm people who really are conceived to help others who need such help. Indeed it is really difficult to express in words what my feelings are on the occasion of your warm gesture to send the booklet as complimentary. With your instinct help and cooperations I am striving my best to foster Gymnastics in India . I, therefore, always look to you for your backing. Once again I am repeating my thanks for your friendly gestures. With kindest regards. Yours Sincerely, M.D.Gurjan

.

.


USGF 1915 CONGilESS

ZWICKEL A Distinctive Line of Men's and Women's Uniforms

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NOVEMBER

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Why Settle for less? FREE CATALOG

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31


19'/5 USGF Materials Mail Orders to: USG F. P.0. Box 4699, Tucson, Arizona 85717 Make checks payable to USGF ALL ORDERS MUST BE PREPAID

)( \

Books are mailed at bookrate unless payment is enclosed for Fir8t Cla:::s Postage Specify men's or women's book

1. Code of points for men

Official FIG Code for men, includes A¡B-C parts with illnstrntions and all rules. A MUST for all judges, coaches and gymnasts

2. Supplement to Men's Code

1971 revisions to the above Code, designed to be pasted into

$ 3.00

above book 3. USGF Men's Rules for=GompetiUon- - - -NEW book for-me-n's eompetiti0n ules, BSHF J . lym!)i- - - - - - -$-H-09 Age Group Compulsory exercises 1975-76 4. Code of Points for women

Official FIG Code, includes figures for difficul ty ratings Rules and all latest revisions in enclosed supplement

5. Age Group Gymnastic Workbook

USGF Age Group Workbook, complete with routines(compulsory)

$ 3.00

for boys and girls, ages 6 to 18, Stick figures and buil t in grading system for class room work 6. Judging Guide for women

Combination of old judging guides 1 & 2, includes all changes from

7. National Compulsory Routines

Official USGF - DGWS routines for girls, three levels of routines

$ 3.00

FIG judging Course in Madrid, Spain Girls

$ 1.75

now be"ng used for nationwide school, college , university and post graduate competition

8. History of the Development of The USGF

Complete documented study, begins in early 30's, reviews amateur

.,

$ 5.00

feuds of years gone by, leads to founding of USG F

9. Rules and Policies for Girls

NEW: Official regulations and policies for Girls in United States

$ 4.00

IO. Measurement & Dimensions

NEW:1975 edition, official FIG booklet on all diagrams

$ 3~25

and measurements for men's and women's equipment 11. FIG Bulletin

Official publication of the FIG, sent directly from Switzerland

$15 .00

four ( 4) issues per year, valuable to all in gymnastics

12. Modern Gymnastics

13. USA Gymnastics News

A. Code of points for modern gymnastics

$ 2.50

B. Class I, II. III, by Mildred

$ 4.00

Prchal

Official' word from the USGF National Office, listings of new books

$ 5.00

and services, technical changes and what's newsworthy on a national scale, Published every other month 14. Gymnastics Checks

Beautiful checks in light blue with male and female gymnast shown on them,mail sample of existing checks and all necessary info. Allow 2 months for delive1y

$ 6.00 -- 200, $ 11.00 --- 400, $ 16.00 -¡- 600 etc. 15. USGF Crest

Embroidered cloth, suitable for use on blazers, or uni forms

$ 2.00

16. USGF Patch

Embroidered, suitable for use on warm-ups , blazers, or unifo rms

$1.00

Colors Available: red, blue, green. gold, 17. Decals

Gold background, showing flag and USGF emblem

18. USGF PIN

Showing flag and USGF emblem

$

19. Who's WHO in Gymnastics

First edition of this new publication

$ 5 J)I)

20. Men's Judging Guide and Course

NEW: Published in lesson plans to enable the instructor to guide

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his students step by step toward becoming a judge

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(fit)

-

To: MRS. JACKIE FIE P.O. BOX 312 IOWA JEFFERS~K;

THE UNITED STATES GYMNASt ICS FEDERATION P. 0. Box 4699 â&#x20AC;¢ Tucson , Arizona 85717 U.S.A.

1.

50129

Non-Profit Organization U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT Nr. 729

Tucson, Arizona

Profile for USA Gymnastics

USGF News - June 1975  

USGF News - June 1975