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THE U.S. GYMNAST IS NOW READY TO GIVE SPECIAL RATES FOR 2 AND 3 YEAR SUBSCRIPTIONS . THE RATE FOR 2 YEARS rs 24 ISSUES FOR $8 . 00. THE 3 YEAR RATE IS 36 ISSUES FOR $12. 00. THE 1 YEAR RATE rs STILL 12 ISSUES FOR $ 4 . 50.

EDITOR

Article By David Jacobs Brooklyn, New York THE U.S. GYMNAST - ONE

YR~R

OLD I recently read an article which mentior:ed that Japan has fewer gyms, more poorly equiped gyms, fewer coaches, and less knowlegable coaches than many countries (ours included) and yet is the top gymnastics power in the World. The answer lies in the Japanese prog r am. The article stated that from first year high school on the Japanese compete six all around men against six a 11 around men in the six olympic events.

WITH THIS ISSUE WE BEGIN OUR SECOND YEARANDATTHIS POINT ARE JUST A FEW WEEKS BEHIND SCHEDULE. WE GA VE YOU 12 ISSUES FOR 1966 AND DURING THIS PERIOD OF GROWTH WE HA VE LEARNED A GREAT DEAL WHICH I AM SURE WILL HELP US GIVE YOU A BETTER 12 ISSUES FOR 1967. WE ARE NOW BEING READ IN EVERY STATE EXCEPT HAWAII AND 7 FOREIGN COUNTRIES AND ' OUR SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE GROWING AT A STEADY RATE. THIS SHOWS US THAT THE SPORT OF GYMNASTICS IS RAPIDLY BECOMING A MAJOR SPORT WITHIN THE UNITED STATES.

Compare this to a college meet with one all around man and 3 specialists in each event. More important think about the fact that for eight years the Japan .~se gymnast competes in a ful 1 olympic program. Eight Years::: Most Americans, take Rusty Mitchel, compete as specialists and do not go all around until their second or maybe the junior year in college . We have some of the best specialists in the world, but the world will never see them because they can't compete in world competition,

BACK ISSUES

BACK ISSUES OF THE U.S. GYMNAST ARE NO LONGER AVAILABLE IN SINGLE COPIES. THEY MAY BE OBTAINED ONLY AS BOUND EDITIONS (Vol. I, Nos. 1 - 12, 1966) WHICH ALSO INCLUDES OUR lST COMPLIMENTARY COPY WHICH APPEARED AS THE AMERICAN GYMNAST. THESE BOUND COPIES ARE NOW O!\ SALE FOR $12. 50 (BOUND IN BOOK FORM WITH A HARD COVER).

The NCAA is to be severely criticized for its current policy. It has taken the all around out of college gymnastics. With the old rules 6,4,3,2,1 points for each event the all around was an event and the all around man scored points for his team. Now he is just another man in each event CONTINUED PAGE 28 -3-


THE U.S.

...

VOL. 2, NO .

MAGAZINE

JANUARY 1967

1

U S GYMNAST STAFF

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Published monthly in Iowa City, Iowa Subscription rates $4.50 per year in U.S.A. and Canada. $6.00 foreign Copyright by the U.S. GYMNAST MAGAZINE, 1966 -4-


Scoreboard HOLIDAY GYMNASTIC CHAN!llIONSHIPS TEAM

RESULTS

Elementary Girls: 1. Flint, Mich. - 42.0 2. Urbana Y, Ill. - 25.5 Elementary Boys: 1. Dayton Y, Ohio - 92.5 2. Franklin, Ohio - 46.0 3. Columbus Gym Club, Ohio - 18.0 Junior Girls: . 1. Flint, Mich. - 48.5 2. Marion-Dennis, Hamilton, Ohio - 43.5 3. Dayton Y, Ohio 36.0 Junior Boys: 1. Dayton, Ohio - 89 .5 2. Youngstown Y, Ohio - 56.5 3. Covington Y, Kentucky - 19 .0 Womens 1. 2. 3.

Open: Flint, Mich. - 35.0 Dayton Y, Ohio - 29.5 Columbus Gym Club, Ohio - 3.0

Mens Open: 1. Columbus Gym Club, Ohio - 53.0 2. Eiche Turners, Ill. - 22.5 3. Fairmont East, Ohio - 21.0 INDIVIDUAL RESUL~S

son, 20.7; 2. George Anglemeyer, 20.2; 3. Ben Barnhart, 12.6: Long Horse: 1. Ben Barnhart 24.7; 2. Gary Hutchinson, 23 . 8; 3. Tim McNew, 19.9: High Bar: 1 Gary Hutchinson 11.3;: 2.Scott Miller, 10.5 3. G. Coyle, 10.3: Parallel Bars:l Gary Hutchinson, 19.1; 2 . Mike McNabb 16.5; 3. Larry Vogt, 15.7; Still Rings: 1. Gary Hutchinson, 22.l; 2. Ray Bryan, 19 .1; 3. ~en Barnhart,17.4: Tumbling:l Dick VanHursett, 25.9; 2. Robert Grabinson, 18.0; 3. John Sositko,13.8: All Around: 1. Gary Hutch inson, 112.1; 2. Larry Vogt 84.7; 3. G. Coyle, 76.9: Womens Open Floor Ex: 1. Linda Metheny, 27.0; 2. Barb McKensie, 23. 5; 3. Judy Markell, 20.8: Vault: l.Linda Metheny, 28. ~Sally Sanford, 25.9 ; 3. Sara Baumgart, 25.7: Unevens: 1. Linda Metheny, 25.3; 2. Barb McKensie, 20. 7; 3. Sally Sanford, 19.6: Beam: 1. Linda Metheny, 26. 3: 2. Sarah Baumgart, 23.3; 3. Judy Markell, 21.8: Tumbling: 1. Barb McKensie, 151 and Debby Riner, 151;3. Cindy Diller, 105: All Around:l. Linda Metheny 106.7; 2. Barb Mc Kensie,90. l; 3. Sarah Baumgart, 88.2. Junior Girls Vault: C. Mulvihill, 16.8. Beam: Sue Werling, 13.4. F.Ex: Di Nowicki, 16.9. Bars: C. Mulvihill, 16.0. Tumb: Cindy Hall, 14.2. A-A: Colleen Mulvihill,60.8

MENS OPEN Junior Boys Floor Ex: 1. Robert Grabin3ki, 20.1; 2. Larry Vogt, 17.2; 3. John Sosiko, 15.4 Side Horse: 1. Gary Hutchin

Side Horse: Ken Stall, 6 . 60 Tumb: John Brezinski, 8.10 . F.Ex: Jack Lanz, 10.4. High Bar: Ken Stall, 12.0. A-A: Ken Stall, 68.30. Elementary Girls Vault: Sandy Juzwiak, 16.2. Beam: Dianne Grayson, 17.6. Bars: Dianne Grayson, 14.3. ~X: Dianne Grayson,14.8. Tumb: Dianne Grayson, 14.6. A-A: Dianne Grayson, 60.3 . Elementary Boys F. Ex: David Eby, 82.0 and Melvin Morton, 82.0. High Bar: David Eby, 10.6. Vault: David Eby, 15.9. ~s: David Eby, 10.9 Rings: David Eby, 7.70 Side Horse: David Eby, 11.7 Tumb: David Eby, 10.5. A-A: David Bby, Dayton Y.

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The American Gymnastics Scene .,

SOUTH ing in the meet.

TOM HANVEY, David Lipscomb College

Again, this year's clinic proved to be very succissful with coaches and gymnasts alike who left the clinic with the feeling that they had profited greatly, that much had been learned, and that it was good to have present. Next year promises to be even better, if that is possible, so we shall be looking forward to seeing all of you again next year.

The second annual Eastern Gymnastics Clinic at Ft. Lauderdale was again a great success and was enjoyed by many coaches and gymnasts from the eastern and southeastern part of the United States. Especially gratifying was the large number of SIGL coaches and their teams who were attending the clinic. Among the SIGL coaches and their teams present were Dr. Hartley Price, Florida State; Len Bryson, Memphis State; Bob Wason, University of Louisville; Lyle Welser, Georgia Tech; Jim Nance, Georgeton; Ron Oertley, Georgia Southern ; Bill Bonsall, University of West Virginia; and Tom Hanvey, David Lipscomb Coiiege. inis fine representation is just another indication of the interest and growth of gymnastics in the south.

CLINIC INSTRUCTORS FRED ORLOFSKY AND CHIC CICIO

This year's program, again under the very capable direction of Bill Meade and Di c k Holzaepfel, included many coaching and teaching sessions which provided informative lessons and valuable workouts for the many visiting teams who were present on this occasion. The highlight of the clinic was again the exciting North-South Meet during which a packed house thrilled to the great performance of the many fine gymnasts compet-

SI GL COACHES

-6-

,


mi sing sophomore all-around man. He works with good form and a nice style. At the present time his exercises lack the difficulty required of a top all-around gymnast. Weissman in Floor Exercise and Vaulting, and Sodowski on the Still Rings are also good point producers. Grossfeld has an excellent freshman in Jim Amerine. Jim is a 9+ performer in almost every event and is as steady as a rock. Everytime you see Amerine his style and execution has improved. The future looks good for Southern Connecticut if the team can come up with a couple of Trampolinists.

EAST CARL PATTERSON, Temple University

THE EASTERN INDEPENDENTS There are not too many Independent schools or colleges in the east that field varsity gymnastics teams. However there seems to be a trend in that direction. Ivy League schools Penn and Cornell have competing teams with all indications pointing toward Yale, Dartmouth, and Princeton following suit. Maybe in the not to distant future there will be a new Ivy League.

Slippery Rock showed that they are to be reckoned with by slapping an early season defeat on the Pitt Panthers. The team lacks a good all-around gymnast, but has several fine individual performers. John Daller tÂľrned in fine performances in Floor Exercise, Long Horse and Parallel Bars in a dual meet with Pittsburgh. Tom Horne in Flo or Exercise, Wayne Busoard in Side Horse and Ring men Tom Parker and Al Cap also play a big part in the success of the Slippery Rock Team.

The Merchant Marine Academy, Courtland, Ithica, Queens College, Long Island University, Trenton State, West Chester, Southern Connecticut and Slippery Rock also have varsity gymnastics. The top three independents in the East are probably West Chester, Slippery Rock and Southern Connecticut.

Each year the Independents get stronger and the list of teams get a little longer. Last year the Independents held a very successful area meet at Queens College. Many of the top performers fared well in the small College Nationals. Another meet is planned for 1967.

West Chester under its new coach, Milan Trnka, has a fine all-around gymnast in Gary Anderson. Gary is a Junior and can hold his own against any gymnast in the Nation . . He is especially strong on Horizontal Bars and Parallel Bars. Last year he qualified for the NCAA Championships in several events. Other good gymnasts at West Chester are Rose and Golden in Floor Exercise, Erdosy in Vaulting, Tustin on the Parallel Bars and Weston in the Still Rings event.

PENN STATE LOSES FIRST DUAL MEET IN THREE YEARS TO SPRINGFIELD SCORE - 187.8 - 186.2

Southern Connecticut's Owls are coached by Abie Grossfeld, two time olympian and former holder of many national titles. Harold Hauben is Abie's big gun. Harold is a better than average all-around gym nast and he too is a Junior. Southern Connecticut's chances for a fine season were hindered greatly when Hauben was injured during the Horizontal Bar event in a meet with West Chester. Capatao is a very pro-7-


MID-EAST

NORTHWESTERN GYMNAS TICS CLI NIC Astoria, Or ego n

The Mid-east region, probably the strongest team region in the nati on moves into the final weeks of the dual meet season with only t wo major teams still undefeated, Southern Ill. who had its c losest scrape of the season a few weeks ago at home with Michigan State. (S.I.U. - 190. 90 - Mich St. - 190 .25) and Michigan. At press time the Big Ten had three leaders, I ow a, Michigan, and Michigan St, all undefeated in conference competition. The Big Ten Conference picks its champion from dual meets (lpt. per win ) and the championships ( 8 pts. 1st place, 7 pts . 2 nd etc. - t o tal possible - 15 p o ints. )

>

For the N.C.A.A. Regionals o n March 1 8 th it could turn into a 5 team race for the top three sp o ts with S o uthern Ill in the lead followed closlybyMichigan St., Iowa, Michigan and I 1 linois who a few weeks ago lost a c lose one to Michigan (Mich.190. 82 - Illinois 190.70) . Leading individuals in the mid-east are: All-around: Dave Thor, Mich. State (Best score t o date-54.45. Fl oor Exercise: Towson - M.S . U, F. Fuller - Mich, andThorM.S.U. Side Ho rse: Gordon - I owa, Mc Canless - Iowa, Boegler - S.I.U. Trampoline: Dvork - S.I.U.,Jacobs- Mich., Duprie - S.I.U, Hardt - S.I.U, Miller-Mich, High Bar: Tucker - S.I.U, Schmitt - Iowa Dennis - S.I.U. Thor - Mich. St., Long Horse: Aure - M.S.U., Shaw - Ill., ThorMich. St., Hardt - S.I.U., Heller - I ow a. Ring s : Dennis - S.I.U., Siorek I ow a , Hat ch - Iowa , Gunny - M.S.U., Goldburg M.S .U . Parallel Bars: Harstad - S. I.U ., Meyer - S. I. U., Rollo - Illin o i s. -8-


GYMNASTICS CLINICS SECOND NORTHWEST GYMNASTIC CLINIC Report by Yoshi Hatano, Clinic Director

CENTRAL NEW YORK STATE GYMNASTIC CLINIC Report By Ed Konapa

The history of gymnastics in the Northwest added a new page when the Second Northwest Gymnastic Clinic was held at the Tongue Point Job Corps Center in Astoria, Oregon, on December 26, 27 and 28, 1966. The Clinic was well accepted by the participants and by the Center. The increase in the number of participants, from 85, last year; to 150 this year, and the ~ew addition of women's section were clear indications of the steady growth of gymnastics in the Northwest. Throughout the clinic there were a lot of fine gymnasts in action, both in teaching and performing.

State University College at Oneonta New York, was the scene of a very successful clinic on December 17, 1966. In attendence were 125 participants from various areas of the state. An international flavor was added with coaching participants from the Royal Military Academy at Kingston, Ontario, Canada. The clinic was conducted under the excellent direction of Joe Fodero. Excellent presentations were given by the clinic staff. Which included: Joe Fodero, long hores vaulting; Paul Romeo, parallel bars; Walt Dodge, Floor exercise; Milan Trnka, horizontal bar; Jeff Cardinalli, side horse and Ed Konopa, still rings. Bud Beyer, Conducted an outstanding session on "the analysis of gymnastics movements", for both coaches and gymnasts.

The success of the clinic should be evaluated in terms of the cooperative effort of many persons who joined the planning and execution of the clinic, and in terms of the total support provided by the Tongue Point Job Corps Center. The clinic director would like to acknowledge the variety of fine services given to the clinic by the following divisions and departments: Division of Recreation, Health and Physical Education, Special Service Department, Food Service, Clothing Issue, Housekeeper, Safety Department, Medical Department, Motor Pool, and Cadre #3.

Both Wa 1 t Dodge, and Phi 1 Vo as did an excellent job of demonstrating when called on. Members of the Syracuse University, Oneonta State, and Oneonta High gymnastic teams served as capable assistants in various aspects of the clinic. Two workouts were conducted by the staff for the participants.

The next Northwest Clinic will not be held at Tongue Point during Christmas, 1967 , due to the Center situation (conversion of Tongue Point into a women's center), and the departure of the past director who wi 11 return to Japan in the near future. However, with the fine personnel among the gymnastic circle in this region, there is no doubt that the Third Christmas clinic will be the most successful ever in the Northwest.

This was the first attempt at a clinic in this area, and its success demonstrates the need for future clinics. Interest has been exp~essed to conduct a clinic of the same type for girls. An outstanding feature of the clinic was a ,~ri tten suplerrtent for eRch event , explaining the moves and requirements.

With this clinic report, may I express my sincere appreciation for your help and friendship, and may I wish you the best in your gymnastic carear.

Onec again a hearty congratulations to Joe Fodero for conducting a very successful and benificial clinic. -9-


mittee I receive all sorts of interesting mail and can't help but wonder if all is on the up and up: 1. The Big Ten appears to be holding the long horse first in dual meets and I get the impression the NCAA rules forbid having any o r der than the published order.

WEST

2.

It appears, also, as though some teams enter 4 men in an event without having an all around man. This of course is only the way it appears to me and may not be that way at all. I only call it to the attention of anyone sure of the rules.

who

is not

GYMNAST OF THE WEEK Ralph Borrelli TheN.A.C.G.C. statistics committee (yours truly) has began a new service with the weekly N.A.C.G.C. statistics by naming an NCAA Gymnast of the week for each of the four regions and a National Gymnast of the Week. Hope this meets with the approval of you coaches. Erwin Volze

The Best of the West

IN MFMORIAM

CLAIR JENNETT - SAN JOSE STATE COLLEGE West Coast Gymnastics lost two of its finest men recently with the passing away of Mr. Irwin Vo lze and Mr. Ralph Borrelli. We will miss these two fine gentlemen:

The present Sec-Treas of the National Association of College Gymnastics Coaches, Mr. Clair Jennett informs me that his gymnastics background centers around the experiences he garnered in his confrontations with his college coach the emminent Mr. Dick Holzaepfel former coach at the State University of Iowa.

JlJDGING Mr. Patterson's article in the November issue of the U.S. Gymnast was read with a great deal of enthusiam by this writer. A National Judging Association could benefit the entire nation and could do it in a hurry.

As a high schooler Clair was a football, Basketball and track performer and did not participate in gymnastics until he entered the University of Iowa where he competed in 1949 and 1950.

COLLEGE DIVISION NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS It appears that there will be a college division national championship meet in the spring of 1968 - HOORAY:

Clair was born on the 26th of Sept . , 1928 in Sac City, Iowa, is presently married and he and his wife, Celeste have a daughter.

NCAA RULES As c hairman of the

NACGC

statistics com-

Clair's -10-

coaching

duties

have

taken

"


him from Asst. coach at the University of Iowa from 195 2-1954 to the University of Tulsa from 1954-1957, then to Ball State University from 1958-1961 and from there to his present position where he has been since 1961.

teams located in Seattle, some 200 miles from Richland. Rex is married and he and his wife, Alice have three youngsters Vicky, Cathy and Gary.

Clair's present team is probably the strongest he has ever had and includes Tony Coppola, one of the top all around men on the West Coast, Jeff Wolfe, Pete Jacobs and Mike Kjeldsen all of whom work 5-6 events.

BOB PEAVY HILLSDALE HIGH SCHOOL, SAN MATEO, CALIFORNIA One of the most energetic and respected high school coaches in the Bay Area is one Robert Peavy - head coach at Hillsdale High School ("The Administrator")

Clair was chairman of the National Association of College Gymnastics Statistics Committee one year, is a member of AAHPER, NCPEAM, CAAHPER, NACGC, NCGOA and Phi Epsilon Kappa and in his spare time he relaxes with his hibby, music.

Bob is one of the best administrators in the coaching ranks and makes it a pleasure t o attend one of his meets because one knows the meet will begin on time and will pr oceed smoothly.

REX DAVIS - WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY In his first year as head coach at Washington State University, Rex Davis is reaping the rewards of a successful high school coaching career, .. Rex coached at Richland High School in Richland, Washington from 1958 to 1966 during which time he developed such gymnasts as Ron Wallace who attended the Univ. of Washington, Toby Elliot - Washington State U. , Don Funderburg - East. Wash, Aaron Holloway - Wash. St and Bill HyattE. Wash. While compilingal7-31 dual meet record.

Amoung his many achievements include his outstanding coaching record which rank with the best. Prior to moving to Hillsdale, Bob coached at Covington and San Antonio Junior Highs in Los Altos, California. Since coming to Hillsdale his teams h ave: 1. Been Sant a Clara County Champions in 1960 and 1962. 2 . Been Mid Peninsula Conference champions 5 straight years. 3. Placed 2nd in the Northern Cal Inv. in 1962. 4. Placed 3rd in the Northern Cal Inv. in 1965. And, from these teams he has produced such gymnasts as Tony Coppola, presently a standout at San Jose State, and Art Lloyd who competed for the University of California.

Rex was born in October on the 31st day and in the year 1931 in La::-kspur, Colorado. His competition in gymnastics did not begin unt i 1 he reached college, that being Washington State University where he worked under the coaching of Dr. Hubert Dunn, competing in local AAU meets in Washington and Canada.

BobwasbornCec. 7, 1932inSanJose, Calif, attended school in San Jose and competed for San Jose State College. His coaches included his father, G.D. Peavy at Hartnell Junior College in Salinas, Cal., and Hugh Mumby at San Jose State.

Rex belongs to the WAHPER, AAHPER, National High School Coaches Association, State High School Coaches Association, NEA Phi Delta Kappa, and the USGF.

Bob's administrative talents have gotten him such assignments as Women's clinic director at the Tucson Christmas Clinic, Instructor a t the Northern California Gymna stics Summer Camp and Instructor at the CONTINUED PAGE 26

Rex writes that just prior to switching to WSU the lo cal high schools were almost to the point of forming districts but that it would be difficult with most of the -ll-


OLYMPIC REPORT

.,

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_...,

-13-

CONTINUED PAGE 14


y

>

T H E U. S. G Y M N A S T MAGAZINE NEW ADDRESS P. 0. BOX 53 IOWA CITY, IOWA 52240

SUBSCRIBE NOW! -

12 ISSUES $4.50 -

-1 4-


CONTINUED PAGE 16 -15-


PAN AMERICAN COMPULSORIES ( c on't)

> LONG HORSE VAULT FOR PAN AMERIC4N GAMES-GIANT CARTWHEEL

)

3. Lower leg and raise upper body to stand with feet together. Two or three running steps forward, hurdle and land with feet• together and jump in turning forward, body and legs bent, ( sa 1 to forward), to land on one leg with the other leg forward and,

1968 OLYMPIC COMPULSORIES

FLOOR EXERCISE

4. Step forward into front handspring to squat position and head kip, (headspring) to stand with arms upward.

1. Raise heels bringing arms backwards and jump backwards to handstand and lower to front leaning rest position with supple movement. (Backhandspring, catch in handstand and lower to front support.) Bend trunk forward bringing legs closer to hands and rise slowly, body bent, legs apart and. arms straight to handstand, joining legs, (Hold)

5. Lower arms forward while raising left leg forward with turn to right, raising arms sideward, step forward with left foot and place left foot down with bending of knee, and place hands on floor, left leg be · tween arms. Pass right leg under right hand an1 under left hand and left foot and ~turn left on left foot and pass right leg under right hand, left hand and left foot on handstand while joining legs. (Hold)

t

2. Bend arms and lower trunk forward to half-inverted position, (kip position) on the neck and kip to handstand, and lower to front scale on one leg, arms raised sideward . (Hold)

6. -16-

1/8 turn left direction (D - B), roll

·•


forward with straight arms and straight leg:> to stand, raising arms upward. Raise left leg forward with i turn right lowering arms sideward, and cartwhee 1 left to land on right leg with i turn right while joining left leg to right and,

SIDE HORSE From side stand frontways with left hand on neck, right hand on left pommel, 1. Pass legs under left hand, i turn right and place right hand on ne c k, pass legs over left pommel and i turn right to rear support, left hand on left pommel, right hand on neck. (Loop around end)

7. Jump turning backwards (flic-flac) to stand and jump in place lowering arms forward with i turn right to front leaning rest position, direction (B-C), bend arms and place chest on floor and,

2. Pass left leg under right hand, and over right pommel and a:r o ;.md left pommel to support with legs apart, pass right leg over neck with i turn right, placing right handonleft pommel with reverse grip and,

8. Turn Backwards, (Backward roll) with body to momentary front leaning rest position and jump forward passing legs straight and apart laterally under hands to rear leaning rest position. (Straddle cut to rear supp o rt )_

3 . Pass right leg over right pommel with i turn right and with support on right arm, pass legs over neck placing left hand on ¡neck to rear support on neck. (Single leg Czech) .

9. Lower to sit position and bend trunk forward and turn backwards on back executing a back roll through momentary handstand to stand, arms upward.

4. Pass legs under right hand with sup- ¡ port on right arm, pass legs over neck and right pomme 1 with t turn right placing left hand on right pomme 1 to rear support on both pommels. (Flank swing right under right hand, Kehre in to rear support.)

10. Step forward on right foot lowering arms sidewards, hop on right foot, swing left leg forward and arms upward, take-off left foot and execute a round-off, back handspring, (flic-flac), back somersault with straight body (Back lay-out), to stand.

5. Pass right leg under right hand and back scissor to left and pass leg forward under right hand and,

NOTE: The Floor Exercise may be reversed totally or partially .

6. Pass both legs under left hand, right hand and left hand to front support on both pommels, (Reverse Circles.)

(The chart below serves as a guide for the gymnast to follow. The gymnast may choose one of the four corners in the area as point A) .

7. Pass right leg forward under right hand and front scissor to left and front scissor to right.

A,___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 6

8 . Pass left leg forward under left hand and pass both legs under right hand, left hand and, 9 . With support on right arm, pass legs over right pommel and neck with ~ turn right placing left hand on neck , pass legs under right hand, and with support on right arm pass legs over neck and right pommel with t turn to right moving left hand to right pommel to rear support on both pommels. (Stocklie right) (Kehre-out, Kehre in, around right arm), pass legs under right hand and left hand and, CONTINUED PAGE 24

D -17-


the gymnast for a skill.

GYMNASTICS

3. to eliminate fear for a skill resulting from missing the skill attempted before mental and physical "readiness". 4. to reduce chances of injury. 5. performing basic skills well and with good form insures a better and more dependable advanced performance.

..

Report By Terry Sendgraff

PROGRESSION IN LEARNING GIRLS GYMNASTICS Learning skills on the balance beam requires a great deal of practice, balance and courage for the beginning and intermediate gymnast. Men coaching girls gymnastics have the advantage of strength in spotting a performer through a move with ease, therefore eliminating a need to teach a progression of skills that lead up to what may be considered a more difficult stunt. It is advisable for women coaches who are less strong and girl gymnasts helping one another to follow a progression of teaching for the following reasons:

POSES ON THE BALANCE BEAM In creating a routine on the balance beam one must consider the requirements ' of smoothness and fluidity which is accomplished by composing good transitions that combine dance, locomotor skills, f lexibi 1i ty skills, poses and tumbling. Although poses are held movements and must not predominate, (maximum of three) they are a vital part of the balance beam routine and should be integrated into the composition with ingenuity. Poses are the punctuationthe exclamation points - in the routine. They provide an opportunity for the gymnast to demonstrate the following valuable assets of a performer:

1. to instill self-confidence in the gymnast by acquainting her with the leadup skills of which a more difficult stunt is composed.

1. style 2. to give the coach an opportunity to know th.e ability and the "readiness" of

2. control

-18-


3. interesting body d es ign 4. pe rs onality 5 . assuranc e In cre ating poses, sider:

one

should

conFigure 1

1 . interesting focus 2. lines that are formed by the body, arms and legs. Figure 2 3. smooth transitions into and out of the poses.

DEVELOPMENT OF POSES Development of poses, although held positions, is actually a result of experiences in movement. In performinaa Figure 3

DEVELOPMENT OF POSES Development of poses, although held pos itions, is actually a result of experiences in movement. In performing a movement of dance, lo comotor, tul'lbling, or flexibility on the balan ce beam or in free exercise, a gymnast must "follow through" that movement to it's fullest extension into another movement or into a pose. It is easi-=r to know which skills of---rrwvement f it and look well by the ease of transition from one into another but, to know if a pose l o oks right, one needs a mirror, a c amera or a co ach or friend with a good eye for line and design. An arm out of line or the head bowed when it should be lifted upward can create a poor general impression with one r, o t really being aware of why. For example, in figures 1 and 2, the head is held forward out of line and creates a feeling of tension and discomfort, not only for the performer, but for the observer. Figures 3, 4, and 5 show poses with balanced and graceful lines.

Figure 4

Figure 5

CONTINUED PAGE 29 -1 9-


f HE Cl I ti IC . .. •

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High School Gymnastics BILL ROETZHEIM, Provisio East High School Maywood, Illinois

I've had a great many requests to in -elude drills a gymnast may perform in order to increase his proficiency on the apparatus.

Fig. II

Fig. I

All gymnastic drills are constructed to develop strength or flexibility - both of these qualities being essential to the champion gymnast. I have selected one drill from each category. Al though difficult in goals, both require props and are designed to help your gymnast with a specific skill on the apparatus. The best way I have found to help a high school boy develop the strength required to perform crosses on the rings is with the aid of a piece of surgicaJ. rubber . Each varsity ring man at my school is isissued a piece of surgical rubber tubing 8 feet long. This product can be purchased in any medical supply house. Holding one end of the tubing in your left hand and the other end in your right, grasp the rings, securing the rubber between your palms and the rings. Muse le up to support and place the soles of your feet on top of the rubber loop. With the aid of the tubing under your feet you can now lower to the correct cross position. If you need more support, double the surgical rubber or shorten the loop. (See Figures 1 and 2).

Fig. IV

Fig. III

The next drill will help promote freer rotation of the upper arm in the shoulder socket which is essential to the performing of eagles. This drill should be used at home frequently throughout the day. Take a broomstick handle (or mop, etc.) and holding it behind your back, arm straight, palms facing forward. (See Figure 3).

Fig. V You will find it easier to start with a wide grip, but in time as you become more supple, slide your hands closer and . closer together until you can perform this skill wit h hands gripping the broom stick at shoulder width. You can modify this drill by having the performer swing the broom

Circle your arms backward and upward all owing the humerus to rotate in the scapula. (See Figures 4 and 5).

CONTINUED -21-


HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASTICS (con't) backward, upward, and finally down in front of his body; and then having him return to the starting position by swinging the broom forward, upward, and down behind him. I said in the last issue I would begin teaching a basic ski 11 on the horizontal bar this month and the drill we have just covered fits right in with the skill I have selected. It is essential that you get your team started on eagles as early as possible. At our school we believe he is ready to begin on this trick right after he has learned his front and back giants. Of course we take it for granted he has been working on the drill we have just discussed to gain suppleness in the shoulders.

--;

Fig. VI more proficient, he will push the shoulder slightly back, allowing the legs to catch up and giving the trick the giant appearance.

Before I choose the manner in which I will have my gymnast get into eagles, I begin with the actual skill of performing this rotated-grip-giant. I first have the gymnast sit on the low bar, reverse grip, the bar carried high across the buttocks. Swing the legs back and then cast out forward. (up and out). Maintain a tight pike (legs to face) until the "V" formed by your arms and torso reaches a maximum angle. The buttocks should lead this portion of the trick. Before you begin your downward movement, extend quickly out of the pike position and rotate the arms into the eagle position simultaneously. Note there are two distinct phases to this cast-one maximum upward and outward cast while piked and then the second effort where you dislocate and forceably extend out of the piked position.

The feeling of the grip as he goes over the bar will be quite foreign to your gymnast and you will have to reassure him often. He will get the idea he is pee ling off when the bar rises up against the side of his wrists. If you are going to try a sequence of eagles it would be beneficial to tape the performer's wrists to prevent abrasions to the tender skin of the wrists.

grip

Never teach a hop out of the eagle until the eagle giant is master¡e.d.

If you teach the hop first, instead of pulling the giant he will unconsciously and automatically hop to an under or over grip before pulling over the giant. Next month we will discuss getting into these giants.

After they have established this skill on the low bar I have them put on a be 1 t and perform this skill on the high bar. Please note in Figure 6 the position of the body as we 11 as ropes leading to the be 1 t.

ways of

Mr. John Read, Freshman gymnastics coach at Proviso West is in the process of developing a Masters Thesis, the results of which we will all find interesting. I will quote one paragraph from his introduction that more or less sums up his study.

You are now ready to pull for eagles. After the cast and when the body begins to rise on the back swing, the boy should exert a great pull with his arms, enabling the shoulders to pass over the bar before the feet. It is important that the shoulders lead the trick. At first, if you do

"I believe it ca':1 be assumed that the coach is constantly looking for the individual who has the capacity to excel and the knowledge of the factors which contribute to success in sports is of fundamental importance to us all. An establishment of attributes that can be used as criteria for predicting successful participation

not pull hard enough on the mechanical belt, he will just flop the trick over the bar. This is commonly referred to as a "vulture". Later, as his skill becomes -22-

>


in gymnastics wo uld be of great value. Because gymnastics as a sport is increasing rapidly, many questions are being raised in regard t o the selection of high school gymnasts. Some of these questions may be answered through research. It is hoped that my study may provide criteria for predicting successful participation in gymnastics."

SIDE HORSE 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

HIGH BAR

The Evanston Invitational is now history. This meet is quite unique in that it matches the top five teams in the state of Illinois. Each team can only enter two performers which makes for a good spectator contest. Evanston won followed by Arlington, Proviso East, Niles West, and Willowbrook.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Highest individual score in the meet was 8.85 by Dave Silverman of Evanston on the trampoline. Steve Rochell of Niles West demonstrated to one and all why he is def ,~nding Illinois ring champion by garnering a score of 8. 65 in winning this event.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

On the basis of this meet it looks like Evanston is the team t o beat in order to be state champions this ye a r. The following are your top five place winners in each event. Scores are based on F. I. G. code.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Steve Rochell - Niles West 8.65 Harold Wright - Evanston 7.25 Daniel Reise - Proviso East 7.10 Art Weidner - Arlington 6.95 Thomas Gordon - Proviso East 6.65 TUMBLING Ray Jauck - Willowbrook 7.50 Dave Silverman - Evanston 7.35 Steve Sultan - Evanston 6.65 Rich Atwater - Arlington 5.90 Randy Raudebaugh - Willowbrook 5.75

If you haven't paid your dues as yet in the National High School Gymnastic Coaches Organization let's get them paid as soon as poss ib le. It's worth the $3.00 just for the list of high school re .s ults from all over the nation. Send your dues to Mr. Sid Drain, Maine West High School, Des Plaines, Illinois.

Dave Silverman - Evanston 8.85 Mark Yedor - Evanston 8 .3 0 Lars Kruse - Willowbrook 6.45 Dave Williamson - Proviso East 6.45 Terry Haines - Arlington 6.10

Crons Gymnastic Specialties

Russell Giles - Evanston 8.25 Terry Kushner - Niles West 7.95 Robert Barak - Evanston 7.20 Dan Swetman - Proviso East 6.40 Lee Brown - Arlington 5.60 RINGS

TRAMPOLINE 1. 2. 3. 3. 5.

Hank Taylor - Arlington 8 . 70 Marc Shapiro - Niles West 7.80 Doug Keats - Evanston 7.60 Mike Shorter - Proviso East 7 .1 0 Terry Kushner - Niles West 6 . 80

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OLYMPIC COMPULSORIES (con't) 10. With support on left arm, pass legs over left pommel and croup with t turn right placing right hand on croup, and with support on right arm pass legs over right pomme 1 with t turn right to dismount to stand on right side. (Back or inverted stocklie, i turn to side stand right.) NOTE: The Side Horse exercise may be reversed only in its entirety.

RINGS

Turn backward to handstand.

4. Swing backward to back uprise with straight arms to support and raise legs forward to "L" position. HOLD

5. Lower legs and slowly press, straight body with bent arms to handstand. HOLD.

6. Lower to support and backward roll to support and lower stretching arms sideward to, Cross.

HOLD

8. Lower and turn backward with slightly bent arms and straight body to straight inverted hand, bend body and dislocate to, 9.

through a handstand.) 2. Swing forward and lower backward to half inverted hang and turn backwards releasing and regrasping, (salto below th e bars) to,

4. Swing backward and pass legs straddled under hands to support with legs lifted horizontally forward. "L" position (Straddle cut catch to "L") HOLD

(Streuli)

3. Swing forward in support and lower body to swing backward in hang and turn forward with dis location, body straight. (In locate with straight body.)

7.

1. From a few running steps forward, jump to upper arms and swing forward and turn backwards releasing and regrasping holds and passing through a handstand. (Streuli

3. Upper arms and swing forward to front uprise to support and,

1. From hang, rise slowly with body bent forward to half inverted hang and turn backward and dis locate to swing forward and,

2.

PARALLEL BARS

Turn backward and dislocate to,

5. Press slowly, body bent and arms and legs straight to a handstand. HOLD Swing forward with t turn releasing and reg rasping hands to support. (StutzeKehre) swing forward and, 6.

7. Lower backwards to half inverted hang and cast to upper arms and swing backward to,

8. Backward uprise with t turn while releasing and regrasping holds to support and swing, 9. To handstand with i turn right on right arm and with support on left arm, i turn right,

10. On the left arm to a side stand left. (Hollander dismount). NOTE: The Parallel Bar exercise reversed t otally or partially.

may

be

10. Turn backward while straddling legs to straddle dismount. HORIZONTAL BAR

LONG HORSE

From side stand frontways:

Vault No. 4 - as listed in the Code of Points, Edition 1964. STOOP VAULT from neck.

1. Jump to hang with ordinary grip, (double overgrip). Pull up and shoot (under swing) with t turn right around right arm


toJ swing forward with mixed grip. hand undergrip).

(Right

ly as "pass legs under right hand and with support on right arm .... ".

2. Swing backward passing straight legs between arms with! turn left around right arm to swing backw~rds with ordinary grip and,

HORIZONTAL BAR: Part ft 4 after the back uprise to straddle "L" support .. might be better described as swinging down forward and pulling out of straddle and jaming legs through arms near end of forward swing to cut and catch on height of ba:kward swing.

3. Back uprise to support legs straddled and raised forward outside of the hands. (Back uprise to straddle "L" support). 4. Swing forward and downward, under the bar, Bring legs together and pass legs between arms and straddle out while releasing and regrasping hand, joining the legs to swing forward with ordinary grip and, 5. Kip and change grips to under grip, (reverse grips) and cast to handstand, and, 6. Giant swing forward and ! turn right around right arm, (forward pirouette), and lower to free support and, 7. Free backward hip circle to handstand and, 8. Two giant swi¡.1 gs backward and ! right around right arm, and 9.

turn

Two forward giant swings and,

10. High straddle dismount to stand rearways.

NOTE: The Horizontal Bar exercise may be reversed totally or partially.

POSSIBLE ERRORS IN TRANSLATION:

*

FLOOR EXERCISE: Part ft 7 indicated a turn right, which might be 1/8 turn right.

T H E U. S. G Y M N A S T MAGAZINE

Part ft 8 indicates turn backward (backward roll) this might be a flic-flac, chest roll (after jumping onto hands) and roll off chest backwards to front leaning rest and then straddle cut to rear support.

NEW ADDRESS P. 0. BOX 53 IOWA CITY, IOWA 52240

SUBSCRIBE NOW!

SIDE HORSE: Part ft 4 states pass legs under right hand with support on right arm ... this might read more correct-

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12 ISSUES $4.50 -


WEST (con't) National Summer Palaestrum, Elk Lake Michigan - 1965 and 1966. Hillsdale gymnasts benifit greatly from Bob's hobby of photography which helps explain whi they have been so successful under his control.

ber of the Metropolitan Conference and league champions 2 years in a row in additi on to placing 6th in the 1958 National AAU Senior meet. Al's most recent assignment has been at Sylmar High School.

Coach Arp has a lif P.time coaching record that stands at .5443 and includes amoung his outstanding gymnasts one Larry Banner who competed for Al at Valley College for two years.

AL ARPS - VALLEY COLLEGE, LOS ANGELES Coach Al Arps started in gymnastics in 1923 as a competitor and has been with the sport ever since. Al's schooling began at Manual Arts High school in Los Angeles where he was coached by Dr. Carl Trieb. He also competed for the L.A. Turners locally and in the National Turnfest in Buffalo in 1930. In addition to this Al attended the American Gymnastics Union Normal College in Indianapolis, Indiana, & Occidenta 1 College competing in the Southern Pa c ific A . A . U. meets.

Al is a past president of CAHPER ( '50) area vice president of AAHPER, has been a member of the So. Cal football officials assoc. for 25 years and a member of the So. Cal. gymnastics officials assoc. for 30 years. In addition to this he was Vice Pres. of the National AAU Gymnastics Committee from 1936-1940, SPAAU Chairman from1936-1941, member of the AAU technical committee and an official at the 1960 Olympic Games in Rome.

Al has coached at Manual Arts High school where the team won the City Championships in 1941; at Valley College - mem-

Al spends his spare time with his wife Joyce and their four children and seven grand children.

THE MAD GYMNAST'S ALIBI SHEET He didn't beat me--he just got a higher score.

SEND US

My pants were too tight. YOUR The P-bars were facing the wrong direction. I didn't allow myself enough rest.

IDEAS FOR

I was too high to stoop through. THE The horse was too solid. My coach reminds me of my father and I hate both of them!!!

MAD GYMNAST

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NATIONAL GYMNASTIC CLINIC TRAMPOLINE COMPETITIONS

The competition was keen, as the results will show, with no one competitor winning all three meets either men or women. The difficulty of the group as a whole has increased, as well as the performance level, over the past year which added to the unpredica table outcome of each of these meets.

Report by Jeff Hennessy

THREE CHAMPIONSHIP competitions were held for the trampoline competitors at the National Gymnastic Clinic in Sarasota, Fla, between December 25 and 31, 1966. These included the Mid-Winter NAAU Trampoline Championships with 17 competing, the Nationa 1 Clinic Championships with 20 competitors, and the 1st official USA Team Trials for the fourth World Championships scheduled for London, England on June 1618, 1967. These trials saw 15 competing, both men and women.

In the men's division, Wayne Miller, defending World Champion, David Jacobs, a member of last year ' s USA team, Jim Y:ongue and Donald Waters, dominated the competition and Judy Wills, defending World Champion, Nancy Smith, also a member of last year's USA team, Judi Ford and Vicki Bolinger, set the pace in the women's di vision.

MID-WINTER CHAMPIONSHIPS

Co:-itestant 1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Miller, Wayne Yongue, Jim Jacobs, Dave Anderson, Jim Waters, Don Strickland, Jerry

Required

1st Optional

Difficulty

2nd Optional

Difficulty

Total

9.60 9.45 9.45 9.00 8 .80 9.00

9.70 9.50 9.00 8.45 8.90 7.70

9 .10 8.70 8.80 7.80 7.20 7.70

9.75 9.40 9.55 8.90 9 .15 8.55

9. 10 8 . 90 8.80 7.80 7.30 7.70

47.25 45.95 45.60 41. 95 41. 35 40.65

FIRST TRIALS FOR WORLD TEAM Men Con testant 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Miller, Wayne Jacobs, Dave Yongue, Jim Waters, Don Strickland, Jerry Hippensteel, Dave

Required

1st Optional

Difficulty

2nd Optional

Difficulty

Total

9.55 9.55 8.15 8.80 9.. 10 9 . 20

9.10 9.70 9.40 8.95 8 .5 0 8.30

9.00 8.80 9.10 7.10 8.10 7.80

9.45 9.50 8.85 9.00 7. 85 8.55

9.30 8.80 8.50 7.90 8.10 7.50

46.40 46.35 44.00 41. 75 41. 65 41. 35

7.80 7.20 7.ZO 7.00 6.40

9.15 8.95 8.30 8.05 7.45

7.90 7.20 7. 80 7 .10 6.40

43.15 41. 75 41. 35 39.75 35.70

Women --1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Wills, Judy Smith, Nancy Bolinger, Vicki Ford, Judi Kauffman, Troy

9.45 9 .15 9.05 8.85 7.80

8.85 9.25 9.25 8.75 7.65

-27-


FORUM (con't) and his all around score is not even counted.

pie six should be the basis for all competition on all levels above junior high.

This is absolutely contrary to the rules of this sport. A side horse man in gymnastics is like a baseball player that says I bat, but I do not run or catch or throw, just bat. How silly is that? This is a sport consisting of six parts not six different sports.

Specialists have their place in the AAU, NCAA, and USGF nationals, and I am also in favor of adding tumbling, rope climb, and swinging rings on a specialist basis for these meets. There should be something for everyone in our sport but emphasis must be on all around .Y!

A first step towards this end would be to take the all around man's score and multiply it by .2 (all around total or all around and trampoline times .2) This a mount should be added to each team's score for dual meets. Two tenths of the all around man's total would make the all around event worth about twice as much as any other event without adding any extra time to a dual meet. But this would put a greater emphasis on developing all around men.

We must keep in mind that the design of this sport, if we participate all around, gets every part of the body. Phys. Ed. books and people will agree that gymnastics is one of the best, if not the best all around muse le conditioning and development sports one can participate in. Why then, should we break it down into parts whose nature would come no where near the benefit of all around work?

The second year the rule could be changed to require 2 all around men per team. And so on until we reach 6 all around against six all around men which we should strive for. This would also lessen the scholarship load and the added funds might go to better use such as video-tape machines which are one of the greatest inovations of our time in sports.

GYMNASTICS WALL CHARTS NOW AVAILABLE Strength Exercises for Still Ring Competition

This chart covers exercises from the very basic all the way through the most advanced training methods for learning all cross movements. Twelve (12) complete exercises. Price $1.50. To order write to Gymnastics Wall Charts, P . 0 . Box 53 , Iowa City, Iowa 52240.

The time element in dual meets is a factor, but when you consider, all around man plus 3 specialists per event as is the current rule that makes 4 men per event. This is the equivalent of 4 all around men. Why not make the rule 4 against 4 all around? Let's get with it NCAA before you bury this country's hopes for the future in gymnastics on a world level:::

The same problem runs rampant in the high schools. In New York for instance the events used are side horse, parallel bars, high bar, free ex, rope climb, and tumbling Where did rope climb and tumbling come from? The colleges don't even use them. This year they expect to use some long horse vaulting on an experimenta 1 basis and somewhere in the future still rings may be added. Lets get with the olympic six. If you want extra events fine, but the olym-

-28-

..


WOMENS REPORT (con't) PROGRESSION IN TEACHING THE CARTWHEEL ON THE BALANCE BEAM

3. Ca rtwhee 1 dismount from the end of the beam.

1.

This differs from the cartwheel on the floor and on the beam in that the legs come together over the head in order to land on both feet.

Cartwheel on the mat (left side). Move body sideways into space stepping left foot, left hand, right hand, right foot, left foot - all touching in sequence on the mat. Finishing position is the same as the starting position. The body should move through space as a wheel with the legs extended in a straddle split, toes pointed, straight arms supporting the body. 2.

Cartwheel on a line on the floor.

4. Cartwheel to a handstand position on the beam-dismount facing the beam sideways. 5. Cartwheel on the beam, performed in the same manner as #2, first paragraph.

To prepare more for the cartwheel on the beam, a slight change is made on the cartwhee 1 on the line on the floor. As the left foot and the right foot land on the line, the body turns to face the direct.ion from which it came. The left handed cartwheel and a onehanded cartwheel should also be learned at this time requiring form and control in all executions. The one handed cartwheel may be done by placing the weight on the left hand as the right leg lifts into the air ~ by placing the weight on the right hand while lifting the right leg into the air. However, in the picture sequence shown below the gymnast is placing the right hand on the beam as the right leg is lifted. The gymnast may find t:-1at with the cartwheel done in this manner it will be easier to maintain balance at the completion of the movement due to the fact that the arm is closer to the foot which is first placed on the beam (right arm by right leg).

SPOTTING THE CARTWHEEL ON THE FLOOR AND THE MAT: Stand in order to be in back of the performer during the support on the hands, grasp the waist with both hands and ease the gymnast through the movement. ON THE CARTW'.-IEEL DISMOUNT FROM THE BEAM Again facing the back of the gymnast, spot either the waist or the forearms. ON THE CARTWHEEL ON THE BEAM: If the beam is a low one, the spotter may be stand ing on the floor, grasping the wasit. If the beam is regulation height, a platform may be used by the spotter.

-29-


COMING

EVENTS U. S. G. F . NATIONAL ALL AROUND AND TRAMPOLINE CHAMPIONSHIPS

JAYCEE NATIONAL INVITATIONAL GYMNASTICS CHAMPIONSHIPS

DATE:

WHERE:

Monroe, Louisiana Neville High School Gym

WHEN:

April 21 - 22, 1967

WHO:

For select men and women gymnasts who have either won national or regional titles during the year or s hown outstanding promise as a possible future nat'l. champion.

WHAT:

An all-trophy meet with all six olympic events and trampoline.

Ap ril 14-15, 1967

PLACE: UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA TUCSON, ARIZONA For Information Write: Mr. Glenn Wilson Gymnastics Coach University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona U. S. G. F. NATIONAL INDIVIDUAL CHAMPIONSHIPS '•

DATE:

April 28-29, 1967

Place:

University of Iowa Iowa City, I owa

MEET DIRECTOR: Barry L. Johnson, chairman Jaycee Nat 'l Meet Committee Dept. of Health and Phys. Educ. Northeast Louisiana St. College Monroe, Louisiana

For Information Write: Mr. Sam Bailie Gymnastics Coach University of Iowa Iowa City, Iowa

r

"SECOND ANNUAL EASTER GYMNASTICS CLINIC" Las Vegas, Nevada

(Lampwick Type)

PALM-SAVERS

PLACE:

N.S.U. Gym, Nev. So. Univ. campus

DATES:

March22, 23, 24, and 25th, 1967.

CLINIC DIRECTOR: Jan Van Tuyl, REGISTRATION FEES

BOX 185

PRE-CLINIC:

Individual $6.00 Family - $10.00 + $2.00 each dependent

AT CLINIC:

$7. 00 per person

IOWA CITY, IOWA 52240 $1.50 per pr. $15.95 per doz. Available in SMALL

MEDIUM

N. S. U.

Make checks payable to: Eastern Gymnastic Clinic. Send fees and requests for additional information to: Jan Van Tuyl 4267 Ridgedale Avenue Las Vegas, Nevada 89109

LARGE

-3 0-


Coming Events

I. G. M. International Gymnastics Materials Uniform Suppliers

MARYLAND GYMNASTICS OFFICIALS ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES FIRST MARYLAND OPEN GYMNASTICS MEET

FOR 1964 U.S. OLYMPIC GYMNASTICS TEAMS Write for Free Catalog to:

I. G. M. 37.56 North Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60647 U.S.A.

DATE: March 18, 1967 PLACE: Overlea Senior High School AGE GROUP DIVISIONS: Boys and Girls Midget Divi slon - 11 & under Junior Division - 12 - 14 = Senior Division 15 & over Events:

Entry Fees: $ .5 0 per event - $ .SO extra for all around. Areas:

Olympic events plus tumbling and all around optional Boys 11 & und e r - Floor Ex, High Bar (54"), & side horse vault tumbling optional.

Maryland, Virginia, Delaward, Pennsylvania, New Jerz

Areas:

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Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, D.C. Pennsylvania, New Jersey. The meet will be run according to FIG rules

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Profile for USA Gymnastics

The U.S. Gymnast Magazine - January 1967  

The U.S. Gymnast Magazine - January 1967